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JulyJuly 2011 OneNOAA Science Seminars

A joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science and management information.

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Web page last updated: Tuesday, 04-Sep-2012 15:40:55 UTC

The OneNOAA Science discussion seminar series is a joint effort to help share science and management information and to promote constructive dialogue between scientists, educators, and resource managers across NOAA. Please help us spread the word about these seminars to anyone interested. For further information please contact Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov.

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July 06, 2011

Effects of Climate on Circulation in Lake Tanganyika

Date and Time: July 06, 2011, 10:30-11:30 ETZ [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: NOAA Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory (4840 South State Road, Ann Arbor, MI), Lake Superior Hall.
Speaker(s): Dr. Piet Verburg (National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research)
Speaker's Email: p.verburg@niwa.co.nz
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NOAA Cooperative Institute for Limnology and Ecosystems Research [CILER]
Abstract:

Lake Tanganyika is the largest, by volume, of the East African Great Lakes with a maximum depth of 1.5 km. Surface energy fluxes were estimated from data collected on lake buoys with thermistor chains. The talk will illustrate how a gradient in meteorology along the length of the lake, driving a gradient in surface energy fluxes, results in a large-scale convective circulation, with currents in the surface layer against the dominant direction of the wind. The circulation may have slowed as the climate warmed over the past century. Changes in climate have affected productivity through effects on physical limnology in this deep tropical lake. The density gradient increased between shallow and deep water as the surface layer warmed more than deep water, resulting in reduced vertical mixing and circulation. The slow down of circulation has reduced internal nutrient loading to the epilimnion. The reduced mixing capacity of the lake between deep nutrient-rich bottom water and the oligotrophic epilimnion resulted in reduced primary productivity and reduced frequency of cyanobacteria blooms over the past century.

Remote Access and Notes:

Remote access via webinar: https://www2.gotomeeting.com/register/701194426. For further information please contact Giselle.Maira@noaa.gov.

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Friday, July 1, 2011 6:57 AM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science and management information. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov. Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].


The Eastern Mediterranean Transient, Can We Expect Repetition of This Phenomena?

Date and Time: July 06, 2011, 11:00-12:00 ETZ [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: NOAA, SSMC-3 (1315 East-West Hwy, Silver Spring. MD 20910), 4th Floor, Room 4817
Speaker(s): Isaac Gertman (NODC visiting scientist, Israel Oceanographic & Limnological Research, National Institute of Oceanography)
Speaker's Email: isaac@ocean.org.il
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NOAA National Oceanographic Data Center Ocean Climate Laboratory
Abstract:

Since the first oceanographic Mediterranean cruise in 1910 until 1987 the Eastern Mediterranean Deep Water temperature and salinity were stable within the accuracy of oceanographic equipment. The deep water formed in the Adriatic Sea and the Aegean Sea dense water contributed basically to the Levantine Intermediate Water. During 1987-1989 development of a multilobe anticyclonic circulation in the southwestern Levantine basin (Malanotte-Rizzoli et al., 1999) impeded penetration of less saline Atlantic Water (AW) into the Levantine basin and prevented the outflow of high salinity Levantine Intermediate Water (LIW) into the Ionian Sea. Thus a long-term increase in the salinity of the Levantine basin was initiated. Advection of abnormally saline Levantine Surface Water (LSW) in the Aegean Sea during 1989-1990 (Gertman et al., 2006), followed by extremely cold winters 1992-1993 (Lascaratos et al., 1999), forced water formation with potential (relative 2000 db) density anomaly of about 37.83 kg/m³. This Cretan dense water cascaded through the Cretan Arc and established the Eastern Mediterranean Transient (EMT) (Roether et al., 2007). The excess over the pre EMT bottom water density was just 0.03 kg/m³. However it was enough to generate a wave like spreading of newly formed water. In 1995, three years after the apogee of dense water outflow from the Cretan Basin, the Levantine Deep Water bellow 2000 m had a stable inversion layer both in salinity and potential temperature. According to a long term series of Israeli observations on station h5 located near the continental slope of the south-eastern Mediterranean shelf (33.0°N, 34.5°E) the first evidence of such inversion was found in 1996. A coarse estimation of propagation velocity of dense water from Cretan Passage to the south-eastern continental slope brings value of about 280 km per year. Before the EMT influence, the h5 station's water in depth of 1400 m had salinity 38.68±0.02 with a negative vertical gradient of about 0.005 per 100 meters. Potential temperature was 13.37±0.02°C with a decrease rate of 0.015 °C per 100 meters. During the period 1996-2002, salinity and potential temperature in the bottom layer increased monotonically reaching values 38.77, 13.59°C and changing the vertical gradients signs. Relatively regular observations in the framework of Israel's national project "Haifa Section" from 2002 to 2009 show fluctuations in salinity and potential temperature with ranges of 0.02 and 0.02°C respectively.

