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FebruaryFebruary 2011 OneNOAA Science Seminars

A joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science and management information.

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Web page last updated: Friday, 07-Sep-2012 12:57:23 UTC

The OneNOAA Science discussion seminar series is a joint effort to help share science and management information and to promote constructive dialogue between scientists, educators, and resource managers across NOAA. Please help us spread the word about these seminars to anyone interested. For further information please contact Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov.

Note: To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science Discussion Seminars, you can subscribe to the weekly email of OneNOAA Science Seminars by visiting https://list.woc.noaa.gov/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/onenoaascienceseminars and filling in your email address or by sending an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body (don't include the quotes). You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the list.

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February 03, 2011

Predation by Bears on Salmon: Ecology, Behavior and Evolution

Date and Time: February 03, 2011, 11:00-12:00 PSZ     [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: Northwest Fisheries Science Center (2725 Montlake Boulevard East, Seattle, WA 98112 -see map-), Room: Auditorium
Speaker(s): Dr. Tom Quinn (School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences, University of Washington) - tquinn@u.washington.edu
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NWFSC Monster Seminar JAM seminar series
Abstract: It has long been recognized that brown and black bears prey on and scavenge Pacific salmon but the last two decades have seen a great increase in research into the many aspects of this relationship. This presentation will describe work over the past 20 years on bear – salmon interactions, with an emphasis on predation by brown bears on sockeye salmon in the Bristol Bay region of southwestern Alaska. The talk will provide information on the factors controlling the level of predation among streams, and within streams among years, the extent to which the predation is selective, and the possible evolutionary effects of the predation on life history traits of salmon. In addition to this information from the standpoint of the salmon, we will also consider the salmon as prey for the bears, and present information on selective consumption of salmon, and the importance of salmon in the ecology of bears. The presentation will conclude with some comments on the role that bears play in controlling the pathways by which nutrients from dead salmon are transferred to terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems.
About the Speaker:

Thomas Quinn received an undergraduate degree in Biology from Swarthmore College in 1976, and a Ph.D. in Fisheries from the University of Washington in 1981. He did post-doctoral work at the Canadian Department of Fisheries and Oceans, Pacific Biological Station in Nanaimo, B.C. from the fall of 1981 through 1985. He joined the faculty at the University of Washington in the School of Fisheries (now School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences) in 1986, and he has taught there since that time. His research investigates the ecology, behavior, evolution, and conservation of salmon and trout. His projects have included all phases of the life cycle but his particular interests are in migration and homing, reproductive success, freshwater ecology, the evolution of populations, and the predator-prey relationship between bears and salmon.

Recent Publications:

1)Quinn, T. P., L. Wetzel, S. Bishop, K. Overberg, and D. E. Rogers. 2001. Influence of breeding habitat on bear predation, and age at maturity and sexual dimorphism of sockeye salmon populations. Canadian Journal of Zoology 79:1782-1793. 2)Quinn, T. P., A. P. Hendry, and G. B. Buck. 2001. Balancing natural and sexual selection in sockeye salmon: interactions between body size, reproductive opportunity and vulnerability to predation by bears. Evolutionary Ecology Research 3:917-937. 3) Quinn, T. P., S. M. Gende, G. T. Ruggerone, and D. E. Rogers. 2003. Density dependent predation by brown bears (Ursus arctos) on sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka). Canadian Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences 60:553-562. 4)Gende, S. M., T. P. Quinn, R. Hilborn, A. P. Hendry, and B. Dickerson. 2004. Brown bears selectively kill salmon with higher energy content but only in habitats that facilitate choice. Oikos 104:518-528. 5) Carlson, S. M., R. Hilborn, A. P. Hendry, and T. P. Quinn. 2007. Predation by bears drives senescence in natural populations of salmon. Public Library of Science One 2(12):1286. 6)Carlson, S. M., H. B. Rich, and T. P. Quinn. 2009. Does variation in selection imposed by bears drive divergence among populations in the size and shape of sockeye salmon? Evolution 63:1244-1261.

Remote Access and Notes:

Remote access To join the online meeting (Now from mobile devices!)

  1. Go to https://nwfsc.webex.com/nwfsc/j.php?ED=147149957&UID=1165236087&RT=MiM0;
  2. If requested, enter your name and email address;
  3. If a password is required, enter the meeting password: (This meeting does not require a password);
  4. Click "Join".

To view in other time zones or languages, please click the link:https://nwfsc.webex.com/nwfsc/j.php?ED=147149957&UID=1165236087&ORT=MiM0. To join the audio conference only Call-in toll number (US/Canada): +1-408-600-3600; Access code:801 050 872.

For assistance

  1. Go to https://nwfsc.webex.com/nwfsc/mc;
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You can contact me at :nwfsc.webex@noaa.gov: For further information please contact Diane Tierney (Diane.Tierney@noaa.gov; 206-860-3380). All seminars are open to the public.

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Friday, January 7, 2011 9:19 AM / Last edited Monday, January 10, 2011 7:14 AM. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can subscribe to the weekly email of OneNOAA Science Seminars by visiting https://list.woc.noaa.gov/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/onenoaascienceseminars and filling in your email address or by sending an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body (don't include the quotes). You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with these seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series please contact Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov. Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

February 04, 2011

Assisting Great Lakes Coastal Communities with Climate Change Adaptation

Date and Time: February 4, 2011 from 12:00-13:00 EST     [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: SSMC-3 (1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD, 20910), 2nd Floor
Speaker(s): Shauna Casey, Danielle Forsyth, Rebecca Held, Sara Katich and Cybelle Shattuck (Masters Students at the University of Michigan's School of Natural Resources and Environment)
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NOAA NODC Central Library
Abstract:

The Great Lakes region is predicted to experience significant coastal impacts due to global climate change that are different than impacts being predicted for our ocean coasts. Specialized education, training and community planning will need to be developed to assist Great Lakes coastal communities in adapting to changes resulting from climate change. This project resulted in three educational modules that can be delivered individually or as a unit to prepare local officials to develop climate change adaptation plans for their communities. These outreach modules will be delivered by Sea Grant Program Extension Staff, USDA Extension Staff, Coastal Zone Management Programs, and other trained outreach professionals who work with local community decision makers in the Great Lakes region. Modules were designed to allow for maximum flexibility and adaptability and can easily be modified to include future research and tools that increase the body of information useful for local decision makers.

The student team from SNRE completed this project with the help of NOAA Great Lakes Regional Collaboration team members and Sea Grant professionals as part of a mini-grant funded by the National NOAA Sea Grant College Program. The SNRE team will present an overview of the project and the educational tools they developed, including examples of materials from the modules. Please join us for a discussion about educational outreach related to climate change adaptation.

Remote Access and Notes: Remote access via webinar: 1. Go to http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?sigKey=mymeetings&i=742656968&=brownbag&t=c; 2. Enter the required fields; 3. Indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy; 4. Click on Proceed. 5. passcode: brownbag. Audio: Dial 866-833-7307; participant passcode: 8986360. Please note: remote access is limited to first 50 participants. For further information about this seminar please contact Mary.Lou.Cumberpatch@noaa.gov (301-713-2600 Ext. 129) or Albert.E.Theberge.Jr@noaa.gov (301-713-2600 Ext. 115).
Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Monday, January 31, 2011 7:51 AM. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can subscribe to the weekly email of OneNOAA Science Seminars by visiting https://list.woc.noaa.gov/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/onenoaascienceseminars and filling in your email address or by sending an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body (don't include the quotes). You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with these seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series please contact Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov. Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

February 07, 2011

A Collaborative Report on the Synthesis of Subsurface Data from the Deepwater Horizon Response Effort

Date and Time: February 7, 2011. 11:00-12:00     [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: NOAA SSMC-3 (1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD, 20910), 4th Floor, Room 4817
Speaker(s): Rost Parsons, Scott Cross, and Russ Beard (NODC NCDDC)
Speaker's Email: Rost.Parsons@noaa.gov, Scott.Cross@noaa.gov, Russ.Beard@noaa.gov
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NODC seminar series
Abstract:

The combined response to the Deepwater Horizon oil spill has generated a substantial collection of multi-disciplinary oceanographic data that have undergone initial quality assurance/quality control (QA/QC) and are publicly available. Physical and biogeochemical measurements used to track the extent and fate of deep subsurface hydrocarbons, have been reviewed and assembled by the Joint Analysis Group (JAG - full membership at http://ecowatch.ncddc.noaa.gov/jag/membership.html). The assembled dataset is hosted on a JAG website (http://ecowatch.ncddc.noaa.gov/jag) and is archived at the NOAA National Oceanographic Data Center (http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/deepwaterhorizon/support.html). The JAG is a collaborative team of scientists from federal, academic and industrial organizations tasked with providing rapid response analysis of data. Initial analysis and reports on the subsurface expression of the Deepwater spill focused on the data collected between 1,000 to 1,500 m depth. The data assembled by the JAG includes more than 1100 hydrographic casts, 3500 chemical analyses of hydrocarbon concentrations, dissolved oxygen, fluorescence, and 2500 laser in situ scattering and transmissometery (LISST) suspended particle size distribution and concentration measurements. The JAG reports on preliminary data analyses are also publicly available through the JAG website. This presentation highlights some initial analyses and results from the subsurface hydrocarbon signature. In addition details on the data collection effort, QA/QC procedure, and available formats will be provided to support continued public access for research purposes. The JAG wishes to acknowledge and thank the scientists and crews of the research vessels for their efforts to collect the data that are included in this presentation. This presentation was delivered previously at AGU 2010.

Download Presentation: OneNOAA_ScienceSeminar_07Feb2011_JAG_AGU_2010_final_updated_2011.pdf
Remote Access and Notes: For Webcast access within the US : 1) go to http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?i=744868915&p=science&t=c; 2) type in other required fields (i.e., your name, e-mail, organization; meeting number is 744868915; password is "science" -without quotation marks, password is case sensitive- ); 3) indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy; 4) click on Proceed. For phone access within the US: toll free dial 877-725-4068 using a touch-tone phone; when prompted enter participant code 8634769 followed by a "#" (Please mute your phone during the presentation or toggle *6 otherwise it produces a sound feedback and we will disconnect everyone). Please note that seating space in SSMC-3 Room 4817 is limited to 25 people. Thus, we encourage everyone to use the remote webcast/phone access to this seminar (please remember to mute your phone or toggle *6). Phone access is limited to the first 50 callers. For further information please contact Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov or Michele.Newlin@noaa.gov.

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Thursday, February 3, 2011 3:35 PM / Last updated Monday, February 7, 2011 9:14 AM. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can subscribe to the weekly email of OneNOAA Science Seminars by visiting https://list.woc.noaa.gov/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/onenoaascienceseminars and filling in your email address or by sending an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body (don't include the quotes). You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with these seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series please contact Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov. Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

February 08, 2011

Hunting Caribou Hunters Beneath Lake Huron

Date and Time: February 8, 2011. 10:00-12:00h AM ETZ [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory. Lake Superior Hall
Speaker(s): Guy Meadows, Ph.D. (Professor; Departments of: Naval Architecture & Marine Engineering / Atmospheric, Oceanic and Space Sciences, Director: Marine Hydrodynamics Laboratories (MHL), College of Engineering, University of Michigan)
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: Cooperative Institute for Limnology and Ecosystems Research [CILER]
Abstract:

During the late glacial formation period of the modern Great Lakes, the Lake Stanley low water stage (10,000-7,500 BP) represents a period whose physical evidence has remained lost beneath modern lake levels. In particular, during the late Lake Stanley stage of Great Lakes history, much of the water that presently fills the Lake Huron-Michigan basin was locked in a retreating ice sheet located in the vicinity of what is now Lake Superior. During this low lake level stage, water levels were as much as 80 meters below modern levels. At these lake levels, what we now call the Alpena-Amberley Ridge, present day Lake Huron was separated into the Manitoulin and Goderich Basins. This rough, narrow, and irregular and continuous rock ridge persisted, exposed for approximately 2000 years. With persisting glacial retreat, the basins filled with melt water, drainage pathways were altered, and the Alpena-Amberley ridge was inundated, and to present time, never re-exposed. Recent exploration of this region of Lake Huron by O'Shea and Meadows (2009) has revealed the existence of a series of stone features that match in form and location hunting structures used for caribou hunting in both prehistoric and ethnographic times. These discoveries represent the first evidence for early hunters on the Alpena-Amberley corridor, and raise the possibility that intact settlements and ancient landscapes are preserved beneath Lake Huron. The existence of these preserved landscapes raise many interesting questions concerning the physical dynamics in operation though this time period and during the subsequent filling of the basins to modern lake levels.

Remote Access and Notes: Remote access via webinar: https://www2.gotomeeting.com/register/883297099. For further information please contact Giselle Maira (giselle.maira@noaa.gov)
Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Monday, January 31, 2011 1:58 PM. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can subscribe to the weekly email of OneNOAA Science Seminars by visiting https://list.woc.noaa.gov/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/onenoaascienceseminars and filling in your email address or by sending an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body (don't include the quotes). You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with these seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series please contact Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov. Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

February 10, 2011

The Influence of a Viral Hyperparasite on Withering Syndrome, a Rickettsial Disease of Abalone

Date and Time: February 10, 2011, 11:00-12:00 PSZ     [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: Northwest Fisheries Science Center (2725 Montlake Boulevard East, Seattle, WA 98112 -see map-), Room: Auditorium
Speaker(s): Dr. Carolyn Friedman (School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences, University of Washington) - carolynf@uw.edu
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NWFSC Monster Seminar JAM seminar series
Abstract:

Withering Syndrome, WS, is a bacterial disease of abalone caused by a Rickettsia-like organism, WS-RLO, resulting in up to 99% losses of black abalone in central and southern California, including San Nicolas Island, SNI. Since 2002, abalone densities have increased 2.5x compared to the minimum in 2001. We exposed juvenile black abalone from SNI (WS selection) and Carmel (no WS selection) to RLO-infected red abalone and monitored them for 17mo. More exposed abalone from Carmel died from WS than did those from SNI (p<0.05), while no differences in survival were observed between control groups (p>0.05). Microscopic examination suggests that resistance may be more related to the host response to initial infection than to the ability to resist infection. During this study, we observed what appeared to be a novel bacterium, morphologically distinct from but shares the same tissue tropism as the WS-RLO. Electron microscopic examination suggests that the novel-RLO may be the WS-bacterium infected with a phage hyperparasite. Based on a second study in which these same groups of abalone were exposed only to WS-RLO, similar losses were observed in both groups after only 7 mo. These data further illustrate disease resistance in the SNI populations but also suggest that phage infection may reduce pathogenicity and dampen losses with the WS-RLO.

About the Speaker:

Carolyn received her B.A. in Aquatic Biology from University of California, Santa Barbara, in 1983 and her Ph.D. in Comparative Pathology from University of California, Davis in 1990. She worked as a fish pathologist at California Department of Fish and Game from 1998 – 2002. In 2001 she joined the faculty at the University of Washington’s School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences. Currently she is an Associate Professor and a JISAO Senior Fellow. Her laboratory focuses on the examination of infectious and non-infectious diseases of wild and cultured marine invertebrates. They are interested in the impacts of disease on animal health at the individual and population levels. At the individual level, they examine host response (gross to gene expression level) and develop and apply diagnostic tools (e.g., cPCR and qPCR) to detect pathogens and host responses. They also develop treatments for bacterial pathogens. The ecology of infectious diseases at the population level is examined via field and wet laboratory experiments in which the roles of variations in host (e.g., species or family), environment (e.g., temperature, salinity, pH), and pathogen are defined. Another focus of her laboratory is the conservation of marine invertebrates, particularly abalone. Carolyn’s awards include: most significant paper of Journal of Aquatic Animal Health from American Fisheries Society in 2001, the Distinguished Research from the College of Ocean and Fishery Sciences, UW in 2007 and Distinguished Undergraduate Teaching Award from the College of Ocean and Fishery Sciences, UW, in 2009.

