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OneNOAA Science Seminars


[Seminar Partner's contacts]

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Web page last updated: Monday, April 18, 2011 10:04 AM ETZ
(1000+ OneNOAA science seminars since 2004)

Please join us for our upcoming OneNOAA science discussion seminars. The seminars are a joint effort by several NOAA seminar coordinators to pool seminars of common interest to help share science and management information to promote constructive dialogue between scientists, educators, and resource managers. These seminars provide an opportunity for anyone to learn about science, climate , and management efforts at NOAA. Please help us spread the word about these seminars to anyone interested. For further information please contact Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov.

Note: To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science Discussion Seminars, you can subscribe to the weekly email of OneNOAA Science Seminars by visiting https://list.woc.noaa.gov/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/onenoaascienceseminars and filling in your email address or by sending an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body (don't include the quotes). You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the list. NOAA staff with access to the NOAA Oracle Calendar can now import OneNOAA science discussion seminar listings into your personal calendar (See FAQ). For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series please contact Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov.


 

i-access to our OneNOAA science seminar announcements:

1. Join our weekly e-mail seminar announcement [nominally, email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list]. You can subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminars moderated email list by sending an email message to: OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body (don't include the quotes) or visit https://list.woc.noaa.gov/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/onenoaascienceseminars and fill in your email address (see also how to suscribe). Note: Effective May 01, 2010 only users of this list will receive weekly email notifications of upcoming OneNOAA Science discussion seminars. Please let me know if you have any questions (Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov).

2. Online OneNOAA web access: http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/ (Maintained by Hernan Garcia)

3. Archive of previous OneNOAA science discussion seminars (by calendar year): [2009] [2008] [2007] [2006] [2005] [2004].

4. Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar RSS feed.

5. Interested in becoming a OneNOAA science seminar partner? or submit a OneNOAA seminar announcement?

6. When available, all seminars can be accessed remotely by anyone on a first-come-first serve basis.

7. Note: All seminars subject to title, location, date, and time changes without notice. Please check the OneNOAA seminar web page for the latest seminar updates. Unless otherwised indicated, seminars are open to the public. The contents of the OneNOAA Science Seminars web page do not reflect any position of the Federeal Government or NOAA. References to trade names or commercial entities do not imply endorsement of any kind. Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer]. The information provided by the OneNOAA Science Seminars is for broad information purposes only. See privacy policy [NOAA Privacy policy]

General notes about the OneNOAA science seminars:

  • Please check for seminar additions and changes (i.e., cancelations, etc.).
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  • Constructive suggestions for improving the content of the seminar series are welcome [Please contact Hernan Garcia or a seminar partner].
  • All NOAA offices/divisions are welcome to participate and/or join as seminar partners (Joining is easy, see seminar format).
  • Please share the seminar announcements with anyone interested. Please notify us of any errors that you find so that we can correct them.
  • Remote access to seminars is available when indicated via web/phone access. When available, seminar presentations will be available for download (see Notes for each seminar).

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January 2010

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Tue
Wed
Thu
Fri
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04 05 06 07 08
11 12 13 14 15
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25 26 27 28 29

Scheduled seminars highlighted in blue
OneNOAA Science Seminars 2010 : Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
(Total number of OneNOAA Science seminars in January 2010: 11)



Data Assimilation of Cloud-Affected Radiances

Date/Time/Location/Seminar Sponsor:
Wednesday, 06 January 2010; 14:00-15:00 ETZ[Check U.S. Time clock for your local time] (Seminar location: World Weather Building, Room 707, 5200 Auth Road, Camp Springs, MD 20746; OneNOAA Science Seminar sponsored by: JCSDA)
Speaker E-mail:
Tomislava Vukicevic (Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory (AOML), Oceanic and Atmospheric Research (OAR)
E-mail:
tomislava.vukicevic@noaa.gov
Abstract:
A summary of research results on assimilation of GOES (Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites) Imager observations into a cloud resolving model will be presented. The purpose of the research is to evaluate feasibility of atmospheric data analysis with clouds. The studies were performed using a research data assimilation algorithm designated Regional Atmospheric Modeling and Data Assimilation System (RAMDS) that was developed at CIRA (Cooperative Institute for Research in the Atmosphere) at CSU (Colorado State University) and at ATOC (department of ATmospheric and OCeanographic sciences) at CU (University of Colorado). In RAMDAS a fully nonlinear 4DVAR (4- dimensional variational) data assimilation approach is applied to the cloud resolving regional model RAMS (Regional Atmospheric Modeling System) that includes explicit bulk parameterization of cloud processes. The observational operator for GOES imager observations is a system for computing unpolarized radiative transfer for either collimated solar and/or thermal emission sources of radiation in both clear and cloudy plane-parallel conditions. Adjoint models of the cloud resolving and radiative transfer models include explicit linearization of these nonlinear models. Overall, the results with RAMDAS indicate that the data assimilation of the cloud affected geostationary observations is feasible. The results show improvement in the model representation of the cloudy atmosphere and consistent change in the dynamical cloud environment.
Remote Access and Notes:
Online video access:1. Click on JCSDA Seminar, 2. Enter your name and e-mail address, 3. Enter the meeting password: JCSDAseminar2009, 4. Click "Join Now", 5. Follow the instructions that appear on your screen. Audio / conference call: USA participants: 1-866-715-2479, Passcode: 9457557, International: 1-517-345-5260 (see http://www.jcsda.noaa.gov/JCSDASeminars.php). For questions please contact George Ohring (George.Ohring@noaa.gov).
Web link to download Presentation(s):
[Click http://www.jcsda.noaa.gov/documents/seminardocs/Vukicevic_20100106.pdf; 2.1 MB]
OneNOAA Science Seminar Date Added and Listserv Subscription information:
OneNOAA Science Seminars added Tuesday, December 22, 2009 / Last edited Tuesday, January 5, 2010 10:00 AM. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can subscribe to the weekly email of OneNOAA Science Seminars by visiting https://list.woc.noaa.gov/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/onenoaascienceseminars and filling in your email address or by sending an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body (don't include the quotes). You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series please contact Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov. Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

OneNOAA Science Seminars 2010 : Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Back to top


The Polar Communications and Weather Mission, A Concrete Solution for Seamless Observation of the Arctic

Date/Time/Location/Seminar Sponsor:
Wednesday, 13 January 2010; 14:00-15:00 ETZ [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time] (Seminar location:World Weather Building, Room 707, 5200 Auth Road, Camp Springs, MD 20746; OneNOAA Science Seminar sponsored by: JCSDA)
Speaker(s):
Louis Garand (Meteorological Service of Canada)
Speaker E-mail:
Louis.Garand@ec.gc.ca
Abstract:
The seminar presents the current status of the Polar Communications and Weather (PCW) mission, led by the Canadian Space Agency. As the name indicates the dual goal of PCW is to provide continuous communications and Earth observation services over the Arctic, this with a near real time operational mandate. Environment Canada will take responsibility for the production and delivery of meteorological products. Currently in the middle of Phase A, the mission is planned for 2016. The seminar focuses on the meteorological component. PCW is defined by a constellation of two satellites in a highly elliptical 12-hour “Molniya” orbit with apogee at ~39,600 km and perigee at ~600 km. The constellation will provide for the first time seamless observations over the entire circumpolar domain above 55 N. The main meteorological instrument is an advanced imager with characteristics similar to those of the imager planned for GOES-R (2015) or Meteosat Third Generation (2016). The PCW imager has 20 channels covering the spectral range 0.45 m to 14.4 m, with pixel sizes ranging from 500 m to 1 km for visible channels to 2 km for infrared channels. The presentation will cover the following elements: imager definition and applications, orbital characteristics, critical technology issues, production of simulated datasets, data assimilation and impact studies, notably in relation to atmospheric wind vectors, and opportunities for other instruments. The international context will also be presented. For example the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) is supporting the highly elliptical observation concept, and several countries have indicated a marked interest for PCW. This interest stems from the fact that the mission allows extending the applications developed for geostationary satellites all the way to the North Pole.
About The Speaker:
Click [Louis Garand]
Remote Access and Notes:
Online video access:1. Click on JCSDA Seminar, 2. Enter your name and e-mail address, 3. Enter the meeting password: JCSDAseminar2009, 4. Click "Join Now", 5. Follow the instructions that appear on your screen. Audio / conference call: USA participants: 1-866-715-2479, Passcode: 9457557, International: 1-517-345-5260 (see http://www.jcsda.noaa.gov/JCSDASeminars.php). For questions please contact George Ohring (George.Ohring@noaa.gov).
Web link to download Presentation(s):

[Click Garand_PCW_20100113.pdf ; ~900KB].

Movie files: (use Windows Media Player) (see http://www.jcsda.noaa.gov/JCSDASeminars.php)

24km_sun.June22.avi, 16MB AVI file
film_ch28_1plane.avi, 9.7MB AVI file
modis31-ps-zoom-pole.avi, 8.7MB AVI file
movie_2planes_10W_170E.avi, 7.8MB AVI fil

OneNOAA Science Seminar Date Added and weekly subscription information:
OneNOAA Science Seminars added Tuesday, December 22, 2009 7:47 AM / Last edited Tuesday, January 5, 2010 12:08 PM. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can subscribe to the weekly email of OneNOAA Science Seminars by visiting https://list.woc.noaa.gov/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/onenoaascienceseminars and filling in your email address or by sending an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body (don't include the quotes). You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series please contact Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov. Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].
OneNOAA Science Seminars 2010 : Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Back to top


U.S. Arctic policy (Seminar Cancelled )

Date/Time/Location/Seminar Sponsor:
Tuesday, 19 January 2010; 11:00-12:00 ETZ [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time] (Seminar location: SSMC-3 (1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD, 20910), 4th Floor, Room 4817; OneNOAA Science Seminar sponsored by: NODC)
Speaker(s):
Julie Gourley (U.S. Senior Arctic Official. Office of Ocean and Polar Affairs, Bureau of Oceans and International Environmental and Scientific Affairs, U.S. Dept. of State)
Speaker e-mail(s):
GourleyJL@state.gov
Abstract:
Last April 2009, the Antarctic Treaty Consultative Meeting and the Arctic Council met together in Washington DC. The USA first hosted the signing of the Antarctic Treat in 1959, 50 years ago.
Remote Access:
For Webcast access: 1) go to http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?i=741283869&p=nodc1315&t=c; 2) type in other required fields (i.e., your name, e-mail, organization; meeting number is 741283869; password is "nodc1315" -password is case sensitive- ); 3) indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy; 4) click on Proceed. For phone access: toll free dial 877-916-2513 using a touch-tone phone; when prompted enter participant code 5877174 followed by a "#" (Please mute your phone during the presentation or toggle *6 otherwise it produces a sound feedback). Please note that webcast & phone access is limited to 50 connections on a first-come-first served basis. Webcast & phone access will start approximately 5 min before the seminar. For general questions about this seminar, please contact Hernan Garcia.
OneNOAA Science Seminar Date Added and Listserv Subscription information:
OneNOAA Science Seminars added December 2009/ Last edited Monday, January 11, 2010 10:01 AM. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can subscribe to the weekly email of OneNOAA Science Seminars by visiting https://list.woc.noaa.gov/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/onenoaascienceseminars and filling in your email address or by sending an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body (don't include the quotes). You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series please contact Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov. Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].
OneNOAA Science Seminars 2010 : Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Back to top


America, The Ocean, and Climate Change: New Insights for Conservation, Awareness, and Action

Date/Time/Location/Seminar Sponsor:
Wednesday 20 January 2010; 12:00-13:00 ETZ [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time] (Seminar location: SSMC-3 (1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD, 20910), 2nd Floor; OneNOAA Science Seminar sponsored by: NODC NOAA Central Library)
Speaker(s):
Paul J. Boyle (Senior Vice President for Conservation at Association of Zoos and Aquariums), Bill Mott (Director of The Ocean Project), and Douglas Meyer (consultant with Bernuth and Williamson).
Speaker E-mail:
PBoyle@AZA.org ; bmott@theoceanproject.org ;
Abstract:
The Ocean Project advances ocean conservation in partnership with zoos, aquariums, and museums. Part of its work is to conduct market research and strategic communications tools for its Partner network of 1,000 institutions and organizations. This presentation will focus on the market research that The Ocean Project completed this past year. It’s the single largest, most comprehensive public opinion research project ever undertaken on behalf of any environmental concern – with findings that are helping those in the ocean conservation community connect more strategically with the public for positive change. With support from NOAA through an Environmental Literacy Grant, the national study was conducted for The Ocean Project by IMPACTS in collaboration with the Monterey Bay Aquarium and the National Aquarium in Baltimore. This study was completed in November 2008 with responses by 22,000 American adults. Additionally, The Ocean Project completed the first of four semi-annual tracking surveys in September 2009. The tracking surveys are helping measure changes in opinions and test messages to the public. This presentation will provide an overview of the research findings, implications, and how The Ocean Project Partners and others are using the findings to improve ocean literacy.
Dowload Presentation:
[Click OneNOAAScience_20Jan2010_Boyle.pdf]
Remote Access:
Remote access via webinar: 1. Go to http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?sigKey=mymeetings&i=742656968&=brownbag&t=c; 2. Enter the required fields; 3. Indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy; 4. Click on Proceed. 5. passcode: brownbag. Audio: Dial 866-833-7307; participant passcode: 8986360. Please note: remote access is limited to first 50 participants. For further information about this seminar please contact Mary.Lou.Cumberpatch@noaa.gov (301-713-2600 Ext. 129) or Albert.E.Theberge.Jr@noaa.gov (301-713-2600 Ext. 115).
OneNOAA Science Seminar Date Added and Listserv Subscription information:
OneNOAA Science Seminars added Friday, November 27, 2009 8:41 AM / Laste edited Wednesday, January 20, 2010 7:23 AM. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can subscribe to the weekly email of OneNOAA Science Seminars by visiting https://list.woc.noaa.gov/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/onenoaascienceseminars and filling in your email address or by sending an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body (don't include the quotes). You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series please contact Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov. Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].
OneNOAA Science Seminars 2010 : Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Back to top


Satellite Altimetry Observations of Sea Level Change (Seminar Postponed to a date TBD)

Date/Time/Location/Seminar Sponsor:
Thursday 21 January 2010; 12:00-13:00 ETZ [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time] (Seminar location: SSMC-3 (1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD, 20910), 2nd Floor; OneNOAA Science Seminar sponsored by: NODC NOAA Central Library)
Speaker(s):
Dr. Laury Miller (NOAA/NESDIS/STAR)
Speaker E-mail:
Laury.Miller@noaa.gov
Abstract:
TBD
Remote Access:
Remote access via webinar: 1. Go to http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?sigKey=mymeetings&i=742656968&=brownbag&t=c; 2. Enter the required fields; 3. Indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy; 4. Click on Proceed. 5. passcode: brownbag. Audio: Dial 866-833-7307; participant passcode: 8986360. Please note: remote access is limited to first 50 participants. For further information about this seminar please contact Mary.Lou.Cumberpatch@noaa.gov (301-713-2600 Ext. 129) or Albert.E.Theberge.Jr@noaa.gov (301-713-2600 Ext. 115).
OneNOAA Science Seminar Date Added and Listserv Subscription information:
OneNOAA Science Seminars added Friday, November 27, 2009 8:41 AM. You can subscribe to the weekly OneNOAA Science Seminars moderated email list by visiting https://list.woc.noaa.gov/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/onenoaascienceseminars and filling in your email address or by sending an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body (don't include the quotes). You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series please contact Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov.
OneNOAA Science Seminars 2010 : Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec


Harmful Algal Blooms and Possible Effects on Fraser River Sockeye Salmon

Date/Time/Location/Seminar Sponsor:
Thursday, 21 January 2010; 11:00 - 12:00 PST [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time] (Seminar location: Auditorium, Northwest Fisheries Science Center, Seatlle, WA; OneNOAA Science Seminar sponsored by: NWFSC)
Speaker(s):
Jack Rensel (Rensel Associates Aquatic Sciences)
Speaker e-mail(s):
jackrensel@att.net
Abstract:
Recruit per spawner of Fraser River sockeye salmon has declined precipitously over the past 20 years and in recent years total run size has reached record low levels for our modern era, despite more than adequate escapement of many stocks. Although in-river mortality of returning adults is a problem, much of the recent decline has been attributed to unexplained marine mortality. Ten years of weekly algal bloom monitoring data by the B.C. Harmful Algae Bloom Monitoring program within four regions in British Columbia, from southern Strait of Georgia to Queen Charlotte Strait, were compared to marine survival data for the only sockeye stock that has smolt outmigration monitoring (Chilko Lake). For juvenile fish and timing, there was a modest inverse correlation between survival data and bloom intensity/duration of the fish-killing alga Heterosigma akashiwo in the southern Strait of Georgia. In particular, Heterosigma blooms in 2006 and 2007 were much earlier and extensive than normally observed in prior years and fish kills of farmed and wild fish were recorded in North Puget Sound along with warmer-than-normal water temperatures. These early blooms possibly affected juvenile sockeye outmigrating in May and June. Run sizes for these juveniles as adults two years later, in 2008 and 2009, were near record lows. Adult fish may be adversely affected too, as northerly diversion rates have generally been high through Queen Charlotte and Johnstone Straits since 1991, areas known for midsummer and later Heterosigma blooms. In some years, either the test fishing data and CPUE models that predicted large abundances of adult sockeye passing through Johnstone Strait were in error or the fish subsequently disappeared in the Strait of Georgia. Bloom duration and intensity during July and August, a period of inshore adult sockeye migration in the Southern Strait of Georgia, were inversely correlated with total sockeye salmon run size. Previously it was thought by many that these blooms only killed farmed fish. However, repeated observations of at least some dead wild fish during blooms in both Washington State and British Columbia; the identification of probable sublethal, chronic-exposure effects on fish; the recognition that the alga is not always surface oriented; plus the fact that bloom-killed fish usually sink in temperate waters could all account for overlooking this possible cause of fish loss in the past. Co-occurring food-web processes that could contribute to the sockeye decline are also considered. The presentation concludes with a review of available tools to further assess the situation and possibly mitigate the damage should harmful algae be further implicated.

Remote Access and Notes:

For remote access, please contact Ruben Sanchez-Teran (Ruben.Sanchez-Teran@noaa.gov). All seminars are open to the public. The auditorium is located at 2725 Montlake Blvd. E., Seattle, WA 98112. For further information, please contact Blake Feist (206-860-3408; Blake.Feist@noaa.gov), Diane Tierney (diane.tierney@noaa.gov), Su Kim (su.kim@noaa.gov), [click NWFSC seminar series].

About the speaker(s):
Dr. Jack Rensel works with business, academic, governments, NGOs and native people in the U.S. and overseas on fisheries and aquaculture issues. His expertise includes impact assessment of benthic and water column effects of aquaculture and development of computer modeling for inshore and offshore locations (www.AquaModel.org). Since the 1970s he has been involved in harmful algal bloom (HAB) studies in Puget Sound and overseas, particularly with regard to bloom dynamics and how they affect wild and cultured fish and shellfish physiology and means to mitigate blooms. His company performs field assessments of physical and biological aquatic food webs in riverine and coastal ocean areas in temperate and tropical marine waters, temperate freshwater riverine habitats such as the mid Columbia River and South American high-altitude lakes. He has been active in assisting state and federal governments, NGOs and the seafood industry to develop performance-based standards for aquaculture. Presently he is a Principle Investigator conducting research on integrated multitrophic (fish-shellfish) aquaculture in Puget Sound, stable isotope food web surveys of the mid Columbia River, model development of tropical fish farm effects management for the State of Hawaii and bioenergetic studies of commercially important fish species for calibration of an aquaculture impact effects model developed with partners at the University of Southern California. He has a long-term interest in nutrient dynamics related to algal blooms, eutrophication of nearshore waters and sediment contamination studies and many related aquatic topics.
OneNOAA Science Seminar Date Added and Listserv Subscription information:
OneNOAA Science Seminars added Thursday, January 21, 2010 7:05 AM. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can subscribe to the weekly email of OneNOAA Science Seminars by visiting https://list.woc.noaa.gov/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/onenoaascienceseminars and filling in your email address or by sending an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body (don't include the quotes). You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series please contact Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov. Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].
OneNOAA Science Seminars 2010 : Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Back to top


Harmful Algal Bloom Forecasts in the Netherlands

Date/Time/Location/Seminar Sponsor:
Friday, 22 January 2010; 12:00-13:00 ETZ [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time] (Seminar location: SSMC-4 (1305 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD, 20910), Room #8150; OneNOAA Science Seminar sponsored by: NOS)
Speaker(s):
Dr. Tineke Troost (Lead Scientist, Sea and Coastal Systems, Deltares, Delft, The Netherlands)
Abstract:
In the past, mass mortality events of mussels have occurred in the Easterscheldt estuary (the Netherlands), which were due to the explosive growth of harmful algae. Also, these algae lead to foam formation on beaches. Therefore, an early warning system (FEWS) was set up to supply water managers with information on the actual and expected developments of harmful algal blooms in the Dutch coastal waters. The system combines information on field data, satellite remote sensing data and model data, and results are compiled in information bulletins that are distributed to the water managers twice a week during the spring bloom season.
Remote Access:
Presentations are available remotely via a combination of phone & webcast. Please be aware that remote access is limited to 50 connections on a first-come-first served basis, so we cannot guarantee participation. To participate remotely you must: 1) Dial 866-816-8440, and then wait for instructions. When prompted enter passcode 3770077 followed by the # sign. Please use your phone’s mute button (or toggle *6) during the presentation until you are ready to ask questions. 2) Go to the webcast site at http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?i=746752585&p=&t=c 3) Enter meeting number 746752585 if needed. No passcode is required. 4) Enter other required fields. 5) Indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy and click Proceed. For questions: contact Tracy Gill (Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov).
OneNOAA Science Seminar Date Added and Listserv Subscription information:
OneNOAA Science Seminars added Wednesday, January 20, 2010 7:12 AM. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can subscribe to the weekly email of OneNOAA Science Seminars by visiting https://list.woc.noaa.gov/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/onenoaascienceseminars and filling in your email address or by sending an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body (don't include the quotes). You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series please contact Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov. Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].
OneNOAA Science Seminars 2010 : Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Back to top


Decision-making For At-risk Communities In A Changing Climate

Date/Time/Location/Seminar Sponsor:
Tuesday, 26 January 2010; 10:00-11:00 Alaska Local Time [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]; (Seminar location: University of Alaska, Faibanks; OneNOAA Science Seminar sponsored by: ACCAP Alaska Climate Teleconferences)
Speaker(s):
Dan White (Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy)
Abstract:
Many communities in Alaska are faced with multiple threats to infrastructure and quality of life due, in part, to projected changes in precipitation, temperature, and related incidences of flooding and erosion. Decision-makers must determine how best to manage their community's vulnerability with the knowledge that future environmental change is uncertain. This webinar will discuss a newly released report "Decision-making for at-risk communities in a changing climate" prepared by the Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy. The report is intended to inform decision-makers relating to climate change and uncertainty, risk management, and relocation planning. Issues addressed regarding the planning process for relocation focus on the steps from planning through execution, perspectives on community engagement, partial relocation, site development costs, and timing. Sustainability recommendations focus on defining sustainability, future energy planning, planning for a changing cost of living, and available transportation corridors. Join this webinar to learn more about decision-making for at-risk communities in a changing climate.
Remote Access and Notes:
How to Participate / Log-In to the Alaska Climate Webinar: 1) Dial:1-800-893-8850; 2) When prompted, enter the PIN code: 7531823; PLEASE MUTE YOUR PHONE DURING THE PRESENTATION. The audio is very sensitive and your external conversations and typing can be heard by other participants and disrupt the presentation. Toview the presentation: 1) Point your web browser to: http://www.shareitnow.com; 2) Click on the blue ‘Join a Meeting’ ; button on the left side bar ; 3) For Presenter ID enter: accap@uaf.edu . If you do not see anything on your screen, click on the refresh button on the top bar. For Macintosh computer users: A copy of the presentation will also be available on the ACCAP website: www.uaf.edu/accap. See the right-hand column under "Highlights." For further information please contact Brook Gamble, Outreach and Education Specialist, (907) 474-7812, accap@uaf.edu.
Web link to download Presentation(s):

[Download presenation click http://www.uaf.edu/accap/documents/DecionMakingForCommunitiesAtRisk.pdf]
[Download podcast click http://www.uaf.edu/accap/files/Teleconference%20Recording/1_2010_Decision_Making_White.mp3]

OneNOAA Science Seminar Date Added and Listserv Subscription information:
OneNOAA Science Seminars added Wednesday, January 20, 2010 6:59 AM. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can subscribe to the weekly email of OneNOAA Science Seminars by visiting https://list.woc.noaa.gov/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/onenoaascienceseminars and filling in your email address or by sending an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body (don't include the quotes). You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series please contact Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov. Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].
OneNOAA Science Seminars 2010 (by month): Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Back to top


An Ecosystem Approach to Performance Management

Date/Time/Location/Seminar Sponsor:
Wednesday, 27 January 2010; 12:00 – 13:00 ETZ [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time] (Seminar location: SSMC-4 (1305 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD, 20910), Room 8150; OneNOAA Science Seminar sponsored by: NOS).
Speaker(s):
J. Britt Holbrook (University of North Texas)
Speaker e-mail(s):
jbrittholbrook@unt.edu
Abstract:
On October 7, 2009 the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) released a memo on “Increased Emphasis on Program Evaluations.” The message was familiar: the government wants to invest in what works, and that requires programs and agencies that can demonstrate results. How different programs and agencies go about demonstrating results will, of course, vary. I want to raise the possibility that NOAA might adapt some elements of its Ecosystem Approach to Management of coastal and marine resources to address OMB’s increased emphasis on evaluations. What would such an Ecosystem Approach to Performance Management look like and (how) might it work?
Remote Access and Notes:
Presentations are available remotely via a combination of phone & webcast. Please be aware that remote access is limited to 50 connections on a first-come-first served basis, so we cannot guarantee participation. To participate remotely you must: 1) Dial 866-816-8440, and then wait for instructions. When prompted enter passcode 3770077 followed by the # sign. Please use your phone’s mute button (or toggle *6) during the presentation until you are ready to ask questions. 2) Go to the webcast site at http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?i=746752585&p=&t=c 3) Enter meeting number 746752585 if needed. No passcode is required. 4) Enter other required fields. 5) Indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy and click Proceed. For questions: contact Tracy Gill (Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov).
About the speaker(s):
J. Britt Holbrook is Assistant Director of the Center for the Study of Interdisciplinarity and Research Assistant Professor within the Department of Philosophy and Religion Studies at the . Holbrook has interdisciplinary teaching experience as a member of the faculty of the 2007 Texas Governor's School and as co-instructor of a field course in socioecological conservation in the Cape Horn Biosphere Reserve in southernmost sub-Antarctic Chile. His current research focuses on interdisciplinarity, peer review, and the relationship between science, technology, and society. He is especially interested in the incorporation of societal impacts considerations into the peer review process of publicly supported science and technology funding agencies. Holbrook is guest editor of a December 2009 special issue of Social Epistemology devoted to NSF’s Broader Impacts Criterion.
OneNOAA Science Seminar Date Added and Listserv Subscription information:
OneNOAA Science Seminars added Monday, January 4, 2010 1:09 PM. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can subscribe to the weekly email of OneNOAA Science Seminars by visiting https://list.woc.noaa.gov/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/onenoaascienceseminars and filling in your email address or by sending an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body (don't include the quotes). You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series please contact Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov. Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].
OneNOAA Science Seminars 2010 (by month): Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Back to top


5 years After the Indian Ocean Tsunami: Where Are We now?

Date/Time/Location/Seminar Sponsor:
Thursday, 28 January 2010; 12:00-13:00 ETZ [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time] (Seminar location: SSMC-3 (1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD, 20910), 2nd Floor; OneNOAA Science Seminar sponsored by: NODC NOAA Central Library)
Speaker(s):
Dr. Dwayne Meadows (NMFS Office of Protected Resources)
Speaker(s) e-mail(s):
Dwayne.Meadows@noaa.gov
Abstract:
Dr. Meadows, A NOAA Fisheries biologist, survived the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami in Khao Lak, Thailand; the worst hit part of Thailand where 80% of the 10,000 deaths occurred. He used his NOAA advanced first-aid training to lead response efforts for group of 1000 survivors who were cut off from assistance. He later used his expertise in marine debris removal and coral restoration to help in the recovery efforts and became an advisor to the Hawaii Civil Defense Office and NOAAs National Tsunami Hazard Mitigation Program on preparedness and mitigation issues. Dr. Meadows will update the status of the recovery of human and ecological communities in the area. He will also provide a summary of international, national, and NOAA accomplishments and outstanding needs to develop improved tsunami preparedness programs. Preliminary lessons from the Samoan Tsunami of 2009 will be highlighted.
Remote Access:
Remote access via webinar: 1. Go to http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?sigKey=mymeetings&i=742656968&=brownbag&t=c; 2. Enter the required fields; 3. Indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy; 4. Click on Proceed. 5. passcode: brownbag. Audio: Dial 866-833-7307; participant passcode: 8986360. Please note: remote access is limited to first 50 participants. For further information about this seminar please contact Mary.Lou.Cumberpatch@noaa.gov (301-713-2600 Ext. 129) or Albert.E.Theberge.Jr@noaa.gov (301-713-2600 Ext. 115).
OneNOAA Science Seminar Date Added and Listserv Subscription information:
OneNOAA Science Seminars added Friday, November 27, 2009 8:53 AM. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can subscribe to the weekly email of OneNOAA Science Seminars by visiting https://list.woc.noaa.gov/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/onenoaascienceseminars and filling in your email address or by sending an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body (don't include the quotes). You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series please contact Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov. Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].
OneNOAA Science Seminars 2010 (by month): Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Back to top


Ecological Consequences of Patchiness in The Coastal Ocean

Date/Time/Location/Seminar Sponsor:
Thursday, 28 January 2010; 11:00 - 12:00 PST [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time] (Seminar location: Auditorium, Northwest Fisheries Science Center, Seatlle, WA; OneNOAA Science Seminar sponsored by: NWFSC)
Speaker(s):
Kelly J Benoit-Bird (College of Oceanic and Atmospheric Sciences; Oregon State University)
Speaker e-mail(s):
kbenoit@coas.oregonstate.edu
Abstract:
In the ocean, most resources are heterogeneously distributed and highly dynamic. This patchiness in time and space has significant consequences for population dynamics, trophic interactions, community organization and stability, and the cycling of elements. Recently discovered plankton thin layers (less than 3 m thick) are an extreme case of biological heterogeneity. Our work on thin plankton layers in a variety of habitats including Hawaii, Monterey Bay, and the Oregon coast have now provided the first evidence of trophic interactions in thin layers, shown that biological processes, rather than physical phenomena, can dictate the structure of thin layers, and provided evidence of ecosystem impacts disproportionate to their biomass. By quantifying the relationships between thin plankton layers and their predators, we were able to examine the relative importance of biomass and patchiness in the regulation of a pelagic marine food web. We found that the number and intensity of aggregations at each trophic level rather than the biomass in each step of the food chain involving phytoplankton, copepods, mesopelagic micronekton, and spinner dolphins (Stenella longirostris) were the most significant predictors of variation in adjacent trophic levels. Our results are in accordance with resource limitation - mediated by patchiness - regulating structure at all trophic steps in this ecosystem as well as the behavior of the top predator. The importance of spatial pattern in ecosystems has long been recognized and its effects on predator-prey pairs has been examined in a number of previous studies, however, patchiness as the dominant force regulating an entire system has not been previously demonstrated.
Remote Access and Notes:

For remote access, please contact Ruben Sanchez-Teran (Ruben.Sanchez-Teran@noaa.gov). All seminars are open to the public. The auditorium is located at 2725 Montlake Blvd. E., Seattle, WA 98112. For further information, please contact Blake Feist (206-860-3408; Blake.Feist@noaa.gov), Diane Tierney (diane.tierney@noaa.gov), Su Kim (su.kim@noaa.gov), [click NWFSC seminar series].

About the speaker(s):
Dr. Kelly Benoit-Bird, an Associate Professor in the College of Oceanic and Atmospheric Sciences at Oregon State University, is the author of more than 30 journal publications applying acoustics to study the ecology of pelagic ocean ecosystems. Her work examines a wide range of animals including zooplankton, fish, squid, and marine mammals, in all cases emphasizing the mechanisms creating spatial and temporal dynamics in pelagic marine ecosystems, the effects these dynamics have on interactions between organisms, and the mechanisms animals use to cope with these patterns. She has been involved in the development of several new optical and acoustical instruments and has made fundamental acoustical measurements of a variety of species in the process of addressing ecological processes in the ocean. Dr. Benoit-Bird’s work was recently recognized by the Acoustical Society of America with the 2009 R. Bruce Lindsay Award for “contributions to marine ecological acoustics” and the American Geophysical Union which awarded her the 2008 Ocean Sciences Early Career Award for “innovative application of acoustical techniques”. Kelly is also the recipient of a United States Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers, a Young Investigator Award from the U.S. Office of Naval Research, and a U.S. National Academy of Sciences Kavli Frontiers Fellowship.
OneNOAA Science Seminar Date Added and Listserv Subscription information:
OneNOAA Science Seminars added Thursday, January 21, 2010 7:05 AM. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can subscribe to the weekly email of OneNOAA Science Seminars by visiting https://list.woc.noaa.gov/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/onenoaascienceseminars and filling in your email address or by sending an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body (don't include the quotes). You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series please contact Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov. Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].
OneNOAA Science Seminars 2010 (by month): Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Back to top


Linking Asian Monsoon to Indian Ocean SST in Observations: Possible Roles of Indian Ocean Basin Mode and Dipole Mode

Date/Time/Location/Seminar Sponsor:
Friday, 29 January 2010; 10:00-11:00h ETZ [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time] (Seminar location: World Weather Building, Room 707, Camp Springs, MD; OneNOAA Science Seminar sponsored by: STAR).
Speaker(s):
Dr. Qinyu Liu (Professor of Physical Oceanography Laboratory, and Ocean-Atmosphere, Interaction and Climate Laboratory, Ocean University of China, Qingdao, China)
Abstract:
The authors investigate the relationship between Sea Surface Temperature (SST) in the tropical Indian Ocean (TIO) and the seasonal atmosphere circulation in the Asian Monsoon Region (AMR) using the Maximum Covariance Analyses (MCA). The results show that the Asian monsoon circulation is significantly correlated with two dominant SST anomaly (SSTA) modes: the Indian Ocean Basin Mode (IOB) and the Indian Ocean Dipole Mode (IOD). The peak SSTA of the IOB appears in spring and has a much stronger relationship with the Asian summer monsoon than the peak of the IOD does, while the peak SSTA for the IOD appears in fall and shows a stronger link to the Asian winter monsoon than to the Asian summer monsoon. In addition, the IOB in spring has relatively stronger link with the atmospheric circulation in summer than in other seasons. The large-scale atmospheric circulation and SSTA patterns of the covariability of the first two dominant MCA modes are described. For the first MCA mode, a warm IOB persists from spring to summer, and the atmospheric circulation is enhanced by the establishment of the climatological summer monsoon. The increased evaporative moisture associated with the warm IOB is transported to South Asia by climatological summer monsoon, which increases the moisture convergence towards this region, leading to a significant increase in the summer monsoon precipitation. For the second MCA mode, a positive IOD possibly corresponds to weaker Indian winter monsoon and more precipitation over the southwestern and eastern equatorial TIO.
Remote Access and Notes:

Phone access: US participants: 866-832-9297; International participants: 203-566-7610; Passcode: 6070416 (see http://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/seminars.php). For questions please contact Jerry Zhan, 301-763-8042 Ext 148 or Bob Yu, 301-763-8042 Ext 140.

Download Presentation:
[Click http://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/documents/seminardocs/Liu_Monsoon_20100129.pdf]
OneNOAA Science Seminar Date Added and Listserv Subscription information:
OneNOAA Science Seminars added Tuesday, January 26, 2010 12:34 PM / Last modified Monday, February 1, 2010 7:23 AM. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can subscribe to the weekly email of OneNOAA Science Seminars by visiting https://list.woc.noaa.gov/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/onenoaascienceseminars and filling in your email address or by sending an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body (don't include the quotes). You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series please contact Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov. Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].
OneNOAA Science Seminars 2010 (by month): Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Back to top


Small Business Innovation Research Program

Date/Time/Location/Seminar Sponsor:
Friday, 29 January 2010; 12:00-13:00h ETZ [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time] (Seminar location: World Weather Building, Room 707, Camp Springs, MD; OneNOAA Science Seminar sponsored by: NESDIS STAR).
Speaker(s):
Bruce H. Ramsay (Cooperative Research Programs (CoRP), Satellite Climate Studies Branch (SCSB), Center for Satellite Applications and Research (STAR), National Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Service)
Speaker E-mail:
bruce.h.ramsay@noaa.gov
Abstract:
The Small Business Innovation Research Program for FY 2010 is a NOAA Program for which a solicitation just opened on October 14, 2009 and closes on January 14, 2010. Program objectives include stimulating technological innovation in the private sector and strengthening the role of small business in meeting Federal research and development (R&D) needs. The SBIR Reauthorization Act of 2000 requires the DOC to establish a three-phase SBIR program by reserving a percentage of its extramural R&D budget to be awarded to small business concerns for innovation research. There are three SBIR phases: Phase I is the for Feasibility Research and the purpose is to determine the technical feasibility of the proposed research and the quality of performance of the small business concern receiving an award. Phase II is for Research and Development prototype development in which only firms that are awarded Phase I contracts under this solicitation will be given the opportunity to submit a Phase II proposal. Phase III is intended for commercialization and it's intended that non-SBIR capital be used by the small business to pursue commercial applications of Phase II. Consultative arrangements between firms and universities or other non-profit organizations are encouraged, with the small business serving as the prime contractor. CoRP/SCSB serves as the focal point for the NESDIS SBIR program. It is the purpose of this presentation to inform NESDIS scientists and managers about the SBIR program, how it can help move forward new and innovative ideas within the organization, and then discuss strategies to solicit more subtopics for the 2011 solicitation notice which is due in the spring of 2010.
Remote Access and Notes:

Phone access: US participants: 866-832-9297; International participants: 203-566-7610; Passcode: 6070416 (see http://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/seminars.php). For questions please contact Bruce Ramsay (bruce.h.ramsay@noaa.gov, phone 301-405-9205).