Observations from R/V "Meteor" during 2001 (Roether et al., 2007) revealed quite homogeneous water for regions east of 25°E and deeper than 2000 m (38.82±0.02, 13.71±0.02°C). However on the most western stations an intrusion of new water was already observed. This water was slightly less saline (38.78) and colder (13.56°C) than the water which originated from Cretan Basin. In the field of potential density relative 2000 db it is possible to see that the new deep water is denser by about 0.005 kg/m³ than the relict water from the previous wave of renewal.

Further eastward propagation of the new water, which Roether et al. (2007) defined as having Adriatic origin, was observed in winter 2008 during the R/V Shikmona cruise. The western boundary of the Cretan origin water was shifted to about 27.5°E. The boundary is clearly observed in the salinity field as well as in fields of potential temperature and dissolved oxygen. The Cretan origin deep water was disconnected from their origin in the Aegean Sea and became, due to mixing, less salty and colder (38.79, 13.63°C) than they were during 2001. The Adriatic origin water did not change their parameters compared to observation from 2001. Apparently this water mass had a permanent feeding from the Otranto strait. Differences in potential density between the Adriatic and Cretan water masses remained the same as in 2001 (about 0.005 kg/m³). The eastward propagation rate of Adriatic origin water was seven times slower than the propagation of the Cretan origin water. This seems to be connected to the smaller difference in potential density.

As a necessary but not sufficient predictor of the EMT activation can be salinity of the LSW, which is the warmest and saltiest water mass of the Mediterranean (27-28°C, 39.2-39.4 for summer and 17-18°C, 39.0-39.2 for winter). The LSW, while propagating cyclonically from the Southeastern Mediterranean to the North Levantine, and entering the Aegean Sea, is losing its buoyancy and become a potential water source of the LIW. The climatological data analysis showed a significant salinity increase (about 0.8) of the LSW during summer periods from 1979 to 1990, before development of the EMT. One of the possible reasons for this increase of the salinity can be decrease of the regional runoff (diminishing of the Nile discharge). Additional cause for the salinity increase may be changes of the general circulation in the area. The latter changes leaded to the restriction of the AW penetration in the Southeastern Mediterranean. During the last 10 years the salinity of the LSW increased by about 0.6. A massive advection of the LSW into the Aegean due to an appropriate circulation can lead to reactivation of the EMT situation.

References

  • Gertman, I., Pinardi, N., Popov, Y., Hecht, A., 2006. Aegean Sea water masses during the early stages of the Eastern Mediterranean Climatic Transient (1988-1990). Journal of Physical Oceanography 36 (9), 1841-1859.
  • Lascaratos, A., Roether, W., Nittis, K., Klein, B., 1999. Recent changes in deep water formation and spreading in the Mediterranean Sea: a review. Progress in Oceanography, Vol. 44, 5-36.
  • Malanotte-Rizzoli, P., B. B. Manca, M. Ribera d'Alcala, A. Theocharis, S. Brenner, G. Budillon, and E. Ozsoy, 1999. The eastern Mediterranean in the 80s and in the 90s: The big transition in the intermediate and deep circulations. Dynamic of Atmospheres and Oceans, 29, 365-395.
  • Roether, W., Klein, B., Manca, B. B., Theocharis, A., Kioroglou, S., 2007. Transient Eastern Mediterranean deep waters in response to the massive dense-water output of the Aegean Sea in the 1990s. Progress in Oceanography, Vol. 74, 540-571.
Remote Access and Notes:

Remote via online access:

  • Click on http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?i=744868915&p=science&t=c
  • Type in other required fields (i.e., your name, e-mail, organization; meeting number is 744868915; password is "science" -without quotation marks, password is case sensitive- )
  • Indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy
  • Click on Proceed and follow the instructions that appear on your screen.

Audio / conference call:

  • Toll free dial 877-725-4068 using a touch-tone phone
  • when prompted enter participant code 8634769 followed by a "#"
  • Please mute your phone during the presentation or toggle *6 otherwise it produces a sound feedback and we will disconnect everyone

For further information please contact Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov. I will not be able to check my email during the presentation

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Wednesday, June 29, 2011 7:10 AM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science and management information. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov. Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

July 07, 2011

Hellenic National Oceanographic Data Centre, Hellenic Centre for Marine Research (HNODC, HCMR)

Date and Time: July 07, 2011, 11:00-12:00 ETZ [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: NOAA, SSMC-3 (1315 East-West Hwy, Silver Spring. MD 20910), 4th Floor, Room 4817
Speaker(s): Sissy Iona (NODC visiting scientist, Hellenic National Oceanographic Data Centre, Greece)
Speaker's Email: sissy@hnodc.hcmr.gr
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NOAA National Oceanographic Data Center Ocean Climate Laboratory
Abstract:

The Hellenic National Oceanographic Data Centre (HNODC) was established in 1986, in the frame of the cooperation of Greece with the Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission (IOC) of UNESCO. It is a national agency, part of the international network of National Oceanographic Data Centres operating within the framework of the IOC's Committee on International Oceanographic Data and Information Exchange (IODE). As part of its contribution to the network, HNODC participates in different elements of the IODE system, including acquiring, formatting, quality controlling, cataloguing, archiving, disseminating and exchanging of marine data and information. In addition, HNODC provides active support to scientists processing their data and carries out work in developing techniques for the processing, display and dissemination of oceanographic data.