Relevant Publications:

#1) Wetchateng, T., C. S. Friedman, N. A. Wight, P. Lee, P. H, Teng, S. Sriurairattana, K. Wongprasert and B. Withyachumnarnkul. 2010. Withering syndrome in the abalone Haliotis diversicolor supertexta. Dis. Aquat. Org. 90: 69–76. # 2) Friedman. C. S. and C. A. Finley. 2003. Anthropogenic introduction of the etiological agent of withering syndrome into northern California abalone populations via conservation efforts. Can. J. Fish. Aquat. Sci. 60: 1424- 1431. #3) Friedman, C. A., W. Biggs, J.D. Shields, and R. P. Hedrick. 2002. Transmission of withering syndrome in black abalone. Haliotos cracherodii (Leach). Journal of Shellfish Research 21:817-824.

Remote Access and Notes: Remote access TBD: For further information please contact Diane Tierney (Diane.Tierney@noaa.gov; 206-860-3380). All seminars are open to the public.
Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Friday, January 7, 2011 9:19 AM. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can subscribe to the weekly email of OneNOAA Science Seminars by visiting https://list.woc.noaa.gov/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/onenoaascienceseminars and filling in your email address or by sending an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body (don't include the quotes). You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with these seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series please contact Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov. Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

February 15, 2011

Healing our Nation's Freshwater Seas: Long-Term Approaches to Restoring the Great Lakes

Date and Time: February 15, 2011. 6:00-7:00 PM ETZ [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: University of Michigan Central Campus, Chemistry Building, Room 1800, 930 N. University, Ann Arbor, MI
Speaker(s): William Bowerman, Ph.D. (United States Co-Chair of the International Joint Commission’s Great Lakes Science Advisory Board, Professor of Wildlife Ecology and Toxicology, Department of Forestry and Natural Resources, Clemson University)
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: Great Lakes Restoration Initiative
Abstract:

The Great Lakes Restoration Initiative is the most recent example of remedial projects that target the Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement’s goal of restoring the physical, chemical, and biological integrity of the lakes. Long-term monitoring programs helped the Great Lakes community to identify where problems have occurred, and, can provide evidence that remedial actions have worked. Dr. Bowerman will provide examples of how long-term monitoring projects are used in the Great Lakes, and some of the unique problems these monitoring programs face.

Remote Access and Notes: https://www2.gotomeeting.com/register/765316515. For further information please contact Giselle Maira (giselle.maira@noaa.gov)
Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Monday, February 7, 2011 4:27 PM. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can subscribe to the weekly email of OneNOAA Science Seminars by visiting https://list.woc.noaa.gov/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/onenoaascienceseminars and filling in your email address or by sending an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body (don't include the quotes). You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with these seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series please contact Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov. Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

February 16, 2011

Habitat Mapping in the Hudson Canyon Head Area by Integration of Various Datasets

Date and Time: February 16, 2011; 11:00-12:00 ETZ [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: NOAA, NMFS, NEFSC, James J. Howard Marine Sciences Laboratory Conference Room. The James J. Howard Marine Sciences Laboratory is located at 74 Magruder Road, Sandy Hook, New Jersey. The Conference Room is located on the first floor of Office Building 74 (http://sh.nefsc.noaa.gov/directions.htm)
Speaker(s): Martina Pierdomenico (University of Rome, La Sapienza)
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: James J. Howard Marine Sciences Laboratory Seminar Series
Abstract:

Habitat mapping has become an important tool for the management of the marine environment, since managing human impact on ecosystems requires that the natural region be identified and mapped over a range of different scales. The term habitat is commonly defined as the environment where an organism or group normally lives or occurs, and is characterized primarily by its physical features. In this view acoustic technologies are regarded as the most efficient remote sensing tool for the physical characterization of the seafloor. Multibeam bathymetry provides background topography and shows seafloor morphology with relative high resolution, while backscatter data can provide indications of the type of material on the seabed in great detail. Three cruises, on 2007, 2008 and 2009, were conducted in the Hudson Canyon head region in which high resolution mapping was performed using AUV-mounted multibeam sonar. The resulting acoustic data was processed to create ultra-high resolution bathymetric and backscatter imagery (3m horizontal resolution for the bathymetry and 1m horizontal resolution for the backscatter) and a gradient (slope) map for the identification of the main geomorphological seafloor features and the characterization of surficial sediments. Comparison with ground truth data (USGS/NEFSC grab samples and still photos taken prior to mapping) enabled validation of acoustic discrimination of the seafloor types. The aim of the ongoing work is the identification and mapping of the different benthic habitats that occur along the rim and the walls of the canyon, by the integration of geophysical patterns with NEFSC oceanographic data and with biological data from NEFSC trawls and UGSC photos transects.

About the Speaker:

Martina Pierdomenico is a visiting scholar from the University of Rome, La Sapienza. In 2007 she received her Bachelor of Science in Natural Science from La Sapienza, and since 2008 she has been pursuing her Master of Science in Marine Science. She is working with Prof. Francesco Chiocci's Marine Geology Group studying the seafloor morphology of the Southern Tyrrhenian Sea in order to produce standard geohazard maps of coastal marine areas. From June 2010 she has been working on her Master’s thesis that involves the study of the Hudson Canyon Head morphology and habitat definition using various data: high resolution Sonar Data, benthic photos, grab samples and trawl catch data. The work is within a larger joint project between NOAA Northeast Fisheries, Mississippi Mineral Research Institute, National Institute for Undersea Science and Technology and Rutgers University. She spent the last six months in Mississippi working with Dr. Leonardo Macelloni on the acoustic data processing and is going to complete her research at NEFSC James J. Howard Marine Sciences Laboratory, under the supervision of Dr. Vince Guida.

Remote Access and Notes:

Remote access To join the meeting online(Now from iPhones too!)

  1. Go to: https://nmfs-st.webex.com/nmfs-st/j.php?ED=150406377&UID=0;
  2. Enter your name and email address;
  3. Enter the meeting password: (This meeting does not require a password);
  4. Click "Join".

To join the teleconference audio Dial: 1-866-6758-9153, Enter the pass code: 3373926. The Seminar Series will be held at the NOAA, NMFS, NEFSC, James J. Howard Marine Sciences Laboratory Conference Room. The James J. Howard Marine Sciences Laboratory is located at 74 Magruder Road, Sandy Hook, New Jersey (Directions http://sh.nefsc.noaa.gov/directions.htm). The Conference Room is located on the first floor of Office Building 74. The visitors are required to bring with them a valid photo ID to obtain the visitor's badge. For further information please contact Vincent Guida (Vincent.Guida@noaa.gov) and Ashok Deshpande (Ashok.Deshpande@noaa.gov).

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Wednesday, February 2, 2011 4:00 PM. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can subscribe to the weekly email of OneNOAA Science Seminars by visiting https://list.woc.noaa.gov/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/onenoaascienceseminars and filling in your email address or by sending an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body (don't include the quotes). You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with these seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series please contact Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov. Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

The GMAO Data Assimilation System: Status and Future Directions (CANCELED)

Date and Time: February 16, 2011: 14:00-15:00h     [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: World Weather Building / Science Center, 5200 Auth Road, Room 707, Camp Springs, MD 20746
Speaker(s): Ricardo Todling (NASA/GSFC/Global Modeling and Assimilation Office)
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NOAA JCSDA seminar series
Abstract: (CANCELED)
Remote Access and Notes:
Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Friday, January 7, 2011 9:19 AM. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can subscribe to the weekly email of OneNOAA Science Seminars by visiting https://list.woc.noaa.gov/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/onenoaascienceseminars and filling in your email address or by sending an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body (don't include the quotes). You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with these seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series please contact Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov. Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

February 17, 2011

Microarray Analysis in Environmental Monitoring

Date and Time: February 17, 2011, 11:00-12:00 PSZ     [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: Northwest Fisheries Science Center (2725 Montlake Boulevard East, Seattle, WA 98112 -see map-), Room: Auditorium
Speaker(s): Dr. Nancy Denslow (Department of Physiological Sciences, University of Florida)
Speakers Email: denslown@vetmed.ufl.edu
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NWFSC Monster Seminar JAM seminar series)
Abstract:

Microarray technology is a relatively novel tool that can be used as an aid to risk assessment for environmental monitoring. We have developed and used microarrays for largemouth bass to evaluate contaminated field sites. Organochlorine pesticide (OCP) contamination of the north shore of Lake Apopka originated with agricultural practices in the muck farms which received multiple yearly applications of high concentrations of DDT, methoxychlor, dieldrin, toxaphene, chlordane, among others. While this practice ended in the 1970’s, sediments are still highly contaminated and have resulted in bird mortality and poor fish reproduction. To study the role of sediment contamination on reproductive success, largemouth bass were introduced into a mesocosm built in the contaminated area for 3 months and developed tissue burdens up to 20 parts per million (by wet weight) and altered gene expression patterns by microarray analysis. We have evaluated a large number of physiological and molecular endpoints to study individual effects of p,p-DDE, methoxychlor (MXC), dieldrin (DIEL) and toxaphene (TOX) in largemouth bass administered the OCPs in their diets to achieve similar body burdens. Each of these OCPs activates distinct biochemical pathways that lead to dysfunction of reproduction at different points in the HPG axis. P,p’-DDE and MXC act both as antiandrogens and estrogens in gene expression experiments, with p,p’-DDE functioning as a stronger antiandrogen of the two. DIEL appeared to have minimal impact on sex hormone regulated pathways, but instead was more active in the brain, affecting genes and proteins normally associated with Parkinson’s disease, Alzheimer’s, DNA damage, inflammation, among others. TOX exposure also produced a unique expression pattern. The model compound ethinyl estradiol (EE2) appeared to be bio-concentrated from the diet and gene expression patterns varied widely with dose applied. Changes in gonadal histology after exposure in the feeding study suggest major alterations to the reproductive system. We also examined ex vivo gonadal steroidogenesis for all the test compounds, and found that exposure to EE2 lowered E2 synthesis in females, but not in males. In vivo TOX, p,p’-DDE, MXC or EE2 exposure in males prevented increased testosterone synthesis in response to gonadotropin stimulation. Ex vivo MXC and TOX exposure caused concentration-dependent decreases in basal and stimulated estradiol synthesis, respectively. These studies begin to explain the biochemical basis for the complex changes seen in the field and are a first step at understanding the effects of mixtures of OCPs on fish reproduction.

About the Speaker:

Nancy Denslow is a professor in the Department of Physiological Sciences and in the Center for Environmental and Human Toxicology at the University of Florida. She received her Ph.D. from the University of Florida in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology. Nancy has pioneered the use of molecular technologies for environmental toxicology especially focusing on endocrine disruption. She has developed estrogen receptor reporter assays to determine the molecular effects of environmental xenoestrogens. In addition, she has pioneered the use of microarray technology for non-model species, adapting technologies used for assessing toxicant effects on human health. She was awarded the University of Florida 2007 Pfizer Award for Research Excellence and was named the 2009-2011 University of Florida Research Professor. Nancy has over 150 peer-reviewed publications and is an inventor on four patents relating to protein factors, biomarkers for endocrine disruption and proteomics methodologies. She is a member of the Society of Toxicology (SOT, Councilor, 2009-2011), Society for Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry (SETAC), American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (ASBMB) and the Association of Biomolecular Research Facilities (ABRF, Executive board member 2004-2009).

Relevant Publications:

1) Garcia-Reyero*, N., Griffitt*[1], R. J., Liu, L., Kroll, K. J., Farmerie, W. G., Barber, D. S., Denslow, N. D. Construction of a robust microarray from a non-model species (largemouth bass) using pyrosequencing technology. J. Fish Biology, 72: 2354-2376 (2008). 2) Martyniuk, C.J., Kroll, K.J., Porak, W.F., Steward, C., Grier, H.J., Denslow, N.D., Seasonal relationship between gonadotropin, growth hormone, and estrogen receptor mRNA expression in the pituitary gland of largemouth bass, Gen and Comp. Endo., 163: 306-317 (2009). 3) Kocerha* J, Prucha*[2] MS, Kroll KJ, Steinhilber D, Denslow N. Regulation of Steroidogenic Acute Regulatory Protein Transcription in Largemouth Bass by Orphan Nuclear Receptor Signaling Pathways. Endocrinology. 151(1):341-349, (2010). 4) Martyniuk CJ, Kroll KJ, Doperalski NJ, Barber DS, Denslow ND. Genomic and Proteomic Responses to Environmentally Relevant Exposures to Dieldrin: Indicators of Neurodegeneration? Toxicol Sci. 117(1):190-199 (2010).

Remote Access and Notes:

To join the online meeting (Now from mobile devices!)

  1. Go to https://nwfsc.webex.com/nwfsc/j.php?ED=147847362&UID=1167886147&RT=MiM0
  2. If requested, enter your name and email address;
  3. If a password is required, enter the meeting password: (This meeting does not require a password);
  4. Click "Join".

To view in other time zones or languages, please click the link:https://nwfsc.webex.com/nwfsc/j.php?ED=147847362&UID=1167886147&ORT=MiM0 To join the audio conference only Call-in toll number (US/Canada): +1-408-600-3600; Access code:807 708 911.

For assistance:

  1. Go to https://nwfsc.webex.com/nwfsc/mc;
  2. On the left navigation bar, click "Support".

You can contact me at :nwfsc.webex@noaa.gov

Webex:

http://www.webex.com
CCP:+14086003600x807708911#
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Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Friday, January 7, 2011 9:19 AM / Last edited Monday, Tuesday, February 15, 2011 9:27 AM. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can subscribe to the weekly email of OneNOAA Science Seminars by visiting https://list.woc.noaa.gov/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/onenoaascienceseminars and filling in your email address or by sending an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body (don't include the quotes). You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with these seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series please contact Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov. Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

TBD (CANCELED)

Date and Time: February 17, 2011; 12:00-13:00 ETZ     [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: SSMC-3 (1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD, 20910), 2nd Floor
Speaker(s): Mary E. Kicza (NOAA Assistant Administrator for Satellite and Information Services NESDIS)
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NOAA NODC Central Library)
Abstract:

(CANCELED)

About the Speaker:

Learn more about Mary Kicza at: http://www.nesdis.noaa.gov/leadership.html#Kicza

Remote Access and Notes: Remote access via webinar: 1. Go to http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?sigKey=mymeetings&i=742656968&=brownbag&t=c; 2. Enter the required fields; 3. Indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy; 4. Click on Proceed. 5. passcode: brownbag. Audio: Dial 866-833-7307; participant passcode: 8986360. Please note: remote access is limited to first 50 participants. For further information about this seminar please contact Mary.Lou.Cumberpatch@noaa.gov (301-713-2600 Ext. 129) or Albert.E.Theberge.Jr@noaa.gov (301-713-2600 Ext. 115).
Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Tuesday, January 4, 2011 8:24 AM. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can subscribe to the weekly email of OneNOAA Science Seminars by visiting https://list.woc.noaa.gov/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/onenoaascienceseminars and filling in your email address or by sending an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body (don't include the quotes). You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with these seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series please contact Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov. Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

February 22, 2011

Coral Reef Management Fellowship: Conservation Projects in the Caribbean and the Pacific

Date and Time: February 22, 2011; 12:00-13:00 ETZ [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: SSMC-3 (1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD, 20910), 2nd Floor
Speaker(s): NOAA Coral Reef Management Fellows
Speaker's Email: Coral Fellowship Coordinator coral.fellowship@noaa.gov
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program
Abstract:

The NOAA Coral Reef Management Fellows from the Pacific and the Caribbean regions will present on their various projects in a series of short sessions during this one-hour seminar. These projects include: Facilitating community participation in marine reserves (PR); Developing guidelines for marine operators (USVI); Coordination of maritime and construction industry permitting (FL); Large-scale watershed revegetation in coral areas (CNMI); and Climate Change island action strategies (AS).