Web link to download Presentation(s):
[Click http://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/documents/seminardocs/RamsaySBIR20100129.pdf]
OneNOAA Science Seminar Date Added and Listserv Subscription information:
OneNOAA Science Seminars added Wednesday, December 23, 2009 1:17 PM /Last edited Friday, January 22, 2010 12:16 PM. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can subscribe to the weekly email of OneNOAA Science Seminars by visiting https://list.woc.noaa.gov/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/onenoaascienceseminars and filling in your email address or by sending an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body (don't include the quotes). You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series please contact Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov. Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].
OneNOAA Science Seminars 2010 (by month): Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Back to top



 


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February 2010

Mon
Tue
Wed
Thu
Fri
01 02 03 04 05
08 09 10 11 12
15 16 17 18 19
22 23 24 25 26

Scheduled seminars highlighted in blue
OneNOAA Science Seminars: Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
(Total number of OneNOAA Science seminars in February 2010: 16)

 


Leadership Attitudes and Public Attitudes on Climate Change

Date/Time/Location/Seminar Sponsor:
Wednesday 03 February 2010; 11:00-11:45 ETZ [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time] (Seminar location: SSMC-3 (1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD, 20910), 2nd Floor; OneNOAA Science Seminar sponsored by: NODC NOAA Central Library)
Speaker(s):
Dr. Jon D. Miller (John Hannah Professor of Integrative Studies at Michigan State University)
Abstract:
Professor Miller will discuss his analyses of leadership attitudes and public attitudes toward climate change and the challenges of effectively communicating scientific concepts and data to these audiences. For more than two decades, Professor Miller has conducted national surveys of science policy leaders and American adults on a wide array of scientific and technological subjects, and he has collected measures of both scientific literacy and substantive policy attitudes over this period. He continues to collect new information from both of these populations. In this presentation, Professor Miller will suggest that on issues that are scientific and technical in character, the process of policy formation involves a dynamic interaction between policy leaders and citizens who are attentive to the issues involved. It is important for policy and communications planners to understand the structure of the public policy process in regard to issues that are partially or substantially scientific, and he will outline a framework for thinking about this process. The presentation will involve a short PowerPoint presentation followed by a period for discussion and dialogue.
Remote Access and Notes:
Remote access via webinar: 1. Go to http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?sigKey=mymeetings&i=742656968&=brownbag&t=c; 2. Enter the required fields; 3. Indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy; 4. Click on Proceed. 5. passcode: brownbag. Audio: Dial 866-833-7307; participant passcode: 8986360. Please note: remote access is limited to first 50 participants. For further information about this seminar please contact Mary.Lou.Cumberpatch@noaa.gov (301-713-2600 Ext. 129) or Albert.E.Theberge.Jr@noaa.gov (301-713-2600 Ext. 115).
About the speaker(s):
Jon D. Miller is the John Hannah Professor of Integrative Studies at Michigan State University. Miller has measured the public understanding of science and technology in the United States for the last three decades, and has examined the factors associated with the development of attitudes toward science. He directed biennial national surveys for the National Science Board for 20 years, the results of which were reported in /Science and Engineering Indicators/. He has pioneered the definition and measurement of scientific literacy and his approach to the public understanding of science has been replicated in more than 40 countries. Miller continues to conduct important studies of the public perception of science in the United States and other nations. He founded and directs the Longitudinal Study of American Youth (LSAY), which began tracking approximately 5,000 public school students in grades 7 and 10 in 1987, and continues to collect data once each year. This is the longest and most intensive longitudinal study of student interest in science and mathematics and the development of STEM career interests ever conducted in the United States. Miller has published four books — /Citizenship in an Age of Science/ (Pergamon Press, 1980), /The American People and Science Policy/ (Pergamon Press, 1983); /Public Perceptions of Science and Technology: A comparative study of the European Union, the United States, Japan, and Canada /(Foundation BBV, Madrid, 1997); and /Biomedical Communications: Purposes, audiences, and strategies/ (Academic Press, 2001) — and more than 50 journal articles and book chapters.
OneNOAA Science Seminar Date Added and Listserv Subscription information:
OneNOAA Science Seminars added Monday, February 1, 2010 7:06 AM. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can subscribe to the weekly email of OneNOAA Science Seminars by visiting https://list.woc.noaa.gov/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/onenoaascienceseminars and filling in your email address or by sending an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body (don't include the quotes). You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series please contact Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov. Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].


How U.S. Technology is Revolutionizing the Design of Recirculating Aquaculture Systems (RAS)

Date/Time/Location/Seminar Sponsor:
Wednesday 03 February 2010; 12:00-13:00 ETZ [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time] (Seminar location: SSMC-3 (1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD, 20910), 2nd Floor; OneNOAA Science Seminar sponsored by: NOAA Aquaculture Program in cooperation with the NODC NOAA Central Library)
Speaker(s):
Dr. Ronald F. Malone (Chevron USA Professor, Louisiana State University)
Abstract:
This presentation will describe technical advances leading to a new design for Recirculating Aquaculture System (RAS) being used in commercial aquaculture facilities in the United States. In addition to efficient water treatment, this new technology supports critical design objectives for large-scale recirculating systems including low water loss, solid waste reduction or reuse, energy conservation, and long term economic sustainability. The most energy efficient RAS designs now operate without mechanical pumps. Instead, these new systems use air blowers and airlifts to create the hydraulic head needed to move recirculating water through floating bead biofilters. An ongoing investigative program with funding from NOAA Sea Grant and the U.S. Dept. of Agriculture has demonstrated the application of this water-conserving RAS filtration approach in marine finfish applications. Development of high volume, modularized closed marine RAS fingerling production facilities are viewed as critical to the development of a commercially viable finfish growout production industry based on netpens, ponds, or RAS technologies.
Remote Access and Notes:
Remote access via webinar: 1. Go to http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?sigKey=mymeetings&i=742656968&=brownbag&t=c; 2. Enter the required fields; 3. Indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy; 4. Click on Proceed. 5. passcode: brownbag. Audio: Dial 866-833-7307; participant passcode: 8986360. Please note: remote access is limited to first 50 participants. For further information about this seminar please contact Mary.Lou.Cumberpatch@noaa.gov (301-713-2600 Ext. 129) or Albert.E.Theberge.Jr@noaa.gov (301-713-2600 Ext. 115). If you have questions about the speaker please contact Kate.Naughten@noaa.gov.
About the speaker(s):
Dr. Malone is a Distinguished Professor in Civil and Environmental Engineering at Louisiana State University (LSU) and the inventor of several proprietary floating bead filter devices that have been widely adopted by aquaculture companies in North America and Europe. The technology is commercially available through companies that specialize in the design of Recirculating Aquaculture Systems (RAS) for diverse aquacultural applications, including biomedical research, zoos, research laboratories, ornamental fish production, fingerling production, and large scale food fish production. Dr. Malone recently received a Lifetime Achievement award from the American Aquaculture Society in recognition of the impact that these technologies have had on aquacultural research and commercial practice. A graduate of Utah State University (Ph.D. 1979) in Civil and Environmental Engineering, Dr. Malone has served on the faculty at LSU for over 30 years. He is also a long- time board member and former President of the Aquacultural Engineering Society.
OneNOAA Science Seminar Date Added and Listserv Subscription information:
OneNOAA Science Seminars added January 28, 2010. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can subscribe to the weekly email of OneNOAA Science Seminars by visiting https://list.woc.noaa.gov/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/onenoaascienceseminars and filling in your email address or by sending an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body (don't include the quotes). You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series please contact Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov. Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

Research Vessel Calibration: The Past, Present and Future of 636 Paired Tows

Date/Time/Location/Seminar Sponsor:
Thursday, 04 February 2010; 11:00 - 12:00 PST [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time] (Seminar location: Auditorium, Northwest Fisheries Science Center, Seatlle, WA; OneNOAA Science Seminar sponsored by: NWFSC)
Speaker(s):
Wendy L Gabriel (Fisheries and Ecosystems Monitoring and Analysis Division; Northeast Fisheries Science Center)
Speaker e-mail(s):
Wendy.Gabriel@noaa.gov
Abstract:
TBD
Remote Access and Notes:

For remote access, please contact Ruben Sanchez-Teran (Ruben.Sanchez-Teran@noaa.gov). All seminars are open to the public. The auditorium is located at 2725 Montlake Blvd. E., Seattle, WA 98112. For further information, please contact Blake Feist (206-860-3408; Blake.Feist@noaa.gov), Diane Tierney (diane.tierney@noaa.gov), Su Kim (su.kim@noaa.gov) [click NWFSC seminar series].

OneNOAA Science Seminar Date Added and Listserv Subscription information:
OneNOAA Science Seminars added Thursday, January 21, 2010 7:26 AM. You can subscribe to the weekly OneNOAA Science Seminars moderated email list by visiting https://list.woc.noaa.gov/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/onenoaascienceseminars and filling in your email address or by sending an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body (don't include the quotes). You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series please contact Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov. Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].


Reducing the Threat of Ship Strikes to North Atlantic Right Whales

Date/Time/Location/Seminar Sponsor:
Thursday, 04 February 2010; 12:00-13:00 ETZ [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time] (Seminar location: SSMC-3 (1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD, 20910), 2nd Floor; OneNOAA Science Seminar sponsored by: NODC NOAA Central Library)
Speaker(s):
Dr. Shannon Bettridge and Dr. Greg Silber (NMFS/OPR/MMCD)
Speaker E-mail:
shannon.bettridge@noaa.gov & greg.silber@noaa.gov
Abstract:
Perhaps long underestimated as a factor in large whale recovery, collisions with large vessels are now regarded as a significant threat to several endangered large whale populations. Vessel collisions, or “ship strikes”, is one of the main causes of death for the highly depleted the North Atlantic right whale. Their vulnerability to ship strikes is compounded by exposure to human activities near population centers in waters along the U.S. and Canadian east coasts, slow swimming speeds, and a natural positive buoyancy. In a population consisting of only 300-400 individuals, an average of about two right whales are struck and killed by vessels annually. Drs. Shannon Bettridge and Gregory Silber will discuss NOAA’s management actions and some research advances in the course of the last decade aimed at reducing the threat of ship strikes to right whales and other large whales. The talk will include two presentations made at a recent international conference.
Remote Access:
Remote access via webinar: 1. Go to http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?sigKey=mymeetings&i=742656968&=brownbag&t=c; 2. Enter the required fields; 3. Indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy; 4. Click on Proceed. 5. passcode: brownbag. Audio: Dial 866-833-7307; participant passcode: 8986360. Please note: remote access is limited to first 50 participants. For further information about this seminar please contact Mary.Lou.Cumberpatch@noaa.gov (301-713-2600 Ext. 129) or Albert.E.Theberge.Jr@noaa.gov (301-713-2600 Ext. 115).
OneNOAA Science Seminar Date Added and Listserv Subscription information:
OneNOAA Science Seminars added Wednesday, January 27, 2010 8:40 AM / Last edited Monday, February 1, 2010 7:02 AM. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can subscribe to the weekly email of OneNOAA Science Seminars by visiting https://list.woc.noaa.gov/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/onenoaascienceseminars and filling in your email address or by sending an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body (don't include the quotes). You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series please contact Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov. Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

Current ECMWF Research and Development

Date/Time/Location/Seminar Sponsor:
Friday, 05 February 2010; 13:00-14:00 ETZ [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time] (Seminar location: World Weather Building, Room 707, 5200 Auth Road, Camp Springs, MD 20746; OneNOAA Science Seminar sponsored by: JCSDA)
Speaker(s):
Prof. Erland Källén (Head of Research, European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts)
Speaker e-mail(s):
erland.kallen@ecmwf.int
Abstract:
The ECMWF forecasting system continues to be world leading in terms of forecast performance in the medium range. Both the deterministic and probabilistic forecast products are continuously improved; in early 2010 a new model version with an increased spatial resolution is being introduced, which will help to maintain the positive performance trends. Research is focused on new data assimilation techniques, improved description of physical processes and development of enhanced ensemble prediction methods. Monthly and seasonal forecasts are also produced; the current El Nino event was predicted more than a year ago. Re-analyses are regularly produced and updated. In recent years the re-analysis shows global temperature trends over land areas that are significantly warmer than results from other data sets suggest.
Remote Access and Notes:
Online video access:1. Click on JCSDA_Seminar, 2. Enter your name and e-mail address, 3. Enter the meeting password: JCSDAseminar2009, 4. Click "Join Now", 5. Follow the instructions that appear on your screen. Audio / conference call: USA participants: 1-866-715-2479, Passcode: 9457557, International: 1-517-345-5260 (see http://www.jcsda.noaa.gov/JCSDASeminars.php). For questions please contact George Ohring (George.Ohring@noaa.gov).
Web link to download Presentation(s):

[Click http://www.jcsda.noaa.gov/documents/seminardocs/Kallen_20100205.pdf]

OneNOAA Science Seminar Date Added and Listserv Subscription information:
OneNOAA Science Seminars added Monday, January 25, 2010 12:09 PM / Last edited Monday, February 1, 2010 7:22 AM. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can subscribe to the weekly email of OneNOAA Science Seminars by visiting https://list.woc.noaa.gov/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/onenoaascienceseminars and filling in your email address or by sending an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body (don't include the quotes). You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series please contact Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov. Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].


The Critically Endangered Hawaiian Monk Seal: A Mysterious Past and An Uncertain Future [Seminar cancelled due to snow]

Date/Time/Location/Seminar Sponsor:
Tuesday, 09 February 2010; 12:00-13:00 ETZ [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time] (Seminar location: SSMC-3 (1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD, 20910), 2nd Floor; OneNOAA Science Seminar sponsored by: NMFS Office of Habitat Conservation)
Speaker(s):
Dr. Jennifer Schultz (Hawai'i Institute of Marine Biology, University of Hawai'i, Manoa)
Speaker(s) e-mail(s):
jschultz@hawaii.edu
Abstract:
Genetic studies indicate that the Hawaiian monk seal diverged from its Mediterranean cousin 10-13 million years ago. At some point, it colonized the Hawaiian archipelago, but beyond that, very little is known about its early history or the first human-seal interactions. There is no mention of the species in the Kumulipo, the ancient Hawaiian chant of creation. The first description of the Seal was in 1807, when Lisianski explored the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands. By the end of that century, the Hawaiian monk seal had been hunted to near extinction. The extremely low genetic diversity of the species offers some clues to its past and raises concern about its future. Dr. Jennifer Schultz will speak about previous research on the genetic diversity and stock structure of the Hawaiian monk seal and describe current efforts to understand the seal’s mating system, diet, and its susceptibility to infectious diseases.
Remote Access:
Remote access via webinar: 1. Go to http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?sigKey=mymeetings&i=742656968&=brownbag&t=c; 2. Enter the required fields; 3. Indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy; 4. Click on Proceed. 5. passcode: brownbag. Audio: Dial 866-833-7307; participant passcode: 8986360. Please note: remote access is limited to first 50 participants. For further information about this seminar please contact Mary.Lou.Cumberpatch@noaa.gov (301-713-2600 Ext. 129) or Albert.E.Theberge.Jr@noaa.gov (301-713-2600 Ext. 115).
OneNOAA Science Seminar Date Added and Listserv Subscription information:
OneNOAA Science Seminars added Wednesday, February 3, 2010 9:18 AM. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can subscribe to the weekly email of OneNOAA Science Seminars by visiting https://list.woc.noaa.gov/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/onenoaascienceseminars and filling in your email address or by sending an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body (don't include the quotes). You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series please contact Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov. Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].


Characterization of Water Reflectance Spectra Variability: Implications for Hyperspectral Remote Sensing in Estuary Waters [Seminar cancelled due to snow]

Date/Time/Location/Seminar Sponsor:
Thursday, 11 February 2010; 12:00-13:00 ETZ [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time] (Seminar location: SSMC-3 (1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD, 20910), 2nd Floor NOAA Central Library; OneNOAA Science Seminar sponsored by: NOS NCCOS)
Speaker(s):
Dr. Chunglei Fan (Morgan State University)
Speaker(s) e-mail(s):
chunlei.fan@morgan.edu
Abstract:
A series of airborne hyperspectral remote sensing campaigns were conducted from 2002 to 2005 at five U.S. estuaries: Apalachicola Bay, FL; ACE basin, SC; Grand Bay, MS; Delaware Bay, DE; and Chesapeake Bay, MD. 151 field stations were occupied within the flight tracts where the following were obtained: (1) water reflectance R(λ) spectra were acquired by a pair of ocean optic 2000 spectroradiometers, simultaneously, the concentration of (2) chlorophyll a and (3) total suspended solid, and the (4) absorption of colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM) were measured at these stations. A principal component analysis was conducted to characterize the general variability of these water reflectance R(λ) spectra, and explore the factors that drive the variability of water reflectance in optically complex coastal environments. The results suggested that water reflectance spectra in turbid estuarine waters are the results of complex interactions of phytoplankton pigments, total suspended solids, and CDOM. The first principal component, which represents 72% of total variance of R(?), is strongly affected by scattering of total suspended solids and the absorption of CDOM at the green region of spectra; while the second principal component represents 20% of total variation of R(λ) spectra is mainly driven by phytoplankton biomass e.g. Chl a concentrations in red and near infrared spectral regions. Furthermore, the results of this study could provide a framework for using hyperspectral remote sensing as a cost effective method to characterize water quality in optically complex coastal waters.
Remote Access:
Remote access via webinar: Please fill out the registration form a few minutes before the meeting is scheduled to begin. The Meeting Number is 742656968; the Passcode is brownbag. For audio, dial 866-833-7307. The participant passcode is 8986360. For further information about this seminar please contact Mary.Lou.Cumberpatch@noaa.gov (301-713-2600 Ext. 129) or Albert.E.Theberge.Jr@noaa.gov (301-713-2600 Ext. 115).
OneNOAA Science Seminar Date Added and Listserv Subscription information:
OneNOAA Science Seminars added Friday, November 27, 2009 9:00 AM / Last edited Wednesday, January 20, 2010 7:07 AM. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can subscribe to the weekly email of OneNOAA Science Seminars by visiting https://list.woc.noaa.gov/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/onenoaascienceseminars and filling in your email address or by sending an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body (don't include the quotes). You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series please contact Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov. Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].


Sea Turtle Bycatch in NW Atlantic Waters: The Truth Behind the Magic Number

Date/Time/Location/Seminar Sponsor:
Thursday, 11 February 2010; 11:00 - 12:00 PST [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time] (Seminar location: Auditorium, Northwest Fisheries Science Center, Seatlle, WA; OneNOAA Science Seminar sponsored by: NWFSC)
Speaker(s):
Kimberly T Murray (Resource Evaluation and Assessment Division, Protected Species Branch; Northeast Fisheries Science Center)
Speaker e-mail(s):
kimberly.murray@noaa.gov
Abstract:
In this presentation I review an approach to estimating bycatch of threatened and endangered sea turtles in Northwest Atlantic waters and describe how bycatch estimates are used in fisheries management. Computing robust bycatch estimates can be difficult due to the rare nature of sea turtle bycatch events and low sampling levels. Datasets typically have excess zeros in the data, and there is low power to detect significant effects when analyzing bycatch rates. Using a case study of loggerhead (Caretta caretta) sea turtle bycatch in the U.S. Mid-Atlantic sink gillnet fishery (Murray 2009), this presentation reviews some of these analytical concerns and approaches to dealing with uncertainty. In this study I developed a Generalized Additive Model to describe bycatch rates of loggerheads, and then applied this model to commercial fishing effort to identify times and areas where conservation efforts should be focused. Finally, I describe how bycatch estimates are typically used in Endangered Species Act (ESA) Section 7 consultations and efforts by colleagues at the NEFSC to put sea turtle bycatch into a broader population context.
Remote Access and Notes:

For remote access, please contact Ruben Sanchez-Teran (Ruben.Sanchez-Teran@noaa.gov). All seminars are open to the public. The auditorium is located at 2725 Montlake Blvd. E., Seattle, WA 98112. For further information, please contact Blake Feist (206-860-3408; Blake.Feist@noaa.gov), Diane Tierney (diane.tierney@noaa.gov), Su Kim (su.kim@noaa.gov), [click NWFSC seminar series].

About the speaker(s):
Kimberly received her B.A. from the University of California, Santa Cruz in Biology and Environmental Studies, and a Masters degree in Environmental Management from Duke University. Having worked at a environmental consulting firm, the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute, and NOAA Fisheries, her work has always centered around scientific writing and wildlife conservation. She has been working in the Protected Species Branch at the Northeast Fisheries Science Center since 2002, where she researches sea turtle bycatch and ecology.
OneNOAA Science Seminar Date Added and Listserv Subscription information:
OneNOAA Science Seminars added Thursday, January 21, 2010 7:05 AM. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can subscribe to the weekly email of OneNOAA Science Seminars by visiting https://list.woc.noaa.gov/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/onenoaascienceseminars and filling in your email address or by sending an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body (don't include the quotes). You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series please contact Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov. Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].


The Global Observing Systems Information Center (GOSIC): A Data Portal for Access to Global Climate Observational Data and Information [Seminar postponed, new seminar date is Monday 15 March 2010 ]

Date/Time/Location/Seminar Sponsor:
Tuesday, 16 February 2010; 11:00-12:00 ETZ [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time] (Seminar location: SSMC-3 (1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD, 20910), 4th Floor, Room 4817; OneNOAA Science Seminar sponsored by: NODC)
Speaker(s):
Howard J. Diamond (U.S. Global Climate Observing System Program Manager, Director World Data Center for Meteorology, Asheville, NOAA/National Climatic Data Center)
Speaker e-mail(s):
Howard.Diamond@noaa.gov
Abstract:
The Global Observing Systems Information Center (GOSIC), initiated in 1997 at the request of the Global Climate Observing System (GCOS) Steering Committee (see http://www.wmo.int/pages/prog/gcos/Publications/gcos-39.pdf), responds to a need identified by the global climate observing community for easier and more effective access to observational climate data and information. GOSIC manages an online portal providing an entry point for users of climate-related global observing systems data and information systems. Following its initial development and implementation at the University of Delaware from 1997 to 2006, the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's National Climatic Data Center (NCDC) assumed operational responsibility for GOSIC on behalf of the international climate observing and data user communities. The goal of GOSIC is to provide basic user services, including a description of the systems and their data as well as a tailored search capability that facilitates access to a worldwide set of observations and derived products. GOSIC's unique value is its ability to quickly link users, via a consistent and user-friendly interface, to a wide range of data sets that reside at multiple data centers; the GOSIC portal (http://GOSIC.org) provides users with links to data, metadata, other search tools, and related climate-observing information.
Remote Access:
For Webcast access: 1) go to http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?i=741283869&p=nodc1315&t=c; 2) type in other required fields (i.e., your name, e-mail, organization; meeting number is 741283869; password is "nodc1315" -password is case sensitive- ); 3) indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy; 4) click on Proceed. For phone access: toll free dial 877-916-2513 using a touch-tone phone; when prompted enter participant code 5877174 followed by a "#" (Please mute your phone during the presentation or toggle *6 otherwise it produces a sound feedback). Please note that webcast & phone access is limited to 50 connections on a first-come-first served basis. Webcast & phone access will start approximately 5 min before the seminar. For general questions about this seminar, please contact Hernan Garcia.
About the speaker:
Howard Diamond is a physical scientist with NOAA's National Climatic Data Center (NCDC) and is based in Silver Spring. He has worked for NOAA in a number of different capacities for the past 28 years, and since 1999 has served as the U.S. Global Climate Observing System (GCOS) Program Manager. In addition to that, he is the director of the World Data Center for Meteorology based at NCDC, serves as NCDC's International Liaison Officer, and works on a number of bilateral and regional climate observing and data management projects in the Pacific Islands region with partners from across the region including Australia and New Zealand. Howard has a B.S. in Biological Sciences from Florida State University, an M.S. in Technology Management from the University of Maryland, and is currently pursuing a Ph.D. in Geography at the University of Auckland in New Zealand where he is doing a climatological study of tropical cyclones in the Southwest Pacific; and is a member of both AMS and AGU. His interest in tropical cyclones has also led to him being a member of NCDC's International Best Tracks Archive for Climate Stewardship (IBTrACS) team as well as the World Meteorological Organization's Southern Hemisphere THORPEX Committee.
Web link to download Presentation:
[Click OneNOAAScience_16Feb2010_Diamon_GOSIC.pdf]
OneNOAA Science Seminar Date Added and Listserv Subscription information:
OneNOAA Science Seminars added Wednesday, December 16, 2009 3:17 PM/ Last edited Tuesday, February 16, 2010 7:55 AM. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can subscribe to the weekly email of OneNOAA Science Seminars by visiting https://list.woc.noaa.gov/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/onenoaascienceseminars and filling in your email address or by sending an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body (don't include the quotes). You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series please contact Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov. Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].


An Assessment of Living Marine Resources and Chemical Contamination of Vieques, Puerto Rico

Date/Time/Location/Seminar Sponsor:
Wednesday, 17 Feb 2010; 12:00 – 13:00 ETZ [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time] (Seminar location: SSMC-4, Room #8150; OneNOAA Science Seminar sponsored by: NOAA NOS)
Speaker(s):
Dave Whitall and Laurie Bauer (NOS/NCCOS/Center for Coastal Monitoring and Assessment)
Speaker e-mail(s):
Dave.Whitall@noaa.gov, Laurie.Bauer@noaa.gov
Abstract:
From 1941 to 2003, the U.S. Navy utilized a significant portion of the island of Vieques (Puerto Rico) for military exercises, including significant use as a bombing range. There has been significant concern among the local population about environmental contamination related to military activities on the island. This study presents an island wide quantification of living resources and contamination in the marine environment. It also serves as a baseline which can be used to help assess the impacts of future development on the marine environment of Vieques. In 2007, sediments were collected for contaminant analysis, from both offshore and inland lagoon locations, for approximately 150 analytes including: trace elements (e.g. heavy metals), PCBs, PAHs, selected pesticides (including DDT, chlordane and dieldrin), as well as energetic compounds associated with military activities. A total of 75 sites were analyzed for sediment contamination. Analyte concentrations at these sites can be compared to the nationwide NOAA National Status and Trends (NS&T) Program database, to determine the relative level of environmental contamination at these sites. In order to quantify the linkage between pollution and coral health, coral tissue samples (Porites astreoides) were also analyzed for contaminants from 35 sites. Overall, chemical contamination was fairly low, with the exceptions being elevated DDT (4 sites) and chromium (1 site), which exceeded published sediment quality guidelines, and while contaminants were detected in coral tissues, they were significantly lower than in sediments. Finally, the spatiotemporal variability of surface water nutrients were quantified; 40 sites (both offshore and in lagoons) were sampled a total of 8 times between May 2007 and March 2008. Nutrient concentrations were similar to what has been measured elsewhere in Puerto Rico, and were not well correlated with land use or precipitation. Field surveys were conducted at 75 sites to characterize benthic and fish communities on hardbottom around Vieques. Sites were stratified by former land use zones and the north/south coasts of Vieques. Hard coral cover was generally low, with a mean of 3.4 (±0.5)%. Several fish metrics varied on a north-south and/or east-west gradient, but there was often a high degree of variability within strata. Overall, differences in fish and benthic communities among strata could not be conclusively linked to former land-use patterns. In addition, updated and improved benthic habitat maps were created for Vieques. Relative to the latest comprehensive maps available, a smaller minimum mapping unit, more recent satellite and aerial imagery, and more detailed classification scheme were used. A total of 350 km2 of seafloor features around Vieques were classified by geographic zone, habitat structure, dominant cover, and live coral cover. The observed coral reef ecosystems were similar to what is seen elsewhere in Puerto Rico, and no spatial patterns related to current or historical land use were observed.
Remote Access and Notes:
Presentations are available remotely via a combination of phone & webcast. Please be aware that remote access is limited to 50 connections on a first-come-first served basis, so we cannot guarantee participation. To participate remotely you must: 1) Dial 866-816-8440, and then wait for instructions. When prompted enter passcode 3770077 followed by the # sign. Please use your phone’s mute button (or toggle *6) during the presentation until you are ready to ask questions. 2) Go to the webcast site at http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?i=746752585&p=&t=c 3) Enter meeting number 746752585 if needed. No passcode is required. 4) Enter other required fields. 5) Indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy and click Proceed. For questions: contact Tracy Gill (Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov).
OneNOAA Science Seminar Date Added and Listserv Subscription information:
OneNOAA Science Seminars added Tuesday, February 16, 2010 6:55 AM. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can subscribe to the weekly email of OneNOAA Science Seminars by visiting https://list.woc.noaa.gov/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/onenoaascienceseminars and filling in your email address or by sending an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body (don't include the quotes). You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series please contact Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov. Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].


Recent Advances in Radiative Transfer Modeling and Microwave Land Surface Property Characterization

Date/Time/Location/Seminar Sponsor:
Wednesday, 17 February 2010; 14:00-15:00h [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time] (Seminar location: World Weather Building, Room 707, 5200 Auth Road, Camp Springs, MD 20746; OneNOAA Science Seminar sponsored by: JCSDA)
Speaker(s):
Jean-Luc Moncet (Atmospheric and Environmental Research)
Abstract:
Accurate modeling of atmospheric absorption and constraints on surface properties are needed to improve atmospheric retrievals and impact of assimilated satellite data on the weather forecasts. AER has developed line-by-line models (LBLRTM and MonoRTM) that have been used in many centers (including the JCSDA) as reference in the development of fast transmittance parameterizations as well as the Optimal Spectral Sampling (OSS) method for fast and numerically accurate parameterization of molecular absorption in the atmosphere. The line-by-line models are continuously validated and updated at AER. Recent updates have been made to the water vapor continuum in the microwave region and line mixing in the 4.3 micron CO2 band, and improvements have been made in the modeling of the 2400 cm-1 band head. The OSS model has been selected by EUMETSAT for the Meteosat Third Generation (MTG)- Infrared Sounding (IRS) Level 2 concept processor development and is among the candidate Fast Radiative Transfer Model’s for integration in the future MTG operational ground segment. The focus of current and future OSS development is on refining our generalized training capability. A status of the models will be discussed. A description of the work in progress on the use of our dynamically updated global atlas of microwave surface emissivities (sample hosted at the JCSDA) in the production of land surface temperatures under cloudy conditions will be provided.
About The Speaker:
[Click Jean-Luc Moncet]
Remote Access and Notes:
Video: 1. Click on JCSDA Seminar; 2. Enter your name and email address; 3. Enter the meeting password: JCSDAseminar2010; 4. Click "Join Now"; 5. Follow the instructions that appear on your screen. Audio: USA participants: 1-866-715-2479, Passcode: 9457557, International: 1-517-345-5260 (see http://www.jcsda.noaa.gov/JCSDASeminars.php). For questions please contact George Ohring (George.Ohring@noaa.gov).
Web link to download Presentation(s):
[Click http://www.jcsda.noaa.gov/documents/seminardocs/Moncet_RTModeling_20100217.pdf]
OneNOAA Science Seminar Date Added and Listserv Subscription information:
OneNOAA Science Seminars added Tuesday, December 22, 2009 7:59 AM/ Last edited Wednesday, February 17, 2010 6:18 AM. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can subscribe to the weekly email of OneNOAA Science Seminars by visiting https://list.woc.noaa.gov/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/onenoaascienceseminars and filling in your email address or by sending an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body (don't include the quotes). You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series please contact Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov. Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].


Reducing Seabird Bycatch in Alaska Longline Fisheries, from GLMs and GAMs to Management and Policy

Date/Time/Location/Seminar Sponsor:
Thursday, 18 February 2010; 11:00 - 12:00 PST [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time] (Seminar location: Auditorium, Northwest Fisheries Science Center, Seatlle, WA; OneNOAA Science Seminar sponsored by: NWFSC)
Speaker(s):
Loveday L Conquest (School of Aquatic & Fishery Sciences; Quantitative Ecology & Resource Management Graduate Program; University of Washington)
Speaker e-mail(s):
conquest@u.washington.edu
Abstract:
""Bycatch" denotes the accidental mortality of seabirds from commercial fishing activities. Thus, Alaskan commercial fisheries are concerned with incidental mortality of endangered seabirds. A study comparing bycatch reduction technologies was carried out in Alaska's Bering Sea. The three technologies were: integrated weight longlines (IW), IW with paired streamer lines (IWPS), and unweighted longlines with paired streamer lines (UWPS). Generalized additive models (GAMs) were used to evaluate treatment effects and other factors influencing catch rates. Seabird bycatch rates were reduced by all mitigation methods; the relative effectiveness varied by foraging guild. A management practice that adds weighted lines to the paired streamer lines already in use can help seabird conservation in longline fisheries, while not appreciably reducing fish catch."
Remote Access and Notes:

For remote access, please contact Ruben Sanchez-Teran (nwfsc.helpdesk@noaa.gov). All seminars are open to the public. The auditorium is located at 2725 Montlake Blvd. E., Seattle, WA 98112. For further information, please contact Blake Feist (206-860-3408; Blake.Feist@noaa.gov [click NWFSC monster seminar jam series]).

About the speaker(s):
Professor Loveday L Conquest , School of Aquatic & Fishery Sciences, is Director of the interdisciplinary program in Quantitative Ecology & Resource Management (QERM) at the University of Washington in Seattle, and holds an adjunct appointment in the College of Forest Resources. Her research interests include development and application of statistical methods for data analysis and sampling/field design to address problems in ecological and environmental monitoring. Recent research has included work on crab mortality, quantifying effects of stream restoration efforts, cost models for statistical designs for stream habitat assessment, and effects of fishing mitigation technologies on endangered Alaskan seabirds. Her teaching includes courses in statistical methods for biologists and a course on generalized linear and additive models (GLMs and GAMs) for quantitative ecologists. She serves on the U.S. EPA's Ecological Processes and Effects Committee and on the Report on the Environment Committee. She also supervises Graduate Teaching Fellows, who are paired with marine science teachers in Seattle high schools as part of the Ocean & Coastal Interdisciplinary Sciences (OACIS) grant from the National Science Foundation (see http://fish.washington.edu/people/conquest).
OneNOAA Science Seminar Date Added and Listserv Subscription information:
OneNOAA Science Seminars added Thursday, January 21, 2010 7:05 AM. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can subscribe to the weekly email of OneNOAA Science Seminars by visiting https://list.woc.noaa.gov/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/onenoaascienceseminars and filling in your email address or by sending an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body (don't include the quotes). You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series please contact Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov. Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].


Hydropower Planning In Alaska: Does Climate Change Matter?

Date/Time/Location/Seminar Sponsor:
Tuesday, 23 February 2010; 10:00-11:00 Alaska Local Time [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time] (Seminar location: University of Alaska, Faibanks; OneNOAA Science Seminar sponsored by: ACCAP Alaska Climate Teleconferences, )
Speaker(s):
Jessie Ellen Cherry (International Arctic Research Center & Institute of Northern Engineering, University of Alaska Fairbanks)
Abstract:
The supply, demand, and price for hydroelectric power can be strongly influenced by climatic factors such as temperature, precipitation, and water storage by the environment. The climate, in turn, is driven by both natural variability (on a variety of timescales) and anthropogenic forcing. For planning water resource management here in Alaska, particularly for long-lived, large infrastructure projects, it is useful to understand the sources of uncertainty in climate projections and how they influence long-term and short-term decision-making. A case study in Southeast Alaska is described, where most of Alaska’s hydropower facilities are concentrated. Challenges to assessing the regional impacts of climate change here are discussed, as well as our interpretation of the historical record of climate variability. Our analysis concludes that understanding and accounting for natural modes of variability may be as important as planning for long-term climate change when it comes to managing existing hydropower facilities and planning new infrastructure.
Download presentation(s):
[downlaod presenation Click http://www.uaf.edu/accap/documents/2010_02_Hydropower_Cherry.pdf]
[download podcast click http://www.uaf.edu/accap/files/Teleconference%20Recording/2_2010_Hydro_Cherry.mp3]
Remote Access and Notes:
How to Participate / Log-In to the Alaska Climate Webinar: 1) Dial:1-800-893-8850; 2) When prompted, enter the PIN code: 7531823; PLEASE MUTE YOUR PHONE DURING THE PRESENTATION. The audio is very sensitive and your external conversations and typing can be heard by other participants and disrupt the presentation. Toview the presentation: 1) Point your web browser to: http://www.shareitnow.com; 2) Click on the blue ‘Join a Meeting’ ; button on the left side bar ; 3) For Presenter ID enter: accap@uaf.edu . If you do not see anything on your screen, click on the refresh button on the top bar. For Macintosh computer users: A copy of the presentation will also be available on the ACCAP website: www.uaf.edu/accap. See the right-hand column under "Highlights." For further information please contact Brook Gamble, Outreach and Education Specialist, (907) 474-7812, accap@uaf.edu.
OneNOAA Science Seminar Date Added and Listserv Subscription information:
OneNOAA Science Seminars added Monday, January 25, 2010 10:29 AM. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can subscribe to the weekly email of OneNOAA Science Seminars by visiting https://list.woc.noaa.gov/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/onenoaascienceseminars and filling in your email address or by sending an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body (don't include the quotes). You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series please contact Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov. Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].


Assimilation of Space-Borne GPS Radio Occultation Data in NWP

Date/Time/Location/Seminar Sponsor:
Wednesday, 24 February 2010; 13:00-14:00h [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time] (Seminar location: World Weather Building, Room 707, 5200 Auth Road, Camp Springs, MD 20746; OneNOAA Science Seminar sponsored by: JCSDA)
Speaker(s):
Xiaolei Zou (Meteorology department, Florida State University)
Speaker e-mail(s):
zou@fsu.edu
Abstract:
GIn the past decade, GPS/RO data have been operationally assimilated at NWP centers and have resulted in positive impacts on the global medium-range forecasts. This talk will cover: (i) GPS RO techniques and data processing, (ii) assimilation of GPS RO data in NWP and (iii) profiling clouds in the atmosphere using GPS data. In GPS RO techniques and data processing, I will introduce the GPS RO measurement principle, data processing chain and potential error sources. I’ll then present and discuss numerical results from quality control, forward modeling, assimilation experiments, and comparison with large-scale analyses in cloudy and clear-sky conditions. Finally, I will discuss future directions for GPS RO research and applications in regional mesoscale forecasts, emphasizing the recognized GPS RO capability for profiling the atmosphere under cloudy and severe storm conditions.
Download presentation(s):
[Click http://www.jcsda.noaa.gov/documents/seminardocs/Zou20100224.pdf]
About The Speaker(s):
[Click http://www.met.fsu.edu/index.pl/personnel/faculty/zou]
Remote Access and Notes:
Video: 1. Click on JCSDA Seminar; 2. Enter your name and email address; 3. Enter the meeting password: JCSDAseminar2010; 4. Click "Join Now"; 5. Follow the instructions that appear on your screen. Audio: USA participants: 1-866-715-2479, Passcode: 9457557, International participants: 1-517-345-5260 (see http://www.jcsda.noaa.gov/JCSDASeminars.php). For questions please contact George Ohring (George.Ohring@noaa.gov).
Web link to download Presentation(s):
Available at http://www.jcsda.noaa.gov/JCSDASeminars.php the day before the talk.
OneNOAA Science Seminar Date Added and Listserv Subscription information:
OneNOAA Science Seminars added Wednesday, February 17, 2010 6:21 AM / Last edited Thursday, February 25, 2010 2:39 PM. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can subscribe to the weekly email of OneNOAA Science Seminars by visiting https://list.woc.noaa.gov/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/onenoaascienceseminars and filling in your email address or by sending an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body (don't include the quotes). You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series please contact Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov. Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].


Global Fever, A Compelling, Hands-on Experience For K-9th Grade Classrooms

Date/Time/Location/Seminar Sponsor:
Thursday, 25 February 2010; 12:00-13:00h ETZ [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time] (Seminar location: SSMC-3 (1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD, 20910), 2nd Floor; OneNOAA Science Seminar sponsored by: NODC)
Speaker(s):
Daniel Shaw (President & CEO High Touch High Tech)
Speaker e-mail(s):
dshaw@sciencemadefun.net
Abstract:
The Global Fever program profoundly and dramatically helps kids understand our climate change. Students will learn about Climatology, the Greenhouse Effect and the impact of their Carbon Footprint.
Remote Access and Notes:
For Webcast access: 1) go to http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?i=741283869&p=nodc1315&t=c; 2) type in other required fields (i.e., your name, e-mail, organization; meeting number is 741283869; password is "nodc1315" -password is case sensitive- ); 3) indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy; 4) click on Proceed. For phone access: toll free dial 877-916-2513 using a touch-tone phone; when prompted enter participant code 5877174 followed by a "#" (Please mute your phone during the presentation or toggle *6 otherwise it produces a sound feedback). Please note that webcast & phone access is limited to 50 connections on a first-come-first served basis. Webcast & phone access will start approximately 5 min before the seminar. For general questions about this seminar, please contact Hernan Garcia, Mary.Lou.Cumberpatch@noaa.gov (301-713-2600 Ext. 129) or Albert.E.Theberge.Jr@noaa.gov (301-713-2600 Ext. 115).
About the speaker(s):
Daniel Shaw, President & CEO High Touch High Tech (HTHT). HTHT provides hands-on science experiences for children. Currently have 28 locations in the USA, France, Singapore, and Canada. Current position held for 19 years.
Web link to download Presentation(s):
[Click OneNOAAScience_25Feb2010_Shaw.pdf]
OneNOAA Science Seminar Date Added and Listserv Subscription information:
OneNOAA Science Seminars added Tuesday, January 5, 2010 1:58 PM / Last updated Monday, January 11, 2010 3:06 PM. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can subscribe to the weekly email of OneNOAA Science Seminars by visiting https://list.woc.noaa.gov/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/onenoaascienceseminars and filling in your email address or by sending an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body (don't include the quotes). You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series please contact Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov. Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].