The HNODC operates within the framework of the Hellenic Centre for Marine Research (HCMR), in Athens. The HCMR is the leading governmental marine research centre in Greece with a long experience in various fields of marine science and technology and important research activity. As part of its research activity, the HCMR participates in several national development programmes, as well as, in international research projects. Within the framework of these programmes systematic multidisciplinary surveys are carried out in coastal and open sea waters (mainly of the Eastern Mediterranean Sea) and a large amount of a wide range of data types is collected the majority of which is managed by the HNODC.

In addition, through its participation in a numerous of National, European and International projects, the Data Centre has obtained an archive of more than 300.000 observational in-situ stations of physical, chemical and biological parameters in the Mediterranean and Black Seas. For the efficient management and exploitation of these data a multidisciplinary oceanographic database has been developed using a relational database management system. All the information related to the data such as oceanographic cruises, descriptions of environmental datasets, description of research projects and monitoring systems are also organized in relational databases compliant with international established standards. In order to improve its services for dynamic on-line access of the environmental data and their information and by exploiting the increasing capabilities of the Geospatial Web Services, HNODC has built a new integrated management system that follows the basic concepts of a Service Oriented Architecture (SOA).

Download Presentation: HNODC_7Jul2011_Iona.pdf [PDF, ~2.7 MB]
About the Speaker:

(Sissy) Athanasia Iona, B.S. in Physics, 1990 and M.Sc. in Oceanography, 1994 (University of Athens, Greece). Head of the Hellenic National Oceanographic Data Centre (HNODC). She has more than 15 years experience in managing oceanographic data and has been involved in a number of National and European Data Management Projects. Since November 2009, Coordinator of the Data Management Programme Area of the WMO-IOC Joint Technical Commission for Oceanography and Marine Meteorology (JCOMM) and Chair of the JCOMM Data Management Coordination Group. Since March 2011, Co-Chair of the IOC's International Oceanographic Data and Information Exchange (IODE) Committee (http://www.hcmr.gr/profile.php?name=Iona Athanasia)

Remote Access and Notes:

Remote via online access:

  • Click on http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?i=744868915&p=science&t=c
  • Type in other required fields (i.e., your name, e-mail, organization; meeting number is 744868915; password is "science" -without quotation marks, password is case sensitive- )
  • Indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy
  • Click on Proceed and follow the instructions that appear on your screen.

Audio / conference call:

  • Toll free dial 877-725-4068 using a touch-tone phone
  • when prompted enter participant code 8634769 followed by a "#"
  • Please mute your phone during the presentation or toggle *6 otherwise it produces a sound feedback and we will disconnect everyone

For further information please contact Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov. I will not be able to check my email during the presentation

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Monday, June 27, 2011 7:05 AM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science and management information. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov. Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].


An Assessment of Radionuclide Activity and Associated Human Health Risks in the United States Arctic

Date and Time: July 07, 2011, 12:00-13:00 ETZ [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: NOAA, SSMC-3 (1315 East-West Hwy, Silver Spring. MD 20910), 2nd Floor, NOAA Central Library
Speaker(s): Jawed Hameedi, Ph.D. (NOAA NOS, National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science)
Speaker's Email: jawed.hameedi@noaa.gov
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NOAA NOS National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science
Abstract:

Different sources of artificial radionuclides have contaminated the United States Arctic coastal and marine environments during the past several decades, including nuclear weapon tests fallout, discharges from nuclear reprocessing plants, leakage from underground nuclear tests, and dumped research materials. Ecological and human health concerns about radionuclide contamination in the region were heightened by the April 1993 disclosure of widespread dumping of nuclear reactors and wastes in the Arctic and northern Pacific Oceans by the former Soviet Union. Responding to those concerns, NOAA participated in a study to characterize the marine environment and biota of the US Arctic in terms of artificial radionuclides. Surficial sediment and biological samples, both vertebrate and invertebrate, from the Beaufort Sea, Norton Sound and Bristol Bay were analyzed for the anthropogenic radionuclides 137Cs, 90Sr, 238Pu, 239Pu, 240Pu and 241Am; a few naturally occurring radionuclides (40K, 212Pb, and 214Pb) were also measured. Tissue samples from animals of subsistence value were analyzed to determine the radiation exposures and health risks to coastal inhabitants of the North Slope Borough. The activity of anthropogenic radionuclides in biological samples was very low; for example 137Cs activity levels, measured by both high resolution gamma spectroscopy and on chemically isolated Cs, in animals of the marine food chain were predominantly less than 1 Bq/kg. In contrast, 137Cs activity levels in caribou tissues (muscle, liver, kidney and rumen) were between 24 and 36 Bq/kg. Radioactivity data, combined with per capita consumption of subsistence-harvested foods in three villages (Barrow, Kaktovik and Nuiqsut) were used to derive age-dependent committed effective dose from 137Cs and 90Sr exposure through ingestion. The calculated dose levels for 137Cs were: 2.2 µSv (Barrow), 5.91 µSv (Kaktovik) and 9.06 µSv (Nuiqsut) for adults; levels for 90Sr were much lower. Caribou meat consumption contributed more than 95% of the dose in the case of 137Cs, and fish consumption contributed more than 60% of the 90Sr dose. In all cases, the estimated dose was very small; 0.01 mSv dose is considered negligible in terms of human health risks. The results also indicate that the internal radiation doses from subsistence foods are due to natural background and fallout from atmospheric nuclear weapons testing. In terms of source attribution of the radionuclides, the measured 240Pu/239Pu atom ratios in sediment from the Beaufort, Norton Sound and Bristol Bay samples were very close to the generally accepted ratio from global fallout (0.180 ± 0.014): 0.19 ± 0.02 in Beaufort Sea (n=14), 0.20 ± 0.01 in Norton Sound (n=15), 0.19 ± 0.01 off Yukon River Delta (n=6), and 0.20 ± 0.01 in Bristol Bay (n=12). 241Am activity was low and when detected at significant levels, its ratio with 239+240Pu alpha activity was indicative of global fallout. There was no detectable 238Pu activity. These data, as originally intended, serve as a baseline about radionuclide activity in the region against which future changes may be assessed.

Remote Access and Notes:
  1. Go to http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?sigKey=mymeetings&i=742656968&=brownbag&t=c
  2. Enter the required fields
  3. Indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy
  4. Click on Proceed
  5. Passcode: brownbag
  6. For audio in the US and Canada, dial 866-833-7307. The participant passcode is 8986360.
Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Thursday, June 9, 2011 10:40 AM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science and management information. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov. Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

July 08, 2011

Among Giants, a Life with Whales

Date and Time: July 08, 2011, 12:00-13:00 ETZ [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: NOAA, SSMC-3 (1315 East-West Hwy, Silver Spring. MD 20910), 2nd Floor, Central Library
Speaker(s): Charles "Flip" Nicklin (Whale Trust)
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NOAA NESDIS NODC Central Library
Abstract:

In the early days of live cetacean research, scientists were trying to learn more, to take whales from fantasy to reality, but they only got glimpses when the animals surfaced to breathe. Only a diver could see these enormous animals in their own world, and a diver who could, like the whales, take a great gulp of air and move into the depths without scuba gear, because the bubbles might disturb the animals. There was a young diver who did that well - and one day in 1979 he dove down to a humpback "singing" in the waters off Maui and took a picture of it. The whale was Frank. The young diver was Flip Nicklin. And that day with Frank led to a career that opened new ground not just in under-water photography but in the whole field of marine mammalogy.

About the Speaker:

Widely regarded as the world's leading cetacean photographer, Flip Nicklin grew up around his father's small dive shop on the California coast. He went on to become National Geographic's premiere whale photographer and marine mammal specialist. In the past 30 years Flip has photographed more than thirty species of whales and dolphins, some so endangered their survival is in question. In 2001 he co-founded Whale Trust, a non-profit organization dedicated to research and public education. He has most recently been named North American Nature Photography Association's (NANPA) Outstanding Nature Photographer of the Year, 2012. For three decades, Flip has photographed sperm whales in the Indian Ocean; minke whales off the Great Barrier Reef; belugas, bowheads, and narwhals in the High Arctic; right whales off Patagonia; blue whales in the Pacific'not to mention many, many humpbacks off Maui. Flip will show some of these images and discuss his recently published book "Among Giants, a Life with Whales" (see http://www.whaletrust.org/about/people_staff.shtml).

Remote Access and Notes:
  1. Go to http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?sigKey=mymeetings&i=742656968&=brownbag&t=c
  2. Enter the required fields
  3. Indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy
  4. Click on Proceed
  5. Passcode: brownbag
  6. For audio in the US and Canada, dial 866-833-7307. The participant passcode is 8986360.
Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Tuesday, June 7, 2011 6:59 AM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science and management information. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov. Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

July 12, 2011

Spreading of Errors and GFS/GSI Perturbation Experiments for Tropical Cyclones

Date and Time: July 12, 2011 from 12:00-13:00 EST [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: World Weather Building, Room 707, 5200 Auth Road, Camp Springs, MD 20746.
Speaker(s): Shran Majumdar (University of Miami)
Speaker's Email: smajumdar@rsmas.miami.edu
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NOAA NCEP Environmental Modelling Center seminars
Abstract:

Tropical cyclone (TC) track forecasts are sensitive to initial perturbations in the near and far environment. Several investigations have been performed to diagnose the sensitivities for two challenging cases: Typhoon Sinlaku and Hurricane Ike (both 2008). First, the dynamical mechanisms behind the spreading of ensemble perturbations around TCs will be presented. Second, the sensitivities of the TC track forecast to direct perturbations of initial conditions in the GFS/GSI system will be reported. The results can be used to offer suggestions on ensemble forecast design, and strategies for adaptive sampling and assimilation.