Remote Access and Notes: Remote access via webinar:
  1. Go to mymeetings.com;
  2. Enter the required fields;
  3. Indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy;
  4. Click on Proceed.
  5. passcode: brownbag.

Audio:

Dial 866-833-7307; participant passcode: 8986360. Please note: remote access is limited to first 50 participants. For further information about this seminar please contact Mary.Lou.Cumberpatch@noaa.gov (301-713-2600 Ext. 129) or Albert.E.Theberge.Jr@noaa.gov (301-713-2600 Ext. 115).

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Friday, February 4, 2011 2:53 PM / last updated Wednesday, February 16, 2011 11:39 AM. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can subscribe to the weekly email of OneNOAA Science Seminars by visiting https://list.woc.noaa.gov/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/onenoaascienceseminars and filling in your email address or by sending an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body (don't include the quotes). You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with these seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series please contact Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov. Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

(POSTPONED) Towards Effective Marine Protected Areas in the Coral Triangle: The Imperative of Linking Regional-Scale Design and Local-Scale Action

Date and Time: (POSTPONED) 7 February 22, 2011, 12:00 – 1:00 ETZ [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: SSMC-4 (1305 East-West Hwy, Silver Spring, MD), Room 9153
Speaker(s): Professor Bob Pressey (FAA, Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies, James Cook University)
Speaker's Email: bob.pressey@jcu.edu.au
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NOS Science Seminar Series
Abstract:

The Coral Triangle presents intriguing and urgent challenges to the science of systematic conservation planning. Our systematic approaches to designing marine protected areas (MPAs) are intended to address both localized and broad-scale objectives. Typically our methods identify large, contiguous tracts of sea and coast to achieve those objectives. Implementing these designs is difficult in the Coral Triangle because of three characteristics: 1. Finely-textured ownership and management of inshore waters; 2. High dependence on local marine resources for subsistence and commerce; and 3. Limited occupational mobility. Put together, these characteristics pose difficulties in implementing regional-scale MPA designs. On the other side, implementation of small, ad hoc MPAs is proceeding apace. These small MPAs might contribute to local objectives for fisheries, but they form collections, not systems that also contribute to broader objectives. Larger objectives are crucial, and include robustness to climate change and protection of wide-ranging species. We know that better integration of regional designs and local actions involves “scaling down” and “scaling up”. But, while these terms roll easily off the tongue, we are also painfully aware that our approaches to scaling need much improvement. The premise of this presentation is that conservation planning will be more effective if regional-scale design and local-scale action are better integrated to capitalize on their respective strengths and minimize their respective weaknesses. I will explore the conceptual, operational, policy and institutional implications of scaling up and down, and what these mean for new ways of approaching marine spatial planning.

About the Speaker:

Bob Pressey is one of the founders and leading innovators of the field of systematic conservation planning. He also has a track record of interpreting cutting-edge science to solve real-world problems in resource management. Bob leads a research group on conservation planning in the Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies at James Cook University. His group is exploring all aspects of planning in marine and terrestrial environments throughout the Asia-Pacific region and beyond. Research areas include data and modeling, decision support tools, costs of conservation, opportunities and constraints, and governance arrangements. Bob is new to academia, having spent 19 years as an agency scientist involved in some of the watershed applications of systematic conservation planning to real-world decision.

Remote Access and Notes: Presentations are available remotely via a combination of phone & webcast. Note that remote access is limited to 50 connections on a first-come-first served basis, so we cannot guarantee participation. To participate remotely you must: 1) Dial toll-free 1-877-708-1667. When prompted enter passcode 7028688 followed by the # sign. Please use your phone’s mute button (or toggle *6) during the presentation until you are ready to ask questions. 2) Go to the webcast site at http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?sigKey=mymeetings&i=744925156&p=&t=c 3) Enter meeting number 744925156 if needed. No passcode is required. 4) Enter other required fields. 5) Indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy, and click Proceed. For questions: contact Tracy Gill (tracy.gill@noaa.gov), or if it is within 5 minutes of the seminar start, call the toll free number above and we will try to answer your questions.
Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Friday, February 4, 2011 2:53 PM. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can subscribe to the weekly email of OneNOAA Science Seminars by visiting https://list.woc.noaa.gov/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/onenoaascienceseminars and filling in your email address or by sending an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body (don't include the quotes). You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with these seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series please contact Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov. Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

February 23, 2011

A Tale of Two Coasts: Causes and Consequences of Cross-shelf Thermal Structure in Lake Michigan

Date and Time: February 23, 2011. 10:30am-11:30 am Michigan Local Time [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: NOAA Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory, Lake Superior Hall, 4840 South State Road, Ann Arbor, MI.
Speaker(s): Cary Troy, Ph.D. (Assistant Professor of Civil Engineering, Purdue University)
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: Sponsored by CILER
Abstract:

Cross-shelf thermal structure in the Great Lakes plays an important role in setting species distributions, offshore transport and dilution, and nearshore circulation patterns. Results from two Lake Michigan field experiments investigating cross-shelf thermal variability during the summer stratified period are presented. The first experiment was carried out near Michigan City (IN) in 2009 and involved 7 temperature moorings, an Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP), and transmissometers. A second experiment, carried out near Muskegon (MI), involved a similar arrangement and extended the measurements to deep waters (110m). Cross-shelf thermal transects from the relatively shallow Michigan City transect show that although the Indiana coast is not upwelling-aligned with the dominant summer winds, it is nonetheless a location of high subsurface thermal variability. An attempt is made to quantify this variability in a biologically-relevant manner. Analysis of data from this site also suggests that basin-scale circulation patterns (themselves caused by the dominant winds) are responsible for the flow along this coast, and that basin-scale internal seiches (Poincare waves) are not the dominant process responsible for moving the thermocline along the lake shelf. Recently-processed data from the Muskegon 2010 experiment highlights the thermal variability seen along this coast, and points to some interesting questions for upcoming work.

Upcoming work involving the use of a Self-Contained Autonomous Microstructure Profiler (SCAMP) is also presented in the context of motivating questions on the effects of basin-scale internal seiches on mixing and dispersion in Lake Michigan. This National Science Foundation-funded work involves the correlation of basin-scale internal seiche structure with temperature and chlorophyll microstructure, and may help to answer questions related to phytoplankton blooms and the effects of invasive bivalves on water-column filtering.

Remote Access and Notes:

Remote access via webinar:

7https://www2.gotomeeting.com/register/369470026. For questions please contact Giselle Maira (Giselle.Maira@noaa.gov)
Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Tuesday, February 22, 2011 9:51 AM To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can subscribe to the weekly email of OneNOAA Science Seminars by visiting https://list.woc.noaa.gov/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/onenoaascienceseminars and filling in your email address or by sending an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body (don't include the quotes). You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with these seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series please contact Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov. Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

Coastal Hazards, Climate Change, and Developed Coastlines: The Need for Coastal Ocean Observations

Date and Time: February 23, 2011; 11:00-12:00 ETZ     [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: NOAA, NMFS, NEFSC, James J. Howard Marine Sciences Laboratory Conference Room. The James J. Howard Marine Sciences Laboratory is located at 74 Magruder Road, Sandy Hook, New Jersey. The Conference Room is located on the first floor of Office Building 74
Speaker(s): Dr. Michael S. Bruno (Dean Charles V. Schaefer Jr. School of Engineering and Science, Stevens Institute of Technology - Hoboken, NJ 07030)
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: James J. Howard Marine Sciences Laboratory Seminar Series
Abstract:

The presentation will examine the need for – and progress toward – a comprehensive observation system for use in urban coastal environments. These environments are uniquely impacted by human activities. In turn, high variability in these human-influenced (built) environments, e.g., via extreme storms, and longer-term uncertainties, e.g., those associated with climate change, significantly impact human decision-making regarding coastal resources, land use, etc. We will discuss present capabilities and future initiatives at the local, regional, national, and international scales, with examples of multi-use (sometimes unexpected) of coastal ocean observation systems.