Acoustic Monitoring of Fish Stocks: Present, Future, and Potential Methods

Date/Time/Location/Seminar Sponsor:
Thursday, 25 February 2010; 11:00 - 12:00 PST [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time] (Seminar location: Auditorium, Northwest Fisheries Science Center, Seatlle, WA; OneNOAA Science Seminar sponsored by: NWFSC)
Speaker(s):
Kenneth G Foote (Applied Ocean Physics & Engineering; Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute)
Speaker e-mail(s):
kfoote@whoi.edu
Abstract:
Acoustic methodology for monitoring and surveying fish stocks is well established, but continues to evolve to address traditional applications better and to effect novel applications. The history of active-sonar methods is reviewed summarily, noting seminal developments in echo counting, echo integration, fish swimbladder resonance detection, Doppler and other behavioral measurement, echo statistics, sonar measurement, and calibration. Some of these are being pursued; others remain to be exploited. More recent developments are reviewed, including applications of multibeam, sidescan, and parametric sonars, as well as passive acoustic monitoring. Advances in acoustic methods are anticipated due to developments in transducer technology effecting greater bandwidth, and developments in platforms, especially underwater vehicles including gliders. Some efforts to address important issues of anthropogenic noise, such as that generated by research vessels and sonar use, with potential behavioral effects on marine life, are described.
Remote Access and Notes:

For remote access, please contact Ruben Sanchez-Teran (nwfsc.helpdesk@noaa.gov). All seminars are open to the public. The auditorium is located at 2725 Montlake Blvd. E., Seattle, WA 98112. For further information, please contact Blake Feist (206-860-3408; Blake.Feist@noaa.gov [click NWFSC monster seminar jam series]).

About the speaker(s):
Foote is a Senior Scientist at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. His research interests are in acoustical scattering, physical and geostatistical methods for resource quantification, and sonar performance evaluation and calibration. He is an Associate Editor for Underwater Sound of The Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, and Chair of the IEEE Oceanic Engineering Society Technology Committee on Underwater Acoustics.
OneNOAA Science Seminar Date Added and Listserv Subscription information:
OneNOAA Science Seminars added Thursday, January 21, 2010 7:05 AM / Last updated Thursday, February 25, 2010 7:22 AM. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can subscribe to the weekly email of OneNOAA Science Seminars by visiting https://list.woc.noaa.gov/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/onenoaascienceseminars and filling in your email address or by sending an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body (don't include the quotes). You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series please contact Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov. Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

OneNOAA Science Seminars 2010 (by month): Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Back to top


 

March 2010

Mon
Tue
Wed
Thu
Fri
01 02 03 04 05
08 09 10 11 12
15 16 17 18 19
22 23 24 25 26
29 30 31    

scheduled seminars highlighted in blue
OneNOAA Science Seminars 2010: Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
(Total number of OneNOAA Science seminars in March 2010: 22)


Characteristics of Successful Fisheries Management Systems: New Zealand and the U.S.

Date/Time/Location/Seminar Sponsor:
Thursday, 04 March 2010; 11:00 - 12:00 PST [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time] (Seminar location: Auditorium, Northwest Fisheries Science Center, Seatlle, WA; OneNOAA Science Seminar sponsored by: NWFSC)
Speaker(s):
Pamela M Mace (Ministry of Fisheries, New Zealand)
Speaker e-mail(s):
Pamela.Mace@fish.govt.nz
Abstract:
TBD
Remote Access and Notes:

For remote access, please contact Ruben Sanchez-Teran (nwfsc.helpdesk@noaa.gov). All seminars are open to the public. The auditorium is located at 2725 Montlake Blvd. E., Seattle, WA 98112. For further information, please contact Blake Feist (206-860-3408; Blake.Feist@noaa.gov [click NWFSC monster seminar jam series]).

OneNOAA Science Seminar Date Added and Listserv Subscription information:
OneNOAA Science Seminars added Thursday, January 21, 2010 7:05 AM /Last updated Thursday, February 25, 2010 7:21 AM. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can subscribe to the weekly email of OneNOAA Science Seminars by visiting https://list.woc.noaa.gov/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/onenoaascienceseminars and filling in your email address or by sending an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body (don't include the quotes). You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series please contact Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov. Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

Maryland’s GreenPrint Project: Identifying and Conserving The Most Ecologically Valuable Lands in Maryland in a Changing Climate

Date/Time/Location/Seminar Sponsor:
Monday, 08 March 2010, 11:30-13:00h ETZ [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time] (Seminar location: SSMC-3 (1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD, 20910), Room 15836; OneNOAA Science Seminar sponsored by: NOAA’s Office of Habitat Conservation)
Speaker(s):
Christine Conn (Office for a Sustainable Future, Maryland DNR), Catherine McCall (Chesapeake and Coastal Program, Maryland DNR), and Chelsie Papiez (NOAA Coastal Management Fellow, Maryland DNR)
Abstract:

GreenPrint is the “First in the Nation” interactive land conservation map to show how Maryland’s land conservation partners and local governments are working together to conserve the State’s most ecologically important lands (Targeted Ecological Areas), and how State funded conservation programs are meeting their land conservation goals. Targeted Ecological Areas are the lands mapped on GreenPrint that the Department of Natural Resources identified as being the most ecologically important areas in the State. These are the forests, wetlands, streams and farmland that protect the water quality of the Chesapeake and Coastal Bays, keep our air clean, provide valuable habitat and ensure ecological health and quality of life for today’s citizens, our children’s families, and for future generations to come.

The Seminar will feature 3 presentations by Maryland’s Department of Natural Resources (DNR):

Speaker:
Christine Conn, Ph.D., Office for a Sustainable Future, Maryland DNR: “Green Infrastructure & GreenPrint: Targeting and Conserving Maryland’s Most Ecologically Important Lands”

Speaker:
Catherine McCall, Chesapeake and Coastal Program, Maryland DNR: “Blue Infrastructure & Sea Level Rise”

Speaker:
Chelsie Papiez, NOAA Coastal Management Fellow, Maryland DNR: “Coastal Land Conservation Targeting Under Future Climate Change Conditions”

Download Presentation(s):
Combined presentations are available for download [Click OneNOAAScience_08Mar2010_MarylandGreenPrint.pdf; ~28.3 Mb]
Remote Access and Notes:
For Webcast access: Go to https://www1.gotomeeting.com/register/313135513. For further information please contact Jessica Berrio (Jessica.Berrio@noaa.gov).
OneNOAA Science Seminar Date Added and Listserv Subscription information:
OneNOAA Science Seminars added Monday, March 1, 2010 7:09 AM / Last edited Tuesday, March 9, 2010 11:28 AM. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can subscribe to the weekly email of OneNOAA Science Seminars by visiting https://list.woc.noaa.gov/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/onenoaascienceseminars and filling in your email address or by sending an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body (don't include the quotes). You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series please contact Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov. Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].


Self-similarity in the Classification of Drainage Networks and Effects of the Spatial Distribution of Imperviousness on Hydrologic Variability

Date/Time/Location/Seminar Sponsor:
Wednesday, 10 March 2010, 11:00-12:00 ETZ [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time] (Seminar location: SSMC-2 (1325 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD, 20910), Room 8246; OneNOAA Science Seminar sponsored by: NOAA OHD)
Speaker(s):
Dr. Alfonso Mejia (NRC Research Associate in OHD)
Abstract:
This seminar will cover two separate topics. The first topic entitled “Self-similarity in the Classification of Drainage Networks” shows how basin planform self-similarity, and deviations from it, can be used to develop a classification system for drainage network patterns. In the past, drainage patterns have been identified and classified by researchers, first by visual inspection of maps and areal photos and more recently by automatic methods. The main drawback of existing automatic methods is that they require a large number of seemingly unrelated stream network characteristics to identify a distinct pattern. Thus the main goal with this research was to develop a simpler classification based on measures derived from planform self-similarity. Results from the proposed classification show that planform self-similarity is able to reduce the classification problem to fewer basin characteristics and provide a unified framework. The second topic is entitled “Effects of the spatial distribution of imperviousness on hydrologic variability”. This research shows that the way imperviousness, or urbanization, is distributed on the landscape can have an influential effect on hydrologic variability. Typically, the effects of urbanization are accounted for in time and the spatial pattern is not considered or only accounted for at the hillslope scale. Additionally, policy recommendations on the urban form are being made based on benefits to water resources that are largely qualitative. Thus the main goal of this research was to better understand the role of the imperviousness pattern at the basin scale and provide a quantitative framework to facilitate its interpretation. To study the role of imperviousness three different approaches were taken. The first approach interprets the effects of the spatial distribution of imperviousness as an optimization problem. From this approach, peak flows were found to decrease globally (along the entire stream network) when imperviousness is clustered along the main stream. The second approach examines the effects of the optimized patterns on hydrologic response using an event-based model. The third approach develops a synthesis framework that accounts analytically and explicitly for the imperviousness pattern and the space-time variability of rainfall, runoff generation, and hydrologic response. From this last approach, average rainfall excess was found to depend on the interaction between the space-time rainfall and the imperviousness pattern, and peakedness was found to vary across scales. Overall results are supportive of the need to account in the future for the space-time evolution of imperviousness in urbanized basins.
Remote Access and Notes:
Conference Call: (866) 713-2373, passcode 9960047; GotoMeeting: https://www1.gotomeeting.com/join/235792968. For further information please contact Mike Smith (Michael.Smith@noaa.gov; 301-713-06404 Ext 128) or ken.pavelle@noaa.gov.
OneNOAA Science Seminar Date Added and Listserv Subscription information:
OneNOAA Science Seminars added Friday, March 5, 2010 8:57 AM. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can subscribe to the weekly email of OneNOAA Science Seminars by visiting https://list.woc.noaa.gov/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/onenoaascienceseminars and filling in your email address or by sending an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body (don't include the quotes). You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series please contact Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov. Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

International...NOAA Style

Date/Time/Location/Seminar Sponsor:
Wednesday, 10 March 2010; 12:00-13:00 ETZ [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time] (Seminar location: SSMC-3 (1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD, 20910), 2nd Floor; OneNOAA Science Seminar sponsored by: NODC NOAA Central Library)
Speaker(s):
Dr. James M. Turner (Director of the NOAA Office of International Affairs and Senior Advisor to the NOAA Administrator)
Speaker(s) e-mail(s):
James.Turner@noaa.gov
Abstract:
NOAA's Mission is driven by Science, Service, and Stewardship. Each of these drivers includes significant international aspects. We work collaboratively with other nations to make measurements and observations and share that data to develop, test, and evaluate our models. Our science and understanding are enriched through interactions with international peers. Besides providing information services to decision and policy makers domestically, NOAA also shares these services and others not only with our neighbors, but globally as well. Stewardship involves both conserving and preserving our domestic resources and protecting those resources from external threats. In the broader picture, stewardship extends to protecting resources in the world-wide ecosystem since national borders are not barriers to phenomena in the oceans and atmosphere. The relationship between the Office of International Affairs, the Line Offices, Goal Teams, and International Affairs Council will be described. What will be presented includes examples of international activities which significantly support NOAA's Mission and opportunities for enhancing international contributions.
About The Speaker:
Download Presenation(s):
[Click OneNOAAScience_10Mar2010_Turner.pdf]
Remote Access:
Remote access via webinar: 1. Go to http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?sigKey=mymeetings&i=742656968&=brownbag&t=c; 2. Enter the required fields; 3. Indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy; 4. Click on Proceed. 5. passcode: brownbag. Audio: Dial 866-833-7307; participant passcode: 8986360. Please note: remote access is limited to first 50 participants. For further information about this seminar please contact Mary.Lou.Cumberpatch@noaa.gov (301-713-2600 Ext. 129) or Albert.E.Theberge.Jr@noaa.gov (301-713-2600 Ext. 115).
OneNOAA Science Seminar Date Added and Listserv Subscription information:
OneNOAA Science Seminars added Wednesday, January 13, 2010 6:48 AM / Last edited Friday, March 12, 2010 8:48 AM. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can subscribe to the weekly email of OneNOAA Science Seminars by visiting https://list.woc.noaa.gov/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/onenoaascienceseminars and filling in your email address or by sending an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body (don't include the quotes). You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series please contact Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov. Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].


International Legal Rights and Obligations Related to Submarines Cables

Date/Time/Location/Seminar Sponsor:
Wednesday, 10 March 2010, 12:00-13:00 ETZ [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time] (Seminar location: SSMC-3 (1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD, 20910), Room 15836; OneNOAA Science Seminar sponsored by: NOAA International Affairs Council Law of the Sea Convention Working Group)
Speaker(s):
Douglas R. Burnett (Squire, Sanders & Dempsey, L.L.P. and the international law advisor to the International Cable Protection Committee).
Speaker(s) e-mail(s):
dburnett@ssd.com
Abstract:
Douglas Burnett will talk on key components of the international legal rights and obligations related to submarines cables. Included in the presentation will be current developments with regard to cable security and environmental issues, including marine mammals and activities between industry and the UN Environmental Programme and other areas where NOAA has important roles. Submarine cables have been used in the oceans since 1850 but never have their importance been so pronounced as now. International fiber optic submarine cables carry over 95 percent of the international internet communications of the United States, including voice, data, and video communications. About 35 cables, each with a diameter of a garden hose, link the United States with the world and are critical national infrastructure by any metric. The use of cables for scientific observations and military purposes is also expanding rapidly. Cables are comprehensively treated in the United Nations Law of the Sea Convention (UNCLOS) which supplies the legal framework under which they are laid and maintained. The attached chart highlights the applicable provisions of UNCLOS, the Geneva Conventions on the High Seas and Continental Shelf, and the 1884 International Convention for the Protection of Submarine Cables.
Remote Access and Notes:
If you wish to attend in person, please RSVP to Alma Lyons (Alma.J.Lyons@noaa.gov). Phone access: If you wish to call-in (audio), please indicate that on your RSVP and arrangements for a call-in line will be made.
About the speaker(s):
Mr. Burnett is a maritime partner at Squire, Sanders & Dempsey, L.L.P. and the international law advisor to the International Cable Protection Committee. He has testified as an expert on cables on behalf of the telecommunication industry at UNCLOS hearings by the Senate Foreign Relations Committee [click Doug_Burnett_Bio.pdf].
OneNOAA Science Seminar Date Added and Listserv Subscription information:
OneNOAA Science Seminars added Monday, March 1, 2010 2:59 PM / Last updated Tuesday, March 2, 2010 7:15 AM. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can subscribe to the weekly email of OneNOAA Science Seminars by visiting https://list.woc.noaa.gov/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/onenoaascienceseminars and filling in your email address or by sending an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body (don't include the quotes). You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series please contact Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov. Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].


A Comparison Study of Calibration Strategies for the NWS Research Distributed Hydrological Model (HL-RDHM)

Date/Time/Location/Seminar Sponsor:
Wednesday, 10 March 2010, 13:30-14:30 ETZ [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time] (Seminar location: SSMC-2 (1325 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD, 20910), Room 8246; OneNOAA Science Seminar sponsored by: NOAA OHD).
Speaker(s):
JJ Gourley (NSSL) and Humberto Vergara (PhD student at the U. of Oklahoma in Norman)
Abstract:
This study evaluates the performance of the NWS Research Distributed Hydrologic Model (HL-RDHM) subject to five different parameterizations. The model parameters were estimated during the calibration period using the traditional manual approach, two local optimization searches, and two sophisticated global optimization methods. While being relatively costly in terms of computational resources and time, the global optimization method (with some added constraints) achieved the greatest accuracy in simulating streamflow during calibration. The overall best performance during the validation period, however, was accomplished with the model that was calibrated with the step-wise, local optimization method. Further analyses of the results during validation indicated the models calibrated manually and with the global optimization methods offered improvements over the local optimization search during high flow periods (i.e., flow exceedance probability < 10%). This study provides information about the performance of a high-dimensional, rainfall-runoff model based on different calibration strategies with a consideration of the desired objectives (i.e., accuracy during calibration, validation, high flows, low flows) and required computational resources. Particular emphasis was placed on model performance during high flow events, in conjunction with the modeling objectives of the Coastal and Inland Flooding Observation and Warning (CI-FLOW) project.
Remote Access and Notes:
Conference Call: (866) 713-2373, passcode 9960047; GotoMeeting: https://www1.gotomeeting.com/join/999815617. For further information please contact Mike Smith (Michael.Smith@noaa.gov; 301-713-06404 Ext 128) or ken.pavelle@noaa.gov.
OneNOAA Science Seminar Date Added and Listserv Subscription information:
OneNOAA Science Seminars added Friday, March 5, 2010 8:57 AM / Last updated Wednesday, March 10, 2010 6:57 AM. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can subscribe to the weekly email of OneNOAA Science Seminars by visiting https://list.woc.noaa.gov/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/onenoaascienceseminars and filling in your email address or by sending an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body (don't include the quotes). You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series please contact Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov. Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

Accounting for pinniped predation in fisheries stock assessment: implications for the recovery of B.C. inside waters yelloweye rockfish (Sebastes ruberrimus)

Date/Time/Location/Seminar Sponsor:
Thursday, 11 March 2010; 11:00 - 12:00 PST [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time] (Seminar location: Auditorium, Northwest Fisheries Science Center, Seatlle, WA; OneNOAA Science Seminar sponsored by: NWFSC)
Speaker(s):
Murdoch K McAllister (Fisheries Centre; University of British Columbia)
Speaker e-mail(s):
m.mcallister@fisheries.ubc.ca
Abstract:
Many B.C. rockfish populations have undergone pronounced declines in the last several decades largely due to episodic high fishing mortality rates. In contrast, B.C. pinniped populations have shown marked increases since the implementation of Canadian Marine Mammal Protection Laws in the early 1970s. Strait of Georgia harbour seals (Phoca vitulina richardsi), for example, have increased from about 3,500 animals in the 1970s to currently about 42,000 animals. Diet studies indicate that rockfishes form only a small fraction of the diet of B.C. pinnipeds. However, the high annual total rates of consumption per animal and current high abundance of pinnipeds in B.C. waters suggest that predation rates on B.C. rockfishes may have increased substantially over the last few decades. In this talk, I present adaptations of a stock assessment model for B.C. inside waters yelloweye rockfish (Sebastes ruberrimus) that accounts for variations in predation since the early 1900s and assesses the implications of current trends in pinniped abundance for rockfish population recovery.
Remote Access and Notes:

There will be no remote access for this seminar. All seminars are open to the public. The auditorium is located at 2725 Montlake Blvd. E., Seattle, WA 98112. For further information, please contact Blake Feist (206-860-3408; Blake.Feist@noaa.gov [click NWFSC monster seminar jam series]).

About the speaker(s):
Dr. McAllister's research focuses on fish population dynamics modeling and Bayesian statistical methods for fisheries stock assessment and quantitative decision analysis. Dr. McAllister obtained his PhD, in Fisheries Science in 1995 at the University of Washington, his MSc in Natural Resource Management in 1990 at Simon Fraser University and Honours B.Sc. in Behavioural Ecology in 1987 at S.F.U. From 2006-present, Dr. McAllister has been an Associate Professor & Canada Research Chair in Fisheries Assessment and Statistics at the University of British Columbia Fisheries Centre. From 2002-2006 Dr. McAllister was a Senior Lecturer in Statistical Risk Assessment, Division of Biology, Imperial College. From 1997 -2002, Dr. McAllister was a lecturer in Statistical Risk Assessment at the Dept of Env. Science and Technology, Imperial College. From 1995-1997, Dr. McAllister was a Post Doctoral Research Fellow, Centre for Environmental Technology, Imperial College. His professional associations have been as Scientific Adviser to Deepwater Fisheries Working Group, Namibia 1997-2000, Member of US and Canadian scientific delegations to the International Commission for the Conservation of Atlantic Tunas 1999-present, Member of the ICES scientific working group on Baltic salmon and sea trout 2002-3, Member of the US National Marine Fisheries Service Shark Evaluation Workshop 1998, 2002, Member of the ICES Scientific Working Group on Methods of Stock Assessment 2004, Member of the US SEDAR Gulf of Mexico Red Snapper Stock Assessment Workshop Panel 2004, Member of the Science and Technical Committee of the Fraser River Strugeon Conservation Society. His current research seeks to develop improved population dynamics and stock assessment models for Canadian rockfish and ling cod, Atlantic bluefin, bigeye and yellowfin tunas, Gulf of Mexico reef fishes and shrimp, B.C. trophy rainbow trout and kokanee, and UK foxes.
OneNOAA Science Seminar Date Added and Listserv Subscription information:
OneNOAA Science Seminars added Thursday, January 21, 2010 7:05 AM/Last edited Friday, March 5, 2010 2:56 PM. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can subscribe to the weekly email of OneNOAA Science Seminars by visiting https://list.woc.noaa.gov/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/onenoaascienceseminars and filling in your email address or by sending an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body (don't include the quotes). You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series please contact Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov. Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].


On Some Useful Connections Between Hydraulic Routing and Rainfall-Runoff Modeling

Date/Time/Location/Seminar Sponsor:
Thursday, 11 March 2010, 11:00-12:00 ETZ [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time] (Seminar location: SSMC-2 (1325 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD, 20910), Room 8246; OneNOAA Science Seminar sponsored by: NOAA OHD)
Speaker(s):
Dr. Alfonso Mejia (NRC Research Associate in OHD)
Abstract:
This seminar will cover research aimed at determining and recommending ways in which predictions (simulated flows at the outlet of headwater basins) may be improved through the combination of hydraulic routing and rainfall-runoff modeling. The work completed thus far is separated into three research areas. The first research area develops a diffusion wave strategy for routing flows within HL-RDHM. The goal of this research was to assess the feasibility of diffusion routing within the current HL-RDHM model structure. From this research, it was found that the two parameters in the diffusion wave (wave celerity and the dispersion coefficient) can be related to the existing a-priori routing parameters (local channel slope, roughness coefficient, and two cross section shape parameters) used in HL-RDHM. Additionally, a numerical strategy for implementing diffusion wave routing was identified from the literature. The numerical strategy remains to be tested within HL-RDHM. It seems beneficial to test this strategy on a stream reach, prior to implementation on a stream network, to determine the stability and accuracy of the numerical solution. The second research area was to replace a portion of the HL-RDHM main stream reach in the Blue and Illinois River basins with a HEC-RAS model. The goal with this research was to assess coupling of the two models, examine the role of parameterized cross section shapes, and assess advantages/disadvantages from implementing a more general routing method. It was found that the external coupling approach is quite inefficient and limiting. It requires a substantial amount of effort and time to set up and transfer information to the hydraulic model, making a systematic analysis of parameters and uncertainty unrealistic. It was also found that some benefit may be possible from including floodplain hydraulic geometry in the routing process. The magnitude of this benefit needs to be identified more precisely with a more efficient modeling framework. The last research project looked at how existing analytical routing criteria may provide information regarding the basin scale where a given routing method (kinematic, non-inertia, or dynamic wave routing) becomes dominant. The goal with this research was to provide additional support to the selection of a routing method. For this research, an existing criteria was chosen and combined with the basin geomorphology, climate, and hydrologic response. The latter is used to extend the criteria to account for basin size. Preliminary numerical tests suggest a strong dependence of the criteria to the slope-area relationship, indicating that this might be a useful quantity when trying to choose a routing method. The combined criteria also shows a tendency for diffusion to become more dominant with increasing basin size. Based on the performed research, a next step could be to continue with the implementation of the diffusion wave strategy and examine the possibility of including floodplain hydraulic geometry.
Remote Access and Notes:
Conference Call: (866) 713-2373, passcode 9960047; GotoMeeting: https://www1.gotomeeting.com/join/456386097. For further information please contact Mike Smith (Michael.Smith@noaa.gov; 301-713-06404 Ext 128) or ken.pavelle@noaa.gov.
OneNOAA Science Seminar Date Added and Listserv Subscription information:
OneNOAA Science Seminars added Friday, March 5, 2010 8:57 AM. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can subscribe to the weekly email of OneNOAA Science Seminars by visiting https://list.woc.noaa.gov/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/onenoaascienceseminars and filling in your email address or by sending an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body (don't include the quotes). You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series please contact Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov. Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

Computing Hurricane Ike Waves, Forerunner, and Surge: Slow and Fast Processes from the Louisiana-Texas Shelf to San Jacinto Bay

Date/Time/Location/Seminar Sponsor:
Thursday, 11 March 2010; 12:00 – 13:00 ETZ [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time] (Seminar location: SSMC-4, Room 8150; OneNOAA Science Seminar sponsored by: NOS)
Speaker(s):
Dr. Joannes J. Westerink (Professor, Department of Civil Engineering and Geological Sciences and Concurrent Professor, Department of Mathematics, University of Notre Dame).
Speaker e-mail(s):
jjw@nd.edu
Abstract:
Coastal Louisiana and Texas are characterized by tremendous complexity and variability in their geography, topography, bathymetry, continental shelf, estuarine systems, and surface roughness. Hurricane Ike significantly impacted both coastal Texas and Louisiana producing a storm surge of more than 5.3m in eastern Texas and more than 2.2 m in eastern Louisiana (more than 500 km away from the storm landfall location). Particularly important was that more than 2m of hurricane forerunner developed prior to the storm coming onto the continental shelf (more than 15 hours prior to landfall), while coastal winds were shore parallel or coming off of the land. The forerunner flooded much of western Louisiana and eastern Texas, and filled Galveston Bay in its entirety, reaching into the heart of Houston. The forerunner then propagated down the Louisiana-Texas (LATEX) shelf as a free wave, passing Corpus Christi with an amplitude of more than 1m. The forerunner is the largest ever recorded. The rapid evolution of data collection systems allows the physical system to be accurately defined, and the rapid evolution of unstructured grid computational models allows these characteristics and the resulting waves and flows to be numerically resolved. The SWAN+ADCIRC unstructured grid modeling system has been developed to simulate fully coupled hurricane winds, wind-waves, storm surge, tides and river flow in this complex region. This is accomplished by defining a domain and computational resolution appropriate for the relevant processes, specifying realistic boundary conditions, and implementing accurate, robust, and highly parallel unstructured grid algorithms for both the wind waves and the long wave current/storm surge/tide model. Basin to channel scale domains and high resolution grids which resolve features down to 30 meters and contain up to 3.3 million nodes have been developed. This modeling system is run on up to 4,096 processors and requires as little as 18 minutes of wall clock time per day of simulation. Hindcasts of the storm indicate an excellent match of measured wave and surge records. Numerical experiments indicate that the unprecedented forerunner was generated by very fast shore parallel currents driven by the early shore parallel winds that allow for a Coriolis driven set up to be pushed up against the coast. Achieving fast enough currents on the mid and outer shelf is vital for the driving mechanism to work. This in turn requires low frictional resistance which is consistent with the smooth and muddy LATEX shelf.
Remote Access and Notes:
Presentations are available remotely via a combination of phone & webcast. Please be aware that remote access is limited to 50 connections on a first-come-first served basis, so we cannot guarantee participation. To participate remotely you must: 1) Dial 866-816-8440, and then wait for instructions. When prompted enter passcode 3770077 followed by the # sign. Please use your phone’s mute button (or toggle *6) during the presentation until you are ready to ask questions. 2) Go to the webcast site at http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?i=746752585&p=&t=c 3) Enter meeting number 746752585 if needed. No passcode is required. 4) Enter other required fields. 5) Indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy and click Proceed. For questions: contact Tracy Gill (Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov).
About the speaker(s):
Joannes Westerink is Professor of Civil Engineering and Geological Sciences at the University of Notre Dame. He has a concurrent appointment in the Department of Mathematics. He obtained his B.S. and M.S. degrees in Civil Engineering at the State University of New York at Buffalo and Ph.D. degree in Civil Engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Westerink’s research focuses on the development, analysis and application of coastal ocean and estuarine hydrodynamic, constituent transport and sediment transport models. This encompasses the basic algorithms; the behavior of these algorithms for varying levels of time and spatial discretization as well as varying hydrodynamics balances; theoretical analysis of algorithms to understand baseline properties; development of high performance codes in vector and parallel computing environments; application of codes to oceans, continental shelf regions, estuaries, rivers, coastal flood plains and lakes; and the linkages of hydrodynamics models to weather and short wind wave models. He has worked extensively on model validation and applications in the Gulf of Mexico, Louisiana, and Texas. Westerink has been the developer or co-developer of numerous coastal hydrodynamic and transport models. He developed a frequency domain – time domain finite element based shallow water equation model, TEA (Tidal Embayment Analysis). The TEA model was notably used in the design and analysis work to place sewage outfalls in the Boston Harbor cleanup. Westerink and Rick Luettich of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill have been the co-developers of the ADCIRC finite element based shallow water equation model. ADCIRC is a very stable and effective solution method due to its ability to handle unstructured grids placed in large computational domains to provide grid resolution where it is necessary and to simplify boundary condition specification. The model is applied to compute basin scale phenomena to inlet scale flows to feature scale flows such as flow around a jetty. The U.S. Army and Navy extensively use the ADCIRC model worldwide to assess coastal currents and flooding. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) makes extensive use of the ADCIRC coastal ocean model in support modeling tidal harmonic constituents for U.S. coasts and estuaries. Second, NOAA is utilizing ADCIRC to further its capabilities to study and predict coastal inundation processes. ADCIRC is being used to support development of the nation's next generation storm surge prediction system, and to understand the impacts of sea level rise at the coast. ADCIRC is also being used to design flood protection systems in Southern Louisiana by the Army Corps of Engineers and to evaluate flooding risk across the U.S. east and Gulf coasts by FEMA. Westerink was a team co-lead in the Army’s IPET investigation of the Katrina flooding failures in Louisiana and continues to work extensively in the evaluation of flood mitigation systems in Louisiana and Texas. Westerink’s current research includes algorithmic and peta-application projects (one of 14 groups in the U.S. selected to build software for the nation’s planned peta-scale computers) from the National Science Foundation, the merging of SWAN+ADCIRC into a high performance code for the Office of Naval Research in a joint project with Delft University, the development and validation of the SL16 model for Southern Louisiana and a new model for Texas with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and numerous university and private sector partners, and marsh resistance and wave-current friction studies with ERDC. His former graduate students and post docs in academia, government, and industry work extensively on hurricane studies.
OneNOAA Science Seminar Date Added and Listserv Subscription information:
OneNOAA Science Seminars added Thursday, February 25, 2010 7:44 AM. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can subscribe to the weekly email of OneNOAA Science Seminars by visiting https://list.woc.noaa.gov/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/onenoaascienceseminars and filling in your email address or by sending an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body (don't include the quotes). You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series please contact Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov. Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

Analysis of Rapid Intensification Mechanisms in Producing and Altering the Distribution of Intense Convection in Three Numerically Simulated Tropical Cyclones

Date/Time/Location/Seminar Sponsor:
Friday, 12 March 2010; 12:00-13:00h [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time] (Seminar location: World Weather Building, Room 707, 5200 Auth Road, Camp Springs, MD 20746; OneNOAA Science Seminar sponsored by: JCSDA)
Speaker(s):
Kathryn A. Shontz (NOAA National Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Service)
Abstract:
Theoretical rapid intensification (RI) mechanisms are diagnosed for high-resolution, 1.33 km Advanced Hurricane WRF (AHW) simulations of three Atlantic hurricanes known to have historically undergone rapid strengthening: Katrina (2005), Gordon (2006) and Felix (2007). A simulated 27 h period detailing the times of RI for each tropical cyclone was evaluated against the NHC Best Track dataset. The verified model output was put into the context of key features thought to be associated with RI. Following the arguments of Black et al. (2002) and Braun et al. (2006), these features are discussed for each hurricane. Five subsequent fields are analyzed: low-level winds, 850 hPa positive vorticity, precipitable water, 0-6 km storm-relative helicity and most-unstable convective available potential energy. The fields piece together a comprehensive model that diagnoses the effect moderate to strong shear has on numerically simulated RI by linking convective and rotational features within the eyewall. Conclusions are drawn on the how well the AHW resolves overall intensity change and the ensuing inner core dynamics. Forecasting potential of this evaluation method is discussed.
Remote Access and Notes:
Phone access: U.S. participants: 866-832-9297, International participants: 203-566-7610; Passcode: 6070416. For questions please contact Bruce Ramsay (301-405-9205).
Web link to download Presentation(s):
Available at http://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/seminars.php
OneNOAA Science Seminar Date Added and Listserv Subscription information:
OneNOAA Science Seminars added Friday, February 19, 2010 7:13 AM. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can subscribe to the weekly email of OneNOAA Science Seminars by visiting https://list.woc.noaa.gov/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/onenoaascienceseminars and filling in your email address or by sending an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body (don't include the quotes). You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series please contact Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov. Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

The Global Observing Systems Information Center (GOSIC): A Data Portal for Access to Global Climate Observational Data and Information

Date/Time/Location/Seminar Sponsor:
Monday, 15 March 2010; 11:00-12:00 ETZ [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time] (Seminar location: SSMC-3 (1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD, 20910), 4th Floor, Room 4817; OneNOAA Science Seminar sponsored by: NODC)
Speaker(s):
Howard J. Diamond (U.S. Global Climate Observing System Program Manager, Director World Data Center for Meteorology, Asheville, NOAA/National Climatic Data Center)
Speaker e-mail(s):
Howard.Diamond@noaa.gov
Abstract:
The Global Observing Systems Information Center (GOSIC), initiated in 1997 at the request of the Global Climate Observing System (GCOS) Steering Committee (see http://www.wmo.int/pages/prog/gcos/Publications/gcos-39.pdf), responds to a need identified by the global climate observing community for easier and more effective access to observational climate data and information. GOSIC manages an online portal providing an entry point for users of climate-related global observing systems data and information systems. Following its initial development and implementation at the University of Delaware from 1997 to 2006, the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's National Climatic Data Center (NCDC) assumed operational responsibility for GOSIC on behalf of the international climate observing and data user communities. The goal of GOSIC is to provide basic user services, including a description of the systems and their data as well as a tailored search capability that facilitates access to a worldwide set of observations and derived products. GOSIC's unique value is its ability to quickly link users, via a consistent and user-friendly interface, to a wide range of data sets that reside at multiple data centers; the GOSIC portal (http://GOSIC.org) provides users with links to data, metadata, other search tools, and related climate-observing information.
Remote Access:
For Webcast access: 1) go to http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?i=741283869&p=nodc1315&t=c; 2) type in other required fields (i.e., your name, e-mail, organization; meeting number is 741283869; password is "nodc1315" -password is case sensitive- ); 3) indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy; 4) click on Proceed. For phone access: toll free dial 877-916-2513 using a touch-tone phone; when prompted enter participant code 5877174 followed by a "#" (Please mute your phone during the presentation or toggle *6 otherwise it produces a sound feedback). Please note that webcast & phone access is limited to 50 connections on a first-come-first served basis. Webcast & phone access will start approximately 5 min before the seminar. For general questions about this seminar, please contact Hernan Garcia. This seminar was originally scheduled for Tuesday, February 16, 2010.
About the speaker:
Howard Diamond is a physical scientist with NOAA's National Climatic Data Center (NCDC) and is based in Silver Spring. He has worked for NOAA in a number of different capacities for the past 28 years, and since 1999 has served as the U.S. Global Climate Observing System (GCOS) Program Manager. In addition to that, he is the director of the World Data Center for Meteorology based at NCDC, serves as NCDC's International Liaison Officer, and works on a number of bilateral and regional climate observing and data management projects in the Pacific Islands region with partners from across the region including Australia and New Zealand. Howard has a B.S. in Biological Sciences from Florida State University, an M.S. in Technology Management from the University of Maryland, and is currently pursuing a Ph.D. in Geography at the University of Auckland in New Zealand where he is doing a climatological study of tropical cyclones in the Southwest Pacific; and is a member of both AMS and AGU. His interest in tropical cyclones has also led to him being a member of NCDC's International Best Tracks Archive for Climate Stewardship (IBTrACS) team as well as the World Meteorological Organization's Southern Hemisphere THORPEX Committee.
Web link to download Presentation:
[Click OneNOAAScience_15Mar2010_Diamon_GOSIC.pdf]
OneNOAA Science Seminar Date Added and Listserv Subscription information:
OneNOAA Science Seminars added Wednesday, December 16, 2009 3:17 PM/ Last edited Tuesday, February 16, 2010 9:01 AM. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can subscribe to the weekly email of OneNOAA Science Seminars by visiting https://list.woc.noaa.gov/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/onenoaascienceseminars and filling in your email address or by sending an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body (don't include the quotes). You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series please contact Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov. Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].


Application of Hydrologic Ensemble Forecasts in the Operation of New York City’s Water Supply System

Date/Time/Location/Seminar Sponsor:
Monday, 15 March 2010, 13:30-14:30h ETZ [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time] (Seminar location: SSMC-2 (1325 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD, 20910), Eight Floor, Room 8246; OneNOAA Science Seminar sponsored by: OHD).
Speaker(s):
John Schaake (NWS/OHD) and Dan Sheer (Hydrologics)
Abstract:
The New York City (NYC) water supply system is operated by the NYC Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) to provide water to more than 9 million people. To help manage this complex system with many reservoirs and several large aqueducts, NYCDEP contracted with the engineering firms of Hazen and Sawyer (NYC) and Hydrologics (Columbia, MD) to develop a decision support system that was initially used in a planning mode to simulate operation of the NYC reservoirs, including daily release and diversion decisions, within the context of water quality objectives, water supply reliability objectives, and release requirements throughout the system. The next phase of work is to integrate this decision support system into an Operations Support Tool (OST) that will use NWS ensemble weather, water and climate forecasts as inputs to support model simulations in Position Analysis (PA) mode. The OST will link DEP’s water quality and quantity models; assimilate near-real-time data on reservoir levels, stream flow into the reservoirs, snowpack and water quality in streams and reservoirs; and ingest NWS forecasts. At the same time, it will apply the rules and laws that govern the water supply operations. And it will involve close collaboration between the NYCDEP and the NWS. This seminar will describe the NYC water supply system, the OST and NWS ensemble forecast requirements.
Remote Access and Notes:
Remote access will be limited to 20 lines. Conference Call: (866) 713-2373, passcode 9960047. GotoMeeting: https://www1.gotomeeting.com/join/851619065. For further information please conatct Pedro Restrepo (Pedro.Restrepo@noaa.gov).
OneNOAA Science Seminar Date Added and Listserv Subscription information:
OneNOAA Science Seminars added Thursday, March 11, 2010 12:55 PM. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can subscribe to the weekly email of OneNOAA Science Seminars by visiting https://list.woc.noaa.gov/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/onenoaascienceseminars and filling in your email address or by sending an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body (don't include the quotes). You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series please contact Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov. Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

Decoupling of The Temperature-Nutrient Relationship in the California Current Ecosystem with Global Warming

Date/Time/Location/Seminar Sponsor:
Tuesday, 16 March 2010; 12:00-13:00 ETZ [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time] (Seminar location: SSMC-3 (1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD, 20910), 2nd Floor; OneNOAA Science Seminar sponsored by: NODC NOAA Central Library)
Speaker(s):
Dr. Ryan R. Rykaczewski and Dr. John P. Dunne (NOAA Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory)
Abstract:
In the California Current Ecosystem (CCE), an inverse relationship between temperature and nitrate is evident over the observational period at interannual to decadal time scales. This robust relationship has encouraged use of temperature as a proxy for nutrient content and allowed extension of nutrient time series backwards in time over multiple decades. Understanding of this relationship has also been extrapolated to suggest that nutrient supply to the euphotic zone of the CCE will be inhibited in the future as the pycnocline strengthens with global warming, and primary and secondary production are expected to decrease in response to decreased nutrient supply. Here, we explore the effect of global warming on the production and nutrient supply of the CCE using a basic biogeochemistry model (TOPAZ) coupled to an ocean-atmosphere general circulation model (GFDL CM 2.1). We find that nutrient supply to the euphotic zone and primary production in the CCE increase as surface ocean temperatures rise. The mechanism relating physical factors to production at multi-decadal to centennial periods differs from that at shorter time scales, and the interannual and multidecadal relationship between nitrate and temperature should not be extrapolated to predict the response of the CCE to global warming. Although contrary to the traditional understanding of interannual and decadal variability in the CCE, this result is consistent with trends in the longest observations of chlorophyll content, nutrient content, and water clarity (as a proxy for chlorophyll content) which show that production has increased over the past 30 to 40 years despite an increase in surface temperatures. We find that the increase in nutrients in the euphotic zone of the CCE is the result of changes in the nutrient content and ventilation of the deep source waters to the region rather than a change in the rate of upwelling, mixed layer depth, or horizontal advection in the surface layers. This change is a consequence of increased stratification and weaker atmospheric circulation over the subtropical gyre. In addition to the long-term increase in primary production, increased temporal and spatial variability in production are predicted in the CCE. Further consideration of the ramifications of such changes to fisheries is warranted.
Remote Access:
Remote access via webinar: 1. Go to http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?sigKey=mymeetings&i=742656968&=brownbag&t=c; 2. Enter the required fields; 3. Indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy; 4. Click on Proceed. 5. passcode: brownbag. Audio: Dial 866-833-7307; participant passcode: 8986360. Please note: remote access is limited to first 50 participants. For further information about this seminar please contact Mary.Lou.Cumberpatch@noaa.gov (301-713-2600 Ext. 129) or Albert.E.Theberge.Jr@noaa.gov (301-713-2600 Ext. 115).
OneNOAA Science Seminar Date Added and Listserv Subscription information:
OneNOAA Science Seminars added Thursday, March 4, 2010 2:14 PM / last edited Friday, March 5, 2010 8:44 AM. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can subscribe to the weekly email of OneNOAA Science Seminars by visiting https://list.woc.noaa.gov/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/onenoaascienceseminars and filling in your email address or by sending an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body (don't include the quotes). You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series please contact Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov. Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].