Remote Access and Notes: Remote access TBD. For questions please contact Yucheng Song (Yucheng.Song@noaa.gov).
Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Thursday, June 23, 2011 7:15 AM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science and management information. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov. Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

July 13, 2011

Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion: A Brief History and OCRM's OTEC Activities Today

Date and Time: July 13, 2011, 12:00-13:00 ETZ [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: NOAA SSMC-4 (1305 East-West Hwy, Silver Spring, MD), 8th Floor, Room 8150.
Speaker(s): Whitney Blanchard (Energy Specialist, Office of Ocean and Coastal Resource Management)
Speaker's Email: whitney.blanchard@noaa.gov
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NOAA NOS Science Seminar Series and NOAA Office of Ocean and Coastal Resource Management
Abstract:

Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion is a marine renewable energy technology that uses temperature differences between deep cold water and warm surface water to generate a constant source of electricity. The electricity can be generated from an off-shore facility and sent to land by power cable. The technology is considered particularly viable in tropical areas with year-round warm surface water. There are currently no commercial OTEC facilities, however, federal agencies and private industry are conducting and pursuing OTEC-related demonstration and research projects. NOAA's Office of Ocean and Coastal Resource Management is responsible for licensing OTEC facilities. In this seminar, OTEC technology, a brief OTEC history, and NOAA's activities in OTEC will be discussed.

About the Speaker: Whitney Blanchard is as an energy specialist working for OCRM's Coastal Programs Division. She joined the team in 2009 to aid the office in developing the capacity for OCRM to administer its licensing responsibilities for OTEC. Whitney is a PhD candidate in the civil engineering program with the Coastal Response Research Center (CRRC) at the University of New Hampshire. She completed her M.S. in civil engineering in 2008 with CRRC and she was a recipient of a Fulbright fellowship to conduct research in Norway to study oil spill remediation in Arctic environments.
Remote Access and Notes:

Presentations are available remotely via a combination of phone (US only) & webcast. Note that remote access is limited to 50 connections on a first-come-first served basis, so we cannot guarantee participation. To participate remotely via phone and internet:

  1. Dial toll-free (U.S.) 1-877-708-1667. When prompted enter passcode 7028688 followed by the # sign. Please use your phone's mute button (*6 toggles on or off) during the presentation until you are ready to ask questions. The phone conference does not start until about five minutes before the seminar.
  2. To access the webex meeting, go the to the webcast site at http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?sigKey=mymeetings&i=744925156&p=&t=c. Enter meeting number 744925156 if needed; no passcode is required. Enter other required fields; First and last name. Check the box that that you have read the Privacy Policy, and click Proceed.

For further information please contact Tracy Gill (tracy.gill@noaa.gov), or if it is within 5 minutes of the seminar start, call the toll free number above and she will try to answer your questions.

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Wednesday, June 1, 2011 9:31 AM / Last updated Friday, June 17, 2011 6:55 AM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science and management information. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov. Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

July 19, 2011

Exporting Data from ArcGIS to KML Format

Date and Time: July 19, 2011, 14:00-15:00 ETZ [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: Seminar available via webinar only (see Remote Access and Notes section below)
Speaker(s): Tim Haverland (NOAA Fisheries Office of Science and Technology)
Speaker's Email: Tim.Haverland@noaa.gov
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NOAA Fisheries Office of Science and Technology
Abstract:

Exporting ArcGIS data to KML is easy with third-party tools. Two tools will be presented (Arc2Earth and City of Portland Bureau of Planning's "Export to KML"), along with how to use HTML templates for creating custom pop up windows for your feature attributes.

Remote Access and Notes:

Presentations are available remotely via a webinar: https://www1.gotomeeting.com/register/791620328. After registering you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the Webinar. This webinar will be recorded for on-demand playback. For further information please contact Tim Haverland Tim.Haverland@noaa.gov

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Thursday, July 14, 2011 1:01 PM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science and management information. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov. Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

July 21, 2011

Sea Oil Field Satellite Monitoring: An Operational View

Date and Time: July 21, 2011, 11:00-12:00 ETZ [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: World Weather Building, Science Center (5200 Auth Road, Camp Springs, MD 20746), Room 707 (See Map & Directions from Google)
Speaker(s): Prof. Maurizio Migliaccio (University of Napoli)
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NOAA STAR seminar series
Abstract:

Sea oil fields are of paramount economical interest in our fossil fuels economy. Large exploiting activities are currently undergoing in various part of the globe and new sea oil fields are under approval by several national governments. Oil growing demand and the spiking of market price, propelled oil extracting industries to explore and drill in deep waters and therefore new areas are now considered over the globe. Operational services can be driven by international remote sensing constellation of constellations. With these respects the key remote sensing sensor is the active microwave Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR). In fact, it provides high spatial resolution, limited sensitivity to cloud cover, other atmospheric phenomena and day-and-night coverage. Sea oil field monitoring must effective to observe oil at sea and oil rigs. The seminar first deals the two issues separately than it shows how it is possible to effectively provide a service that combines the two needs. The seminar shows as SAR polarimetry and physical based approaches, instead of image based approaches, can provide successful operational results.