About the Speaker:

Dr. Michael S. Bruno is Dean of the School of Engineering and Science, and Professor of Ocean Engineering at Stevens Institute of Technology, Hoboken, New Jersey. He is the Director of the Center for Secure and Resilient Maritime Commerce and Coastal Environments (CSR), a Department of Homeland Security National Center of Excellence. His research and teaching interests include ocean observation systems, maritime security, and coastal ocean dynamics. He is the author of more than 100 technical publications in various aspects of the field. Prior to assuming the duties of Dean, Dr. Bruno was the Director of the Center for Maritime Systems and Davidson Laboratory at Stevens from 1989 to 2007. During this period, he initiated the development of several ocean and weather observation and forecasting systems. Dr. Bruno is Chairman of the National Research Council’s Marine Board; Member of the Ocean Research and Resources Advisory Panel; Member of the Naval Research Advisory Committee; and serves as the Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Marine Environmental Engineering; Secretary-General of the Pan American Federation of Coastal and Ocean Engineers; Visiting Professor at University College, London; and member of the Board of Directors of the American Shore and Beach Preservation Association. A Fulbright Scholar (1996 appointment at the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece), he served on the Defense Science Board Task Force on Homeland Security in 2003. Dr. Bruno is a Fellow of the American Society of Civil Engineers. He received the Office of Naval Research Young Investigator Award in 1991, and the Outstanding Service Award from the American Society of Civil Engineers in 1988. Dr. Bruno holds a B.S. degree in Civil Engineering from the New Jersey Institute of Technology, a M.S. degree in Civil Engineering from the University of California at Berkeley, and a PhD degree in Civil and Ocean Engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution.

Remote Access and Notes:

To join the meeting online(Now from iPhones too!)

  1. Go to: https://nmfs-st.webex.com/nmfs-st/j.php?ED=150882672&UID=0
  2. Enter your name and email address.
  3. Enter the meeting password: (This meeting does not require a password.)
  4. Click "Join".

To join the teleconference audio

  1. Dial: 1-866-658-9153
  2. Enter the pass code: 3373926
Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Monday, January 24, 2011 7:56 AM. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can subscribe to the weekly email of OneNOAA Science Seminars by visiting https://list.woc.noaa.gov/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/onenoaascienceseminars and filling in your email address or by sending an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body (don't include the quotes). You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with these seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series please contact Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov. Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

Demystifying Strategic Planning: The What and Why

Date and Time: February 23, 2011, 12:00 – 1:00 ETZ [Check U.S. Time cl7ock for your local time]
Location: SSMC-4 (1305 East-West Hwy, Silver Spring, MD), Room 8150
Speaker(s): Stephanie Kavanaugh (Certified Professional Facilitator, NOAA’s National Ocean Service Special Projects Division)
Speaker Email: Stephanie.Kavanaugh@noaa.gov
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NOS Science Seminar Series
Abstract:

NOS Special Projects provides information, assessments, and tools in support of the collaborative coastal stewardship mission of the National Ocean Service (NOS) and its partners. Special Projects (SP) executes projects through three core capabilities:

  • Coastal Ecosystem and Demographic Analysis
  • Spatial Information Services
  • Planning, Collaboration, and Facilitation

This seminar will provide an overview of strategic planning terms and processes. Ever wonder what the real difference is between vision and mission? Goals and objectives? Why is it advantageous for groups to have a strategic plan? How do you ensure your strategic plan is a “living document,” not one that sits on the shelf? Answers to all these questions, as well as the most common “pitfalls” of strategic planning, will be addressed.

About the Speaker:

Stephanie is an IAF Certified Professional Facilitator, with more than ten years of experience in collaborative process facilitation, strategic planning, and public involvement. She is also a skilled policy analyst with expertise in natural resource management and environmental certification programs. Her love of “all things collaborative” began in graduate school at the University of Maryland in College Park, where she earned a Master of Science in Conservation Biology and Sustainable Development. During her undergraduate studies, she spent a year studying marine and plant ecology in Australia. Stephanie has facilitated dozens of meetings on very sensitive topics, including nuclear waste disposal, and marine energy facilities. She holds a Certificate in Public Participation from the International Association for Public Participation, and has completed over 100 hours of training in facilitation and dispute resolution.

Remote Access and Notes:

Presentations are available remotely via a combination of phone & webcast. Note that remote access is limited to 50 connections on a first-come-first served basis, so we cannot guarantee participation.

To participate remotely you must:

  1. Dial toll-free 1-877-708-1667. When prompted enter passcode 7028688 followed by the # sign. Please use your phone’s mute button (or toggle *6) during the presentation until you are ready to ask questions.
  2. Go to the webcast site at http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?sigKey=mymeetings&i=744925156&p=&t=c
  3. Enter meeting number 744925156 if needed. No passcode is required.
  4. Enter other required fields.
  5. Indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy, and click Proceed.

For questions: contact Tracy Gill (tracy.gill@noaa.gov), or if it is within 5 minutes of the seminar start, call the toll free number above and we will try to answer your questions.

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Friday, January 28, 2011 9:36 AM. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can subscribe to the weekly email of OneNOAA Science Seminars by visiting https://list.woc.noaa.gov/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/onenoaascienceseminars and filling in your email address or by sending an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body (don't include the quotes). You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with these seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series please contact Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov. Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

February 24, 2011

CANCELEDArctic Policy Issues

Date and Time: February 24, 2011; 10:00-11am Alaska Local Time [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy (ACCAP) office (second floor of the Denali Building, 3352 College Rd., Fairbanks, Alaska
Speaker(s): Kate Moran (Senior Policy Advisor, White House Office of Science and Technology Policy)
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy (ACCAP)
Abstract:

CANCELED Dr. Kathryn (Kate) Moran, Senior Policy Analyst at the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP) will present on Arctic Policy for this month’s ACCAP Climate Science Webinar. Dr. Moran has expertise in oceans, the Arctic, and global climate change. She was most recently Professor of Oceanography and Associate Dean in the Graduate School of Oceanography at the University of Rhode Island.

Remote Access and Notes:

Remote access:

How to Participate / Log-In to the Alaska Climate Webinar: (please note we have a new log-in procedure, starting February 2011!)

  1. With a regular telephone dial: 1- (877) 594-8353
  2. When prompted, enter the Participant passcode: 83847342

To view the presentation during a we7777binar:

  1. Point your web browser to: http://infiniteconferencing.com/Events/accap/
  2. Check Participant button (default) and in the first box, enter Participant Code 83847342.
  3. Enter the rest of the requested information (The name and organization you enter will be seen by other participants, but your contact information will remain confidential)
  4. Click the blue "log-in" button

For support during a call, press *0 on your phone and a conferencing coordinator will assist you. To register please fill out the web-form at: http://ine.uaf.edu/accap/teleconference.htm#register, or contact: Brook Gamble, Outreach and Education Specialist, (907) 474-7812, accap@uaf.edu. Please let us know if you intend to come in person. Dr. Moran will not be presenting from Fairbanks, but you are still welcome to join us!

Download Presentation: A copy of the presentation will also be available on the ACCAP website: http://ine.uaf.edu/accap/
Download Presentation:

A copy of the presentation will also be available on the ACCAP website: http://ine.uaf.edu/accap/

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Tuesday, February 22, 2011 9:34 AM To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can subscribe to the weekly email of OneNOAA Science Seminars by visiting https://list.woc.noaa.gov/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/onenoaascienceseminars and filling in your email address or by sending an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body (don't include the quotes). You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with these seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series please contact Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov. Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

Deepwater Horizon Oil Disaster: Seafood Safety Response

Date and Time: February 24, 2011, 11:00-12:00 PSZ [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: Northwest Fisheries Science Center (2725 Montlake Boulevard East, Seattle, WA 98112 -see map-), Room: Auditorium
Speaker(s): Dr. John Stein (Office of the Science Director, Northwest Fisheries Science Center)
Speaker Email: John.E.Stein@noaa.gov
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NWFSC Monster Seminar JAM seminar series
Abstract:

The Deepwater Horizon Incident in the Gulf of Mexico, recently voted the top story in 2010 by a major news organization, is the first oil spill to be declared a spill of national significance in U.S. history and immediately raised fear over seafood safety and economic collapse of the Gulf fishing industry. As part of NOAA’s response to the spill, NOAA Fisheries in collaboration with the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) was responsible for assuring the safety of seafood from the Gulf. Shortly after oil began flowing, significant areas of Gulf waters were closed to fishing. At its peak, over 88 thousand square miles, or nearly 37% of the U.S. Exclusive Economic Zone was closed for fishing. Seafood sampling started with baseline and surveillance monitoring, which was conducted in designated fishing areas that were impacted or at risk of being impacted by spilled oil. After the well was capped or there was no risk of oiling in an area, sub-regions of the closed area were systematically sampled for re-opening. The Northwest Fisheries Science Center served as the lead laboratory for conducting chemical analyses of Gulf seafood for the presence of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) that comprise petroleum and are the compounds of public health concern. Nearly 2000 seafood samples have been analyzed and none contained levels of PAHs that exceeded “levels of concern.” Along with sensory analysis conducted at the National Seafood Inspection Laboratory in Pascagoula and coordinated by NOAA Fisheries Seafood Inspection Program, these results were used by decision makers to re-open closed areas. Communication of NOAA’s seafood safety response to a wide range of audiences, both internally and externally, proved challenging but critically important. Because of intense media interest it was necessary that NOAA communication on its seafood safety response was accurate, reliable and consistent. Although NOAA had the lead for analyzing seafood, decisions to close and then re-open fishing areas also involved the FDA , the Gulf states, the Department of Commerce and the White House, all of which required intensive coordination and communication. The Seafood Safety program in the Gulf and the re-opening protocol were developed to be adaptive and respond to changing conditions. This proved crucial as tar balls were encountered in an area that had been re-opened and required re-closing to assure public confidence in harvested seafood. Nonetheless, rebuilding confidence in the safety of Gulf seafood requires much attention and continues to be very challenging and will take time.

About the Speaker:

John Stein, Deputy Science Director of the Northwest Fisheries Science Center, NOAA Fisheries Service, Seattle, WA is the current Acting Science Director until a new director is selected. He is the current Program Manager for NOAA Fisheries Seafood Safety Program and is extensively involved with NOAA’s seafood safety response after the Deepwater Horizon incident in the Gulf of Mexico. He also serves as co-Director for NOAA’s West Coast Center for Oceans and Human and Health collaborative research program involving NOAA, academia and non-governmental organizations and is the Regional Team Lead for NOAA’s Western Regional Collaboration Team. Previously, he was the Center’s Pacific Salmon Science Coordinator and Director of the Environmental Conservation Division and served as the Chair of the Science Board of the North Pacific Marine Science Organization (PICES), a multinational organization. In 2005, he was appointed Affiliate Professor at the University of Washington in the Department of Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences and serves on several committees in the Pacific Northwest that address recovery of listed Pacific Salmon. During Dr. Stein’s science and scientific career, primary research focus included impacts of anthropogenic and natural toxic compounds (e.g., chemical contaminants and marine biotoxins) on fishery resources and protected marine species, how human activities affect watershed processes that support anadromous fish, the development and application of biological markers of chemical contaminant effects in fishes and marine mammals, and the application of these techniques in delineating relationships between chemical contaminant exposure and effects in fishes and marine mammals. Dr. Stein is also involved in the effects of the state of the ocean on the health of humans, both health benefits and disease risk, ocean acidification, and the development of indicators/forecasts of biological responses to changing environmental conditions such as climate change.

Relevant Publications:

#1) Varanasi, U., J.E. Stein, and M. Nishimoto (1989). Biotransformation and disposition of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in fish. In: Metabolism of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in the Aquatic Environment, U. Varanasi, Ed. CRC Press, Boca Raton, FL, pp. 93-149. #2) Stein, J.E., C.A.., Wigren, K.L. Tilbury, S.-L. Chan, and U. Varanasi. (1993). Assessment of exposure of subsistence fish species to aromatic contaminants following the Exxon Valdez oil spill. In: Proceed. Exxon Valdez Oil Spill Symposium. pp. 206 - 209. #3) Varanasi, U., D.W. Brown, T. Hom, D.G. Burrows, C.A. Sloan, L.J. Field, J.E. Stein, K.L. Tilbury, B.B. McCain, and S.-L. Chan. 1993. Survey of Alaskan Subsistence fish, marine mammal, and invertebrate samples collected 1989-91 for exposure to oil spilled from the Exxon Valdez. U.S. Dept. of Commerce, NOAA Tech. Memo. NMFSNWFSC-12, Seattle, WA. 110pp. #4) Collier, T.K., C.A. Krone, M.M. Krahn, J.E. Stein, S-L. Chan, and U. Varanasi. Petroleum exposure and associated biochemical effects in subtidal fish after the Exxon Valdez oil spill. 1996. Pages 671-683. In: S.D. Rice, R.B. Spies, D.A. Wolfe, and B.A. Wright (eds). Proceedings of the Exxon Valdez oil spill symposium. American Fisheries Society Symposium 18. Bethesda, MD. #5) Hom, T., D.W Brown, J.E. Stein, and U. Varanasi. 1999. Measuring the exposure of subsistence fish and marine mammals species to aromatic compounds following the Exxon Valdez oil spill. Pages 169-194. In: L.J. Field, J.A. Fall, T.S. Nighswander, N. Peacock, and U. Varanasi (eds). Evaluating and communicating subsistence seafood safety in a cross-cultural contexts: Lessons learned from the Exxon Valdez oil spill. SETAC Press, Pensacola, FL.

Remote Access and Notes:

Remote Access: Go to https://nwfsc.webex.com/nwfsc/j.php?ED=148286102&UID=1169476847&RT=MiM0. To join the audio conference only: Call-in toll number (US/Canada): +1-408-600-3600- Access code:808 247 782. For further information please contact Diane Tierney (Diane.Tierney@noaa.gov; 206-860-3380). All seminars are open to the public.

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Friday, January 7, 2011 9:19 AM / Last edited Monday, January 10, 2011 7:25 AM. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can subscribe to the weekly email of OneNOAA Science Seminars by visiting https://list.woc.noaa.gov/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/onenoaascienceseminars and filling in your email address or by sending an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body (don't include the quotes). You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with these seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series please contact Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov. Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

Communications in the Mobile World

Date and Time: February 24, 2011, 11:00 – 12:00 ETZ [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: SSMC-5 (NOAA Science Center/Auditorium): 1301 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD
Speaker(s): Jeff Roberts (President, Moiré Marketing Partners) and Sean Leenaerts (Senior Brand Strategist, Moiré Marketing Partners)
Speaker Email: jroberts@moiremarketing.com and sleenaerts@moiremarketing.com
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NOS Science Seminar Series
Abstract:

Learn how marketers are taking the Web experience mobile from the experts at Moire Marketing Partners. The presenters will cover communications, content and strategy for designing mobile websites.

About the Speaker:

Jeff Roberts is the founder and creative director of Moiré Marketing Partners. With over 20 years experience in strategic marketing communications, branding, and client focused design, Jeff brings extensive leadership to Moiré's multi-leveled creative marketing services. Before launching Moiré, Jeff served as design director at Post-Newsweek and senior art director at The Magazine Group, where he earned numerous awards, including a Gold Ozzie Award for Excellence in Design from the Folio show in New York. He also received design awards from PRINT magazine, Society of News Designers, Art Directors Club, HOW, the American Institute of Graphic Arts (AIGA) and the Society of National Association Publications.

Sean Leenaerts is a Senior Brand Strategist at Moiré. Sean works with clients to develop brand identities, messaging, and integrated marketing approaches that give them a unique, compelling voice in their respective markets. Sean brings to Moiré over 20 years of experience in creative and brand strategy for a broad range of clients in professional services, finance, technology, e-commerce, healthcare, and real estate. His work crosses all mediums and has won awards from the National Agricultural Marketing Association (NAMA), American Bankers Association (ABA), Medical Marketing & Media and Legal Marketing Association (LMA). On the creative side, Sean has also won ADDYs, Effies (for effective advertising), Pollies (for political advertising) and creative awards from the Art Directors Club of Denver, the Denver Ad Club, the Minneapolis Ad Show, Communications Arts and Graphic Design USA.