Climate Variability and Change Assessment for the Southeast US

Date/Time/Location/Seminar Sponsor:
Wednesday, 17 March 2010: 13:00 pm - 14:30 ETZ [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time] (Seminar location: SSMC-3 (1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD, 20910), 12th floor, Room 12836; OneNOAA Science Seminar sponsored by: NOAA Climate Program Office).
Speaker(s):
Dr. Aris P. Georgakakos (Professor and Director, Georgia Water Resources Institute, Georgia Institute of Technology), Dr. Huaming Yao (Senior Research Scientist, Georgia Water Resources Institute, Georgia Institute of Technology), and Feng Zhang (PhD Student, Georgia Water Resources Institute, Georgia Institute of Technology).
Speaker(s) e-mail(s):
ageorgak@ce.gatech.edu; huaming.yao@ce.gatech.edu
Abstract:
Southeast US has historically enjoyed abundant water resources, but recent decades ushered in rapid population increase, crawling urbanization, unsustainable agricultural expansion, severe droughts with devastating socioeconomic consequences, widespread river pollution, endangered ecosystems, and litigious transboundary water disputes. These challenges are exemplified in the Apalachicola- Chattahoochee-Flint (ACF) River Basin shared by Alabama, Georgia, and Florida, which provides a wealth of regional water resources, energy, environmental, ecological, and socio-economic benefits. The study includes (1) processing all IPCC available GCM scenarios for bias correction and downscaling, (2) developing physically based models for all ACF sub-watersheds, and (3) incorporating the watershed response within an adaptive river and reservoir regulation and assessment model encompassing all ACF storage facilities and water uses. An assessment of the historical 1901-2009 period shows that the ACF exhibits drier soil moisture and runoff trends, with drought impacts exacerbated by inflexible federal project regulation practices and ineffective drought management plans. Basin assessments with future climate and demand scenarios indicate that (1) drier trends will continue with drought and flood episodes becoming more severe, and (2) lake levels, water supply reliability, energy generation, and ecological flows are impacted adversely. The study illustrates that there is a critical need for flexible technical and institutional measures to mitigate and adapt to simultaneous climate, demand, and land use change. Adaptive management was shown to be a particularly effective mitigation strategy.
Remote Access and Notes:
Web access: https://www2.gotomeeting.com/?Portal=gotomeeting.com , Click on “Join a Meeting”, Webinar ID: 364521794. Audio access: 866.710.6541, Participant Code: 364521794. For further information please contact Sarah Abdelrahim (Sarah.Abdelrahim@noaa.gov).
About The Speakers:
[Click Aris Georgakakos]; [Click Huaming Yao]
OneNOAA Science Seminar Date Added and Listserv Subscription information:
OneNOAA Science Seminars added Tuesday, March 9, 2010 2:24 PM / Last updated Friday, March 12, 2010 7:01 AM. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can subscribe to the weekly email of OneNOAA Science Seminars by visiting https://list.woc.noaa.gov/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/onenoaascienceseminars and filling in your email address or by sending an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body (don't include the quotes). You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series please contact Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov. Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].


The New Climate Services Line Office

Date/Time/Location/Seminar Sponsor:
Thursday, 18 March 2010; 12:00-13:00 ETZ [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time] (Seminar location: SSMC-3, 2nd Floor; OneNOAA Science Seminar sponsored by: NODC NOAA Central Library)
Speaker(s):
Mary M. Glackin (NOAA Deputy Under Secretary for Oceans and Atmosphere)
Speaker(s) e-mail(s):
Mary.Glackin@noaa.gov
Abstract:
TBD
About The Speaker:
[See Mary M. Glackin]
Remote Access:
Remote access via webinar: 1. Go to http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?sigKey=mymeetings&i=742656968&=brownbag&t=c; 2. Enter the required fields; 3. Indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy; 4. Click on Proceed. 5. passcode: brownbag. Audio: Dial 866-833-7307; participant passcode: 8986360. Please note: remote access is limited to first 50 participants. For further information about this seminar please contact Mary.Lou.Cumberpatch@noaa.gov (301-713-2600 Ext. 129) or Albert.E.Theberge.Jr@noaa.gov (301-713-2600 Ext. 115).
OneNOAA Science Seminar Date Added and Listserv Subscription information:
OneNOAA Science Seminars added Friday, November 27, 2009 9:00 AM / Last updated Monday, February 22, 2010 9:45 AM. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can subscribe to the weekly email of OneNOAA Science Seminars by visiting https://list.woc.noaa.gov/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/onenoaascienceseminars and filling in your email address or by sending an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body (don't include the quotes). You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series please contact Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov. Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].


Ocean Acidification in Alaska

Date/Time/Location/Seminar Sponsor:
Tuesday, 23 March 2010; 10:00-11:00 Alaska Local Time [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]; (Seminar location: University of Alaska, Faibanks, Alaska; OneNOAA Science Seminar sponsored by: ACCAP Alaska Climate Teleconferences)
Speaker(s):
Dr. Jeremy Mathis (School of Fisheries and Ocean Sciences, University of Alaska Fairbanks)
Abstract:
Since the Industrial Revolution approximately 1/3 of all human CO2 emissions have been absorbed by the ocean. While this process has mitigated global temperature increases it has had a profound effect on the chemistry of the surface ocean, making the water more acidic. This phenomenon is exacerbated in the cold, highly productive waters in the continental shelf seas surrounding Alaska. Recent observations have shown that the bottom waters over the shelves of the Chukchi and Bering Seas, as well has the Gulf of Alaska become undersaturated with respect to aragonite in late summer and fall. These undersaturated waters could be corrosive to shell building organisms such as clams, oysters, and crabs. Here, the controls and seasonal distribution of ocean acidification around Alaska will be discussed in the context of the import commercial fisheries.
Remote Access and Notes:
How to Participate / Log-In to the Alaska Climate Webinar: 1) Dial:1-800-893-8850; 2) When prompted, enter the PIN code: 7531823; PLEASE MUTE YOUR PHONE DURING THE PRESENTATION. The audio is very sensitive and your external conversations and typing can be heard by other participants and disrupt the presentation. Toview the presentation: 1) Point your web browser to: http://www.shareitnow.com; 2) Click on the blue ‘Join a Meeting’ ; button on the left side bar ; 3) For Presenter ID enter: accap@uaf.edu . If you do not see anything on your screen, click on the refresh button on the top bar. For Macintosh computer users: A copy of the presentation will also be available on the ACCAP website: www.uaf.edu/accap. See the right-hand column under "Highlights." For further information please contact Brook Gamble, Outreach and Education Specialist, (907) 474-7812, accap@uaf.edu.
OneNOAA Science Seminar Date Added and Listserv Subscription information:
OneNOAA Science Seminars added Thursday, February 18, 2010 6:43 AM / Last edited Monday, March 8, 2010 9:07 AM. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can subscribe to the weekly email of OneNOAA Science Seminars by visiting https://list.woc.noaa.gov/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/onenoaascienceseminars and filling in your email address or by sending an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body (don't include the quotes). You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series please contact Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov. Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].


Marine Conservation on the High Seas: Strategies to Move Forward with Limited Knowledge

Date/Time/Location/Seminar Sponsor:
Wednesday, 24 March 2010; 12:00-13:00 ETZ [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time] (Seminar location: SSMC-3, 2nd Floor; OneNOAA Science Seminar sponsored by: NODC NOAA Central Library)
Speaker(s):
Jeffrey Ardron (Director of the High Seas Program for the Marine Conservation Biology Institute)
jeff.ardron@mcbi.org
Abstract:
In this presentation, an overview of international developments in high seas conservation will be provided. Examples of ongoing scientific research / analyses relevant in applying various internationally-accepted conservation planning criteria will be provided, as well as opportunities and challenges ahead. Working in the high seas, it is impossible not to be faced with issues surrounding incomplete data / knowledge, and how we can make decisions in such situations. Of course, to various extents, incomplete knowledge of ecosystems plagues the daily lives of marine conservation scientists, practitioners and decision-makers everywhere, and there is little sign that this will change soon... So, how do we balance the need to know with the need to act? Addressing ever-mounting environmental problems requires moving beyond habitually calling for more sectoral research, laudable though that may be, to learning how to deal collaboratively with what little we’ve got. In this part of the presentation, I would like to put forward some preliminary ideas developing as part of a collaborative research effort with James Cook University (Australia) on “adaptive Maritime Spatial Planning” (aMSP).
Download Presentation:
[Click http://www.lib.noaa.gov/about/news/Ardron_03242010.pdf]
About The Speaker:
[Click http://www.mcbi.org/staff_board/staff_board.htm]
Remote Access:
Please RSVP to Alma Lyons at Alma.J.Lyons@noaa.gov.
Remote access via webinar
: 1. Go to http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?sigKey=mymeetings&i=742656968&=brownbag&t=c; 2. Enter the required fields; 3. Indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy; 4. Click on Proceed. 5. passcode: brownbag. Audio: Dial 866-833-7307; participant passcode: 8986360. Please note: remote access is limited to first 50 participants. For further information about this seminar please contact Mary.Lou.Cumberpatch@noaa.gov (301-713-2600 Ext. 129) or Albert.E.Theberge.Jr@noaa.gov (301-713-2600 Ext. 115).
OneNOAA Science Seminar Date Added and Listserv Subscription information:
OneNOAA Science Seminars added Monday, March 15, 2010 11:41 AM / Last edited Thursday, March 18, 2010 7:35 AM. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can subscribe to the weekly email of OneNOAA Science Seminars by visiting https://list.woc.noaa.gov/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/onenoaascienceseminars and filling in your email address or by sending an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body (don't include the quotes). You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series please contact Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov. Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].


Help Restore The Chesapeake Bay: Host an Office Switchgrass Growing Tank

Date/Time/Location/Seminar Sponsor:
Wednesday, 24 March 2010; 12:00-13:00 ETZ [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time] (Seminar location: SSMC-4, Room 1W611 [1st Floor Conference Room]; OneNOAA Science Seminar sponsored by: NOAA Office of Ocean and Coastal Resource Management).
Speaker(s):
Alison Hammer and Peter Bergstrom, Ph.D.
Speaker e-mail(s):
Alison.Hammer@noaa.gov and Peter.Bergstrom@noaa.gov
Abstract:
NOAA Restoration Day is an annual opportunity for NOAA employees to put into action the mission they support in their office work while helping to restore and protect the Chesapeake Bay. This is one of the largest voluntary federal employee-sponsored environmental stewardship events in the Chesapeake Bay watershed and for the past seven years, NOAA volunteers have had a great time growing underwater grasses in our Silver Spring offices and planting them in the Chesapeake Bay. This year we will be trying something new – growing and planting switchgrass! Switchgrass, or beachgrass, is typically found on beach dunes and helps stabilize the shoreline. We have 22 grow tanks to be distributed NOAA-wide. It’s easy to set-up a tank in your office and only takes a small time commitment. After 2.5 months, your grasses will be planted as one of several, get your hands dirty and get out in-the-field, NOAA Restoration Day activities in June being held at the NOAA Oxford Lab, one of five research labs for the NOS National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science (NCCOS) located in Oxford, MD (http://www.chbr.noaa.gov/oxfordlab/default.aspx). All are welcome to attend the workshop to learn more about Chesapeake Bay habitat, growing switchgrass in your office, and to receive your tank supplies. Due to limited supplies, if your office is interested in hosting a tank you must RSVP by March 19 and seek prior approval from your Office Director. Tanks are available on a first come, first served basis. To RSVP, please contact: Michele.Winowitch@noaa.gov; on the Web: NOAA Restoration Day: http://restorationday.noaa.gov.
Remote Access and Notes:
No remote access available. For further information please contact Michele.Winowitch@noaa.gov.
OneNOAA Science Seminar Date Added and Listserv Subscription information:
OneNOAA Science Seminars added Tuesday, March 16, 2010 2:16 PM. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can subscribe to the weekly email of OneNOAA Science Seminars by visiting https://list.woc.noaa.gov/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/onenoaascienceseminars and filling in your email address or by sending an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body (don't include the quotes). You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series please contact Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov. Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].


Overview of Dr. Richard Spinrad Career with NOAA: Challenges, Opportunities

Date/Time/Location/Seminar Sponsor:
Thursday, 25 March 2010; 12:00-13:00 ETZ [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time] (Seminar location: SSMC-3 (1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD, 20910), 2nd Floor; OneNOAA Science Seminar sponsored by: NODC NOAA Central Library)
Speaker(s):
Dr. Richard W. Spinrad (Assistant Administrator for Oceanic and Atmospheric Research)
Speaker(s) e-mail(s):
Richard.Spinrad@noaa.gov
Abstract:
Overview of Dr. Spinrad's Career with NOAA: Challenges, Opportunities.
Download Presentation:
[Click http://www.lib.noaa.gov/about/news/Spinrad_03252010.pdf]
About The Speaker:
[Click http://www.oar.noaa.gov/aboutus/spinrad.html]
Remote Access:
Remote access via webinar: 1. Go to http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?sigKey=mymeetings&i=742656968&=brownbag&t=c; 2. Enter the required fields; 3. Indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy; 4. Click on Proceed. 5. passcode: brownbag. Audio: Dial 866-833-7307; participant passcode: 8986360. Please note: remote access is limited to first 50 participants. For further information about this seminar please contact Mary.Lou.Cumberpatch@noaa.gov (301-713-2600 Ext. 129) or Albert.E.Theberge.Jr@noaa.gov (301-713-2600 Ext. 115).
OneNOAA Science Seminar Date Added and Listserv Subscription information:
OneNOAA Science Seminars added Thursday, March 18, 2010 7:38 AM. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can subscribe to the weekly email of OneNOAA Science Seminars by visiting https://list.woc.noaa.gov/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/onenoaascienceseminars and filling in your email address or by sending an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body (don't include the quotes). You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series please contact Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov. Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].


Monitoring Soil Moisture and Drought Using a Thermal Two-Source Energy Balance Model

Date/Time/Location/Seminar Sponsor:
Friday, 26 March 2010, 10:00 – 11:00 ETZ [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time] (Seminar location: World Weather Building, Room 707, Camp Springs, MD; OneNOAA Science Seminar sponsored by: NESDIS STAR).
Speaker(s):
Christopher Hain (Ph.D. Candidate of University of Alabama-Huntsville, Huntsville, AL)
Speaker(s) e-mail(s):
hain@nsstc.uah.edu
Abstract:
Soil moisture plays a vital role in the partitioning of sensible and latent heat fluxes in the surface energy budget and the lack of a dense spatial and temporal network of ground-based observations provides a challenge to the initialization of the “true” soil moisture state in numerical weather prediction simulations. The retrieval of soil moisture using observations from both satellite-based thermal-infrared (TIR) and passive microwave (PM) sensors has been developed (Anderson et al., 2007; Hain et al., 2009; Jackson, 1993; Njoku et al., 2003). The ability of the TIR and microwave observations to diagnose soil moisture conditions within different layers of the soil profile provides an opportunity to use each in a synergistic data assimilation approach towards the goal of diagnosing the “true” soil moisture state from surface to root-zone. TIR and PM retrievals of soil moisture are compared to soil moisture estimates provided by a retrospective Land Information System (LIS) simulation using the NOAH LSM during the time period of 2003 - 2008. The TIR-based soil moisture product is provided by a retrieval of soil moisture associated with surface flux estimates from the Atmosphere-Land-Exchange-Inversion (ALEXI) model (Anderson et al., 1997; Mecikalski et al., 1999; Hain et al., 2009). The PM soil moisture retrieval is provided by the Vrijie Universiteit Amsterdam(VUA)-NASA surface soil moisture product. The VUA retrieval is based on the findings of Owe et al. (2001; 2008) using the Land Surface Parameter model (LPRM), which uses one dual polarized channel (6.925 or 10.65 GHz) for a dual-retrieval of surface soil moisture and vegetation water content. In addition, retrievals of ALEXI (TIR) and AMSR-E (PM) soil moisture are assimilated with the LIS and the NOAH LSM. A series of data assimilation experiments are completed with the following configuration, (a) no assimilation, (b) only ALEXI soil moisture, (c) only AMSR-E soil moisture, and (d) ALEXI and AMSR-E soil moisture. The relative skill of each assimilation configuration is quantified through a data-denial experimental design, where the LSM is forced with an inferior precipitation dataset (in this case, the TRMM 3B42RT precipitation dataset). The ability of each assimilation configuration to correct for precipitation errors is quantified through the comparison of the results with a single simulation over the same domain with a highquality (NLDAS) precipitation dataset. Finally, applications of ALEXI surface flux estimates with respect to the detection and monitoring of drought across North America will also be presented.
Remote Access and Notes:
Phone access: USA 866-832-9297 , International 203-566-7610, Passcode 6070416. For further information please contact Jerry Zhan (xiwu.zhan@noaa.gov; 301-763-8042 Ext. 148) or Danette Warren (Danette.Warren@noaa.gov; 301-763-8042 Ext. 104).
Web link to download Presentation(s):
[Click http://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/documents/seminardocs/Hain_20100326.pdf]
OneNOAA Science Seminar Date Added and Listserv Subscription information:
OneNOAA Science Seminars added Tuesday, March 9, 2010 6:49 AM / Last edited Thursday, March 25, 2010 11:31 AM. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can subscribe to the weekly email of OneNOAA Science Seminars by visiting https://list.woc.noaa.gov/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/onenoaascienceseminars and filling in your email address or by sending an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body (don't include the quotes). You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series please contact Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov. Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

The Kittlitz’s Murrelet: Alaska's Next Polar Bear or a Total Misunderstanding?

Date/Time/Location/Seminar Sponsor:
Tuesday, 30 March 2010; 12:00-13:00 ETZ [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time] (Seminar location: SSMC-3 (1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD, 20910), 2nd Floor; OneNOAA Science Seminar sponsored by: NODC NOAA Central Library)
Speaker(s):
Scott Gende (National Park Service, Glacier Bay Field Station, Juneau, Alaska )
Abstract:
The Kittlitz’s murrelet (KIMU) is one of the rarest seabirds in North America, found only in Alaska and the Russian Far East. Historical population estimates are highly variable due in part to difficulties in monitoring this species: typical counts at nesting colonies do not work for this species because they are solitary nesters. What’s more KIMU are small and roost on the water which has resulted in imprecise or biased at-sea abundance estimates. Nevertheless, best estimates suggest a range-wide population decline of up to 84% over the past several decades provoking the USFWS to upgrade the species to a Candidate 2 listing priority under the Endangered Species Act. They are also considered “critically endangered” (IUCN Red List 2006). Because KIMU are closely associated with glacial habitats there is speculation that global climate change and loss of glacial habitat may be linked to population declines. However, because so little is known about this species, causal factors associated with the declines are highly speculative. For the past five years we have been studying Kittlitz’s murrelets in and adjacent to Wrangell-St. Elias National Park, southeastern Alaska. This area, combined with Glacier Bay National Park supports upwards of 15-20% of the global population of this species, with Icy Bay, adjacent to Wrangell-St.Elias, supporting the highest density of KIMU found in the world. Each of these areas is characterized by large glacial habitats, tidewater glaciers, and early successional landscapes. At the onset of this project less than 25 nests of this species had ever been found, with only a subset of those scientifically investigated. Less than 20 individuals had been captured and radio-tagged with very little known with regards to even their most basic life-history (movements, habitat use, nesting ecology, population structure, etc). Not surprisingly the Birds of North America consider the Kittlitz’s murrelet one of the least know species that breeds in North America. We have since captured over 300 Kittlitz’s murrelets and radio tagged and tracked over 100 individuals from 205-2009. Eight nests have been found, some as far as 4500’ in elevation over hanging glaciers; all have been in early successional habitats. Nesting attempts and success in this area appears to be very low, despite very little direct anthropogenic impacts. At several nests we placed cameras capturing footage of behavior rarely, if ever, recorded for this species. Perhaps more importantly, adult survival during the breeding season may be strongly influenced by predation rates from several raptor species. The uncertainty in factors driving abundance, their implications for management, and possible mechanisms by which climate change may (or may not) be a major driver in population dynamics will be discussed.
Remote Access:
Remote access via webinar: 1. Go to http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?sigKey=mymeetings&i=742656968&=brownbag&t=c; 2. Enter the required fields; 3. Indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy; 4. Click on Proceed. 5. passcode: brownbag. Audio: Dial 866-833-7307; participant passcode: 8986360. Please note: remote access is limited to first 50 participants. For further information about this seminar please contact Mary.Lou.Cumberpatch@noaa.gov (301-713-2600 Ext. 129) or Albert.E.Theberge.Jr@noaa.gov (301-713-2600 Ext. 115).
OneNOAA Science Seminar Date Added and Listserv Subscription information:
OneNOAA Science Seminars added Thursday, March 4, 2010 2:14 PM / Last updated Monday, March 22, 2010 7:10 AM. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can subscribe to the weekly email of OneNOAA Science Seminars by visiting https://list.woc.noaa.gov/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/onenoaascienceseminars and filling in your email address or by sending an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body (don't include the quotes). You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series please contact Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov. Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

Ross Sea, The Last Ocean: A Multimedia Presentation

Date/Time/Location/Seminar Sponsor:
Wednesday, 31 March 2010; 12:00-13:00 ETZ [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time] (Seminar location: SSMC-3 (1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD, 20910), 2nd Floor; OneNOAA Science Seminar sponsored by: NODC NOAA Central Library)
Speaker(s):
Dr. David Ainley (Senior Marine Wildlife Ecologist, H. T. Harvey & Associates)
Abstract:
The recent analysis of anthropogenic alteration of the world ocean by Halpern et al. (2009, Science) identified the Ross Sea, Antarctica, as the least affected stretch of open ocean on the planet. A compliation of interviews of noted scientists and splendid imagery tells the Ross Sea story, and the story of efforts to set it aside as a marine reserve under the Antarctic Treaty.
Remote Access:
Remote access via webinar: 1. Go to http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?sigKey=mymeetings&i=742656968&=brownbag&t=c; 2. Enter the required fields; 3. Indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy; 4. Click on Proceed. 5. passcode: brownbag. Audio: Dial 866-833-7307; participant passcode: 8986360. Please note: remote access is limited to first 50 participants. For further information about this seminar please contact Mary.Lou.Cumberpatch@noaa.gov (301-713-2600 Ext. 129) or Albert.E.Theberge.Jr@noaa.gov (301-713-2600 Ext. 115).
OneNOAA Science Seminar Date Added and Listserv Subscription information:
OneNOAA Science Seminars added Thursday, February 25, 2010 7:25 AM / Last updated Monday, March 1, 2010 2:42 PM. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can subscribe to the weekly email of OneNOAA Science Seminars by visiting https://list.woc.noaa.gov/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/onenoaascienceseminars and filling in your email address or by sending an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body (don't include the quotes). You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series please contact Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov. Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

OneNOAA Science Seminars 2010 (by month): Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Back to top



 

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Scheduled seminars highlighted in blue
OneNOAA Science Seminars 2010: Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
(Total number of OneNOAA Science seminars in April 2010: TBD)

 



The Hydrographic Survey Meta Data Base (HSMDB)

Date/Time/Location/Seminar Sponsor:
Thursday, 01 April 2010; 12:00-13:00 ETZ [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time] (Seminar location: SSMC-3 (1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD, 20910), 2nd Floor; OneNOAA Science Seminar sponsored by: NODC NOAA Central Library)
Speaker(s):
Mr. Daniel Neumann (NOAA Office of Coast Survey)
Abstract:
NOAA and its predecessor agencies have completed over 16,300 hydrographic surveys, dating back to 1837. Digital metadata capture from these surveys began in 1997 with the inception of the hydrographic survey descriptive report preservation project. Metadata recovered from the hydrographic survey descriptive reports was entered into a database implemented in DB3, and subsequently migrated to Microsoft Access. Metadata was gradually expanded to reflect the how, where and why of each survey. Migration to a new Oracle platform was achieved in 2004, through a partnership with the National Geophysical Data Center (NGDC). Since 2004, hydrographic survey metadata presentation and query has increased in sophistication to the present day offerings on the NGDC Map Service Web Browser. The newest metadata product is the Hydrographic Survey Rap Sheet, a user-friendly summary metadata view which came on line in late January of 2010 and is now available for surveys from 1982 to the present. This seminar illustrates how to access NOAA’s hydrographic survey metadata and data through the NGDC site.
Remote Access:
Remote access via webinar: 1. Go to http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?sigKey=mymeetings&i=742656968&=brownbag&t=c; 2. Enter the required fields; 3. Indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy; 4. Click on Proceed. 5. passcode: brownbag. Audio: Dial 866-833-7307; participant passcode: 8986360. Please note: remote access is limited to first 50 participants. For further information about this seminar please contact Mary.Lou.Cumberpatch@noaa.gov (301-713-2600 Ext. 129) or Albert.E.Theberge.Jr@noaa.gov (301-713-2600 Ext. 115).
OneNOAA Science Seminar Date Added and Listserv Subscription information:
OneNOAA Science Seminars added Tuesday, February 23, 2010 7:37 AM / Last updated Thursday, February 25, 2010 10:49 AM. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can subscribe to the weekly email of OneNOAA Science Seminars by visiting https://list.woc.noaa.gov/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/onenoaascienceseminars and filling in your email address or by sending an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body (don't include the quotes). You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series please contact Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov. Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].


Monitoring Malaria from Operational Satellites

Date/Time/Location/Seminar Sponsor:
Wednesday, 07 April 2010; 10:00-11:00h ETZ [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time] (Seminar location: World Weather Building, Room 707, Camp Springs, MD; OneNOAA Science Seminar sponsored by: NESDIS STAR).
Speaker(s):
Felix Kogan (NOAA/NESDIS/STAR)
Speaker e-mail(s):
Felix.Kogan@noaa.gov
Abstract:
Malaria is the major vector-born disease in the world. It occurs in 107 countries with a ½ of world population. Every year 300-500 million clinical cases of malaria occur with 1.5-3 million fatalities. Children, old people and pregnant women are the most vulnerable to malaria. Africa is the most affected continent, which contributes 60 % of global malaria cases and 80% of death. Malaria is strongly affected by the environment. Climate and ecosystems determines distribution of malaria and weather affects timing, duration, area and intensity of outbreaks. In general warm and wet weather stimulated mosquitoes hatching, activity and the rate of malaria transmission to people. Satellite data have been used in recent years to monitor malaria based on Vegetation Health (VH), method that have been developed applied successfully for early detect and monitor malaria from the operational environmental satellite. The VH was developed from reflectance/emission measured by the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) flown on NOAA polar-orbiting satellites since 1981. The calibrated measurements were converted to the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) and brightness temperature (BT), which were expressed as a deviation from 30-year climatology. Three indices characterizing moisture (VCI), thermal (TCI) and vegetation health (VHI) conditions were produced and calibrated against in situ data. They were applied to identify malaria early enough to mitigate its consequences. These results covering several countries in Africa, Asia and South America will be presented.
Remote Access and Notes:
Phone access: USA 866-832-9297 , International 203-566-7610, Passcode 6070416. For further information please contact Jerry Zhan (xiwu.zhan@noaa.gov; 301-763-8042 Ext. 148) or Danette Warren (Danette.Warren@noaa.gov; 301-763-8042 Ext. 104).
Web link to download Presentation(s):
[Click http://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/documents/seminardocs/Kogan_20100407.pdf]
About The Speaker:
[Click http://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/Kogan_F.php]
OneNOAA Science Seminar Date Added and Listserv Subscription information:
OneNOAA Science Seminars added Thursday, March 11, 2010 11:23 AM / Updated Monday, April 12, 2010 2:51 PM. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can subscribe to the weekly email of OneNOAA Science Seminars by visiting https://list.woc.noaa.gov/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/onenoaascienceseminars and filling in your email address or by sending an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body (don't include the quotes). You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series please contact Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov. Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].


Cardiovascular Risks and Benefits of Fish Consumption-Qualitative and Quantitative Risk-Benefit Assessment

Date/Time/Location/Seminar Sponsor:
Thursday, 08 April 2010; 11:00 - 12:00 PDT [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time] (Seminar location: Auditorium, Northwest Fisheries Science Center, Seatlle, WA; OneNOAA Science Seminar sponsored by: NWFSC)
Speaker(s):
Dariush Mozaffarian (Department of Epidemiology; Harvard School of Public Health)
Speaker e-mail(s):
dmozaffa@hsph.harvard.edu
Abstract:
Controversy has arisen among the public and in the media regarding the health effects of fish intake in adults. Substantial evidence indicates that fish consumption reduces coronary heart disease mortality, the leading cause of death in developed and most developing nations. Conversely, concerns have grown regarding potential effects of exposure to mercury and other contaminants found in some fish. Because fish consumption appears to have important health benefits in adults, elucidating the relationships between fish intake, mercury and other contaminant exposure, and health risk is of considerable scientific and public health relevance. Modest consumption of fish (e.g., 1-2 servings/wk), especially species higher in the n-3 fatty acids eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), reduces risk of coronary death by 36% (95% confidence interval, 20%-50%; P<.001) and may favorably affect other clinical outcomes. Women of childbearing age and nursing mothers should consume seafood for optimal brain development in their children, limiting intake of only a few selected species. Health effects of low-level methylmercury in adults are not clearly established; methylmercury may modestly decrease the cardiovascular benefits of fish intake. A variety of seafood should be consumed; individuals with very high consumption (≥ 5 servings/wk) may wish to limit intake of species highest in mercury levels. Levels of dioxins and polychlorinated biphenyls in fish are low, and potential carcinogenic and other effects are greatly outweighed by potential benefits of fish intake and should have little impact on individual choices for commercial seafood consumption. (All individuals should consult regional advisories for local sportscaught fish). For major health outcomes among adults, based on both the strength of the evidence and the potential magnitudes of effect, the benefits of fish intake greatly exceed the potential risks. These findings demonstrate that quantitative and comparable assessment of risks and benefits is needed to make informed recommendations about optimal fish consumption. Such evaluation has been limited in the past by widely varying standard methods for assessing nutritional benefits vs. toxicological risks.
Remote Access and Notes:

For remote access, please contact Ruben Sanchez-Teran (Ruben.Sanchez-Teran@noaa.gov). All seminars are open to the public. The auditorium is located at 2725 Montlake Blvd. E., Seattle, WA 98112. For further information, please contact Blake Feist (206-860-3408; Blake.Feist@noaa.gov); [click NWFSC seminar series].

About the speaker(s):
"Dariush Mozaffarian is a cardiologist and epidemiologist; Co-Director of the Program in Cardiovascular Epidemiology (www.hsph.harvard.edu/research/cvdepi/); Assistant Professor in the Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School; and Assistant Professor in the Department of Epidemiology at the Harvard School of Public Health. His research focuses on the effects of lifestyle, particularly dietary habits, on cardiovascular health and disease. Dr. Mozaffarian has authored numerous scientific publications and research studies relating to lifestyle and cardiovascular health, including papers on trans fatty acids; fish and omega-3 fatty acids, contaminants, and human health; and the Meditteranean diet. He has served on several national and international committees and advisory boards, including the American Heart Association Epidemiology and Prevention Leadership Committee, Nutrition Committee, Statistics Committee, 2020 Goals Committee, and Trans Fat Initiative Committee; the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization / World Health Organization Expert Consultation on Fats and Fatty Acids In Human Nutrition; the Pan American Health Organization Task Force on Trans Fat Free Americas; the Canadian Health Measures Survey Expert Advisory Committee; the U.S. Department of Agriculture Seafood Education Project Advisory Group; and the Gates Foundation / World Health Organization Global Burden of Diseases Nutrition Expert Group. A Fellow of the American College of Cardiology and Fellow of the American Heart Association, Dr. Mozaffarian received a B.S. in biological sciences from Stanford University (with Honors, with Distinction, Phi Beta Kappa), an M.D. from Columbia University (Alpha Omega Alpha), an M.P.H. from the University of Washington, and a Doctorate in Epidemiology from the Harvard School of Public Health. He is board-certified in Internal Medicine and Cardiovascular Medicine."
OneNOAA Science Seminar Date Added and Listserv Subscription information:
OneNOAA Science Seminars added Monday, April 5, 2010 6:32 AM. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can subscribe to the weekly email of OneNOAA Science Seminars by visiting https://list.woc.noaa.gov/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/onenoaascienceseminars and filling in your email address or by sending an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body (don't include the quotes). You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series please contact Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov. Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].


Looking North: Current and Future Ecosystem Monitoring in the Arctic: Panel discussion

Date/Time/Location/Seminar Sponsor:

Monday, 12 April 2010; 12:00-13:15 Pacific Time Zone [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time] (Seminar location: 7600 Sand Point Way NE, Seattle WA, Building 4, Room 2076, Traynor Conference Room; OneNOAA Science Seminar sponsored by: Alaska Fisheries Science Center).

Speaker(s):
Robyn Angliss (AFSC/NMML), Matt Eagleton (AKRO), Sue Moore (NMFS/ST), Mike Sigler (AFSC/HEPR), Bill Wilson (NPFMC)
Abstract:
TBD
Remote Access and Notes:

Remote seminar access (webex): Meeting Number: 573 011 328; Meeting Password: seminar. To join the online meeting (Now from iPhones too!): 1. Go to https://akfsc.webex.com/akfsc/j.php?ED=144079717&UID=1132797427&PW=NMTM4MzA5ZWM5&RT=MiM0; 2. Enter your name and email address; 3. Enter the meeting password: seminar; 4. Click "Join Now". To view in time zones other than Pacific or languages, please click the link: https://akfsc.webex.com/akfsc/j.php?ED=144079717&UID=1132797427&PW=NMTM4MzA5ZWM5&ORT=MiM0. To join the audio conference only: 1-866-762-1812 code = 5367175 (member). For assistance: 1. Go to https://akfsc.webex.com/akfsc/mc; 2. On the left navigation bar, click "Support" or contact
mike.a.brown@noaa.gov. For information about this seminar please contact Rebecca.Reuter@noaa.gov. For information about the AFSC seminar series see http://www.afsc.noaa.gov/seminarseries/seminarseries.htm.

OneNOAA Science Seminar Date Added and Listserv Subscription information:
OneNOAA Science Seminars added Monday, April 5, 2010 8:41 AM. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can subscribe to the weekly email of OneNOAA Science Seminars by visiting https://list.woc.noaa.gov/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/onenoaascienceseminars and filling in your email address or by sending an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body (don't include the quotes). You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series please contact Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov. Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].


The GOES-R Geostationary Lightning Mapper (GLM) and Opportunities for Assimilation of the Data into NWP Models

Date/Time/Location/Seminar Sponsor:
*Seminar postponed; new date May 26, 2010* Tuesday, 13 April 2010; 2010; 14:00-15:00 ETZ [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time] (Seminar location: World Weather Building, Room 707, 5200 Auth Road, Camp Springs, MD 20746; OneNOAA Science Seminar sponsored by: JCSDA)
Speaker(s):
Steve Goodman (NOAA GOES-R Program Senior Scientist)
Speaker e-mail(s):
steve.goodman@noaa.gov
Abstract:
The next generation Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES-R) series with a planned launch in 2015 includes an advanced imager and a new capability for total lightning detection (cloud and cloud-to-ground flashes). The Geostationary Lightning Mapper (GLM) will map total lightning activity continuously day and night with near-uniform spatial resolution of 8 km and with a product refresh rate of less than 20 sec over the western hemisphere from the west coast of Africa (GOES-E) to New Zealand (GOES-W) when the constellation is fully operational. Near global coverage will be possible by the end of the decade with operational lightning imagers planned by EUMETSAT and the Chinese Meteorological Agency. Cloud-resolving numerical models, such as the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model, now have the capability of computing fields of mixing ratios of multiple species of hydrometeors, including several important ice-phase species known to be associated with lightning flash rate (graupel, hail, ice water content). In this presentation, we review the past decade of data assimilation experiments using proxy relationships for lightning and present new methodologies and opportunities to demonstrate how regional cloud-resolving forecast simulations can be exploited to create quantitatively calibrated, time-dependent and specific short-term forecasts of lightning flash rates in convective environments. Our prototype methods being tested at the NOAA Hazardous Weather Testbed and Storm Prediction Center this spring yield lightning forecast products that are straightforward, while avoiding the added expense and complexity of incorporating explicit cloud electrification algorithms into the models.
Remote Access and Notes:
Online video access:1. Click on JCSDA Seminar, 2. Enter your name and e-mail address, 3. Enter the meeting password: JCSDAseminar2010, 4. Click "Join Now", 5. Follow the instructions that appear on your screen. Audio / conference call: USA participants: 1-866-715-2479, Passcode: 9457557, International: 1-517-345-5260 (see http://www.jcsda.noaa.gov/JCSDASeminars.php). For questions please contact George Ohring (George.Ohring@noaa.gov). Note that this eminar was originally scheduled for March 24, 2010.
Web link to download Presentation(s):
Available at http://www.jcsda.noaa.gov/JCSDASeminars.php the day before the talk.
About The Speaker:
Steve Goodman is the GOES-R Program Senior Scientist since 2008 and a past Acting Deputy Director of the JCSDA. Dr. Goodman’s research specialization includes the remote sensing of thunderstorms, lightning, and precipitation processes, and the application of space-based remote sensing to improve short-range forecasts of convective weather hazards. In 2001 he received the NASA Medal for Exceptional Scientific Achievement for his research on severe storms. In support of current and planned missions Dr. Goodman is the Team Lead for the GOES-R Geostationary Lightning Mapper Lightning Applications Team and a Co-Investigator on the NASA Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission Lightning Imaging Sensor (TRMM/LIS) Instrument Team. Dr. Goodman is currently a member of the AMS Committee on Satellite Meteorology and Oceanography, U.S. representative to the WWRP Nowcasting Working Group, and an Associate Editor of the Journal of Geophysical Research-Atmospheres. He earned his PhD in Systems Engineering from the University of Alabama in Huntsville, MS in Meteorology from the University of Oklahoma, and BA in Atmospheric and Oceanic Science from the University of Wisconsin at Madison.
OneNOAA Science Seminar Date Added and Listserv Subscription information:
OneNOAA Science Seminars added Tuesday, December 22, 2009 8:07 AM / Last edited Thursday, April 8, 2010 1:09 PM. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can subscribe to the weekly email of OneNOAA Science Seminars by visiting https://list.woc.noaa.gov/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/onenoaascienceseminars and filling in your email address or by sending an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body (don't include the quotes). You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series please contact Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov. Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].