Download Presentation: http://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/documents/seminardocs/2011/Migliaccio20110721.pdf
Remote Access and Notes:

Phone access: USA participants: 866-832-9297 International: 203-566-7610 Passcode: 6070416. For further information please contact patrick.sweeney@noaa.gov (301-763-8102 Ext 175), William.G.Pichel@noaa.gov (301-763-8237 Ext 166), Xiaofeng.Li@noaa.gov (301-763-8177 Ext321); see http://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/seminars.php)

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Friday, July 15, 2011 2:09 PM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science and management information. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov. Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

July 22, 2011

Collaborative Efforts to Improve the Conservation and Management of Elasmobranchs: Melding Policy, Management and Science

Date and Time: July 22, 2011, 14:00-15:00 ETZ [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: NOAA SSMC3-3, (1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD 20910), 12th Floor, Room 12836.
Speaker(s): Dr. John Carlson (Research Fishery Biologist at South East Fisheries Science Center NMFS)
Speaker's Email: John.Carlson@noaa.gov
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NOAA NMFS Office of Science and Technology
Abstract:

TBD

About The Speaker

Dr. John Carlson is currently a Research Fisheries Biologist at the National Marine Fisheries Service Laboratory in Panama City, FL. His current work at the laboratory involves biological and analytical work relating to population assessment. Dr. Carlson has authored and co-authored over 30 peer-reviewed publications on shark biology and been invited and presented papers at international and national workshops and symposia. He holds a bachelor and master's degree in biology from Southern Connecticut State University and a doctorate in biological sciences from the University of Mississippi.

Remote Access and Notes:

TBD. For further information please contact mridula.srinivasan@noaa.gov

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Thursday, July 21, 2011 9:49 AM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science and management information. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov. Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

July 26, 2011

Date and Time: July 26, 2011, 12:00-13:00 ETZ [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: NOAA, SSMC-3 (1315 East-West Hwy, Silver Spring. MD 20910), 2nd Floor, Central Library
Speaker(s): Jason Link (NOAA National Marine Fisheries Service, Northeast Fisheries Science Center)
Speaker's Email: Jason.Link@noaa.gov
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NOAA NESDIS NODC Central Library
Abstract:

In a recent study, Dr. Jason Link and colleagues reviewed options for incorporating realistic estimates of predation mortality into stock assessments. They concluded that traditional, single-species population models generally underestimate the effects of predation on target species when predation is assumed to be low and constant rather than variable as predator and other prey populations change. The researchers found that including predation leads to more accurate estimates of total population size and more conservative biological reference points, or stock-specific benchmarks. The authors recommend adopting some of the existing methods they reviewed in order to incorporate ecological interactions into stock assessments.

Download Presentation: http://www.lib.noaa.gov/about/news/NOAA_Brown_Bag_7_26_11_Link.pdf [PDF]
Remote Access and Notes:
  1. Go to http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?sigKey=mymeetings&i=742656968&=brownbag&t=c
  2. Enter the required fields
  3. Indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy
  4. Click on Proceed
  5. Passcode: brownbag
  6. For audio in the US and Canada, dial 866-833-7307. The participant passcode is 8986360.
Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Wednesday, June 22, 2011 7:43 AM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science and management information. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov. Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].


Research Focus on Persistent Organic Contaminants in the Marine Environment by the Korean Ocean Research and Development Institute (KORDI)

Date and Time: July 26, 2011, 12:00-13:00 ETZ [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: NOAA, SSMC-4 (1305 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD, 20910), 8th Floor, Room 8150
Speaker(s): Dr. Sang Hee Hong and Dr. Won Joon Shim (Korean Ocean Research & Development Institute)
Speaker's Email: shhong@kordi.re.kr wjshim@kordi.re.kr
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NOAA NOS Science Seminar Series, the Korean Ocean Research & Development Institute, and the National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science
Abstract:

Korean Ocean Research and Development Institute (KORDI) is one of the leading Marine Research Institutes in the Republic of Korea. The focus of the Oil and Persistent organic pollutants (POPs) Research Group (OPRG) at Geoje Branch will be discussed in this presentation. OPRG, with a state-of-the-art research facility, has been involved in pollution research since the mid-1990s. The research focus was on status, spatial distribution, transport, fate and impact of POPs in Korean waters, regional seas like the Yellow Sea and the polar region. Most of the industrialized bays in Korea have been surveyed, initially using the Mussel Watch approach for the classic pollutants such as organochlorine pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyls, organotins and dioxins. OPRG has initiated studies on these pollutants in various marine environmental media such as air, water, sediment and biota, and time-integrated sampling techniques such as passive air and water samplers are continuously employed. OPRG has added to its focus the emerging pollutants such as flame retardants and several persistent polar endocrine disruptors. A study on microplastics has also been recently initiated. A major effort is underway to evaluate the impact of these chemicals on the marine ecosystem, especially heavily contaminated inland bays, based on integrative assessment techniques. KORDI has taken up the major task of managing the Hebei Spirit Oil Spill Research from the time of the accident in December 2007; it is one of the worst oil spills that has ever happened on the shores of Korea. The post spill monitoring results and related research will be briefly mentioned.