Remote Access and Notes:

Presentations are available remotely for free, via a combination of toll-free phone & webcast. Please be aware that remote access is limited to 50 connections on a first-come-first served basis, so we cannot guarantee participation. To participate remotely you must: 1) To listen and speak, dial in toll-free to 1-877-708-1667. When prompted, enter passcode 7028688 followed by the # sign. During the presentation, please use your phone’s mute button (or toggle *6) during the talk until you are ready to ask questions. 2) To see the online presentation, go to the webcast site at http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?sigKey=mymeetings&i=744925156&p=&t=c;3) Enter meeting number 744925156 if needed. No passcode is required; 4) Enter other required fields; 5) Indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy and click Proceed. For questions: contact Tracy Gill ( tracy.gill@noaa.gov); she will not have email from a half hour before the talk to a half hour after, but you can talk to her on the phone thru the toll-free number above if you have questions. We are usually on the phone five minutes before the talk.

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Tuesday, February 8, 2011 4:35 PM. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can subscribe to the weekly email of OneNOAA Science Seminars by visiting https://list.woc.noaa.gov/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/onenoaascienceseminars and filling in your email address or by sending an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body (don't include the quotes). You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with these seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series please contact Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov. Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

February 25,2011

Satellite Image Automatic Mapper™ (SIAM™)

Date and Time: February 25, 12:00 – 1:00 p.m. EST [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: World Weather Building Room 707, 5200 Auth Road, Camp Springs, MD 20746 (view on map)
Speaker(s): Dr. Andrea Baraldi, Research Associate Professor, Department of Geography, University of Maryland, College Park
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: STAR, Center for Satellite Applications and Research
Abstract:

While the demand for spaceborne Earth observation (EO) data has continued to increase in terms of both data quantity and quality, the automatic or semi-automatic transformation of huge amounts of multi-source multi-resolution remote sensing (RS) imagery into information still remains far more problematic than might be reasonably expected. For example, supervised data learning algorithms (say, Support Vector Machines, SVMs), considered successful at local/regional scale, turn out to be impracticable/unable to classify remote sensing (RS) image mosaics at national/continental/ global scale. This means that, in RS common practice, the cost, timeliness, quality and availability of adequate reference (ground truth) data sets are becoming the most limiting factors on RS data product generation and validation. To increase the operational quality indicators of RS image understanding systems (RS-IUSs), namely, degree of automation, efficiency, effectiveness, robustness to changes in the input data set, robustness to changes in input parameters, scalability, timeliness and economy, two actions are undertaken. (1) A novel two-stage stratified hierarchical hybrid RS-IUS architecture is proposed. (2) An operational, near real-time, multi-sensor, multi-resolution prior knowledge-based decision-tree classifier, called Satellite Image Automatic Mapper™ (SIAM™), is implemented as the preliminary classification first stage of a two-stage stratified hierarchical hybrid RS-IUS.

In this seminar SIAM™ is proposed to the multi-disciplinary NOAA community of experts by means of few technical details together with a variety of application examples employing as input RS imagery acquired by nearly all existing spaceborne EO optical imaging sensors (e.g., AVHRR, MODIS, MSG, Landsat, SPOT, AATSR, AVNIR-2, RapidEye, IKONOS, QuickBird, WorldView-2), namely: automatic Land Cover (LC) classification from regional to continental scale, automatic LC change (LCC) detection from regional to continental scale, flaming and smoldering fire detection, burned area detection, cloud detection, semantic querying of large-scale RS image databases.

About the Speaker: More about Andrea Baraldi
Remote Access and Notes:

Dial In: USA participants: 866-832-9297 International: 203-566-7610 Passcode: 6070416

For more information, contact Patrick Sweeney at 301-763-8102 x175; patrick.sweeney@noaa.gov or Christopher Brown at 301-405-8031; Christopher.W.Brown@noaa.gov

Download Presentation: Presentation slides are available
Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Thursday, February 17, 2011 10:34 AM To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can subscribe to the weekly email of OneNOAA Science Seminars by visiting https://list.woc.noaa.gov/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/onenoaascienceseminars and filling in your email address or by sending an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body (don't include the quotes). You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with these seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series please contact Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov. Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

February 28,2011

The Sargasso Sea Project

Date and Time: February 28, 2011 at 12 noon EST [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: SSMC-3 (1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD, 20910), 2nd Floor
Speaker(s): Dr. David Freestone (Executive Director, the Sargasso Sea Alliance)
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NOAA Office of General Counsel for International Law
Abstract:

Sylvia Earle has called the Sargasso Sea "the golden rainforest of the ocean." It is a unique pelagic ecosystem based on species of Sargassum that are able to develop without contact with land. It is a crucial habitat for a number of species including fish, turtles and eel on the IUCN red list of endangered species. There is also an emerging recognition of the crucial role it plays in the wider ecosystem ranging from the Atlantic to the Caribbean and the Gulf of Mexico. The threats to the Sargasso include garbage and plastics cast overboard from boats, oil discharges, overfishing, the extraction of Sargasso for bio fuels, and climate change.

Dr. Freestone will discuss the Alliance and their approach to sectoral organisations with relevant competences to encourage them to adopt new protection measures in accordance with the 1982 Law of the Sea Convention. These might include the International Maritime Organisation (IMO), in relation to ship discharges and the designation of a Particularly Sensitive Sea Area, as well as fisheries bodies such the Northwest Atlantic Fisheries Organisation (NAFO) and the International Convention for the Conservation of Atlantic Tunas (ICCAT) (which already has agreed to monitoring and reporting requirements for Sargassum impacts).

About the Speaker: Dr. Freestone is a world-renowned legal expert on international environmental law with extensive experience, including as a senior legal adviser at the World Bank and as a professor at the Law School of George Washington University, the University of Hull in the UK and the UN University Institute of Advanced Studies. Dr. Freestone has written widely on international environmental law and Law of the Sea and is the founding editor of the International Journal of Marine and Coastal Law. More information about Dr. Freestone and the Sargasso Sea Alliance is available at http://www.greenrock.org/news/bermuda/399-director-appointed-sargasso-sea-alliance.
Remote Access and Notes: Remote access via webinar: 1. Go to http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?sigKey=mymeetings&i=742656968&=brownbag&t=c; 2. Enter the required fields; 3. Indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy; 4. Click on Proceed. 5. passcode: brownbag. Audio: Dial 866-833-7307; participant passcode: 8986360. Please note: remote access is limited to first 50 participants. For further information about this seminar please contact Mary.Lou.Cumberpatch@noaa.gov (301-713-2600 Ext. 129) or Albert.E.Theberge.Jr@noaa.gov (301-713-2600 Ext. 115).
Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Thursday, February 10, 2011 10:15 AM. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can subscribe to the weekly email of OneNOAA Science Seminars by visiting https://list.woc.noaa.gov/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/onenoaascienceseminars and filling in your email address or by sending an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body (don't include the quotes). You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with these seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series please contact Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov. Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

OneNOAA Science Seminars Subscription Information

i-access to our OneNOAA science seminar announcements:

  1. Join our weekly e-mail seminar announcement [nominally, email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list]. You can subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminars moderated email list by sending an email message to: OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body (don't include the quotes) or visit https://list.woc.noaa.gov/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/onenoaascienceseminars and fill in your email address (see also how to suscribe).
  2. Online OneNOAA web access: http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/ (Web page maintained by Bryan Stephenson)
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  4. Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar RSS feed.
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  6. When available, all seminars can be accessed remotely by anyone on a first-come-first serve basis.
  7. Note: All seminars subject to title, location, date, and time changes without notice. Please check the OneNOAA seminar web page for the latest seminar updates. Unless otherwised indicated, seminars are open to the public. The contents of the OneNOAA Science Seminars web page do not reflect any position of the Federeal Government or NOAA. References to trade names or commercial entities do not imply endorsement of any kind. Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer]. The information provided by the OneNOAA Science Seminars is for broad information purposes only. See privacy policy [NOAA Privacy policy]

 

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