Characterization of Water Reflectance Spectra Variability: Implications for Hyperspectral Remote Sensing in Estuary Waters

Date/Time/Location/Seminar Sponsor:
Thursday, 15 April 2010; 12:00-13:00 ETZ [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time] (Seminar location: SSMC-3 (1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD, 20910), 2nd Floor NOAA Central Library; OneNOAA Science Seminar sponsored by: NOS NCCOS)
Speaker(s):
Dr. Chunlei Fan (Morgan State University)
Speaker(s) e-mail(s):
chunlei.fan@morgan.edu
Abstract:
A series of airborne hyperspectral remote sensing campaigns were conducted from 2002 to 2005 at five U.S. estuaries: Apalachicola Bay, FL; ACE basin, SC; Grand Bay, MS; Delaware Bay, DE; and Chesapeake Bay, MD. 151 field stations were occupied within the flight tracts where the following were obtained: (1) water reflectance R(λ) spectra were acquired by a pair of ocean optic 2000 spectroradiometers, simultaneously, the concentration of (2) chlorophyll a and (3) total suspended solid, and the (4) absorption of colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM) were measured at these stations. A principal component analysis was conducted to characterize the general variability of these water reflectance R(λ) spectra, and explore the factors that drive the variability of water reflectance in optically complex coastal environments. The results suggested that water reflectance spectra in turbid estuarine waters are the results of complex interactions of phytoplankton pigments, total suspended solids, and CDOM. The first principal component, which represents 72% of total variance of R(?), is strongly affected by scattering of total suspended solids and the absorption of CDOM at the green region of spectra; while the second principal component represents 20% of total variation of R(λ) spectra is mainly driven by phytoplankton biomass e.g. Chl a concentrations in red and near infrared spectral regions. Furthermore, the results of this study could provide a framework for using hyperspectral remote sensing as a cost effective method to characterize water quality in optically complex coastal waters.
Remote Access:
Remote access via webinar: Please fill out the registration form a few minutes before the meeting is scheduled to begin. The Meeting Number is 742656968; the Passcode is brownbag. For audio, dial 866-833-7307. The participant passcode is 8986360. For further information about this seminar please contact Mary.Lou.Cumberpatch@noaa.gov (301-713-2600 Ext. 129) or Albert.E.Theberge.Jr@noaa.gov (301-713-2600 Ext. 115).
OneNOAA Science Seminar Date Added and Listserv Subscription information:
OneNOAA Science Seminars added Friday, November 27, 2009 9:00 AM / Last edited Wednesday, January 20, 2010 7:07 AM. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can subscribe to the weekly email of OneNOAA Science Seminars by visiting https://list.woc.noaa.gov/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/onenoaascienceseminars and filling in your email address or by sending an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body (don't include the quotes). You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series please contact Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov. Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].


Demography and Genetic Structure of a Recovering Grizzly Bear Population

Date/Time/Location/Seminar Sponsor:
Thursday, 15 April 2010; 11:00 - 12:00 PDT [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time] (Seminar location: Auditorium, Northwest Fisheries Science Center, Seatlle, WA; OneNOAA Science Seminar sponsored by: NWFSC)
Speaker(s):
Katherine Kendall (Northern Rocky Mountain Science Center; USGS)
Speaker e-mail(s):
Dezhang.Chu@noaa.gov
Abstract:
The threatened grizzly bear (Ursus arctos) population in northwestern Montana has been managed for recovery since 1975, yet no rigorous data were available to monitor program success. We used data from a large noninvasive genetic sampling effort conducted in 2004 and 33 years of physical captures to assess the abundance, distribution, and genetic structure of this population. We combined data from 3 sampling methods (hair trap, bear rub, and physical capture) to construct individual bear encounter histories for use in Huggins–Pledger closed mark–recapture models. Our population estimate, = 765 (CV = 3.8%) was more than double the existing estimate derived from sightings of females with young. Based on our results, the estimated known, human–caused mortality rate in 2004 was a 4.6% (95% CI: 4.2–4.9%), slightly above the 4% considered sustainable; however, the high proportion of female mortalities raises concern. Using location data from genetic sampling, telemetry, and confirmed sightings, we found that grizzly bears occupied 33,480 km2 in the NCDE during 1994–2007, including 10,340 km2 outside the recovery zone. We used factorial correspondence analysis to identify potential barriers to gene flow within this population. Our results suggested that genetic interchange recently increased in areas with low gene flow; however, we also detected evidence of incipient fragmentation across the major transportation corridor in this ecosystem. Our results suggest that the NCDE population is faring better than previously thought, and highlight the need for a more rigorous monitoring program than the Grizzly Bear Recovery Plan specifies.
Remote Access and Notes:

For remote access, please contact Ruben Sanchez-Teran (Ruben.Sanchez-Teran@noaa.gov). All seminars are open to the public. The auditorium is located at 2725 Montlake Blvd. E., Seattle, WA 98112. For further information, please contact Blake Feist (206-860-3408; Blake.Feist@noaa.gov); [click NWFSC seminar series].

About the speaker(s):
Kate Kendall is currently a research ecologist with the USGS at the Glacier Field Station in Glacier National Park, MT. As Leader of the Northern Divide Bear Project, she directs a research team that is using hair snaring and genetic analysis to investigate the status of the grizzly and black bear populations in the 8 M-acre Glacier NP – Bob Marshall Wilderness Ecosystem. She came to NW Montana in 1982 after studying bears in the Yellowstone Ecosystem as a member of the Interagency Grizzly Bear Study Team. She initiated a research project this spring to develop and evaluate the effectiveness of noninvasive sampling methods and genetic analysis to monitor bear population trend at a landscape scale.
OneNOAA Science Seminar Date Added and Listserv Subscription information:
OneNOAA Science Seminars added Monday, April 5, 2010 6:32 AM. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can subscribe to the weekly email of OneNOAA Science Seminars by visiting https://list.woc.noaa.gov/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/onenoaascienceseminars and filling in your email address or by sending an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body (don't include the quotes). You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series please contact Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov. Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].


The Role of Tourism in Fisheries Crises: The Case of Newfoundland and Applications to Maine

Date/Time/Location/Seminar Sponsor:
Monday, 19 April 2010; 12:00-13:00 ETZ [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time] (Seminar location: SSMC-3 (1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD, 20910), 2nd Floor; OneNOAA Science Seminar sponsored by: the Sea Grant Program)
Speaker(s):
Natalie Springuel (Sea Grant, Maine)
Abstract:
Tourism is increasingly touted as a development opportunity for coastal and rural areas affected by natural resource decline. As commercial fisheries face depletion the world over, people look to tourism to help coastal communities recover from economic crisis, but little work has been done to explore if the investment in tourism can ever replace the full human ecological value of the fishery, including its impacts on a region's culture, economy, and environment. Springuel's sabbatical in Newfoundland examined the impact of the 1992 cod moratorium on Newfoundland's coastal communities over the last 16 years, and particularly how marine heritage tourism has emerged as a model in the province's revitalization attempts. Dozens of interviews with Newfoundlanders involved in tourism and fisheries (including current and former fisherman and fish plant workers, boat captains, tour operators, community development and government representatives, residents, community leaders, academics, and front line staff at tourism destinations, visitor centers and museums) and first hand observations of marine tourism destinations show that marine heritage, in particular, has contributed to both the revitalization of devastated outports and the rise of tourism in these coastal communities. Though tourism will never replace an exhausted natural resource, it can play an important role in the future of coastal and rural areas. Maine's reliance on a single marine fishery (lobster) mirrors Newfoundland's reliance on cod. This presentation will highlight the Newfoundland experience and touch on how lessons learned can be applied in Maine.
Remote Access:
Remote access via webinar: 1. Go to http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?sigKey=mymeetings&i=742656968&=brownbag&t=c; 2. Enter the required fields; 3. Indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy; 4. Click on Proceed. 5. passcode: brownbag. Audio: Dial 866-833-7307; participant passcode: 8986360. Please note: remote access is limited to first 50 participants. For further information about this seminar please contact Mary.Lou.Cumberpatch@noaa.gov (301-713-2600 Ext. 129) or Albert.E.Theberge.Jr@noaa.gov (301-713-2600 Ext. 115).
Download Seminar Presentation:
[Click http://www.lib.noaa.gov/about/news/springuel_04192010.pdf]
OneNOAA Science Seminar Date Added and Listserv Subscription information:
OneNOAA Science Seminars added Thursday, February 25, 2010 10:53 AM / Last edited Tuesday, April 20, 2010 7:01 AM. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can subscribe to the weekly email of OneNOAA Science Seminars by visiting https://list.woc.noaa.gov/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/onenoaascienceseminars and filling in your email address or by sending an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body (don't include the quotes). You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series please contact Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov. Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].


Faster-than-Real-Time Operational Flood Simulation using GPGPU Programming

Date/Time/Location/Seminar Sponsor:
Monday, 19 April 2010, 13:00-14:00pm ETZ [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time] (Seminar location: SSMC-2 (1325 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD, 20910), Room 8246; OneNOAA Science Seminar sponsored by: NWS Office of Hydrologic Development).
Speaker(s):
Mustafa Altinakar, Ph.D. (Associate Director and Research Professor, National Center for Computational Hydroscience and Engineering, The University of Mississippi)
Speaker e-mail(s):
altinakar@ncche.olemiss.edu
Abstract:
Food simulations for engineering studies and operational forecasting are traditionally carried out using one-dimensional (1D) numerical models, which present serious limitations for simulating non channelized flows over a flat topography. Advances in upwind shock-capturing numerical schemes and two-dimensional topography provided by graphical information systems (GIS) and remote sensing technologies have led to the development of robust two-dimensional flood simulation models that can be used for engineering studies. Despite considerable advances in CPU speeds of modern computers, two-dimensional models require relatively longer computational times due to small time step imposed by rather restrictive stability conditions associated with explicit time integration. Existing two-dimensional models are generally too slow for operational forecasting purposes, which require faster-than-real-time simulation speeds. In the past there have been many attempts to speed up two-dimensional models. USGS has experimented with near-real time flood simulations using TRIMR2D model developed by Casulli, University of Trento, Italy. Despite ingenuous use of semi-implicit, semi-Lagrangian finite difference techniques, only near-real-time simulation speeds could be achieved. Game programmers have succeeded in obtaining real-time simulation speeds by simplifying and/or linearizing governing shallow water equations. Unfortunately, although visually plausible, the results produced by these overly simplified models cannot be used for engineering purposes. More recently, Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) and Lattice Boltzman method (LBM) have been proposed to achieve higher computational speeds. However, these methods constitute approximations to real flow phenomena and defining certain physical parameters, such as viscosity, may be a problem. Parallel computing on mainframe supercomputers can offer significant increase in computing speeds, but remain outside of the reach of ordinary users. The recent developments in programmable graphics cards commonly present in desktop and laptop computers now bring parallel computing power to the realm of personal computers. The seminar will present a two-dimensional numerical model, which can perform faster-than-real-time flood simulation and visualization by exploiting these developments and the emerging GPGPU (General-Purpose computation on GPUs) techniques. The numerical model uses the second-order accurate central-upwind scheme of Kurganov-Petrova to solve shallow water equations over a complex topography. The model offers both Euler and 2nd order Runge Kutta time integration. It can handle wetting and drying, disconnected flow domains, and mixed flow regimes. A slope limiter is used to capture sharp interfaces without spurious oscillations. This numerical model is incorporated into a computer-game like environment with simultaneous visualization and interactive user functions to zoom in and out, pan, and rotate the computational domain. The user is also given the possibility to reel back the solution to a specified time, modify the terrain and continue the simulation to see the effects of the changes. Developed with funding from the Department of Homeland Security-sponsored Southeast Region Research Initiative (SERRI) at the Department of Energy’s Oak Ridge National Laboratory, USA, this tool currently focuses primarily on dam-break modeling. However, it can be cost-effectively modified to suit the needs of NWS as an operational forecasting tool. The numerical model and its implementation on GPGPU using CUDA language will be presented and several examples will be shown. The computational speed of the model will be demonstrated by running some test cases on a laptop and by visualizing the results.
Remote Access and Notes:
Remote access via webinar: GotoMeeting: https://www1.gotomeeting.com/join/814976576. Conference Call: (866) 713-2373, passcode 9960047. Remote access limited to 20 connections. For further information about this seminar please contact Ken Pavelle (ken.pavelle@noaa.gov, 301-713-0640 Ext 183).
OneNOAA Science Seminar Date Added and Listserv Subscription information:
OneNOAA Science Seminars added Wednesday, April 14, 2010 9:20 AM. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can subscribe to the weekly email of OneNOAA Science Seminars by visiting https://list.woc.noaa.gov/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/onenoaascienceseminars and filling in your email address or by sending an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body (don't include the quotes). You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series please contact Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov. Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

Is NOAA for the Birds? An Overview of NOAA Fisheries National Seabird Program

Date/Time/Location/Seminar Sponsor:
Tuesday, 20 April 2010; 12:00-13:00 ETZ [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time] (Seminar location: SSMC-3 (1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD, 20910), 2nd Floor; OneNOAA Science Seminar sponsored by: NODC NOAA Central Library)
Speaker(s):
Kim Rivera (NOAA Fisheries' National Seabird Coordinator)
Speaker(s) e-mail(s):
Kim.rivera@noaa.gov
Abstract:
Several of NOAA’s Fisheries Science Centers and Regional Offices have been working on a broad suite of seabird issues since the early 1980’s. This work involves seabird bycatch monitoring and reporting, coordination with other Federal Agencies (US Fish and Wildlife Service and US Geological Survey), addressing Endangered Species Act issues, and collaborative work (with industry and academia) to develop seabird bycatch reduction approaches. Some work also explored or described the role of seabirds in marine ecosystems and how they quickly respond to changes in the ocean environment. Seabird work was being developed independently at several sites and with few resources. The need for coordination, continued international work, and development of funding sources led to the establishment of a National Seabird Program in 2001. With very limited resources, the program supports studies on fisheries bycatch of seabirds and the development of solutions to mitigate and reduce fishing gear impacts on seabirds both domestically and internationally. The program is also expanding its scope to provide better support to Regions and Centers in their work to understand seabirds exclusive of bycatch issues. We know that seabirds are important indicators of marine ecosystem health. Seabird distribution and abundance can reflect physical and biological oceanography, abundance and distribution of mid trophic-level organisms, and the effects of climate change on apex predators. Contaminant levels in seabirds can provide insight into the health of a particular ecosystem. And, unlike so many marine organisms, seabirds are relatively easy and cost-effective to sample. With the ever increasing recognition of the vital role seabirds have within the marine ecosystem, and the continued importance of bycatch monitoring and mitigation, NOAA scientists and managers acknowledge the need for continued support of seabird studies. This seminar will offer highlights of some of the key activities of the NOAA Fisheries’ Seabird Program, including describing some of its projects, as well as touching on other seabird work within NOAA.
Download Presentation:
[Click http://www.uaf.edu/accap/documents/2010_4_MarineMammal_Kelly.pdf]
Remote Access:
Remote access via webinar: 1. Go to http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?sigKey=mymeetings&i=742656968&=brownbag&t=c; 2. Enter the required fields; 3. Indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy; 4. Click on Proceed. 5. passcode: brownbag. Audio: Dial 866-833-7307; participant passcode: 8986360. Please note: remote access is limited to first 50 participants. For further information about this seminar please contact Mary.Lou.Cumberpatch@noaa.gov (301-713-2600 Ext. 129) or Albert.E.Theberge.Jr@noaa.gov (301-713-2600 Ext. 115).
OneNOAA Science Seminar Date Added and Listserv Subscription information:
OneNOAA Science Seminars added Thursday, March 4, 2010 2:23 PM / Last updated Wednesday, April 21, 2010 6:52 AM. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can subscribe to the weekly email of OneNOAA Science Seminars by visiting https://list.woc.noaa.gov/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/onenoaascienceseminars and filling in your email address or by sending an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body (don't include the quotes). You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series please contact Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov. Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].


The Sky is not Falling, But The Ocean is Rising: A Skeptic’s View of Sea Ice Loss and Marine Mammals

Date/Time/Location/Seminar Sponsor:
Tuesday, 20 April 2010; 10:00-11:00 Alaska Local Time [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time] (Seminar location: University of Alaska, Faibanks, Alaska; OneNOAA Science Seminar sponsored by: ACCAP Alaska Climate Teleconferences)
Speaker(s):
Brendan P. Kelly (Research Scientist, National Marine Lab NOAA; and Professor, International Arctic Research Center, University of Alaska, Fairbanks)
Speaker(s) e-mail(s):
brendan.kelly@uas.alaska.edu
Abstract:
Over the past 12 million years, a diversity of mammals evolved specializations for exploiting Arctic sea ice. Other marine mammals—lacking adaptations to ice—have been isolated from one another by sea ice and have evolved along separate paths in the North Atlantic and North Pacific oceans. For the past 10,000 years, Arctic people have developed cultures around the seasonal availability of Arctic marine mammals. Today, 11 ice-associated marine mammal species face unprecedented rapid loss of a continent-sized habitat as Arctic sea ice diminishes. A skeptical analysis (a first principal of science) of ecological and evolutionary data indicate that rapid changes in food resources, predation, competition, and interbreeding threaten many species as well as traditional ways of life among Arctic people. Responding to these changes will require sound analyses, mitigation, and adaptation.
Remote Access and Notes:
How to Participate / Log-In to the Alaska Climate Webinar: 1) Dial:1-800-893-8850; 2) When prompted, enter the PIN code: 7531823; PLEASE MUTE YOUR PHONE DURING THE PRESENTATION. The audio is very sensitive and your external conversations and typing can be heard by other participants and disrupt the presentation. Toview the presentation: 1) Point your web browser to: http://www.shareitnow.com; 2) Click on the blue ‘Join a Meeting’ ; button on the left side bar ; 3) For Presenter ID enter: accap@uaf.edu . If you do not see anything on your screen, click on the refresh button on the top bar. For Macintosh computer users: A copy of the presentation will also be available on the ACCAP website: www.uaf.edu/accap. See the right-hand column under "Highlights." For further information please contact Brook Gamble, Outreach and Education Specialist, (907) 474-7812, accap@uaf.edu.
OneNOAA Science Seminar Date Added and Listserv Subscription information:
OneNOAA Science Seminars added Thursday, April 8, 2010 6:57 AM. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can subscribe to the weekly email of OneNOAA Science Seminars by visiting https://list.woc.noaa.gov/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/onenoaascienceseminars and filling in your email address or by sending an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body (don't include the quotes). You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series please contact Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov. Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].


Monitoring Fish and Plankton: Applications and Challenges for the Arctic: Panel discussion

Date/Time/Location/Seminar Sponsor:
Wednesday, 21 April 2010; 12:00-13:15 Pacific Time Zone [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time] (Seminar location: 7600 Sand Point Way NE, Seattle WA, Building 4, Room 2076, Traynor Conference Room; OneNOAA Science Seminar sponsored by: Alaska Fisheries Science Center).
Speaker(s):
Ed Farley (AFSC/ABL); Bob Lauth, Jeff Napp, Duane Stevenson, Chris Wilson (AFSC/RACE)
Abstract:
TBD
Remote Access and Notes:
Remote seminar access (webex): Meeting Number: 577 582 667; Meeting Password: seminar. To join the online meeting (Now from iPhones too!): 1. Go to https://akfsc.webex.com/akfsc/j.php?ED=143431177&UID=1130813967&PW=NYjkxYTVmZmVk&RT=MiM0; 2. Enter your name and email address; 3. Enter the meeting password: seminar; 4. Click "Join Now". To view in time zones other than Pacific or languages, please click the link: https://akfsc.webex.com/akfsc/j.php?ED=143431177&UID=1130813967&PW=NYjkxYTVmZmVk&ORT=MiM0. To join the audio conference only: 1-866-762-1812 code = 5367175 (member). For assistance: 1. Go to https://akfsc.webex.com/akfsc/mc; 2. On the left navigation bar, click "Support" or contact
mike.a.brown@noaa.gov. For information about this seminar please contact Rebecca.Reuter@noaa.gov. For information about the AFSC seminar series see http://www.afsc.noaa.gov/seminarseries/seminarseries.htm.
OneNOAA Science Seminar Date Added and Listserv Subscription information:
OneNOAA Science Seminars added Friday, March 26, 2010 10:30 AM. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can subscribe to the weekly email of OneNOAA Science Seminars by visiting https://list.woc.noaa.gov/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/onenoaascienceseminars and filling in your email address or by sending an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body (don't include the quotes). You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series please contact Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov. Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].


Environmental Pathogens in Ocean Reservoirs

Date/Time/Location/Seminar Sponsor:
Thursday, 22 April 2010; 11:00 - 12:00 PDT [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time] (Seminar location: Auditorium, Northwest Fisheries Science Center, Seatlle, WA; OneNOAA Science Seminar sponsored by: NWFSC)
Speaker(s):
Erin Lipp (College of Public Health, Environmental Health Science; University of Georgia)
Speaker e-mail(s):
elipp@uga.edu
Abstract:
Oceanic and coastal waters are known to harbor and transport microorganisms that cause disease in humans and other animals. While certain pathogenic microorganisms, including Vibrio spp., occur naturally in marine and estuarine waters, anthropogenic contaminants including enteric bacteria, protozoa and viruses may be introduced to coastal waters as sewage pollution. Despite the relatively unfavorable environment, these introduced organisms may survive for prolonged periods in the marine environment; and, it remains unclear how human pathogenic microbes interact in the complex estuarine environment and how those interactions ultimately affect their fate. We are exploring the role of plankton as a defined niche for a suite of microbial pathogens, both native and sewage-associated. We hypothesize that the high level of surface area represented by plankton would present a natural zone for microbial accumulation, in general, and that the specific composition of the plankton community would influence population dynamics in Vibrio spp. in particular. We examined the interactions between plankton, Vibrio spp., human enteric viruses and traditional fecal indicator bacteria in estuaries of coastal Georgia. Consistent with previous findings, Vibrio spp. were highly concentrated in the plankton fractions relative to the water column. Vibrio concentrations were also positively associated with copepod abundance in the small plankton fraction, when temperature and salinity were controlled. Both enterococci and fecal coliform bacteria were also found in higher concentrations in plankton fractions but varied in magnitude of enrichment over the study period; however, plankton-associated enterococci contributed up to 95% of the total enterococci load during summer months. Additionally, the human enteric noroviruses were found at their highest concentrations in the plankton, at up to 1014 genomes g-1. While this project started with the aim of expanding our understanding of the known relationship between Vibrio spp. and plankton our results suggest that microbial association among these phytoplankton and zooplankton groups may be a general phenomenon. It also suggests that plankton may provide critical refuge for many enteric microbes in an estuarine setting and thus enhance persistence and increase chances for human exposure.
Remote Access and Notes:

For remote access, please contact Ruben Sanchez-Teran (Ruben.Sanchez-Teran@noaa.gov). All seminars are open to the public. The auditorium is located at 2725 Montlake Blvd. E., Seattle, WA 98112. For further information, please contact Blake Feist (206-860-3408; Blake.Feist@noaa.gov); [click NWFSC seminar series].

About the speaker(s):
Erin Lipp is an associate professor in environmental health science at the University of Georga Dr. Lipp’s research focus is the ecology of human pathogens in ambient waters and the role of environmental exposures in disease transmission. Her research incorporates molecular biology, microbial ecology, epidemiology and climate research to better understand the fate of bacteria and viruses introduced from wastewater to aquatic environments and their potential for transmission to humans and other hosts.
OneNOAA Science Seminar Date Added and Listserv Subscription information:
OneNOAA Science Seminars added Monday, April 5, 2010 6:32 AM. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can subscribe to the weekly email of OneNOAA Science Seminars by visiting https://list.woc.noaa.gov/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/onenoaascienceseminars and filling in your email address or by sending an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body (don't include the quotes). You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series please contact Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov. Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].


Overfishing, Trophic Cascades, And The Transition From Benign To Malign HABs

Date/Time/Location/Seminar Sponsor:
(22 April 2010 Seminar Postponed, new date is Thursday 29 April 2010) Thursday, 22 April 2010; 14:00-15:00 [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time] (Seminar location: Dolphin Conference Room, NOAA/NMFS Southeast Regional Office, 263 13th Avenue S, St. Petersburg, FL 33701; OneNOAA Science Seminar sponsored by: NOAA/NMFS/SERO).
Speaker(s):
Dr. John J. Walsh (College of Marine Science, University of South Florida)
Speaker e-mail(s):
jwalsh@marine.usf.edu
Abstract:
A half-century of overfishing, trophic cascades, eutrophication, and consequent potential transition from benign, fish-killing Harmful Algal Blooms (HAB)s of the brevetoxin source of Karenia brevis to malign, people-killing HABs of the saxitoxin source of Pyrodinium bahamense on the West Florida shelf: Pressing needs for bottom-up, model-guided, ecosystem-based management of biotic resources within coastal waters of the physically teleconnected eastern Gulf of Mexico and the downstream South Atlantic Bight.
Remote Access and Notes:
This seminar is held at the Dolphin Conference Room, NOAA/NMFS Southeast Regional Office, 263 13th Avenue S, St. Petersburg, FL 33701 (see google map location). Remote access: TBD. For general questions about this seminar please contact Bill.Arnold@noaa.gov and for IT questions, Becky.Stanley@noaa.gov.
About the speaker(s):
[Click http://www.marine.usf.edu/faculty/john-walsh.shtml]
Web link to download Presentation(s):
Webinar: Reserve your Webinar seat now at https://www1.gotomeeting.com/register/300883768 (space is limited). After registering you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the Webinar.
OneNOAA Science Seminar Date Added and Listserv Subscription information:
OneNOAA Science Seminars added Wednesday, April 14, 2010 10:41 AM / Last edited Thursday, April 22, 2010 8:48 AM. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can subscribe to the weekly email of OneNOAA Science Seminars by visiting https://list.woc.noaa.gov/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/onenoaascienceseminars and filling in your email address or by sending an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body (don't include the quotes). You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series please contact Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov. Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].


Assessment of Existing Information on Atlantic Coastal Fish Habitats: Development of a Web-Based Spatial bibliography, Query Tools, and Data Summaries

Date/Time/Location/Seminar Sponsor:
Wednesday, 28 April 2010; 12:00 – 13:00 ETZ [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time] (Seminar location: (SSMC-4, Room #8150; OneNOAA Science Seminar sponsored by: NOS).
Speaker(s):
David Moe Nelson and Tom McGrath (NOAA/NOS Center for Coastal Monitoring and Assessment)
Speaker e-mail(s):
David.Moe.Nelson@noaa.gov
Abstract:
NOAA’s National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science has completed a collaborative project titled “Assessment of Existing Information on Atlantic Coastal Fish Habitats: Development of a web-based spatial bibliography, query tools, and data summaries”, and published the results in a Technical Memorandum. The Assessment includes three components: 1) a representative bibliographic and assessment database, 2) a Geographical Information System (GIS) spatial framework, and 3) a published summary report with description of methods, analyses of habitat assessment information, and recommendations for further work. The spatial bibliography was created by linking the bibliographic table developed in Microsoft Excel and exported to SQL Server, with the spatial framework developed in ArcGIS and exported to GoogleMaps. Information on habitat condition indicators, threats, and conservation recommendations are extracted from each entry and recorded in a separate linked table. Together, the bibliography and assessment tables and their spatial framework provide a powerful tool to query and assess available information through a publicly available web interface. The project is a cooperative effort of NOAA/NOS Center for Coastal Monitoring and Assessment (CCMA) Biogeography Branch and Atlantic Coastal Fish Habitat Partnership (ACFHP). The results are assisting conservation planning by the Partnership, and the general approach is being applied towards the coastal component of the National Fish Habitat Action Plan (NFHAP) 2010 Assessment. A PDF version of the report, along with additional information, is available at: http://ccma.nos.noaa.gov/ecosystems/estuaries/coastalfish.html, and the web-based query tools are accessible at: http://www8.nos.noaa.gov/bhv/spatbibindex.html.
Remote Access and Notes:
Presentations are available remotely via a combination of phone & webcast. Please be aware that remote access is limited to 50 connections on a first-come-first served basis, so we cannot guarantee participation. For phone access: dial 877-708-1667, passcode 7028688. For webcast access: 1. Go to the My Meetings website. 2. Select "Join an event" and enter the required fields. (Meeting Number: 744925153; no passcode required) 3. Indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy. 4. Click on Proceed. 5. Dial into the phone so you can hear too!. For questions: contact Tracy Gill (Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov).
OneNOAA Science Seminar Date Added and Listserv Subscription information:
OneNOAA Science Seminars added Monday, March 15, 2010 2:29 PM / Last edited Wednesday, April 21, 2010 2:55 PM. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can subscribe to the weekly email of OneNOAA Science Seminars by visiting https://list.woc.noaa.gov/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/onenoaascienceseminars and filling in your email address or by sending an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body (don't include the quotes). You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series please contact Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov. Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].


Living in a Changing Environment: Update on Ice-Associated Seals

Date/Time/Location/Seminar Sponsor:
Wednesday, 28 April 2010; 12:00-13:15 Pacific Time Zone [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time] (Seminar location: 7600 Sand Point Way NE, Seattle WA, Building 4, Room 2076, Traynor Conference Room.; OneNOAA Science Seminar sponsored by: Alaska Fisheries Science Center).
Speaker(s):
Peter Boveng (AFSC/NMML)
Abstract:
TBD
Remote Access and Notes:
Remote seminar access (webex): Meeting Number: 574 443 466; Meeting Password: seminar. To join the online meeting (Now from iPhones too!): 1. Go to https://akfsc.webex.com/akfsc/j.php?ED=143431527&UID=1130814237&PW=NNDY5YTc1ZTdm&RT=MiM0; 2. Enter your name and email address; 3. Enter the meeting password: seminar; 4. Click "Join Now". To view in time zones other than Pacific or languages, please click the link: https://akfsc.webex.com/akfsc/j.php?ED=143431527&UID=1130814237&PW=NNDY5YTc1ZTdm&ORT=MiM0. To join the audio conference only: 1-866-762-1812 code = 5367175 (member). For assistance: 1. Go to https://akfsc.webex.com/akfsc/mc; 2. On the left navigation bar, click "Support" or contact
mike.a.brown@noaa.gov. For information about this seminar please contact Rebecca.Reuter@noaa.gov. For information about the AFSC seminar series see http://www.afsc.noaa.gov/seminarseries/seminarseries.htm.
OneNOAA Science Seminar Date Added and Listserv Subscription information:
OneNOAA Science Seminars added Friday, March 26, 2010 10:30 AM. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can subscribe to the weekly email of OneNOAA Science Seminars by visiting https://list.woc.noaa.gov/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/onenoaascienceseminars and filling in your email address or by sending an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body (don't include the quotes). You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series please contact Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov. Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].


An Introduction to ShoreZone Coastal Habitat Mapping and the Nearshore Fish Atlas of Alaska

Date/Time/Location/Seminar Sponsor:
Wednesday, 28 April 2010; 12:00-13:00 ETZ [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time] (Seminar location: SSMC-3, 2nd Floor; OneNOAA Science Seminar sponsored by: NODC NOAA Central Library)
Speaker(s):
Mandy Lindeberg (NMFS, Alaska Fisheries Science Center), Steve Lewis (NMFS, Alaska Region) and Cindy Hartmann Moore (NMFS, Alaska Region).
Abstract:
This seminar will describe the Alaska ShoreZone coastal habitat imaging and mapping project: what it is, how to access it, and what practical applications it serves. This seminar will also present the Nearshore Fish Atlas database and demonstrate the integrated ShoreZone/Fish Atlas web site.
Remote Access:
Remote access via webinar: 1. Go to http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?sigKey=mymeetings&i=742656968&=brownbag&t=c; 2. Enter the required fields; 3. Indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy; 4. Click on Proceed. 5. passcode: brownbag. Audio: Dial 866-833-7307; participant passcode: 8986360. Please note: remote access is limited to first 50 participants. For further information about this seminar please contact Mary.Lou.Cumberpatch@noaa.gov (301-713-2600 Ext. 129) or Albert.E.Theberge.Jr@noaa.gov (301-713-2600 Ext. 115).
Download Presentation:
[Click http://www.lib.noaa.gov/about/news/lindeberg_04282010.pdf]
OneNOAA Science Seminar Date Added and Listserv Subscription information:
OneNOAA Science Seminars added Monday, April 5, 2010 8:03 AM / last edited Thursday, April 29, 2010 2:16 PM. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can subscribe to the weekly email of OneNOAA Science Seminars by visiting https://list.woc.noaa.gov/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/onenoaascienceseminars and filling in your email address or by sending an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body (don't include the quotes). You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series please contact Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov. Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].


Hybridization Between Native Westslope Cutthroat Trout and Introduced Rainbow Trout: Genomic Extinction or Adaptive Evolution?

Date/Time/Location/Seminar Sponsor:
Thursday, 29 April 2010; 11:00 - 12:00 PDT [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time] (Seminar location: Auditorium, Northwest Fisheries Science Center, Seatlle, WA; OneNOAA Science Seminar sponsored by: NWFSC)
Speaker(s):
Clint Muhlfeld (Northern Rocky Mountain Science Center; USGS)
Speaker e-mail(s):
cmuhlfeld@usgs.gov
Abstract:
Human-mediated hybridization is a leading cause of biodiversity loss worldwide. How hybridization affects ecological adaptations and what level of hybridization is permissible pose difficult conservation questions with little empirical information to guide policy and management decisions. This is particularly true for salmonids, where widespread introgression among nonnative and native taxa has often created hybrid swarms over extensive geographic areas resulting in genomic extinction. Interbreeding between westslope cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarkii lewisi) with nonnative rainbow trout (O. mykiss) exemplifies the conservation challenges of interspecific hybridization. Clint will present over 10 years of research in Montana that has investigated the behavioral, ecological, and fitness consequences of hybridization and the factors influencing the spread of hybridization between native westslope cutthroat trout and introduced rainbow trout. The combined results suggest that hybrids are not only genetically different than westslope cutthroat trout but also have reduced fitness and are ecologically different, and that hybridization is likely to continue to spread if hybrid populations with high amounts of rainbow trout admixture are not reduced or eliminated. Results indicate that extant aboriginal cutthroat trout are at greater conservation risk due to hybridization than previously thought and policies that protect hybridized populations need reconsideration.
Remote Access and Notes:

For remote access, please contact Ruben Sanchez-Teran (Ruben.Sanchez-Teran@noaa.gov). All seminars are open to the public. The auditorium is located at 2725 Montlake Blvd. E., Seattle, WA 98112. For further information, please contact Blake Feist (206-860-3408; Blake.Feist@noaa.gov); [click NWFSC seminar series].

About the speaker(s):
Clint Muhlfeld is a Research Aquatic Ecologist for the Northern Rocky Mountain Science Center of the U.S. Geological Survey. He is stationed at Glacier National Park, Montana and is a faculty affiliate at the University of Montana and Montana State University. Clint’s research has focused on various aspects of aquatic ecology, fisheries biology, and conservation of native aquatic biota. His published research spans a range of research questions and conservation issues from examining the impacts of hybridization and competition between native and non-native salmonids, to assessing life history diversity and genetic structure of native fishes, to investigating the impacts of hydroelectric dams on aquatic ecosystems, and to developing quantitative bioenergetics and population viability models for fish populations and aquatic communities. He received a Ph.D. in Fish and Wildlife Biology from Montana State University in 2008, M.S. degree in Fishery Resources from the University of Idaho in 1999, and B.S. in Aquatic Biology from the University of Montana in 1994. Clint mentors and teaches undergraduate and graduate students interested in aquatic ecology and biology, and advises graduate students working on his aquatics research program. He is the former President of the Montana Chapter of the American Fisheries Society, former Chair of the Resident Fish Committee of the Columbia River drainage, and currently serves on the Montana governor’s advisory board for invasive species. Clint has held several research positions with state and federal agencies in Montana and Oregon, and is currently active in several regional, national, and international science teams that address native fish conservation and aquatic resource issues.
OneNOAA Science Seminar Date Added and Listserv Subscription information:
OneNOAA Science Seminars added Monday, April 5, 2010 6:32 AM. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can subscribe to the weekly email of OneNOAA Science Seminars by visiting https://list.woc.noaa.gov/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/onenoaascienceseminars and filling in your email address or by sending an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body (don't include the quotes). You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series please contact Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov. Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].


Overfishing, Trophic Cascades, And The Transition From Benign To Malign HABs

Date/Time/Location/Seminar Sponsor:
Thursday, 29 April 2010; 14:00-15:00 [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time] (Seminar location: Dolphin Conference Room, NOAA/NMFS Southeast Regional Office, 263 13th Avenue S, St. Petersburg, FL 33701; OneNOAA Science Seminar sponsored by: NOAA/NMFS/SERO). This seminar was originally scheduled for 22 April 2010.
Speaker(s):
Dr. John J. Walsh (College of Marine Science, University of South Florida)
Speaker e-mail(s):
jwalsh@marine.usf.edu
Abstract:
A half-century of overfishing, trophic cascades, eutrophication, and consequent potential transition from benign, fish-killing Harmful Algal Blooms (HAB)s of the brevetoxin source of Karenia brevis to malign, people-killing HABs of the saxitoxin source of Pyrodinium bahamense on the West Florida shelf: Pressing needs for bottom-up, model-guided, ecosystem-based management of biotic resources within coastal waters of the physically teleconnected eastern Gulf of Mexico and the downstream South Atlantic Bight.
Remote Access and Notes:
This seminar is held at the Dolphin Conference Room, NOAA/NMFS Southeast Regional Office, 263 13th Avenue S, St. Petersburg, FL 33701 (see google map location). Remote access: Reserve your Webinar seat now at https://www1.gotomeeting.com/register/827775808 (space is limited). After registering you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the Webinar. For general questions about this seminar please contact Bill.Arnold@noaa.gov and for IT questions, Becky.Stanley@noaa.gov.
About the speaker(s):
[Click http://www.marine.usf.edu/faculty/john-walsh.shtml]
OneNOAA Science Seminar Date Added and Listserv Subscription information:
OneNOAA Science Seminars added Wednesday, April 14, 2010 10:41 AM / Last edited Wednesday, April 28, 2010 12:50 PM. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can subscribe to the weekly email of OneNOAA Science Seminars by visiting https://list.woc.noaa.gov/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/onenoaascienceseminars and filling in your email address or by sending an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body (don't include the quotes). You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series please contact Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov. Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

OneNOAA Science Seminars 2010 (by month): Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Back to top


 

May 2010

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Scheduled seminars highlighted in blue
OneNOAA Science Seminars 2010: Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
(Total number of OneNOAA Science seminars in May 2010: TBD)



Methane Emissions From Thermokarst Lakes

Date/Time/Location/Seminar Sponsor:
Tuesday, 04 May 2010; 10:00-11:00 Alaska Local Time [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]; (Seminar location: University of Alaska, Faibanks, Alaska; OneNOAA Science Seminar sponsored by: ACCAP Alaska Climate Teleconferences)
Speaker(s):
Katey Walter Anthony (Assistant Professor, Water & Environmental Research Center, University of Alaska Fairbanks)
Speaker(s) e-mail(s):
ftkmw1@uaf.edu
Abstract:
Methane is a potent greenhouse gas released from millions of lakes in the Arctic. The largest methane emissions come from lakes where organic-rich permafrost is thawing. Permafrost organic matter released into the bottoms of lakes fuels methane production, and methane escapes lakes largely by bubbling. Given the huge quantity of organic carbon in permafrost (>1500 Gt C, which is more than twice the atmospheric C content), and projections of permafrost warming and thawing, the fate of carbon and greenhouse gas release is important for understanding climate change feedbacks.
Remote Access and Notes:
How to Participate / Log-In to the Alaska Climate Webinar: 1) Dial:1-800-893-8850; 2) When prompted, enter the PIN code: 7531823; PLEASE MUTE YOUR PHONE DURING THE PRESENTATION. The audio is very sensitive and your external conversations and typing can be heard by other participants and disrupt the presentation. To view the presentation: 1) Point your web browser to: http://www.shareitnow.com; 2) Click on the blue ‘Join a Meeting’ ; button on the left side bar ; 3) For Presenter ID enter: accap@uaf.edu . If you do not see anything on your screen, click on the refresh button on the top bar. For Macintosh computer users: A copy of the presentation will also be available on the ACCAP website: www.uaf.edu/accap. See the right-hand column under "Highlights." For further information please contact Brook Gamble, Outreach and Education Specialist, (907) 474-7812, accap@uaf.edu.
OneNOAA Science Seminar Date Added and Listserv Subscription information:
OneNOAA Science Seminars added Wednesday, April 21, 2010 6:55 AM. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can subscribe to the weekly email of OneNOAA Science Seminars by visiting https://list.woc.noaa.gov/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/onenoaascienceseminars and filling in your email address or by sending an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body (don't include the quotes). You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series please contact Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov. Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].