About the Speaker:

Dr. Sang Hee Hong is a senior research scientist in Oil and Persistent Organic Pollutants Research Group at the Korean Ocean Research and Development Institute (KORDI). Her research interest is the environmental fate of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) and their integrative risk assessment in the marine environment. She has more than 15 years' experience in POPs study and has published 32 research papers in peer reviewed journals.

Remote Access and Notes:

Presentations are available remotely via a combination of phone (US only) & webcast. Remote access is limited to 50 connections on a first-come-first served basis.

To participate remotely via phone and internet:
  1. Dial toll-free (U.S.) 1-877-708-1667. When prompted enter passcode 7028688 and the # sign. Please use your phone's mute button (*6 toggles on or off) during the presentation until you are ready to ask questions. The phone conference does not start until ~ five minutes before the seminar.
  2. To access the webex meeting, go the to the webcast site at http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?sigKey=mymeetings&i=744925156&p=&t=c. Enter meeting number 744925156 if needed; no passcode is required. Enter other required fields - First and last name. Check the box that that you have read the Privacy Policy, and click Proceed.

Questions? : Contact Tracy Gill (tracy.gill@noaa.gov) at least 45 minutes before the seminar, or if it is within 5 minutes of the seminar start, call the toll free number above/

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Friday, July 15, 2011 8:24 AM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science and management information. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov. Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

July 27, 2011

Facebook 101: Part Two of a Series Exploring Social Media Tools

Date and Time: July 27, 2011, 12:00-13:00 ETZ [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: NOAA, SSMC-4 (1305 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD, 20910), 8th Floor, Room 8150
Speaker(s): Emily Crum (Chief, Communications and Content Services Branch, NOS Communications and Education Division)
Speaker's Email: emily.crum@noaa.gov
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: The NOS Science Seminar Series and the NOS Communications and Education Division
Abstract:

Facebook, a social networking service where users can connect and interact with other people, is one of several social media tools approved for use by the Department of Commerce (DOC) and thus is available for use by NOAA. This presentation will take a closer look at Facebook-what it is (and is not) and who is using it (and how). We'll look at Facebook as a communications and marketing tool and ways that you can evaluate whether or not it is an appropriate and necessary tool for your office. I will provide an overview of what is required for you to get an 'official' DOC-sanctioned Facebook account and what is required (in terms of policy and resources) to maintain an account. Finally, I'll give you a few tips/insights into what seems to work best for the National Ocean Service Facebook account (http://www.facebook.com/usoceangov).

This is the second in a series of presentations exploring the social media tools that the National Ocean Service is currently using; future presentations will cover Flickr and YouTube.

About the Speaker:

Emily Crum is the Chief of the Communications and Content Services Branch within NOAA's National Ocean Service Communications and Education Division. She serves as the managing editor of the National Ocean Service Web site; manages and implements NOS's social media tools; manages the development of NOS outreach materials; and is involved in messaging and communications strategy/planning for the organization. Emily has been with been at NOAA for five years; she previously did science policy (lobbying) and media relations work for the American Geophysical Union and developed Earth science textbooks and educational Web sites for the American Geological Institute. She holds a master's degree in science communication, a master's degree in geological sciences, and an undergraduate degree in environmental geology and art studio.

Remote Access and Notes:

Presentations are available remotely via a combination of phone (US only) & webcast. Remote access is limited to 50 connections on a first-come-first served basis.

To participate remotely via phone and internet:
  1. Dial toll-free (U.S.) 1-877-708-1667. When prompted enter passcode 7028688 and the # sign. Please use your phone's mute button (*6 toggles on or off) during the presentation until you are ready to ask questions. The phone conference does not start until ~ five minutes before the seminar.
  2. To access the webex meeting, go the to the webcast site at http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?sigKey=mymeetings&i=744925156&p=&t=c. Enter meeting number 744925156 if needed; no passcode is required. Enter other required fields - First and last name. Check the box that that you have read the Privacy Policy, and click Proceed.

Questions? : Contact Tracy Gill (tracy.gill@noaa.gov) at least 45 minutes before the seminar, or if it is within 5 minutes of the seminar start, call the toll free number above/

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Wednesday, July 6, 2011 3:42 PM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science and management information. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov. Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].