Salmon: A Tool for Understanding Effects of Climate on Marine Species

Date/Time/Location/Seminar Sponsor:
Wednesday, 05 May 2010; 12:00-13:15 Pacific Time Zone [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time] (Seminar location: 7600 Sand Point Way NE, Seattle WA, Building 4, Room 2076, Traynor Conference Room; OneNOAA Science Seminar sponsored by: y Alaska Fisheries Science Center).
Speaker(s):
Ellen Martinson (AFSC/ABL)
Abstract:
TBD
Remote Access and Notes:

Remote seminar access (webex): Meeting Number: 579 741 513; Meeting Password: seminar. To join the online meeting (Now from iPhones too!): 1. Go to https://akfsc.webex.com/akfsc/j.php?ED=143431602&UID=1130815507&PW=NZDYxZDJiMDFm&RT=MiM0; 2. Enter your name and email address; 3. Enter the meeting password: seminar; 4. Click "Join Now". To view in time zones other than Pacific or languages, please click the link: https://akfsc.webex.com/akfsc/j.php?ED=143431602&UID=1130815507&PW=NZDYxZDJiMDFm&ORT=MiM0. To join the audio conference only: 1-866-762-1812 code = 5367175 (member). For assistance: 1. Go to https://akfsc.webex.com/akfsc/mc; 2. On the left navigation bar, click "Support" or contact mike.a.brown@noaa.gov. For information about this seminar please contact Rebecca.Reuter@noaa.gov. For information about the AFSC seminar series see http://www.afsc.noaa.gov/seminarseries/seminarseries.htm.

OneNOAA Science Seminar Date Added and Listserv Subscription information:
OneNOAA Science Seminars added Friday, March 26, 2010 10:30 AM. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can subscribe to the weekly email of OneNOAA Science Seminars by visiting https://list.woc.noaa.gov/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/onenoaascienceseminars and filling in your email address or by sending an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body (don't include the quotes). You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series please contact Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov. Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].


Remote Sensing Coastal Areas

Date/Time/Location/Seminar Sponsor:
Wednesday, 05 May 2010, 10:00–11:00 ETZ [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time] (Seminar location: World Weather Building, Room 707, Camp Springs, MD; OneNOAA Science Seminar sponsored by: STAR).
Speaker(s):
Carl Nim (NOAA Sea Grant Knauss Fellow, NOAA/NESDIS/STAR Coral Reef Watch)
Speaker e-mail(s):
carl.nim@noaa.gov
Abstract:
This seminar will serve as an introduction of Carl Nim who is a 2010 Knauss Fellow in the Coral Reef Watch office of STAR. The seminar will provide an overview of his background and experience using remote sensing in coastal locations and discuss its applications to environmental issues in these areas. Carl will also explain how his position fits in amongst the broader role of communicating between scientists and managers in order to develop products, which aid in fulfilling the goals and objectives of NOAA. Using examples from the recent Coral Reef Watch workshop, Carl will illustrate how current requests for remote sensing products by managers can be derived from STAR products to achieve the goals and objectives of STAR and CRCP.
Remote Access and Notes:
Phone access: USA 866-832-9297, International 203-566-7610, Passcode 6070416. World Weather Building, Room 707, Camp Springs, MD. For further information please conatct Jerry Zhan (301-763-8042 Ext 148) or Danette Warren (301-763-8042 Ext 104).
About The Speaker:
[Click http://www.seagrant.noaa.gov/knauss/photos/2010_fellows/pages/nim_carl_oh.html]
Web link to download Presentation(s):
[Click http://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/documents/seminardocs/Nim_20100505.pdf]
OneNOAA Science Seminar Date Added and Listserv Subscription information:
OneNOAA Science Seminars added Wednesday, April 14, 2010 1:38 PM / Last updated Wednesday, May 5, 2010 7:42 AM. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can subscribe to the weekly email of OneNOAA Science Seminars by visiting https://list.woc.noaa.gov/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/onenoaascienceseminars and filling in your email address or by sending an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body (don't include the quotes). You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series please contact Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov. Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].


The Distinctive Ecology and Population Structure of Vibrio Parahaemolyticus in the Pacific Northwest: Implications for Risk Assessment and Early Warning Systems

Date/Time/Location/Seminar Sponsor:
Thursday, 06 May 2010; 11:00 - 12:00 PDT [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time] (Seminar location: Auditorium, Northwest Fisheries Science Center, Seatlle, WA; OneNOAA Science Seminar sponsored by: NWFSC)
Speaker(s):
Rohinee Paranjpye (Northwest Fisheries Science Center; NOAA Fisheries)
Speaker e-mail(s):
rohinee.paranjpye @noaa.gov
Abstract:
Vibrio parahaemolyticus is responsible for nearly 50% of Vibrio-related infections in the United States. The majority of infections are acquired by ingestion of raw or undercooked shellfish such as oysters that harbor the bacterium, resulting in a severe but self-limiting gastroenteritis. Over the past decade there have been significant increases in Vibrio parahaemolyticus-related illnesses in some years from consumption of raw oysters harvested from shellfish growing areas in Washington State. Current risk assessment models are based on the presence or absence of two potential virulence genes, tdh (encoding the thermostable-direct hemolysin) and trh (encoding the thermostable-related hemolysin). However, extensive monitoring and analyses of oysters by the Washington State Department of Health (WDOH), along with modifications in post-harvest handling of oysters by shellfish growers, has shown little or no correlation of illnesses with the presence or concentrations of tdh+/trh+ V. parahaemolyticus in oysters harvested from the Pacific Northwest. We are investigating the influence of environmental variables on concentrations of potentially pathogenic and avirulent strains of V. parahaemolyticus in oysters as well as in water and plankton, focusing on harvest areas with historically higher incidences of the bacteria. In addition we are examining the association of V. parahaemolyticus with co-isolated phytoplankton species. Finally we are comparing the genetic diversity of environmental and illness-associated V. parahaemolyticus strains from the Pacific Northwest to a strain representative of the pandemic complex as well as strains from other geographic regions. Through this work, we hope to gain a better understanding of the spatial, temporal, environmental, and bacterial genetic relationships that promote the selection of strains responsible for clinical V. parahaemolyticus infections, which may assist in the improvement of risk assessment strategies, early warning systems, and mitigation tools to prevent disease outbreaks.
Remote Access and Notes:

For remote access, please contact Ruben Sanchez-Teran (Ruben.Sanchez-Teran@noaa.gov). All seminars are open to the public. The auditorium is located at 2725 Montlake Blvd. E., Seattle, WA 98112. For further information, please contact Blake Feist (206-860-3408; Blake.Feist@noaa.gov); [click NWFSC seminar series].

About the speaker(s):
Rohinee Paranjpye is a research microbiologist at the Northwest Fisheries Science Center. Her current research is focused on the identification of abiotic environmental factors, biotic factors and microbial genetic factors on the presence and amplification of Vibrio species in the marine environment. The overall goal of this research is to develop methods to mitigate the threat posed by these pathogens to human health and to develop tools to assess health risk at harvest.
OneNOAA Science Seminar Date Added and Listserv Subscription information:
OneNOAA Science Seminars added Monday, April 5, 2010 6:32 AM. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can subscribe to the weekly email of OneNOAA Science Seminars by visiting https://list.woc.noaa.gov/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/onenoaascienceseminars and filling in your email address or by sending an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body (don't include the quotes). You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series please contact Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov. Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].


Quantifying Ecosystem Interactions of a FLUPY-Based Oyster Nursery

Date/Time/Location/Seminar Sponsor:
Tuesday, 11 May 2010, 12:00 – 13:00 ETZ[Check U.S. Time clock for your local time] (Seminar location: SSMC-3 (1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD, 20910), 2nd Floor; OneNOAA Science Seminar sponsored by: NOAA Aquaculture Program and NODC NOAA Central Library).
Speaker(s):
Mark S. Dixon, Yaqin Li, and April N. Croxton (All at NOAA Northeast Fishery Science Center Milford Laboratory).
Speaker e-mail(s):
Mark.Dixon@noaa.gov, Judy.Yaqin.Li@Noaa.gov, april.croxton@noaa.gov
Abstract:
Increasing global demand for seafood is being, and will continue to be, met by increased aquaculture production. Suspension-feeding shellfish, a premium aquaculture product, obtain nutrition directly from phytoplankton primary production and are considered to have environmental benefits beyond human food value. Relatively-recent innovations, Floating Upwelling Systems (FLUPSYs) are now a common and important component of many shellfish-aquaculture operations. A FLUPSY is an in-situ nursery system designed to increase water flow, and therefore microalgal food delivery, to post-set shellfish. Typically the system is incorporated into a floating dock array and deployed in a productive, coastal waterway. The widespread use of FLUPSYs is a testament to their success. The placement of FLUPSYs, however, leads to questions about their potential impacts -- negative, neutral, or ecosystem service -- upon the local environment. As part of the NOAA National Aquaculture Program, the Milford Laboratory has been developing a set of tools to quantify the effects of shellfish aquaculture operations upon planktonic and nutrient variables. Working in cooperation with Aeros Cultured Oyster Company and the town of Riverhead, NY, we are conducting a multi-year field study in East Creek estuary. Physical and chemical variables are being monitored by automated sensors and conventional methods. Seston and plankton analyses, as well as an assessment of oyster immune defense functions, are done with flow-cytometric methods. Variable-fluorescence methods are used to assess photosynthetic parameters. An estuarine transect was completed to determine nutrient dynamics. Most recently, mesocosm bag experiments were conducted to evaluate the status of phytoplankton and zooplankton communities in the absence of tidal and sediment signals. Preliminary results reveal a typical nitrogen-limited estuary system that is dominated by natural tidal, diel, and weather cycles. Measurable oyster feeding is discontinuous and consistent with oyster physiology and the physical parameters of the system. The phytoplankton community structure is controlled by tidal exchange, succession, competition and zooplankton grazing. Oysters appear not to be stressed in the FLUPSY system when environmental variables are within oyster tolerance ranges. The study is providing an overall picture of a FLUPSY that is having negligible effects on this very productive system, and has produced methodologies that are transferable to other aquaculture settings.
Remote Access and Notes:
Remote access via webinar: 1. Go to http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?sigKey=mymeetings&i=742656968&=brownbag&t=c; 2. Enter the required fields; 3. Indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy; 4. Click on Proceed. 5. passcode: brownbag. Audio: Dial 866-833-7307; participant passcode: 8986360. Please note: remote access is limited to first 50 participants. For further information about this seminar please contact Kate.Naughten@noaa.gov, Mary.Lou.Cumberpatch@noaa.gov (301-713-2600 Ext. 129) or Albert.E.Theberge.Jr@noaa.gov (301-713-2600 Ext. 115).
About the speaker(s):

  • Mark Dixon has worked as the manager of the Microalgal Mass Culture facility at the NMFS lab in Milford Connecticut for over 10 years. He received an MS in Oceanography from the University of Connecticut with a research focus on fish ecology. Mark’s research interests at Milford are centered around trophic interactions in aquaculture systems. He is an active member of the lab’s dive team, as a NOAA Scientific Diver, and regularly participates in lab-wide field work.
  • Judy Li received a BS and MS degree from Xiamen University in the People’s Republic of China and a PhD in Biological Oceanography from the University of Rhode Island. Judy has worked as an Ecologist in the Milford lab since 2005. Prior to 2005 she worked as an Environmental Analyst for the Connecticut Department of Environmental Protection. She is interested in the interactions between the plankton community and shellfish aquaculture applying flow cytometry, microscopic and pigment analysis and proteomic techniques.
  • April Croxton is a Research Fishery Biologist at the NOAA Fisheries Service’s Milford Laboratory in Milford, CT. She received her B.Sc. in Biology from Virginia Union University and Ph.D. in Environmental Sciences, with a concentration in Aquatic Ecology, from Florida A&M University. April joined the Milford Lab as a NOAA Educational Partnership Program’s Graduate Sciences Fellow in 2003, where she completed her dissertation research. Her dissertation topic investigated the trophic transfer of organic contaminants to the eastern oyster and the subsequent effects of this contaminant exposure on the immune defense functions of this bivalve species. Currently at the Milford Lab, April is studying the effects of environmental stressors on bivalve species.
OneNOAA Science Seminar Date Added and Listserv Subscription information:
OneNOAA Science Seminars added Monday, April 12, 2010 7:47 AM. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can subscribe to the weekly email of OneNOAA Science Seminars by visiting https://list.woc.noaa.gov/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/onenoaascienceseminars and filling in your email address or by sending an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body (don't include the quotes). You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series please contact Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov. Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].


Confirmation, Controversy, or Chaos? Interactions Between Scientific and Traditional Knowledge in Arctic Research

Date/Time/Location/Seminar Sponsor:
Wednesday, 12 May 2010; 12:00-13:15 Pacific Time Zone [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time] (Seminar location: 7600 Sand Point Way NE, Seattle WA, Building 4, Room 2076, Traynor Conference Room; OneNOAA Science Seminar sponsored by: Alaska Fisheries Science Center).
Speaker(s):
Henry Huntington (Arctic Science Director for the Pew Environment Group)
Abstract:
TBD
Remote Access and Notes:
Remote seminar access (webex): Meeting Number: 579 606 439; Meeting Password: seminar. To join the online meeting (Now from iPhones too!): 1. Go to https://akfsc.webex.com/akfsc/j.php?ED=144079802&UID=1132797657&PW=NNGNkNmY0OTZm&RT=MiM0; 2. Enter your name and email address; 3. Enter the meeting password: seminar; 4. Click "Join Now". To view in time zones other than Pacific or languages, please click the link: https://akfsc.webex.com/akfsc/j.php?ED=144079802&UID=1132797657&PW=NNGNkNmY0OTZm&ORT=MiM0. To join the audio conference only: 1-866-762-1812 code = 5367175 (member). For assistance: 1. Go to https://akfsc.webex.com/akfsc/mc; 2. On the left navigation bar, click "Support" or contact
mike.a.brown@noaa.gov. For information about this seminar please contact Rebecca.Reuter@noaa.gov. For information about the AFSC seminar series see http://www.afsc.noaa.gov/seminarseries/seminarseries.htm.
OneNOAA Science Seminar Date Added and Listserv Subscription information:
OneNOAA Science Seminars added Friday, March 26, 2010 10:30 AM. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can subscribe to the weekly email of OneNOAA Science Seminars by visiting https://list.woc.noaa.gov/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/onenoaascienceseminars and filling in your email address or by sending an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body (don't include the quotes). You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series please contact Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov. Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].
OneNOAA Science Seminars 2010 (by month): Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Back to top

The Pacific Sardine (Sardinops sagax) Fishery: Federal Regulation Alternatives

Date/Time/Location/Seminar Sponsor:
Wednesday, 12 May 2010; 12:00-12:30 ETZ [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time] (Seminar location: SSMC-3 (1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD, 20910), 2nd Floor; OneNOAA Science Seminar sponsored by: Sea Grant Knauss Fellows Brown Bag Series).
Speaker(s):
Karen Carlson (Sea Grant Knauss Fellow, PPI/PPI)
Speaker e-mail(s):
karen.carlson@noaa.gov
Abstract:
The largest volume fishery in the Western Hemisphere, Pacific sardine (Sardinops sagax) has collapsed and rebounded to levels now considered well-managed utilizing sustainable fishing practices. Recent scientific egg surveys suggest the fishery is entering another decline while fishermen report large schools of sardines in higher latitudes. The sardine industry is primarily a high-volume, low-value export industry with low domestic food value. Declining quotas and increased competition are putting pressure on the viability of high volume sardine fishermen and bulk export processors. Four alternatives are explored in the paper: #1 Status Quo – continue with Harvest Guideline rule and tri-annual percentages with quotas closures. #2 Short-Term – initiate permit equity between the regions, add a domestic catch allowance, #3 Catch Shares - Individual Transferable Quotas (ITQ) and #4 Catch Shares - Community Property Rights (CPR). Regulations are needed which reduce regional rivalry and encourage industry innovations to adjust to lower volume catch.
Remote Access and Notes:
Remote access via webinar: 1. Go to http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?sigKey=mymeetings&i=742656968&=brownbag&t=c; 2. Enter the required fields; 3. Indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy; 4. Click on Proceed. 5. passcode: brownbag. Audio: Dial 866-833-7307; participant passcode: 8986360. Please note: remote access is limited to first 50 participants. For further information about this seminar please contact Mary.Lou.Cumberpatch@noaa.gov (301-713-2600 Ext. 129) or Albert.E.Theberge.Jr@noaa.gov (301-713-2600 Ext. 115). For information about the Sea Grant Knauss Fellows Brown Bag Series please contact Wendy.Morrison@noaa.gov.
OneNOAA Science Seminar Date Added and Listserv Subscription information:
OneNOAA Science Seminars added Monday, May 3, 2010 11:09 AM / Last updated Tuesday, May 11, 2010 1:14 PM . To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can subscribe to the weekly email of OneNOAA Science Seminars by visiting https://list.woc.noaa.gov/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/onenoaascienceseminars and filling in your email address or by sending an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body (don't include the quotes). You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series please contact Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov. Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].
OneNOAA Science Seminars 2010 (by month): Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Back to top


Reactive Iron in the Alaska Coastal Current and a Kenai Eddy in the Gulf of Alaska: The Delivery of Iron to High-nutrient, Lower than Expected Chlorophyll Waters

Date/Time/Location/Seminar Sponsor:
Wednesday, 12 May 2010; 12:30-13:00 ETZ [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time] (Seminar location: SSMC-3 (1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD, 20910), 2nd Floor; OneNOAA Science Seminar sponsored by: Sea Grant Knauss Fellows Brown Bag Series).
Speaker(s):
Sherry Lippiatt (Sea Grant Knauss Fellow, NOAA Marine Debris Program)
Speaker e-mail(s):
sherry.lippiatt@noaa.gov
Abstract:
Coastal waters in the northern Gulf of Alaska (GoA) are considered iron-rich and nitrate-poor, in contrast to the iron-poor high nutrient, lower than expected chlorophyll (HNLC) waters of the central GoA. The degree of mixing between these two regimes is essential to the high productivity observed in the GoA. In the Alaska Coastal Current, suspended leachable particulate Fe is available for exchange to the dissolved phase and is suggested to maintain a relatively constant (~ 2 nM) source of dissolved Fe. Kenai Eddy core water reactive Fe concentrations were up to 15 times greater than basin waters, reflective of the eddy’s coastal origin. GoA eddies can be a source of Fe to HNLC waters when they propagate into the central GoA and eventually relax or rebound. This work emphasizes the importance of considering the leachable particulate Fe phase, in addition to dissolved Fe, when quantifying biologically available Fe in coastal regions.
Remote Access and Notes:
Remote access via webinar: 1. Go to http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?sigKey=mymeetings&i=742656968&=brownbag&t=c; 2. Enter the required fields; 3. Indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy; 4. Click on Proceed. 5. passcode: brownbag. Audio: Dial 866-833-7307; participant passcode: 8986360. Please note: remote access is limited to first 50 participants. For further information about this seminar please contact Mary.Lou.Cumberpatch@noaa.gov (301-713-2600 Ext. 129) or Albert.E.Theberge.Jr@noaa.gov (301-713-2600 Ext. 115). For information about the Sea Grant Knauss Fellows Brown Bag Series please contact Wendy.Morrison@noaa.gov.
OneNOAA Science Seminar Date Added and Listserv Subscription information:
OneNOAA Science Seminars added Monday, May 3, 2010 11:09 AM / Last edited Monday, April 18, 2011 10:04 AM . To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can subscribe to the weekly email of OneNOAA Science Seminars by visiting https://list.woc.noaa.gov/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/onenoaascienceseminars and filling in your email address or by sending an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body (don't include the quotes). You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series please contact Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov. Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].


TBA (NWFSC Monster Seminar JAM)

Date/Time/Location/Seminar Sponsor:
Thursday, 13 May 2010; 11:00 - 12:00 PDT [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time] (Seminar location: Auditorium, Northwest Fisheries Science Center, Seatlle, WA; OneNOAA Science Seminar sponsored by: NWFSC).
Speaker(s):
Michael Tringali (Florida Fish & Wildlife Conservation Commission)
Speaker e-mail(s):
mike.tringali@myfwc.com
Abstract:
TBA
Remote Access and Notes:

For remote access, please contact Ruben Sanchez-Teran (Ruben.Sanchez-Teran@noaa.gov). All seminars are open to the public. The auditorium is located at 2725 Montlake Blvd. E., Seattle, WA 98112. For further information, please contact Blake Feist (206-860-3408; Blake.Feist@noaa.gov); [click NWFSC seminar series].

About the speaker(s):
TBA
OneNOAA Science Seminar Date Added and Listserv Subscription information:
OneNOAA Science Seminars added Monday, April 5, 2010 6:32 AM. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can subscribe to the weekly email of OneNOAA Science Seminars by visiting https://list.woc.noaa.gov/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/onenoaascienceseminars and filling in your email address or by sending an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body (don't include the quotes). You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series please contact Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov. Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

Arctic Ecosystem Knowledge: Where Are We? Where Do We Go?

Date/Time/Location/Seminar Sponsor:
Wednesday, 19 May 2010; 12:00-13:15 Pacific Time Zone [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time] (Seminar location: 7600 Sand Point Way NE, Seattle WA, Building 4, Room 2076, Traynor Conference Room; OneNOAA Science Seminar sponsored by: Alaska Fisheries Science Center).
Speaker(s):
Sarah Gaichas (AFSC/REFM)
Abstract:
TBD
Remote Access and Notes:
Remote seminar access (webex): Meeting Number: 577 324 264; Meeting Password: seminar. To join the online meeting (Now from iPhones too!): 1. Go to https://akfsc.webex.com/akfsc/j.php?ED=143431677&UID=1130815712&PW=NNmQ4YWRkOGNi&RT=MiM0; 2. Enter your name and email address; 3. Enter the meeting password: seminar; 4. Click "Join Now". To view in time zones other than Pacific or languages, please click the link: https://akfsc.webex.com/akfsc/j.php?ED=143431677&UID=1130815712&PW=NNmQ4YWRkOGNi&ORT=MiM0. To join the audio conference only: 1-866-762-1812 code = 5367175 (member). For assistance: 1. Go to https://akfsc.webex.com/akfsc/mc; 2. On the left navigation bar, click "Support" or contact mike.a.brown@noaa.gov. For information about this seminar please contact Rebecca.Reuter@noaa.gov. For information about the AFSC seminar series see http://www.afsc.noaa.gov/seminarseries/seminarseries.htm.
OneNOAA Science Seminar Date Added and Listserv Subscription information:
OneNOAA Science Seminars added Friday, March 26, 2010 10:30 AM. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can subscribe to the weekly email of OneNOAA Science Seminars by visiting https://list.woc.noaa.gov/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/onenoaascienceseminars and filling in your email address or by sending an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body (don't include the quotes). You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series please contact Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov. Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

NMFS's Voices from the Fisheries Project

Date/Time/Location/Seminar Sponsor:
Wednesday, 19 May 2010; 12:00-13:00 ETZ [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time] (Seminar location: SSMC-3 (1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD, 20910), 2nd Floor; OneNOAA Science Seminar sponsored by: NODC NOAA Central Library).
Speaker(s):
Susan Abbott-Jamieson, Ph.D. (Senior Social Scientist, NOAA NMFS/OST)
Speaker e-mail(s):
susan.abbott-jamieson@noaa.gov
Abstract:
The Voices from the Fisheries Database (VFF Database) is a unique resource available to the public to inform, educate, and provide primary information for research for all who are interested in our local, human experience with the surrounding marine and Great Lakes environment. The Voices from the Fisheries Oral History Project builds its collection in two ways: 1) by locating existing collections and persuading their owners to donate copies, and 2) by encouraging the collection of new oral histories for donation. This presentation describes the project in detail. Initial support for the VFF Project came from a NOAA Preserve America Initiative Grant and continued support has come from the NOAA Fisheries Office of Science and Technology. The VFF Database is accessed at http://www.voices.nmfs.noaa.gov/.
Remote Access and Notes:
Remote access via webinar: 1. Go to http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?sigKey=mymeetings&i=742656968&=brownbag&t=c; 2. Enter the required fields; 3. Indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy; 4. Click on Proceed. 5. passcode: brownbag. Audio: Dial 866-833-7307; participant passcode: 8986360. Please note: remote access is limited to first 50 participants. For further information about this seminar please contact Kate.Naughten@noaa.gov, Mary.Lou.Cumberpatch@noaa.gov (301-713-2600 Ext. 129) or Albert.E.Theberge.Jr@noaa.gov (301-713-2600 Ext. 115).
Download Presentation
[Click http://www.lib.noaa.gov/about/news/abbott-jamieson_05192010.pdf]
About the speaker(s):
Susan Abbott-Jamieson is Lead Social Scientist at NOAA Fisheries Headquarters, Office of Science and Technology, and Adjunct Professor of Anthropology, University of Maryland. Her research specializations are in psychological anthropology, community studies, and family and household. She has done field research among East African farmer families coping with economic, social, and cultural change, and Appalachian Kentucky coal mining families coping with structural unemployment due to technological changes in mining and natural resource depletion. As Lead Social Scientist, she is guiding the development of the emerging NOAA Fisheries social science program. The program will improve the agency's ability to meet its mission-related social science research requirements. Susan is the Senior Project Manager of the Local Fisheries Knowledge Project.
OneNOAA Science Seminar Date Added and Listserv Subscription information:
OneNOAA Science Seminars added Thursday, April 29, 2010 10:06 AM. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can subscribe to the weekly email of OneNOAA Science Seminars by visiting https://list.woc.noaa.gov/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/onenoaascienceseminars and filling in your email address or by sending an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body (don't include the quotes). You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series please contact Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov. Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

Sharks, The Perfect Predator

Date/Time/Location/Seminar Sponsor:
Wednesday, 19 May 2010; 14:00- 15:00 EDT [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time] (Seminar location: Dolphin Conference Room, NOAA/NMFS Southeast Regional Office, 263 13th Avenue S, St. Petersburg, FL 33701; OneNOAA Science Seminar sponsored by: NOAA/NMFS/SERO).
Speaker(s):
Dr. Jose Castro (NMFS/SEFSC/SFD/PRBD)
Speaker e-mail(s):
Jose.Castro@noaa.gov
Abstract:
TBD
Remote Access and Notes:
This seminar is held at the Dolphin Conference Room, NOAA/NMFS Southeast Regional Office, 263 13th Avenue S, St. Petersburg, FL 33701 (see google map location). Webinar: Space is limited. Reserve your Webinar seat now at https://www1.gotomeeting.com/register/983804536. After registering you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the Webinar including audio access. For general questions about this seminar please contact Peter.Hood@noaa.gov or Bill.Arnold@noaa.gov.
OneNOAA Science Seminar Date Added and Listserv Subscription information:
OneNOAA Science Seminars added Friday, May 14, 2010 7:13 AM. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can subscribe to the weekly email of OneNOAA Science Seminars by visiting https://list.woc.noaa.gov/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/onenoaascienceseminars and filling in your email address or by sending an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body (don't include the quotes). You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series please contact Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov. Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].


Indirect Effects of Fishing on Predators and Their Prey

Date/Time/Location/Seminar Sponsor:
Thursday, 20 May 2010; 11:00 - 12:00 PDT [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time] (Seminar location: Auditorium, Northwest Fisheries Science Center, Seatlle, WA; OneNOAA Science Seminar sponsored by: NWFSC).
Speaker(s):
Chris Stallings (Coastal Marine Laboratory; Florida State University)
Speaker e-mail(s):
stallings@bio.fsu.edu
Abstract:
Predators are fundamentally important for regulating and driving prey population dynamics as well as structuring ecological communities. Over-exploitation of marine resources has caused dramatic depletions of predatory fish species and shifts in marine community composition, with attendant declines in productivity and diversity of marine ecosystems. Despite the important ramifications of these patterns for humankind, the specific ecological mechanisms and potential indirect effects underlying these trends have been largely unexplored. I combined small-scale experiments and broad-scale observations to investigate how fishing can affect interactions among predators and subsequently be transferred to interactions between predators and their prey. Previous observations had indicated that small, unfished predators increase in abundance on reefs where large, fished predators are removed. To test the effects of such shifts in relative abundance of different predatory fishes on community structure of lower trophic-level species, I manipulated the presence of fished and unfished predatory species on coral patch reefs in the Bahamas. This controlled field experiment demonstrated that different predatory fishes, which are often assumed to have similar effects on prey species, in fact had remarkably different effects on prey diversity and abundance. In a second field experiment, I found that increased abundance of a large, fished predatory species on coral reefs decreased the activity and growth of smaller, unfished predators. Although small, unfished predators had strong, negative effects on lower trophic-level prey on reefs with low abundances of larger, fished predators, these effects were reduced with increasing abundance of the fished species. Lastly, I used observational data from volunteer SCUBA-diver surveys to investigate how the structure of predatory fish communities on coral reefs across the greater Caribbean region has been affected by fishing. I used density of human populations as a proxy for fishing intensity. I found that, as human density increases, overall predator abundance and diversity decreases, and reef communities became dominated by only a few, small species. This research indicates that the effects of fishing on larger predatory species can permeate throughout ecological communities, well beyond simple reductions in the abundance of fished species.
Remote Access and Notes:

For remote access, please contact Ruben Sanchez-Teran (Ruben.Sanchez-Teran@noaa.gov). All seminars are open to the public. The auditorium is located at 2725 Montlake Blvd. E., Seattle, WA 98112. For further information, please contact Blake Feist (206-860-3408; Blake.Feist@noaa.gov); [click NWFSC seminar series].

About the speaker(s):
Dr. Chris Stallings’ research focuses on basic concepts in ecology, yet includes a strong applied component to inform marine conservation and management efforts. His recent efforts have examined ecological processes that drive population and community dynamics of marine fishes, and seek to evaluate the effects of human activities, such as fishing and coastal development, on ecological systems. Much of his research is field-oriented and involves both experimental and large-scale observational approaches. His study sites have included tropical coral reefs, warm-temperate seagrass beds and rocky reefs, and cold-temperate kelp forests. Dr. Stallings received his Ph.D. from Oregon State University and is currently a member of the research faculty at the Florida State University Coastal and Marine Laboratory.
OneNOAA Science Seminar Date Added and Listserv Subscription information:
OneNOAA Science Seminars added Monday, April 5, 2010 6:32 AM. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can subscribe to the weekly email of OneNOAA Science Seminars by visiting https://list.woc.noaa.gov/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/onenoaascienceseminars and filling in your email address or by sending an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body (don't include the quotes). You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series please contact Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov. Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].


The Emerging Role of Tidal Wetlands Restoration in Mitigating Climate Change Impacts through Carbon Sequestration

Date/Time/Location/Seminar Sponsor:
Tuesday, 25 May 2010; 11:00-12:00 ETZ [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time] (Seminar location: SSMC-3 (1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD, 20910), 14th Floor, Room 14836; OneNOAA Science Seminar sponsored by: NOAA Office of Habitat Conservation).
Speaker(s):
Jeff Benoit (President, Restore America's Estuaries), Steve Emmett-Mattox (Senior Director for Strategic Planning and Programs, Restore America's stuaries), Steve Crooks (Director, Climate Change Services, Philip Williams and Associates), Jette Findsen (Program Manager, Climate Change, Strategic Applications International Corporation).
Speaker e-mail(s):
Jeff Benoit (jbenoit@estuaries.org), Steve Emmett-Mattox (sem@estuaries.org), Steve Crooks (s.crooks@pwa-ltd.com), Jette Findsen (jette.findsen@saic.com)
Abstract:
Coastal wetlands play an important role in carbon sequestration and are significant net carbon sinks. Recent international reports by the IUCN and UNEP describe the substantial role of coastal, estuarine and marine ecosystems in carbon sequestration. So coastal habitat restoration could play a meaningful role in climate change mitigation through carbon sequestration. Development of a national greenhouse gas offset protocol for coastal wetland restoration and management activities would drive new private investment in coastal habitat restoration as climate change mitigation projects. Tidal wetlands restoration may be an especially appealing source of climate offsets; unlike many other offset projects, habitat restoration provides numerous ecosystem benefits. Restore America’s Estuaries is leading a national effort to develop a tidal wetlands greenhouse gas offset protocol that will bring habitat restoration into the carbon markets. Restore America’s Estuaries and its partners will present the rationale for a tidal wetlands protocol and provide an update on the effort, including recommendations made by a national Blue Ribbon Panel of experts during its April 2010 workshop.
Remote Access and Notes:
Phone access: 866-815-0340 passcode 8172125; Web access: Reserve your Webinar seat now at https://www1.gotomeeting.com/register/565927593 (Space is limited). For further information about this seminar please contact Roger.B.Griffis@noaa.gov
OneNOAA Science Seminar Date Added and Listserv Subscription information:
OneNOAA Science Seminars added Monday, May 3, 2010 11:09 AM / Last edited Wednesday, May 12, 2010 7:20 AM. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can subscribe to the weekly email of OneNOAA Science Seminars by visiting https://list.woc.noaa.gov/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/onenoaascienceseminars and filling in your email address or by sending an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body (don't include the quotes). You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series please contact Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov. Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

Saved by The Sea: A Love Story with Fish

Date/Time/Location/Seminar Sponsor:
Tuesday, 25 May 2010; 12:00-13:00 ETZ [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time] (Seminar location: SSMC-3 (1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD, 20910), 2nd Floor; OneNOAA Science Seminar sponsored by: NODC NOAA Central Library).
Speaker(s):
David Helvarg (President of the Blue Frontier Campaign)
Speaker e-mail(s):
helvarg@bluefront.org
Abstract:
Long time ocean enthusiast, journalist and founder of the Blue Frontier Campaign (http://www.bluefront.org) David Helvarg talks about his life's journey to the sea as told in his latest book, Saved by the Sea: A Love Story with Fish. From bodysurfing Central American war zones, diving barrier reefs with his tragically fated love Nancy, or being bumped by a whale off Antarctica Helvarg has lived a life often as endangered as the ocean he now works to protect. The journey he recounts over the last half-century is a profound, startling and sometimes surprisingly funny reflection on the state of our seas and the intimate ways in which our lives are all linked to the natural world around us. According to Henry David Thoreau "Heaven is under our feet as well as over our heads." According to Helvarg it's also under our flippers.
Remote Access and Notes:
Remote access via webinar: 1. Go to http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?sigKey=mymeetings&i=742656968&=brownbag&t=c; 2. Enter the required fields; 3. Indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy; 4. Click on Proceed. 5. passcode: brownbag. Audio: Dial 866-833-7307; participant passcode: 8986360. Please note: remote access is limited to first 50 participants. For further information about this seminar please contact Mary.Lou.Cumberpatch@noaa.gov (301-713-2600 Ext. 129) or Albert.E.Theberge.Jr@noaa.gov (301-713-2600 Ext. 115).
About The Speaker:
David Helvarg is President of the Blue Frontier Campaign (www.bluefront.org) and the author of four books, Blue Frontier, The War Against the Greens, 50 Ways to Save the Ocean and Rescue Warriors. He’s editor of the Ocean and Coastal Conservation Guide, organizer of several ‘Blue Vision’ Summits for ocean activists, and winner of Coastal Living Magazine’s 2005 Leadership Award and the 2007 Herman Melville literary Award. Helvarg worked as a war correspondent in Northern Ireland and Central America, covered a range of issues from military science to the AIDS epidemic, and reported from every continent including Antarctica. An award-winning journalist, he produced more than 40 broadcast documentaries for PBS, The Discovery Channel, and others. His print work has appeared in publications including The New York Times, LA Times, Smithsonian, Popular Science, Sierra, and The Nation. He’s done radio work for Marketplace, AP radio, and Pacifica. He’s led workshops for journalists in Poland, Turkey, Tunisia, Slovakia and Washington DC. He is a licensed Private Investigator, body-surfer and scuba diver.
OneNOAA Science Seminar Date Added and Listserv Subscription information:
OneNOAA Science Seminars added Monday, May 3, 2010 2:04 PM. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can subscribe to the weekly email of OneNOAA Science Seminars by visiting https://list.woc.noaa.gov/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/onenoaascienceseminars and filling in your email address or by sending an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body (don't include the quotes). You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series please contact Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov. Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].


OneNOAA Science Seminar Title (Workshop):

NOAA Environmental Data Management Workshop

Date/Time/Location/Seminar Sponsor:
25-26 May 2010; 8:30 AM - 5:00 PM (Eastern Time) [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time] (Workshop location: NOAA Campus, 1305 East West Highway, Silver Spring, Maryland 20910 (map and directions); OneNOAA Science Seminar sponsored by: NOAA Environmental Data Management Committee (EDMC).
Abstract:
The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s (NOAA) Environmental Data Management Committee (EDMC) will host a 2-day workshop on May 25-26, 2010 at the NOAA Science Center in Silver Spring, Maryland (see http://www.regonline.com/builder/site/Default.aspx?eventid=842367). The Workshop will build on the EDMC’s charter “…to coordinate the development of NOAA’s environmental data management strategy, and policy, and provide guidance to promote consistent implementation across NOAA…” and advance a framework for end-to-end lifecycle environmental data management at NOAA. See agenda: http://www.regonline.com/builder/site/tab2.aspx?EventID=842367.

With expected attendance from across NOAA’s line offices, the Workshop will feature presentations from NOAA leadership, breakouts led by data management experts and an afternoon of exhibits and technical demos. The goals for this Workshop include:

* Promote cross-NOAA collaboration in specific areas
* Provide an opportunity for broader community interactions
* Identify and document best practices
* Identify current capabilities that can be leveraged across NOAA

Remote Access and Notes:
No webinar capabilities planned. To attend in person register at https://www.regonline.com/checkin.asp?eventid=842367. For further information please contact Lewis.McCulloch@noaa.gov (Phone: 301-713-3104 Extention 168). A NOAA badge or Government issued picture ID will be needed to get into the building. The registration desk will be open starting at 7:30 and there will be coffee and light refreshments available at that time. The opening plenary session will begin promptly at 8:30 with remarks by Mary Glackin, NOAA's Deputy Under Secretary.
OneNOAA Science Seminar Date Added and Listserv Subscription information:
OneNOAA Science Seminars added Friday, May 14, 2010 8:51 AM Last updated Monday, May 24, 2010 8:17 AM. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can subscribe to the weekly email of OneNOAA Science Seminars by visiting https://list.woc.noaa.gov/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/onenoaascienceseminars and filling in your email address or by sending an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body (don't include the quotes). You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series please contact Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov. Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

The GOES-R Geostationary Lightning Mapper (GLM) and Opportunities for Assimilation of the Data into NWP Models

Date/Time/Location/Seminar Sponsor:
Wednesday, 26 May 2010; 2010; 14:00-15:00 ETZ [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time] (Seminar location: World Weather Building, Room 707, 5200 Auth Road, Camp Springs, MD 20746; OneNOAA Science Seminar sponsored by: NOAA JCSDA)
Speaker(s):
Steve Goodman (NOAA GOES-R Program Senior Scientist)
Speaker e-mail(s):
steve.goodman@noaa.gov
Abstract:
The next generation Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES-R) series with a planned launch in 2015 includes an advanced imager and a new capability for total lightning detection (cloud and cloud-to-ground flashes). The Geostationary Lightning Mapper (GLM) will map total lightning activity continuously day and night with near-uniform spatial resolution of 8 km and with a product refresh rate of less than 20 sec over the western hemisphere from the west coast of Africa (GOES-E) to New Zealand (GOES-W) when the constellation is fully operational. Near global coverage will be possible by the end of the decade with operational lightning imagers planned by EUMETSAT and the Chinese Meteorological Agency. Cloud-resolving numerical models, such as the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model, now have the capability of computing fields of mixing ratios of multiple species of hydrometeors, including several important ice-phase species known to be associated with lightning flash rate (graupel, hail, ice water content). In this presentation, we review the past decade of data assimilation experiments using proxy relationships for lightning and present new methodologies and opportunities to demonstrate how regional cloud-resolving forecast simulations can be exploited to create quantitatively calibrated, time-dependent and specific short-term forecasts of lightning flash rates in convective environments. Our prototype methods being tested at the NOAA Hazardous Weather Testbed and Storm Prediction Center this spring yield lightning forecast products that are straightforward, while avoiding the added expense and complexity of incorporating explicit cloud electrification algorithms into the models.
Remote Access and Notes:
Online video access:1. Click on JCSDA Seminar, 2. Enter your name and e-mail address, 3. Enter the meeting password: JCSDAseminar2010, 4. Click "Join Now", 5. Follow the instructions that appear on your screen. Audio / conference call: USA participants: 1-866-715-2479, Passcode: 9457557, International: 1-517-345-5260 (see http://www.jcsda.noaa.gov/JCSDASeminars.php). For questions please contact George Ohring (George.Ohring@noaa.gov). Note that this seminar was originally scheduled for April 13, 2010.
Web link to download Presentation(s):
[Click http://www.jcsda.noaa.gov/documents/seminardocs/Goodman20100526/Goodman_20100526.pdf]
About The Speaker:
Steve Goodman is the GOES-R Program Senior Scientist since 2008 and a past Acting Deputy Director of the JCSDA. Dr. Goodman’s research specialization includes the remote sensing of thunderstorms, lightning, and precipitation processes, and the application of space-based remote sensing to improve short-range forecasts of convective weather hazards. In 2001 he received the NASA Medal for Exceptional Scientific Achievement for his research on severe storms. In support of current and planned missions Dr. Goodman is the Team Lead for the GOES-R Geostationary Lightning Mapper Lightning Applications Team and a Co-Investigator on the NASA Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission Lightning Imaging Sensor (TRMM/LIS) Instrument Team. Dr. Goodman is currently a member of the AMS Committee on Satellite Meteorology and Oceanography, U.S. representative to the WWRP Nowcasting Working Group, and an Associate Editor of the Journal of Geophysical Research-Atmospheres. He earned his PhD in Systems Engineering from the University of Alabama in Huntsville, MS in Meteorology from the University of Oklahoma, and BA in Atmospheric and Oceanic Science from the University of Wisconsin at Madison.
OneNOAA Science Seminar Date Added and Listserv Subscription information:
OneNOAA Science Seminars added Tuesday, December 22, 2009 8:07 AM / Last edited Wednesday, May 19, 2010 11:02 AM. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can subscribe to the weekly email of OneNOAA Science Seminars by visiting https://list.woc.noaa.gov/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/onenoaascienceseminars and filling in your email address or by sending an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body (don't include the quotes). You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series please contact Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov. Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

The Black Swan Shipwreck Case

Date/Time/Location/Seminar Sponsor:
Wednesday, 26 May 2010, 12:00 – 13:00 ETZ[Check U.S. Time clock for your local time] (Seminar location: SSMC-3 (1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD, 20910), 2nd Floor; OneNOAA Science Seminar sponsored by: NOAA Office of General Council International Affairs)
Speaker(s):
Jim Goold (Of Counsel, Covington and Burling LLP)
Abstract:
Mr. Goold will tell us about the process by which Spain investigated the report and prosecuted legal action in the United District Court in Tampa that led to a December 2009 ruling for Spain that the site is the Mercedes, a Spanish Navy Frigate that exploded and sank in the October 1804 Battle of Cape Saint Mary, and that, as the "natural and legal patrimony" of Spain, the ship and its contents are protected by sovereign immunity from unauthorized disturbance. Odyssey Marine Exploration, Inc. v. Unidentified, Shipwrecked Vessel, 675 F.Supp.2d 1126 (M.D.Fla. 2009). The district court has ordered Odyssey to return to Spanish custody all artifacts taken from the site. The case is now on appeal, with Odyssey, the Republic of Peru and five groups of individuals who claim to be descendants of persons who owned property on the Mercedes, all seeking to overturn the district court ruling. The United States Department of Justice with the support of NOAA and the State Department filed a "friend of the court" brief supportive of Spain's legal position in the district court litigation and is likely to do so again in the appeal.
Remote Access and Notes:
Remote access via webinar: 1. Go to http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?sigKey=mymeetings&i=742656968&=brownbag&t=c; 2. Enter the required fields; 3. Indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy; 4. Click on Proceed. 5. passcode: brownbag. Audio: Dial 866-833-7307; participant passcode: 8986360. Please note: remote access is limited to first 50 participants. For further information about this seminar please contact Mary.Lou.Cumberpatch@noaa.gov (301-713-2600 Ext. 129) or Albert.E.Theberge.Jr@noaa.gov (301-713-2600 Ext. 115).
Download Presentation
[Click http://www.lib.noaa.gov/about/news/blackswan_05262010.pdf]
OneNOAA Science Seminar Date Added and Listserv Subscription information:
OneNOAA Science Seminars added Friday, April 16, 2010 6:42 AM / Last edited Friday, May 14, 2010 9:28 AM. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can subscribe to the weekly email of OneNOAA Science Seminars by visiting https://list.woc.noaa.gov/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/onenoaascienceseminars and filling in your email address or by sending an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body (don't include the quotes). You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series please contact Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov. Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

The Value of Stream Temperature Forecasts: An Application to Salmonid Management in the Pacific Northwest

Date/Time/Location/Seminar Sponsor:
Thursday, 27 May 2010; 11:00 - 12:00 PDT [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time] (Seminar location: Auditorium, Northwest Fisheries Science Center, Seatlle, WA; OneNOAA Science Seminar sponsored by: NWFSC).
Speaker(s):
Richard Adams (Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics; Oregon State University)
Speaker e-mail(s):
richard.adams@oregonstate.edu
Abstract:
Water temperature is an important factor affecting aquatic life within the stream environment. Cold water species, such as salmonids, are particularly susceptible to elevated water temperatures. For example, increased water temperatures are believed to have been the major cause of a large fish kill observed in the Klamath River in September 2002. This paper examines the economic value of short-term (7 to 10 days) water temperature forecasts for salmonid management. Forecasts may have value if they allow the water resource manager to make more cost-effective water allocation decisions. This study considers two applications. One is the case of adult Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) returning to the lower Klamath River in California. Water management in this setting involves the potential release of cooler water upstream from Lewiston Dam on the Trinity River, the major tributary to the Klamath River. Such water releases create opportunity costs because of foregone hydropower production and crop irrigation. The second application is to steelhead trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) in the North Fork of the John Day River. The water mangement decision here is to lease water from agriculture to prevent water temperature increases during critical late summer time periods. The opportunity cost is in the form of lower crop yields. This assessment incorporates bio-physical models and water temperature distribution data into a Bayesian framework to simulate changes in fish populations and the corresponding opportunity cost of water under different temperature forecast accuracies. Simulation results indicate that use of the forecasts results in increased fish production. The resultant marginal cost in the Klamath River declines from about $74 per fish when the forecast standard deviation is 6 (moderate accuracy) to about $34 when the forecast standard deviation is 0 (perfect forecast). In the John Day River the marginal cost per fish declines from $34 for a standard deviation of 6 to $29 for a perfect forecast. While these findings are conditioned on the accuracy of the numerous models and assumptions embedded in this assessment, a key result of the assessment is the pattern of declining marginal costs as forecast accuracy increases, suggesting that provision and use of such stream temperature forecasts would have potential value to society. To assess the overall efficacy of adding water temperature forecasts to the suite of NOAA weather products, these benefits need to be compared with the costs of providing such forecasts.
Remote Access and Notes:

For remote access, please contact Ruben Sanchez-Teran (Ruben.Sanchez-Teran@noaa.gov). All seminars are open to the public. The auditorium is located at 2725 Montlake Blvd. E., Seattle, WA 98112. For further information, please contact Blake Feist (206-860-3408; Blake.Feist@noaa.gov); [click NWFSC seminar series].

About the speaker(s):
Richard Adams is Professor Emeritus of Agricultural and Resource Economics at Oregon State University. Professor Adams was selected as a Distinguished Fellow by the American Agricultural Economics Association in 2001, and was recently named one of the top four percent of academic economists in the world in Who’s Who in Economics. He has won numerous research awards, including the 2008 Publication of Enduring Quality award from the American Agricultural Economics Association for his 1990 publication in Nature on the economics effects of climate change on U.S. agriculture. He served as editor of the American Journal of Agricultural Economics and associate editor for Water Resources Research and the Journal of Environmental Economics and Management. He has made important contributions to the economic policy of, among other areas, global climate change, water resources, the valuation of non-market goods, and recreation. His research findings have been published over 150 peer-reviewed books, book chapters and journal articles. Dr. Adams is a member of various government committees dealing with climate change, water resources management, and other environmental issues. Dr. Adams’ current research interests focus on the use of economic information in water resource allocation decisions, including analysis of the value of weather and other information in the management of water resources. Dr. Adams received his B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. in Agricultural Economics from the University of California, Davis.
OneNOAA Science Seminar Date Added and Listserv Subscription information:
OneNOAA Science Seminars added Monday, April 5, 2010 6:32 AM. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can subscribe to the weekly email of OneNOAA Science Seminars by visiting https://list.woc.noaa.gov/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/onenoaascienceseminars and filling in your email address or by sending an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body (don't include the quotes). You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series please contact Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov. Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

Upper-Air Temperature Trends: History of a Controversy

Date/Time/Location/Seminar Sponsor:
Thursday, 27 May 2010; 12:00-13:00 ETZ [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time] (Seminar location: SSMC-3 (1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD, 20910), 2nd Floor; OneNOAA Science Seminar sponsored by: NODC NOAA Central Library).
Speaker(s):
Dian J. Seidel (NOAA Air Resources Laboratory)
Speaker e-mail(s):
dian.seidel@noaa.gov
Abstract:
Changes in the vertical profile of atmospheric temperature have a particular importance in climate change research, because climate models have long predicted a distinctive response to increases in greenhouse gases and stratospheric ozone changes. Twenty years ago, analysis of a ten-yr record of satellite observations of tropospheric temperature by Spencer and Christy (Science, 1990) found no evidence of warming, calling into question the credibility of observations of surface temperature increases and the validity of climate model simulations. These issues have spurred both a long-running scientific controversy and a considerable body of scientific research. This seminar will survey the evolution of our understanding of upper-air temperature trends from the 1970s to present. Both theoretical and observational advances will be reviewed, with a focus on major concepts rather than on technical details. A fresh perspective on the controversy will be provided by addressing both tropospheric and stratospheric temperature trend studies, which have some common issues as well as some significantly different challenges. Lessons learned and approaches for future progress will be discussed.
Download Presentation:
[Click http://www.lib.noaa.gov/about/news/Seidel_05272010.pdf]
Remote Access and Notes:
Remote access via webinar: 1. Go to http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?sigKey=mymeetings&i=742656968&=brownbag&t=c; 2. Enter the required fields; 3. Indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy; 4. Click on Proceed. 5. passcode: brownbag. Audio: Dial 866-833-7307; participant passcode: 8986360. Please note: remote access is limited to first 50 participants. For further information about this seminar please contact Mary.Lou.Cumberpatch@noaa.gov (301-713-2600 Ext. 129) or Albert.E.Theberge.Jr@noaa.gov (301-713-2600 Ext. 115).
OneNOAA Science Seminar Date Added and Listserv Subscription information:
OneNOAA Science Seminars added Monday, May 3, 2010 12:41 PM / Last upadted Thursday, May 27, 2010 8:15 AM. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can subscribe to the weekly email of OneNOAA Science Seminars by visiting https://list.woc.noaa.gov/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/onenoaascienceseminars and filling in your email address or by sending an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body (don't include the quotes). You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series please contact Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov. Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

OneNOAA Science Seminars 2010 (by month): Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Back to top

 


 

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Scheduled seminars highlighted in blue
OneNOAA Science Seminars 2010: Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
(Total number of OneNOAA Science seminars in June 2010: TBD)

 


Mobilizing Marine Biodiversity Research: The Canadian Healthy Oceans Network

Date/Time/Location/Seminar Sponsor:
Tuesday, 01 June 2010; 11:00-12:00 ETZ [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time] (Seminar location: New Jersey Marine Science Consortium (NJMSC, Bldg. 22) Conference Room, 22 Magruder Road, Fort Hancock, NJ 07732; OneNOAA Science Seminar sponsored by: James J. Howard Marine Sciences Laboratory Seminar Series).
Speaker(s):
Dr. Paul Snelgrove (Canada Research Chair in Boreal and Cold Ocean Systems, the Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. John's, Canada)
Abstract:
The Census of Marine Life has provided a framework for collaborative research in marine biodiversity, and as this 10 year program winds down a mechanism is needed to sustain this momentum. Most science funding is obtained through national funding sources for work within their jurisdictional waters, and here we present a model for academic and government partnership that has created the Canadian Healthy Oceans Network, a new national research program that is uniting researchers to provide new insights into marine biodiversity and provide scientific guidelines for policy in conservation and sustainable use of marine biodiversity resources in Canada’s three oceans. This initiative is structured around three interlinking themes. Theme Marine Biodiversity addresses the relationships between biodiversity and habitat diversity by testing hypotheses that link functional and species biodiversity to habitat complexity. Theme Ecosystem Function addresses how ecosystem function and health are linked to biodiversity and natural and anthropogenic disturbances by linking biodiversity and ecosystem function measures, and providing predictive models and tools to minimize anthropogenic impacts. Theme Population Connectivity addresses how dispersal of marine organisms, typically by early life stages such as eggs and larvae, influences patterns of diversity, resilience, and source/sink dynamics of species and biological communities, including studies of larval dispersal in regional source-sink species dynamics using existing management areas (e.g. marine protected areas) as model systems, and comparative studies of different metrics of larval dispersal to estimate metapopulation connectivity. We will synthesize the outcomes of each of these themes across the Network to identify approaches to bridge science and policy and communicate these results to the complex networks of user groups who ultimately influence policy application.
Download The Presentation:
[Click http://sh.nefsc.noaa.gov/seminars/snelgrovetalk.pdf ; ~7 MB]
Remote Access and Notes:
Phone Access: Dial dial 866-658-9153 and enter the passcode 3373926 followed by #. Seminar takes place at New Jersey Marine Science Consortium (NJMSC, Bldg. 22) Conference Room, 22 Magruder Road, Fort Hancock, NJ 07732. For further information please contact Thomas Noji (Thomas.Noji@noaa.gov) or Ashok Deshpande (Ashok.Deshpande@noaa.gov).
About the speaker(s):
Dr. Paul Snelgrove is a Professor at Memorial University of Newfoundland’s Ocean Sciences Centre. He received his B.Sc. Hons. from Memorial, his M.Sc. from McGill University, and his Ph.D. from Massachusetts Institute of Technology / Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. He currently holds the Canada Research Chair in Boreal and Cold Ocean Systems, and studies the role of transport of larval fish and invertebrates and how these and other variables contribute to species recruitment and biodiversity patterns in marine bottom communities. He is the Director of the NSERC Canadian Healthy Oceans Network, a national research network in Canada that has partnered with Fisheries and Oceans Canada to develop new scientific approaches for sustainable oceans. He also leads the Synthesis Group that is working to pull together the findings of the Census of Marine Life. He has written a book entitled “Discoveries of the Census of Marine Life: Making Ocean Life Count” that Cambridge University Press will publish in October 2010.
OneNOAA Science Seminar Date Added and Listserv Subscription information:
OneNOAA Science Seminars added Monday, May 24, 2010 7:24 AM / Last updated Friday, May 28, 2010 10:41 AM. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can subscribe to the weekly email of OneNOAA Science Seminars by visiting https://list.woc.noaa.gov/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/onenoaascienceseminars and filling in your email address or by sending an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body (don't include the quotes). You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series please contact Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov. Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].


Beyond Correlations: An Integrated Approach to Modeling the Effects of Climate Variability on Fish Growth

Date/Time/Location/Seminar Sponsor:
Wednesday, 02 June 2010; 12:00-13:15 Pacific Time Zone [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time] (Seminar location: 7600 Sand Point Way NE, Seattle WA, Building 4, Room 2076, Traynor Conference Room; OneNOAA Science Seminar sponsored by: Alaska Fisheries Science Center).
Speaker(s):
Thomas Helser (AFSC/REFM), Han-lin Lai (NMFS/ST)
  thomas.helser@noaa.gov and han-lin.lai@noaa.gov
Abstract:
TBD
Remote Access and Notes:
Remote seminar access (webex): Meeting Number: 574 099 071; Meeting Password: seminar. To join the online meeting (Now from iPhones too!): 1. Go to https://akfsc.webex.com/akfsc/j.php?ED=143431802&UID=1130814897&PW=NODc0MjU5Nzcz&RT=MiM0; 2. Enter your name and email address; 3. Enter the meeting password: seminar; 4. Click "Join Now". To view in time zones other than Pacific or languages, please click the link: https://akfsc.webex.com/akfsc/j.php?ED=143431802&UID=1130814897&PW=NODc0MjU5Nzcz&ORT=MiM0. To join the audio conference only: 1-866-762-1812 code = 5367175 (member). For assistance: 1. Go to https://akfsc.webex.com/akfsc/mc; 2. On the left navigation bar, click "Support" or contact mike.a.brown@noaa.gov. For information about this seminar please contact Rebecca.Reuter@noaa.gov. Seminars are open to the public - please bring a valid gov’t ID such as a Driver’s License for entry. For information about the AFSC seminar series see http://www.afsc.noaa.gov/seminarseries/seminarseries.htm.
OneNOAA Science Seminar Date Added and Listserv Subscription information:
OneNOAA Science Seminars added Friday, March 26, 2010 10:30 AM. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can subscribe to the weekly email of OneNOAA Science Seminars by visiting https://list.woc.noaa.gov/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/onenoaascienceseminars and filling in your email address or by sending an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body (don't include the quotes). You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series please contact Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov. Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].
OneNOAA Science Seminars 2010 (by month): Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Back to top


Oysters & Sturgeon: Mapping the Way for Restoration in Chesapeake Bay Rivers

Date/Time/Location/Seminar Sponsor:
Wednesday, 02 June 2010; 12:00 – 13:00 ETZ [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time] (Seminar location: SSMC-4 (1305 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD, 20910), 8th Floor, Room 8150; OneNOAA Science Seminar sponsored by: NOS).
Speaker(s):
Steve Giordano and Jay Lazar (NOAA Chesapeake Bay Office)
Speaker e-mail(s):
steve.giordano@noaa.gov or jay.lazar@noaa.gov
Abstract:
The NOAA Chesapeake Bay Office is engaged in habitat assessment and mapping work in several rivers in the Chesapeake Bay watershed to guide restoration efforts for oysters and Atlantic sturgeon. To date, efforts have focused on the James River, the York River and the Great Wicomico River in Virginia and numerous rivers in the middle and upper Maryland portion of the Chesapeake Bay. Identifying historic habitat and potential future habitat is critical to support efforts to restore these depleted species. Discussion will focus on the sonar technology and techniques of mapping, mapping products, and how they are being used by resource managers at the state and federal level.
Remote Access and Notes:
Presentations are available remotely via a combination of phone & webcast. Please be aware that remote access is limited to 50 connections on a first-come-first served basis, so we cannot guarantee participation. To participate remotely you must: 1) Dial toll-free 1-877-708-1667. When prompted enter passcode 7028688 followed by the # sign. Please use your phone’s mute button (or toggle *6) during the presentation until you are ready to ask questions. 2) Go to the webcast site at http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?sigKey=mymeetings&i=744925156&p=&t=c 3) Enter meeting number 744925156 if needed. No passcode is required. 4) Enter other required fields. 5) Indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy and click Proceed. For questions: contact Tracy Gill (tracy.gill@noaa.gov).
About the speaker(s):
  • Steve Giordano is a fisheries biologist and directs field operations for the NOAA Chesapeake Bay Office. He has extensive experience in habitat assessment and macrofauna sampling in complex habitats. His specific research and policy interests center on habitat and living resource interactions and their implications for ecosystem approaches to living resource and watershed management.
  • Jay Lazar is Lead Hydrographer with the NOAA Chesapeake Bay Office Habitat Assessment Team. His background is in shallow water acoustic seafloor mapping for charting and habitat assessment.
OneNOAA Science Seminar Date Added and Listserv Subscription information:
OneNOAA Science Seminars added Tuesday, May 11, 2010 7:54 AM. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can subscribe to the weekly email of OneNOAA Science Seminars by visiting https://list.woc.noaa.gov/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/onenoaascienceseminars and filling in your email address or by sending an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body (don't include the quotes). You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series please contact Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov. Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].
OneNOAA Science Seminars 2010 (by month): Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Back to top


The Reproductive Behavior and Breeding Success of Hatchery and Wild Spring Chinook Salmon Spawning in an Artificial Stream

Date/Time/Location/Seminar Sponsor:
Thursday, 03 June 2010; 11:00 - 12:00 PDT [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time] (Seminar location: Auditorium, Northwest Fisheries Science Center, Seatlle, WA; OneNOAA Science Seminar sponsored by: NWFSC)
Speaker(s):
Steve Schroder (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife)
Speaker e-mail(s):
Steven.Schroder@dfw.wa.gov
Abstract:
Hatcheries have the potential to be important agents of salmonid conservation because of their capacity to enhance survival during incubation and freshwater rearing. Artificial culture, however, is known to affect age at maturity, morphology, physiology, and behavior in salmonids. A key question is will such changes deleteriously impact hatchery fish when they reproduce under natural conditions. We compared the reproductive behavior and breeding success of hatchery and wild spring Chinook salmon spawning in an artificial stream. Hatchery and wild females had comparable egg retention rates and no differences were seen in their spawning ground longevity, in-stream distribution patterns, digging behavior and redd tenure. Yet, egg-to-fry survival rates in wild females were 6% higher than those achieved by hatchery fish. Subtle inequalities in redd abandonment, choice of redd locations, and egg burial efficiency appear to be responsible. The effects of body weight, spawning ground longevity, agonism, courting frequency, and mate number on breeding success in four and five-yr-old hatchery and wild males were evaluated. Neither hatchery nor wild males exhibited a preference for females based on their origin. Wild males had higher attack rates and greater social dominance than hatchery fish. These disparities occurred because wild males were typically 9% larger than hatchery males. Despite observed differences in agonism and social status, DNA-based pedigree analyses showed that four and five yr-old hatchery and wild males had comparable breeding success values. We also examined the effect of age at maturity on male breeding success. On average, four and five yr-old anadromous males produced 89%, jacks (three-yr-old anadromous males) 3.2%, yearling precocious 7.4%, and sub-yearling precocious males 0.8% of the fry that were sampled from seven separate test groups. These percentages remained stable even though the proportion of four and five year-old males ranged from 48% to 87.5% and tertiary sex ratios varied from 1.4 to 2.4 males per female. Consequently, in our experimental setting a single generation of hatchery exposure had a low impact on the reproductive behavior and breeding success of spring Chinook salmon.
Remote Access and Notes:

For remote access, please contact Ruben Sanchez-Teran (Ruben.Sanchez-Teran@noaa.gov). All seminars are open to the public. The auditorium is located at 2725 Montlake Blvd. E., Seattle, WA 98112. For further information, please contact Blake Feist (206-860-3408; Blake.Feist@noaa.gov); [click NWFSC seminar series].

About the speaker(s):
Steve is the leader of the Ecological Investigations Unit; a part of the Science Division in the Washington Department of Fish & Wildlife’s Fish Program. He has over 35 years of fisheries research experience that has ranged from evaluating the effects of biological and environmental factors on the survival and productivity of salmonid populations to inventing, testing, and using new marking methods (thermal marking and strontium marking) on salmonids and other fishes. Specific areas of interest are: reproductive ecology of salmonid fishes, gamete quality assessments of hatchery and wild salmonids, evaluating alternative salmonid fish cultural methods (incubation methods, feeding regimes, release strategies, modifications to rearing areas), developing and testing fish marking tools, examining juvenile salmon ecology in freshwater and estuarine areas, and recovery of depressed or ESA listed salmonids via habitat alterations and fish cultural methods.
OneNOAA Science Seminar Date Added and Listserv Subscription information:
OneNOAA Science Seminars added Monday, April 5, 2010 6:32 AM. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can subscribe to the weekly email of OneNOAA Science Seminars by visiting https://list.woc.noaa.gov/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/onenoaascienceseminars and filling in your email address or by sending an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body (don't include the quotes). You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series please contact Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov. Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].
OneNOAA Science Seminars 2010 (by month): Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Back to top


Tracing Planktonic Colonization and Community Structure in Freshwater Lakes from Paleoecological Records

Date/Time/Location/Seminar Sponsor:
Wednesday, 09 June 2010; 12:00-12:30 ETZ [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time] (Seminar location: SSMC-3 (1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD, 20910), 2nd Floor; OneNOAA Science Seminar sponsored by: Sea Grant Knauss Fellows Brown Bag Series).
Speaker(s):
Mike Allen (Sea Grant Knauss Fellow, OAR Office of Laboratories and Cooperative Institutes)
Speaker e-mail(s):
mike.allen@noaa.gov
Abstract:
When multiple new habitats are created, community assembly may follow independent trajectories, since the relative importance of dispersal limitation, priority effects, species interactions, and environmental gradients changes as assembly proceeds. Unfortunately, tracking community colonization and composition across decades is challenging. We compiled a multiyear community composition dataset using planktonic water column samples and reconstructed past communities with remains from sediment cores to investigate cladoceran assembly dynamics in six older (1920s) and two more recently formed (1950s) lakes. We found that current communities cluster along a stratification gradient related to predation intensity. Assembling communities showed evidence for a greater influence of species sorting and a reduced influence of spatial structure since the first colonizations. However, lake colonization sequences and community trajectories varied considerably, reflecting the influence of the earliest colonizers on changing community composition through time. In the older lakes, small-bodied cladocerans often arrived much earlier than large-bodied cladocerans, while the two younger lakes were colonized much more rapidly, and one was quickly dominated by a large-bodied species. Thus, by combining contemporary community data with paleoecological records, we show that assembly history influences natural community structure for decades while patterns of ecological sorting develop.
Remote Access and Notes:
Remote access via webinar: 1. Go to http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?sigKey=mymeetings&i=742656968&=brownbag&t=c; 2. Enter the required fields; 3. Indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy; 4. Click on Proceed. 5. passcode: brownbag. Audio: Dial 866-833-7307; participant passcode: 8986360. Please note: remote access is limited to first 50 participants. For further information about this seminar please contact Mary.Lou.Cumberpatch@noaa.gov (301-713-2600 Ext. 129) or Albert.E.Theberge.Jr@noaa.gov (301-713-2600 Ext. 115). For information about the Sea Grant Knauss Fellows Brown Bag Series please contact Wendy.Morrison@noaa.gov.
About the speaker(s):
 
OneNOAA Science Seminar Date Added and Listserv Subscription information:
OneNOAA Science Seminars added Tuesday, May 4, 2010 7:29 AM / Last updated Wednesday, May 26, 2010 8:54 AM. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can subscribe to the weekly email of OneNOAA Science Seminars by visiting https://list.woc.noaa.gov/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/onenoaascienceseminars and filling in your email address or by sending an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body (don't include the quotes). You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series please contact Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov. Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].
OneNOAA Science Seminars 2010 (by month): Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Back to top


A Social Landscape Analysis of Land Use Decision Making in the Towns of the Lamprey River Watershed

Date/Time/Location/Seminar Sponsor:
Wednesday, 09 June 2010; 12:30-13:00 ETZ [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time] (Seminar location: SSMC-3 (1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD, 20910), 2nd Floor; OneNOAA Science Seminar sponsored by: Sea Grant Knauss Fellows Brown Bag Series).
Speaker(s):
Erika Washburn (Sea Grant Knauss Fellow, USEC/IA)
Speaker e-mail(s):
erika.l.washburn@noaa.gov
Abstract:
This presentation discusses the results of dissertation research funded through a NOAA Social Science Fellowship in coastal New Hampshire. This region has experienced substantial population increase which has resulted in land use decisions contributing to increased impervious surfaces, sprawl and deteriorating water quality in the Great Bay estuarine system. A mixed qualitative methodology will be presented which examined the landscape of decision making and the potential for moving towards an EBM, watershed-scaled spatial planning approach.
Remote Access and Notes:
Remote access via webinar: 1. Go to http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?sigKey=mymeetings&i=742656968&=brownbag&t=c; 2. Enter the required fields; 3. Indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy; 4. Click on Proceed. 5. passcode: brownbag. Audio: Dial 866-833-7307; participant passcode: 8986360. Please note: remote access is limited to first 50 participants. For further information about this seminar please contact Mary.Lou.Cumberpatch@noaa.gov (301-713-2600 Ext. 129) or Albert.E.Theberge.Jr@noaa.gov (301-713-2600 Ext. 115). For information about the Sea Grant Knauss Fellows Brown Bag Series please contact Wendy.Morrison@noaa.gov.
OneNOAA Science Seminar Date Added and Listserv Subscription information:
OneNOAA Science Seminars added Tuesday, May 4, 2010 7:29 AM / Last edited Friday, June 4, 2010 7:26 AM. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can subscribe to the weekly email of OneNOAA Science Seminars by visiting https://list.woc.noaa.gov/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/onenoaascienceseminars and filling in your email address or by sending an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body (don't include the quotes). You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series please contact Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov. Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].
OneNOAA Science Seminars 2010 (by month): Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Back to top


Recent Developments in the Assimilation of Satellite Data at Météo-France

Date/Time/Location/Seminar Sponsor:
Wednesday, 09 June 2010; 2010; 14:00-15:00 ETZ [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time] (Seminar location: World Weather Building, Room 707, 5200 Auth Road, Camp Springs, MD 20746; OneNOAA Science Seminar sponsored by: NOAA JCSDA)
Speaker(s):
Florence Rabier (Météo-France)
Speaker e-mail(s):
florence.rabier@meteo.fr
Abstract:
The operational data assimilation system of Météo-France uses a Four-Dimensional Variational scheme (4DVAR), performed on 6h time windows. The 4DVAR scheme provides the initial state of a global spectral forecasting model called “ARPEGE” with a T798 horizontal resolution, 70 levels in the vertical . The assimilation makes a massive use of satellite data, namely atmospheric motion vectors from geostationary platforms and from MODIS, radiances from HIRS, AMSU, AIRS, IASI and SEVIRI, scatterometer data, GPS radio-occultation bending angles. In the seminar, latest developments on the use of cloudy AIRS and IASI radiances, on the use of microwave radiances over land and sea-ice, and on the preparation for the use of SSMIS data will be presented. Furthermore, the Concordiasi field campaign planned over Antarctica for September-November 2010 will be presented. Its main scientific objectives are the validation of the use of satellite data and the understanding of ozone depletion linked with gravity-wave activity and Polar Stratospheric Clouds.
Download Presentation:
[Click http://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/jcsda/documents/seminardocs/Rabier_20100609.pdf; PDF ~8 MB]
Remote Access and Notes:
Online video access:1. Click on JCSDA Seminar, 2. Enter your name and e-mail address, 3. Enter the meeting password: JCSDAseminar2010, 4. Click "Join Now", 5. Follow the instructions that appear on your screen. Audio / conference call: USA participants: 1-866-715-2479, Passcode: 9457557, International: 1-517-345-5260 (see http://www.jcsda.noaa.gov/JCSDASeminars.php). For questions please contact George Ohring (George.Ohring@noaa.gov).
OneNOAA Science Seminar Date Added and Listserv Subscription information:
OneNOAA Science Seminars added Wednesday, May 26, 2010 11:33 AM / Last updated Monday, June 7, 2010 10:09 AM. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can subscribe to the weekly email of OneNOAA Science Seminars by visiting https://list.woc.noaa.gov/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/onenoaascienceseminars and filling in your email address or by sending an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body (don't include the quotes). You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series please contact Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov. Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].
OneNOAA Science Seminars 2010 (by month): Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Back to top


Seventy-Five Years of Observations of the Shellfisheries

Date/Time/Location/Seminar Sponsor:
Thursday, 10 June 2010; 11:00-12:00 ETZ [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time] (Seminar location: New Jersey Marine Science Consortium (NJMSC, Bldg. 22) Conference Room, 22 Magruder Road, Fort Hancock, NJ 07732; OneNOAA Science Seminar sponsored by: James J. Howard Marine Sciences Laboratory Seminar Series).
Speaker(s):
Clyde Mackenzie, Jr. (James J. Howard Marine Sciences Laboratory NOAA Fisheries/NEFSC - Highlands, NJ)
Speaker e-mail(s):
clyde.mackenzie@noaa.gov
Abstract:
The shellfisheries consist of harvesting and marketing the estuarine mollusks—oysters, hardclams (quahogs), softclams, bay scallops and blue mussels—and offshore (oceanic) mollusks—sea scallops, surfclams, and ocean quahogs. The estuarine mollusks have been harvested by fishermen (usually men) walking to their beds from shore or by using dredges, tongs or dip nets from boats. During the 1800s, the harvests for oysters and the estuarine clams began on a substantial scale. In the 1870s, the bay scallop fishery began, and in the late 1970s, the mussel fishery began. Some recreational harvesting of the estuarine mollusks has also occurred. The offshore gathering of the sea scallops and the clams began on substantial scales after the mid1940s. The oyster fishery along the U. S. East Coast, that had become large in the late 1800s and early 1900s (around 20 million bushels were produced each year) became steadily smaller after that, mainly due to a lack of demand for oysters and since the late 1950s from a lack of supply also because oysters had large persistent mortalities from diseases. East coast oyster landings were 390,000 bushels in 2007. The oyster industry along most of the U. S. Gulf Coast has not declined, though market demand for its oysters, rather than supply, has consistently limited its production through history. Hardclam production has remained at a more consistent level than that for oysters, and it has been buoyed by production from hatchery-growout farms mainly in New Jersey, Virginia, South Carolina, and Florida. Maine is the largest producer of softclams; in the 2000s, its average landings have been about a third as large as those during the 1970s. After 1987, bay scallop landings have fallen sharply following years of annually-consistent coast-wide landings since the fishery began. In 2007, the landings of the offshore mollusks, a total of 147 million pounds of meats, exceeded those of the estuarine mollusks, 38 million pounds of meats, by 3.8-fold; and in value, the offshore mollusks exceeded the estuarine mollusks by $437 million to $164 million. The taking of the offshore mollusks is tightly controlled by the U.S. Regional Management Councils, which use data collected by NOAA Fisheries vessels. The vessels determine the quantities of the mollusks present: surveys of sea scallops are conducted once every year, and the surfclams and ocean quahogs once every three years. A description of the fisheries can be presented by listing a series of personal observations over the past 75 years besides some previous historical documentation.
Remote Access and Notes:
To attend the WebEx Online Seminar Series: (1) Go to https://nmfs-st.webex.com/nmfs-st/j.php?ED=143941517&UID=0; (2) Enter your name and email address.
(3) Enter the meeting password: (This meeting does not require a password); (4) Click "Join"; (5) For the audio: dial the toll-free number: 866-658-9153; enter the pass code: 3373926 followed by the # sign. Seminar takes place at New Jersey Marine Science Consortium (NJMSC, Bldg. 22) Conference Room, 22 Magruder Road, Fort Hancock, NJ 07732. For further information please contact Ashok Deshpande (Ashok.Deshpande@noaa.gov).
Download Presentation:
[Click http://sh.nefsc.noaa.gov/seminars/jimmy.pdf]
About the speaker(s):
Clyde MacKenzie, Jr., in addition to studying the biology and ecology of mollusks in the eastern United States and Canada, has made at least 12 survey trips to Latin America to observe and document its molluscan fisheries in various countries. He has traveled along the coasts of the Pacific Ocean, the Caribbean Sea and the Gulf of Mexico. He is the author of several papers describing the shellfisheries there. This seminar will describe his observations of the fisheries in Kerala, a coastal State in southern India during a 3-week trip in November and December, 2009.
OneNOAA Science Seminar Date Added and Listserv Subscription information:
OneNOAA Science Seminars added Monday, May 17, 2010 12:53 PM / Last updated Wednesday, June 9, 2010 7:00 AM. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can subscribe to the weekly email of OneNOAA Science Seminars by visiting https://list.woc.noaa.gov/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/onenoaascienceseminars and filling in your email address or by sending an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body (don't include the quotes). You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series please contact Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov. Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].
OneNOAA Science Seminars 2010 (by month): Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Back to top

Weather Forecasts and Sea Ice Information for Bering Straights Communities: The Sea Ice for Walrus Outlook Project

Date/Time/Location/Seminar Sponsor:
Tuesday, 15 June 2010; 10:00-11:00 Alaska Local Time [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]; (Seminar location: University of Alaska, Faibanks, Alaska; OneNOAA Science Seminar sponsored by: ACCAP Alaska Climate Teleconferences).
Speaker(s):
Hajo Eicken (Geophysical Institute, University of Alaska Fairbanks) and Gary Hufford (National Weather Service, Alaska Region; Vera Metcalf, Eskimo Walrus Commission, Kawerak, Inc.).
Abstract:
The Sea Ice for Walrus Outlook (SIWO), an activity of the SEARCH Sea Ice Outlook, is a new resource for Alaska Native subsistence hunters, coastal communities, and others interested in sea ice and walrus. The SIWO is updated weekly with information on sea ice conditions relevant to walrus in the Northern Bering Sea and southern Chukchi Sea regions of Alaska. SIWO reports include: an assessment of current ice conditions relevant to distribution and access of walrus; a 10-day outlook of wind conditions; up-to-date satellite imagery for the Bering Strait and St. Lawrence Island; written observations of ice development from Alaska Native hunters, sea-ice experts, or NOAA and university researchers; and additional comments provided by local experts and other contributors. Please join us to learn how the SIWO is created, how to contribute to the outlook, and for discussion about how it can serve your sea ice information needs and be most useful to you [To access the outlook see http://www.arcus.org/search/siwo].
Remote Access and Notes:
How to Participate / Log-In to the Alaska Climate Webinar: 1) Dial:1-800-893-8850; 2) When prompted, enter the PIN code: 7531823; PLEASE MUTE YOUR PHONE DURING THE PRESENTATION. The audio is very sensitive and your external conversations and typing can be heard by other participants and disrupt the presentation. Toview the presentation: 1) Point your web browser to: http://www.shareitnow.com; 2) Click on the blue ‘Join a Meeting’ ; button on the left side bar ; 3) For Presenter ID enter: accap@uaf.edu . If you do not see anything on your screen, click on the refresh button on the top bar. For Macintosh computer users: A copy of the presentation will also be available on the ACCAP website: www.uaf.edu/accap. See the right-hand column under "Highlights." For further information please contact Brook Gamble, Outreach and Education Specialist, (907) 474-7812, accap@uaf.edu.
OneNOAA Science Seminar Date Added and Listserv Subscription information:
OneNOAA Science Seminars added Monday, May 17, 2010 9:48 AM / Last updated Wednesday, June 9, 2010 10:42 AM. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can subscribe to the weekly email of OneNOAA Science Seminars by visiting https://list.woc.noaa.gov/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/onenoaascienceseminars and filling in your email address or by sending an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body (don't include the quotes). You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series please contact Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov. Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].
OneNOAA Science Seminars 2010 (by month): Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Back to top