Engaging Stakeholders in Coastal Management through Participatory Mapping

Date and Time: July 27, 2011, 14:00-15:00 ETZ [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: Seminar available via webinar only (see Remote Access and Notes section below)
Speaker(s): Chrissa Waite (NOAA Coastal Services Center) and Christine Feinholz (NOAA Pacific Services Center)
Speaker's Email: Chrissa.Waite@noaa.gov; christine.feinholz@noaa.gov
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NOAA Coastal Services Center
Abstract:

Recognizing the importance of public knowledge, perceptions, and attitudes, many coastal managers have moved toward planning and decision-making processes that involve stakeholders. These planning processes are often spatial in nature and can benefit from the use of a geographic information system (GIS). This webinar will examine the role of participatory mapping as a technique for engaging stakeholders in decision-making.

Remote Access and Notes:

Presentations are available remotely via a webinar. To register, visit http://www.csc.noaa.gov/digitalcoast/webinar/index.html. You will receive an email prior to the webinar containing information about join. This webinar will be recorded for on-demand playback. For further information please contact Krista McCraken@noaa.gov.

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Friday, July 22, 2011 3:07 PM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science and management information. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov. Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

July 29, 2011

The Atlantic Coastal Fish Habitat Partnership: Strategic Conservation on a Regional Scale

Date and Time: July 29, 2011, 12:00-13:00 ETZ [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: NOAA, SSMC-3 (1315 East-West Hwy, Silver Spring. MD 20910), 2nd Floor, Central Library
Speaker(s): Emily Greene (Atlantic Coastal Fish Habitat Partnership Coordinator, Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission, Arlington, VA)
Speaker's Email: EGreene@asmfc.org
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NOAA NMFS Office of Habitat Conservation
Abstract:

The Atlantic Coastal Fish Habitat Partnership (ACFHP) is a coast-wide partnership of fish habitat resource managers, scientists, and communications professionals from 30 different state, federal, tribal, and non-governmental entities. Working from the headwaters of coastal draining rivers to the edge of the continental shelf, and from Maine to the Florida Keys, ACFHP seeks to accelerate the protection, restoration, and enhancement of habitat for native Atlantic coastal, estuarine dependent and diadromous fishes. ACFHP is developing goals, objectives, action strategies and priorities to guide conservation efforts along the Atlantic coast. Its draft goals include protecting and maintaining healthy aquatic systems, preventing further degradation of aquatic habitats, and restoring degraded aquatic habitats. Towards this end, the Partnership seeks to secure, leverage, and distribute resources for on-the-ground fish habitat conservation projects. This presentation will summarize its strategic planning efforts, to date and highlight progress on the Partnership's initial restoration work.

Download Presentation http://www.lib.noaa.gov/about/news/ACFHP_NOAA_presentation_2011.ppt
About the Speaker:

Emily Greene is the Atlantic Coastal Fish Habitat Partnership Coordinator (ACFHP) for the Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission in Arlington, VA. Emily coordinates all ACFHP activities, providing daily support to the development and operations of the Partnership by facilitating committee and working group meetings and products, managing contracted projects, identifying funding opportunities, and developing outreach materials. Emily has a B.S. in Biology and Environmental Science from the College of William and Mary and an M.E.M from the Nicholas School of Environment at Duke University.

Remote Access and Notes: Remote access is not available. For further information about this seminar please contact Mary.Lou.Cumberpatch@noaa.gov (301-713-2600 Ext. 129), Albert.E.Theberge.Jr@noaa.gov (301-713-2600 Ext. 115), or Brenda.Rupli@noaa.gov (301-713-2325, Ext 126).
Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Tuesday, July 19, 2011 7:07 AM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science and management information. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov. Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

OneNOAA Science Seminars Subscription Information

i-access to our OneNOAA science seminar announcements:

  1. Join our weekly e-mail seminar announcement [nominally, email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list]. You can subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminars moderated email list by sending an email message to: OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body (don't include the quotes) or visit https://list.woc.noaa.gov/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/onenoaascienceseminars and fill in your email address (see also how to suscribe).
  2. Online OneNOAA web access: http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/ (Web page maintained by Bryan Stephenson)
  3. Archive of previous OneNOAA science discussion seminars (by calendar year): [2010] [2009] [2008] [2007] [2006] [2005] [2004].
  4. Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar RSS feed.
  5. Interested in becoming a OneNOAA science seminar partner?
  6. When available, all seminars can be accessed remotely by anyone on a first-come-first serve basis.
  7. Note: All seminars subject to title, location, date, and time changes without notice. Please check the OneNOAA seminar web page for the latest seminar updates. Unless otherwised indicated, seminars are open to the public. The contents of the OneNOAA Science Seminars web page do not reflect any position of the Federeal Government or NOAA. References to trade names or commercial entities do not imply endorsement of any kind. Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer]. The information provided by the OneNOAA Science Seminars is for broad information purposes only. See privacy policy [NOAA Privacy policy]

 

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