Ensemble data Assimilation of Ocean Observations into the GEOS-5 coupled GCM

Date/Time/Location/Seminar Sponsor:
Tuesday, 15 June 2010; 12:00-13:00 ETZ [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time] (Seminar location: World Weather Building, Room 209, 5200 Auth Road, Camp Springs, MD 20746; OneNOAA Science Seminar sponsored by: NCEP Environmental Modelling Center).
Speaker(s):
Christian Keppenne (NASA/GMAO)
Speaker e-mail(s):
christian.l.keppenne@nasa.gov
Abstract:
The second generation NASA GMAO ocean data assimilation system (ODAS-2) uses an “augmented” ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) approach to assimilate ocean observations into an ensemble of coupled GEOS-5 GCMs (GEOS-5 AGCM coupled to the MOM-4 OGCM). The AGCM component of the coupled system is constrained by “replaying” the GMAO atmospheric analysis into the AGCM. The replay procedure involves the inclusion of random perturbations to maintain a representative ensemble spread. The augmented EnKF approach relies on a background error-covariance model which combines information from the following sources: (a) a dynamic ensemble of model trajectories, (b) high-pass filtered past instances of the state of each model trajectory, (c) a steady state ensemble of background-error estimates obtained from an analysis of short-term forecast-error growth and (d) an idealized analytical error covariance model. The EnKF analysis is localized by allowing each observation to only influence the state variables inside a local volume in 5-dimensional (x, y, z, t, density) space. The localization in density space confers flow-adaptive properties upon the covariance localization. An iterative data adaptive algorithm is used to separately optimize the error-covariance localization scales involved in the processing of each observation. The representation error associated with each observation is also estimated iteratively to satisfy specific global and local constraints. Prior to each EnKF analysis , the ensemble of ocean state estimates obtained by integrating the ensemble of coupled models since the time of the previous analysis is first redistributed using a particle filter approach. The prior particle filter redistribution generally results in posterior ocean-state estimates that more resemble a validation set of control observations than ocean-state estimates obtained with a traditional EnKF approach (i.e., without a prior redistribution). Results from the assimilation of remotely sensed sea surface height observations and in situ temperature and salinity data into ensembles of MOM-4 OGCMs (on a 720×410×40 grid) and GEOS-5 AGCMs (on a 288×144×72 grid) will be shown and the relative performance of the various components of the ensemble assimilation system will be contrasted using closeness to independent unassimilated observations as the main performance metric.
Remote Access and Notes:
We can arrange teleconference if we are notified at least three days in advance. We will provide phone number and password. For further information please contact Michiko Masutani (Michiko.Masutani@noaa.gov; 301-763-8000 ext. 7551).
OneNOAA Science Seminar Date Added and Listserv Subscription information:
OneNOAA Science Seminars added Tuesday, May 25, 2010 8:16 AM / Last updated Monday, June 7, 2010 7:36 AM. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can subscribe to the weekly email of OneNOAA Science Seminars by visiting https://list.woc.noaa.gov/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/onenoaascienceseminars and filling in your email address or by sending an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body (don't include the quotes). You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series please contact Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov. Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].
OneNOAA Science Seminars 2010 (by month): Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Back to top


Coastal Louisiana Habitats: Problems, Issues and Opportunities

Date/Time/Location/Seminar Sponsor:
Wednesday, 16 June 2010, 11:15– 12:15 ETZ [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time] (Seminar location: SSMC-3 (1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD, 20910), 4th Floor, Room 4527; OneNOAA Science Seminar sponsored by: NOAA Fisheries, Office of Habitat Conservation Brown Bag Series).
Speaker(s):
Richard (Rick) Hartman (Fishery Biologist and Team Leader, NOAA Fisheries SE Region, Habitat Field Office, Baton Rouge, LA)
Speaker e-mail(s):
Richard.Hartman@noaa.gov
Abstract:
This presentation discusses NOAA’s regional efforts in coastal Louisiana in response to hurricanes, wetland loss, and the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill. Emphasis will be on post-Katrina/Rita hurricane protection efforts, wetland restoration programs under the Coastal Wetlands Planning, Protection and Restoration Act (CWPPRA), and the Louisiana Coastal Area Program, the Roadmap for Restoring Ecosystem Resiliency and Sustainability, and how these programs fit into the scheme of things. Other civil works programs will be discussed including the Louisiana State request for a barrier berm to block oil movement in the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill.
About The Speaker:
Received his Bachelor’s degree in Biology from Auburn University in 1977; was a high school teacher in central Florida; obtained his Masters Degree in Fisheries, Louisiana State University (LSU) 1983; a Research Associate LSU, 1989 – marine fishery migrations into estuarine nursery areas; joined NOAA Fisheries in 1989; has been the NOAA Fisheries SE Region, Baton Rouge Habitat Field Office Team Leader since 1999 to present. Mr. Hartman currently serves as the NOAA representative on the Technical Committee for the Coastal Wetlands Planning Protection and Restoration Act Program (CWPPRA), on the Mitigation Team for Louisiana-Mississippi Ecosystem Restoration Working Group Roadmap, and on various other committees. Mr. Hartman is presently a recipient of the 2009 NOAA Employee of the Year Award.
Remote Access and Notes:
Remote access via webinar: No remote access will be available. For further information about this seminar please contact Brenda.Rupli@noaa.gov.
OneNOAA Science Seminar Date Added and Listserv Subscription information:
OneNOAA Science Seminars added Friday, June 11, 2010 3:02 PM. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can subscribe to the weekly email of OneNOAA Science Seminars by visiting https://list.woc.noaa.gov/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/onenoaascienceseminars and filling in your email address or by sending an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body (don't include the quotes). You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series please contact Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov. Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].
OneNOAA Science Seminars 2010 (by month): Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Back to top

Hurricanes in Maryland

Date/Time/Location/Seminar Sponsor:
Wednesday, 16 June 2010, 12:30 – 13:30 ETZ [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time] (Seminar location: SSMC-3 (1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD, 20910), 2nd Floor; OneNOAA Science Seminar sponsored by: NOAA Office of General Council International Affairs).
Speaker(s):
Rick Schwartz
Abstract:
This presentation will explore local hurricane risks in the Mid-Atlantic region including high winds, flooding in tidal sections, flash and generalized flooding and tornadoes. Hurricanes Hazel, Camille and Agnes are just a few of the storms examined. Characteristics, as well as similarities and differences of the "big ones," will be discussed and illustrated by track maps and photographs. The region's hurricane history portends what might be expected in the future.
Remote Access and Notes:
Remote access via webinar: 1. Go to http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?sigKey=mymeetings&i=742656968&=brownbag&t=c; 2. Enter the required fields; 3. Indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy; 4. Click on Proceed. 5. passcode: brownbag. Audio: Dial 866-833-7307; participant passcode: 8986360. Please note: remote access is limited to first 50 participants. For further information about this seminar please contact Kate.Naughten@noaa.gov, Mary.Lou.Cumberpatch@noaa.gov (301-713-2600 Ext. 129) or Albert.E.Theberge.Jr@noaa.gov (301-713-2600 Ext. 115).
About The Speaker:
Richard Schwartz is an author and researcher whose book, Hurricanes and the Middle Atlantic States, took seven years to research and write. It is the first to focus on the hurricane history of the Mid-Atlantic region.
OneNOAA Science Seminar Date Added and Listserv Subscription information:
OneNOAA Science Seminars added Friday, April 30, 2010 9:32 AM / Last updated Monday, June 14, 2010 10:10 AM. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can subscribe to the weekly email of OneNOAA Science Seminars by visiting https://list.woc.noaa.gov/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/onenoaascienceseminars and filling in your email address or by sending an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body (don't include the quotes). You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series please contact Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov. Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].
OneNOAA Science Seminars 2010 (by month): Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Back to top


Using Sensory Cues to Reduce Sea Turtle and Shark Interactions With Fishing Gear

Date/Time/Location/Seminar Sponsor:
Thursday, 17 June 2010, 12:00 – 13:00 ETZ [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time] (Seminar location: SSMC-3 (1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD, 20910), 2nd Floor; OneNOAA Science Seminar sponsored by: NOAA Central Library).
Speaker(s):
John H. Wang and Melanie Hutchinson (University of Hawaii, Joint Institute of Marine and Atmospheric Research), Shara Fisler (Ocean Discovery Institute, San Diego, CA); and Yonat Swimmer (NOAA Pacific Island Fisheries Science Center, Honolulu, HI)
Abstract:
Many sea turtle and shark populations are in decline. Bycatch in fisheries has been implicated as a significant source of mortality and subsequently as source of these population decreases. Recent studies have raised concerns regarding the high rates of incidental capture and mortality of sea turtles in coastal gill net fisheries as well as the high rates of mortality of shark species in longline fisheries. A variety of sensory cues play important roles in the behaviors of target species and bycatch species. These cues most likely influence their interactions with fishing gear. As such, altering these cues may be a useful strategy to reduce the incidental catch of sea turtles in various fisheries. We examined the potential effectiveness of three visual cues in reducing green sea turtle interactions with nets: shark shapes, nets illuminated by LED lights, and nets illuminated with chemical lightsticks. We then adapted these potential deterrents into commercial bottom gill net fishery to quantify their effects on target fish catch rates and the catch value. Our results indicate that the presence of shark shapes significantly reduced the mean catch rates of green turtles by 54% but also reduced target catch and catch value. In contrast, nets illuminated by LED lights significantly reduced mean sea turtle catch rates by 40% while having negligible impacts on target catch and catch value. Similarly, nets illuminated by chemical lightsticks also significantly reduced mean sea turtle catch rates by 60% while having no significant impact on target catch and catch value. These results illustrate the potential for modifying fishing gear with visual deterrents to effectively reduce sea turtle catch rates. Sharks and other elasmobranches can detect minute electric fields. We conducted two experiments to test the ability of electropositive metals to deter sharks from feeding. In one experiment we utilized a shark-viewing cage to film and observe choice experiments with Galapagos (Carcharhinus galapagensis) and sandbar sharks (Carcharhinus plumbeus). Results indicate that bait associated with lead metal was eaten over bait associated with electropositive metal. In addition, sharks exhibited more aversion behaviors as they approached bait associated with the electropositive metal. In a second study, we conducted paired fishing experiments to determine the effects of Nd/Pr (Neodymiun/Praseodymium) alloy on the catch rates of sharks on bottom set longline gear. Preliminary results from longline field trials in Kaneohe Bay, Hawaii suggest that catch rates of juvenile scalloped hammerhead sharks (Sphyrna lewini) are reduced when a Nd/Pr weight is attached to the branchline. Taken together, these results suggest that electropositive metals do influence feeding behavior in sharks and could be potentially used to reduce the incidental capture of sharks in longline fisheries.
Remote Access and Notes:
Remote access via webinar: 1. Go to http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?sigKey=mymeetings&i=742656968&=brownbag&t=c; 2. Enter the required fields; 3. Indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy; 4. Click on Proceed. 5. passcode: brownbag. Audio: Dial 866-833-7307; participant passcode: 8986360. Please note: remote access is limited to first 50 participants. For further information about this seminar please contact Mary.Lou.Cumberpatch@noaa.gov (301-713-2600 Ext. 129) or Albert.E.Theberge.Jr@noaa.gov (301-713-2600 Ext. 115).
OneNOAA Science Seminar Date Added and Listserv Subscription information:
OneNOAA Science Seminars added Friday, June 11, 2010 8:37 AM. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can subscribe to the weekly email of OneNOAA Science Seminars by visiting https://list.woc.noaa.gov/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/onenoaascienceseminars and filling in your email address or by sending an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body (don't include the quotes). You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series please contact Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov. Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].
OneNOAA Science Seminars 2010 (by month): Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Back to top


Concentrations of Polychlorinated Biphenyls in Water from U.S. Lake Ontario tributaries between 2004 and 2008

Date/Time/Location/Seminar Sponsor:
Thursday, 17 June 2010; 15:00-16:00 ETZ [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time] (Seminar location: New Jersey Marine Science Consortium (NJMSC, Bldg. 22) Conference Room, 22 Magruder Road, Fort Hancock, NJ 07732; OneNOAA Science Seminar sponsored by: James J. Howard Marine Sciences Laboratory Seminar Series).
Speaker(s):
Dr. Tiago Oliviera (USEPA, Region 2 DESA Laboratory Branch – Organic Section)
Abstract:
The United States Environmental Protection Agency – Region 2 has been assessing Polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) contamination in aqueous media from Lake Ontario Tributaries. The main reasons for this effort include: a) the importance of Lake Ontario to the region; b) the persistence of these compounds in the environment; c) their bioaccumulation properties; and d) the nonexistence of water column PCB concentration data sets for the majority of US Lake Ontario Tributaries to estimate loads and support legal decisions. The monitoring study presented includes nine sampling events between 2004 and 2008 in five U.S. Lake Ontario Tributaries (Black River, Eighteen Mile Creek, Genesee River, Oswego River and Salmon River). PCB concentrations (total and homologue groups) were measured by High Resolution Gas Chromatography/ High Resolution Mass Spectrometry (HRGC/HRMS) following USEPA Method 1668A. PCB concentrations were evaluated against other variables (e.g. water discharge, total suspended solids, precipitation).
Remote Access and Notes:
To join the meeting online (Now from iPhones too): 1. https://nmfs-st.webex.com/nmfs-st/j.php?ED=144098892&UID=0; 2. Enter your name and email address. 3. Enter the meeting password: (This meeting does not require a password.) 4. Click "Join". 5. If the meeting includes a teleconference, follow the instructions that appear on your screen [Meeting Number: 792 028 490; Password: (This meeting does not require a password)]. To join the teleconference only: The dial-up instructions are as follows: (1) dial the toll-free number: 866-658-9153; (2) enter the pass code: 3373926 followed by the # sign. Note that there is a 25 participant limit for the Webex Seminar Series (including the host). Seminar takes place at New Jersey Marine Science Consortium (NJMSC, Bldg. 22) Conference Room, 22 Magruder Road, Fort Hancock, NJ 07732. For further information please contact Ashok Deshpande (Ashok.Deshpande@noaa.gov).
About The Speaker:
Dr. Tiago Oliveira obtained his Doctorate Degree in Applied Environmental Science at University of Aveiro – Portugal with the presentation of the thesis “Carbonaceous aerosols in rural and remote atmospheres of Europe”. The research work developed resulted in the publication of 5 peer-review papers in Journal of Geophysical Research (Vol.112, D23S09) and Atmospheric Environment (Vol.41 pages 1359-1373; Vol.41 pages 3631-3643; Vol.42 7530-7543) Dr. Tiago Oliveira is currently working as researcher/analyst at USEPA Region 2 DESA Laboratory Branch – Organic Section. Besides being involved in the analyses of (Polychlorinated biphenyls) PCBs in water matrix by High Resolution Gas Chromatography/ High Resolution Mass Spectrometry (HRGC/HRMS) he is developing methodologies to measure Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) in water matrix by HRGC/HRMS. Other research interests include the measurement of Pharmaceuticals and Primary Care Products (PPCPs) in water matrix by Liquid Chromatography Tandem Mass Spectrometry (LC/MS/MS).
OneNOAA Science Seminar Date Added and Listserv Subscription information:
OneNOAA Science Seminars added Monday, May 17, 2010 12:53 PM / Last edited Monday, June 14, 2010 12:21 PM. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can subscribe to the weekly email of OneNOAA Science Seminars by visiting https://list.woc.noaa.gov/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/onenoaascienceseminars and filling in your email address or by sending an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body (don't include the quotes). You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series please contact Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov. Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].
OneNOAA Science Seminars 2010 (by month): Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Back to top

Towards Integrated Earth Observation and Data Management Systems [SEMINAR CANCELLED]

Date/Time/Location/Seminar Sponsor:
[SEMINAR CANCELLED] Tuesday, 22 June 2010; 11:00-12:00 ETZ [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time] (Seminar location: SSMC-3 (1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD, 20910), 4th Floor, Room 4817; OneNOAA Science Seminar sponsored by: NODC).
Speaker(s):
Helen M. Wood (NOAA GEOSS Integration Manager & Senior Advisor, NOAA Satellite and Information Service)
Speaker e-mail(s):
Helen.Wood@noaa.gov
Abstract:
An intergovernmental initiative, the Global Earth Observation System of Systems (GEOSS) is intended to provide a scientific basis for sound policy and decision making in across a number of societal benefit areas including energy, public health, agriculture, disaster reduction and other areas that shape the quality of everyday life. In February 2005 the GEOSS-Year Implementation Plan was established. Now endorsed by more than 80 countries, the European Commission, and over 50 international organizations, the plan summarized the steps to be taken over the next decade by a growing community of nations and intergovernmental, international, and regional organizations to establish a GEOSS. This presentation will briefly summarize the GEOSS initiative; describe progress achieved among governments; and highlight related, collaborative efforts of US government agencies. It will conclude with a description of efforts within NOAA to improve the end-to-end management of its environmental data in order to both support and benefit from the developing GEOSS and related efforts.
Download Presentation:
[Click http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/docs/10/OneNOAA_Science_Seminar_Wood_v3.pdf; ~2.3 MB]
Remote Access and Notes:

For Webcast access: 1) go to http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?i=744868915&p=science&t=c; 2) type in other required fields (i.e., your name, e-mail, organization; meeting number is 744868915; password is "science" -without quotation marks, password is case sensitive- ); 3) indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy; 4) click on Proceed. For phone access: toll free dial 877-725-4068 using a touch-tone phone; when prompted enter participant code 8634769 followed by a "#" (Please mute your phone during the presentation or toggle *6 otherwise it produces a sound feedback and we will disconnect everyone). Please note that phone access is limited to 50 connections on a first-come-first served basis. Webcast & phone access will start approximately 5 min before the seminar. If you are a first time user of mymeetings, you may want to check your system requirements prior to attending the webcast. For general questions about this seminar, please contact Hernan Garcia.

About the speaker:

Helen Wood has worked extensively on use of earth observing satellites for hazard support. She is a senior advisor and Global Earth Observation System of Systems (GEOSS) Integration Manager for the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). She co-chairs and represents NOAA on the subcommittee on Global Earth Observation (USGEO) under the U.S. national Science and TechnologyCouncil (NSTC). She is the chair of the NOAA Environmental Data Management Committee, which is charge with improving lifecycle management of NOAA's valuable environmental data. Wood is a fellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) in which she has held numerous positions including IEEE vice-resident and member of the board of directors, and president. She has received numerous awards for her work including 2 Gold medals, 1 Bronze medal, and Presidential Meritorious Executive Award from the U.S. Department of Commerce. She holds a BS in mathematics from the University of Maryland and a MS in computer science from the American University.

OneNOAA Science Seminar Date Added and Listserv Subscription information:
OneNOAA Science Seminars added Wednesday, May 5, 2010 7:22 AM / Last updated Tuesday, June 22, 2010 7:38 AM. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can subscribe to the weekly email of OneNOAA Science Seminars by visiting https://list.woc.noaa.gov/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/onenoaascienceseminars and filling in your email address or by sending an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body (don't include the quotes). You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series please contact Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov. Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].
OneNOAA Science Seminars 2010 (by month): Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Back to top


Coastal Ecosystem Assessment: Linking Human Activities to Ecosystem Services in the Chesapeake Bay

Date/Time/Location/Seminar Sponsor:
Wednesday, 23 June 2010, 12:00–1:00 ETZ [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time] (Seminar location: SSMC-4 (1305 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD, 20910), 8th Floor, Room 8150; OneNOAA Science Seminar sponsored by: NOS NCCOS). [SEMINAR CANCELLED: new date is July 07, 2010]
Speaker(s):
John Jacobs and Bob Wood (NCCOS’s Cooperative Oxford Lab)
Speaker e-mail(s):
John.jacobs@noaa.gov
Abstract:
The speakers will discuss the general concepts of integrated ecosystem assessment and present results from an ongoing study attempting to link land use to societal expectations regarding ecosystem services and to tradeoffs inherent to realistic ecosystem management policy decisions for Chesapeake Bay.
Remote Access and Notes:
Presentations are available remotely via a combination of phone & webcast. Please be aware that remote access is limited to 50 connections on a first-come-first served basis, so we cannot guarantee participation. To participate remotely you must: 1) Dial toll-free 1-877-708-1667. When prompted enter passcode 7028688 followed by the # sign. Please use your phone’s mute button (or toggle *6) during the presentation until you are ready to ask questions. 2) Go to the webcast site at http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?sigKey=mymeetings&i=744925156&p=&t=c 3) Enter meeting number 744925156 if needed. No passcode is required. 4) Enter other required fields. 5) Indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy and click Proceed. For questions: contact Tracy Gill (tracy.gill@noaa.gov).
OneNOAA Science Seminar Date Added and Listserv Subscription information:
OneNOAA Science Seminars added June 2010. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can subscribe to the weekly email of OneNOAA Science Seminars by visiting https://list.woc.noaa.gov/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/onenoaascienceseminars and filling in your email address or by sending an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body (don't include the quotes). You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series please contact Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov. Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

The Role of Haddock Egg Predation in the Decline of an Atlantic Herring Population

Date/Time/Location/Seminar Sponsor:
Thursday, 24 June 2010; 15:00-16:00 ETZ [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time] (Seminar location: New Jersey Marine Science Consortium (NJMSC, Bldg. 22) Conference Room, 22 Magruder Road, Fort Hancock, NJ 07732; OneNOAA Science Seminar sponsored by: James J. Howard Marine Sciences Laboratory Seminar Series).
Speaker(s):
Dr. David Richardson (Narragansett Laboratory, NOAA Fisheries/NEFSC - Narragansett, RI)
Speakers email:
david.richardson@noaa.gov
Abstract:
Predation on the early-life-stages of marine fishes may be a source of interannual and multidecadal variability in recruitment. However, quantifying predation related mortality of eggs and larvae has proven difficult, hampering attempts to incorporate predation into population models. We developed an egg predation model to estimate the survival rate of Atlantic herring (Clupea harengus) eggs on Georges Bank from haddock (Melanogrammus aeglefinus) predation. This model assumed that larval herring abundance was a function of herring spawning stock biomass and egg survival from haddock predation, and that haddock exhibit a type III functional feeding response. Estimated herring egg survival rates from haddock predation ranged from <2 to 70% between 1971-2005. Egg predation was then incorporated into a herring population model that included a Beverton-Holt model describing the relationship between larval abundance and recruitment at age 2. The population model indicates that Georges Bank Atlantic herring has multiple equilibrium population levels, and predicts that when the haddock population is high, seemingly conservative levels of fishing can precipitate a collapse of the herring population. This model explains the severe decline in herring population in the 1970s. The model also predicts another major decline due to the recent recovery of haddock on Georges Bank, a prediction that is supported by the declining abundance of herring since 2006 in a compilation of 17 fisheries-independent time series. These findings illustrate the difficulty in rebuilding fisheries when ecological interactions are not incorporated into fisheries models and management plans.
Remote Access and Notes:
Webex access: To join the online meeting (Now from iPhones too!) 1. Go to https://nmfs-st.webex.com/nmfs-st/j.php?ED=144307302&UID=1132636407; 2. Enter your name and email address; 3. Enter the meeting password: (This meeting does not require a password); 4. Click "Join Now". Phone access: To join the teleconference: (1) Dial the toll-free number: 866-658-9153; (2) Enter the pass code: 3373926 followed by the # sign. There is a 25 participant limit for the Webex Seminar Series (including the host). Seminar takes place at New Jersey Marine Science Consortium (NJMSC, Bldg. 22) Conference Room, 22 Magruder Road, Fort Hancock, NJ 07732. For further information please contact Ashok Deshpande (Ashok.Deshpande@noaa.gov).
About the speaker(s):
Dr. David Richardson is a Research Fisheries Biologist at the Narragansett laboratory of the Northeast Fisheries Science Center. He received his Ph.D. at The University of Miami Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences working with Dr. Robert Cowen. His dissertation work addressed the spawning habitat of large pelagic species, including billfish and tunas. More recently, he has focused on the mechanisms underlying order-of-magnitude multi-decadal population cycles in Atlantic herring and sand lance.
OneNOAA Science Seminar Date Added and Listserv Subscription information:
OneNOAA Science Seminars added Monday, May 17, 2010 12:53 PM/ Last updated Wednesday, June 23, 2010 7:16 AM. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can subscribe to the weekly email of OneNOAA Science Seminars by visiting https://list.woc.noaa.gov/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/onenoaascienceseminars and filling in your email address or by sending an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body (don't include the quotes). You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series please contact Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov. Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].
OneNOAA Science Seminars 2010 (by month): Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Back to top

An Integrative Approach to Managing Climate Change and Nitrogen Overload

Date/Time/Location/Seminar Sponsor:
Thursday, 24 June 2010; 13:30-14:30h ETZ [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time] (Seminar location: SSMC-3 (1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD, 20910) 3rd Floor, Room 3404; OneNOAA Science Seminar sponsored by: NOAA ARL).
Speaker(s):
Dr. James S. Wang (Environmental Defense Fund)
Abstract:
Dr. Wang will discuss the multi-faceted climate research and advocacy that he has been involved with at the Environmental Defense Fund (EDF). This includes the national- and international-level analyses of greenhouse gas emissions pathways that will turn the world toward climate safety and EDF’s proposal for a new market-based mechanism to encourage early participation by developing countries. EDF has also begun to explore strategies for integrated management of nitrogen pollution and its climate impacts, a critical issue that has received less attention than carbon cycle management. Dr. Wang will present a case study on how the availability of a greenhouse gas credit system could provide an incentive for simultaneous mitigation of aquatic N pollution and N2O emissions from wastewater treatment plants. He will also touch on other interrelated issues, including whether and how to proceed with the geoengineering option.
Remote Access and Notes:
For further information please contact Betty Wells (betty.wells@noaa.gov)
OneNOAA Science Seminar Date Added and Listserv Subscription information:
OneNOAA Science Seminars added Monday, June 21, 2010 9:34 AM. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can subscribe to the weekly email of OneNOAA Science Seminars by visiting https://list.woc.noaa.gov/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/onenoaascienceseminars and filling in your email address or by sending an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body (don't include the quotes). You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series please contact Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov. Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

NDMC-NOAA Connections to Deliver Drought Information Services to the Nation

Date/Time/Location/Seminar Sponsor:
Tuesday, 29 June 2010; 14:00-15:30h ETZ [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time] (Seminar location: SSMC-3 (1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD, 20910) 12th Floor, Room 12836; OneNOAA Science Seminar sponsored by: NOAA ARL).
Speaker(s):
Michael Hayes and Mark Svoboda (National Drought Mitigation Center, University of Nebraska, Lincoln)
Speakers email:
mjhayes@unlnotes.unl.edu and Msvoboda@unlnotes.unl.edu
Abstract:
With its mission to reduce society’s vulnerability to drought, the National Drought Mitigation Center (NDMC) has been providing drought information services for the nation since its creation in 1995. A strong partnership with NOAA to accomplish this mission has existed from the very beginning. In recent years, the NDMC has received funding from multiple NOAA programs, including SARP, TRACS, and NIDIS. The NDMC has been able to leverage this funding with funding from other agencies to create or enhance development of a variety of drought decision support tools by incorporating stakeholder feedback. This seminar will present these tools and services, such as the Drought Impact Reporter, the Drought Ready Communities Project, and our activities with NIDIS, and provide a roadmap for future NDMC-NOAA climate/drought information services.
Remote Access and Notes:
Remote Access: https://www2.gotomeeting.com/?Portal=gotomeeting.com, Webinar ID: 387953202. Audio Dial In #: 1-866-710-6541, Access Code: 5841149. For further information please contact Sarah Abdelrahim (Sarah.Abdelrahim@noaa.gov).
OneNOAA Science Seminar Date Added and Listserv Subscription information:
OneNOAA Science Seminars added Monday, June 21, 2010 9:43 AM. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can subscribe to the weekly email of OneNOAA Science Seminars by visiting https://list.woc.noaa.gov/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/onenoaascienceseminars and filling in your email address or by sending an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body (don't include the quotes). You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series please contact Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov. Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].
OneNOAA Science Seminars 2010 (by month): Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Back to top

Commemorating Dr. Joseph G. Sela

Date/Time/Location/Seminar Sponsor:
Tuesday, 29 June 2010, 10:00-12:00 [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time] (Seminar location: World Weather Building, Room 707, 5200 Auth Road, Camp Springs, MD 20746; OneNOAA Science Seminar sponsored by: NCEP Environmental Modelling Center).
Speaker(s):
TBD
Abstract:
Dr. Stephen Lord and the men and women of NOAA’s National Weather Service Environmental Modeling Center invite you to a celebration commemorating the life and work of Dr. Joseph G. Sela, who was instrumental in the development and improvement of Medium Range Forecast (MRF), Aviation (AVN), and the Global Forecast System (GFS) models. This commemoration will take place on Tuesday, June 29, 2010, 10:00a.m.-12:00 p.m. in the World Weather Building, 5200 Auth Road, Camp Springs, Maryland 20746, room 707. Lunch will be served following the conclusion of the ceremony. We envision that special guest speakers and other interested parties will speak about Dr. Sela and some aspect of his professionalism, dedication, good works, the science, or stories, especially related to the MRF, AVN, the GFS. Please contact Jordan.Alpert@noaa.gov or 301.763.8000 Ext7205, if you would like to speak at the commemoration as we remember the father of NOAA’s Spectral Model now close to its 30th year. If you are not be able to attend the meeting your message will be read at the meeting.
Remote Access and Notes:
Dial in PARTICIPANT ACCESS NUMBER: 866-685-5896 (Toll Free); 1-517-244-5890 (Toll); PARTICIPANT PASSCODE: 8108134. Go To Meeting will be available: https://www2.gotomeeting.com/join/604554883; Access Code: 604554883. Audio PIN: Shown after joining the meeting. Meeting ID: 604554883. For further information please contact Jordan Alpert (301)763-8000x7205 Jordan.Alpert@noaa.gov.
Web link to download Presentation(s):
[Click http://www.emc.ncep.noaa.gov/seminars/presentations/2010/Sela]
OneNOAA Science Seminar Date Added and Listserv Subscription information:
OneNOAA Science Seminars added Tuesday, June 29, 2010 8:41 AM. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can subscribe to the weekly email of OneNOAA Science Seminars by visiting https://list.woc.noaa.gov/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/onenoaascienceseminars and filling in your email address or by sending an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body (don't include the quotes). You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series please contact Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov. Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].
OneNOAA Science Seminars 2010 (by month): Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Back to top


Feeding and Growth Rates Among Native and Non-Native Apple Snails (Ampullariidae) in the United States

Date/Time/Location/Seminar Sponsor:
Wednesday, 30 June 2010; 12:00-12:30 ETZ [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time] (Seminar location: SSMC-3 (1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD, 20910), 2nd Floor; OneNOAA Science Seminar sponsored by: Sea Grant Knauss Fellows Brown Bag Series).
Speaker(s):
Wendy Morrison (Sea Grant Knauss Fellow, NMFS Office of Sustainable Fisheries)
Speaker e-mail(s):
wendy.morrison@noaa.gov
Abstract:
The United States hosts one native and five non-native species of aquatic apple snails, with all species currently located in or around the Everglades ecosystem in South Florida. These introduced apple snails have devastated wetlands in Southeast Asia, but little is known about their impact on the Everglades. To evaluate potential impacts of introduced apple snails, we investigated plant preference, consumption rates, growth rates, and growth efficiencies for four introduced and one native species across six to eight aquatic plants native to South Florida. Three of the non-native snails are invasive, one has shown no tendency to expand (innocuous), and one has minimal impact on macrophytes due to its diet. All macrophyte consuming snails exhibited similar feeding preference, with Utricularia being the highest preference, Bacopa, Sagitaria, and Nymphaea being intermediate preference, and Eleocharis, Pontederia, Panicum and Typha being avoided. The invasive species Pomacea insularum and P. canaliculata tended to eat more, grow more, and have higher conversion efficiencies than the native species P. paludosa or the non-invasive P. haustrum. These contrasts were more often significant for P. insularum than for P. canaliculata. Consumption and growth were minimal for P. diffusa on all macrophytes; this species is mainly an algivore. In general, invasives showed greater rates of feeding and growth, and sometimes increased efficiency, compared to native and innocuous non-native species - suggesting a mechanism for greater rates of expansion by invasive species.
Remote Access and Notes:
Remote access via webinar: 1. Go to http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?sigKey=mymeetings&i=742656968&=brownbag&t=c; 2. Enter the required fields; 3. Indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy; 4. Click on Proceed. 5. passcode: brownbag. Audio: Dial 866-833-7307; participant passcode: 8986360. Please note: remote access is limited to first 50 participants. For further information about this seminar please contact Mary.Lou.Cumberpatch@noaa.gov (301-713-2600 Ext. 129) or Albert.E.Theberge.Jr@noaa.gov (301-713-2600 Ext. 115). For information about the Sea Grant Knauss Fellows Brown Bag Series please contact Wendy.Morrison@noaa.gov.
About The Speakers:
Wendy has her B.S. in Marine Biology from the University of Miami. After graduating from Miami, Wendy spent 2 years with the Peace Corps in the Philippines working with the local fishermen to make the marine fisheries more sustainable (implementing a marine protected area and alternative livelihood projects). Wendy has her M.S. degree in fisheries management, and her Ph.D. in ecology. This presentation covers one aspect of her dissertation research. Wendy is currently working with The Office of Sustainable Fisheries in NMFS.
OneNOAA Science Seminar Date Added and Listserv Subscription information:
OneNOAA Science Seminars added Tuesday, May 4, 2010 7:29 AM / Last updated Tuesday, May 26, 2010 8:06 AM. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can subscribe to the weekly email of OneNOAA Science Seminars by visiting https://list.woc.noaa.gov/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/onenoaascienceseminars and filling in your email address or by sending an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body (don't include the quotes). You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series please contact Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov. Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].
OneNOAA Science Seminars 2010 (by month): Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Back to top


Influence of Habitat and Life History of Reef Fish on the Effectiveness of a Network of Marine Protected Areas to Replenish Aquarium Fish

Date/Time/Location/Seminar Sponsor:
Wednesday, 30 June 2010; 12:30-13:00 ETZ [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time] (Seminar location: SSMC-3 (1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD, 20910), 2nd Floor; OneNOAA Science Seminar sponsored by: Sea Grant Knauss Fellows Brown Bag Series).
Speaker(s):
Delisse Ortiz (Sea Grant Knauss Fellow, NMFS/OSF/HMSD)
Speaker e-mail(s):
delisse.ortiz@noaa.gov
Abstract:
Identifying and incorporating habitats important to vulnerable life stages of reef fish is necessary for the effective design and management of Marine Protected Areas (MPAs). However, data on habitat requirements for most fish species are very limited, hindering the efficacy of MPAs to protect targeted fish species. Dr. Ortiz’s research examines the ontogenetic patterns of habitat use by reef-fish and provides information whereby the effectiveness of a well-studied MPA network can be evaluated relative to the distribution and abundance of habitats important to aquarium fish species in Hawaii.
Remote Access and Notes:
Remote access via webinar: 1. Go to http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?sigKey=mymeetings&i=742656968&=brownbag&t=c; 2. Enter the required fields; 3. Indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy; 4. Click on Proceed. 5. passcode: brownbag. Audio: Dial 866-833-7307; participant passcode: 8986360. Please note: remote access is limited to first 50 participants. For further information about this seminar please contact Mary.Lou.Cumberpatch@noaa.gov (301-713-2600 Ext. 129) or Albert.E.Theberge.Jr@noaa.gov (301-713-2600 Ext. 115). For information about the Sea Grant Knauss Fellows Brown Bag Series please contact Wendy.Morrison@noaa.gov.
About The Speakers:
Dr. Ortiz completed her B.S. at the University of Puerto Rico, where she researched the health of New Mexico’s endangered wildlife and ecology of coral reef fishes in Hawaii, and M.A. at San Francisco State University, where she researched the ecology and phylogeny of Indo-Pacific marine invertebrates. Her doctoral work at Washington State University researches the ontogenetic patterns of habitat use among commercially important reef fish in a network of Marine Protected Areas in Hawaii.
OneNOAA Science Seminar Date Added and Listserv Subscription information:
OneNOAA Science Seminars added Tuesday, May 4, 2010 7:29 AM / Last updated Tuesday, June 22, 2010 7:13 AM. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can subscribe to the weekly email of OneNOAA Science Seminars by visiting https://list.woc.noaa.gov/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/onenoaascienceseminars and filling in your email address or by sending an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body (don't include the quotes). You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series please contact Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov. Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

 

 


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July 2010

Mon
Tue
Wed
Thu
Fri
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05 06 07 08 09
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19 20 21 22 23
26 27 28 29 30

Scheduled seminars highlighted in blue
OneNOAA Science Seminars 2010: Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
(Total number of OneNOAA Science seminars in July 2010: TBD)

 


Coastal Ecosystem Assessment: Linking Human Activities to Ecosystem Services in the Chesapeake Bay

Date/Time/Location/Seminar Sponsor:
Wednesday, 07 July 2010, 12:00–13:00 ETZ [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time] (Seminar location: SSMC-4 (1305 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD, 20910), 8th Floor, Room 8150; OneNOAA Science Seminar sponsored by: NOS NCCOS).
Speaker(s):
John Jacobs and Bob Wood (NCCOS’s Cooperative Oxford Lab)
Speaker e-mail(s):
John.jacobs@noaa.gov
Abstract:
This talk was originally scheduled for June 23, but due to technical difficulties, was not offered and so was rescheduled for July 7. The speakers will discuss the general concepts of integrated ecosystem assessment and present results from an ongoing study attempting to link land use to societal expectations regarding ecosystem services and to tradeoffs inherent to realistic ecosystem management policy decisions for Chesapeake Bay.
Remote Access and Notes:
Presentations are available remotely via a combination of phone & webcast. Please be aware that remote access is limited to 50 connections on a first-come-first served basis, so we cannot guarantee participation. To participate remotely you must: 1) Dial toll-free 1-877-708-1667. When prompted enter passcode 7028688 followed by the # sign. Please use your phone’s mute button (or toggle *6) during the presentation until you are ready to ask questions. 2) Go to the webcast site at http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?sigKey=mymeetings&i=744925156&p=&t=c 3) Enter meeting number 744925156 if needed. No passcode is required. 4) Enter other required fields. 5) Indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy and click Proceed. For questions: contact Tracy Gill (tracy.gill@noaa.gov).
OneNOAA Science Seminar Date Added and Listserv Subscription information:
OneNOAA Science Seminars added Friday, June 25, 2010 8:23 AM. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can subscribe to the weekly email of OneNOAA Science Seminars by visiting https://list.woc.noaa.gov/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/onenoaascienceseminars and filling in your email address or by sending an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body (don't include the quotes). You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series please contact Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov. Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].
OneNOAA Science Seminars 2010 (by month): Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Back to top


Environmental Modeling: Examples from Florida and Other Places

Date/Time/Location/Seminar Sponsor:
Tuesday, 13 July 2010; 11:00-12:00 ETZ [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time] (Seminar location: SSMC-3 (1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD, 20910), 4th Floor, Small Conference Room 4817; OneNOAA Science Seminar sponsored by: NOAA NODC).
Speaker(s):
Dr. Gary A. Zarillo (Professor of oceanography, Department of Marine and Environmental Systems, Florida Institute of Technology)
Speaker e-mail(s):
zarillo@fit.edu
Abstract:
Environmental modeling methods using a coupled hydrodynamic and eutrophication model are examined though a series of applications along the east coast of Florida and one application from the coast of North Carolina. Desired capabilities of numerical and water quality predictions schemes are reviewed. Specific model studies are discussed that involve the Environmental Fluid Dynamics Code (EFDC). Selected studies also include EFDC coupled with a water quality model within which the kinetics are equivalent to the Chesapeake Bay Water Quality Model first developed by Cerco et al, (1991). The combined EFDC and water quality modeling scheme is termed HEM3D and calculates the values of 21 water column state variables, including multiple classes of algae and organic Carbon, Nitrogen and Phosphorous. EFDC/HEM3D also has an optional 27 state variable sediment diagenesis sub-model. Case studies of the Indian River Lagoon, Lake Worth Lagoon in South Florida, the Lower Cape Fear River are presented.
Remote Access and Notes:
For Webcast access: 1) go to http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?i=744868915&p=science&t=c; 2) type in other required fields (i.e., your name, e-mail, organization; meeting number is 744868915; password is "science" -without quotation marks, password is case sensitive- ); 3) indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy; 4) click on Proceed. For phone access: toll free dial 877-725-4068 using a touch-tone phone; when prompted enter participant code 8634769 followed by a "#" (Please mute your phone during the presentation or toggle *6 otherwise it produces a sound feedback and we will disconnect everyone). Please note that phone access is limited to 50 connections on a first-come-first served basis. Webcast & phone access will start approximately 5 min before the seminar. If you are a first time user of mymeetings, you may want to check your system requirements prior to attending the webcast. For general questions about this seminar, please contact Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov and Jo-Ann.Rosario-Llantin@noaa.gov.
About the speaker(s):
Dr. Zarillo has more than 35 years of experience in coastal processes, marine geology and physical oceanography. He has conducted applied and basic research on tidal inlet hydraulics, dynamics of barrier island systems, sediment transport mechanics environments, and the hydrodynamics of coastal and estuarine environments. He has dedicated the past 21 years of his career on the application of numerical models to the prediction of hydrodynamics, sediment transport, and water quality in shallow marine environments. Dr. Zarillo also has extensive experience the application of statistics and time-series analysis to environmental studies and the application of remote sensing methods in coastal and terrestrial areas.
Web link to download Presentation(s):
[Click OneNOAAScience_13Jul2010_Gary_Zarillo_Enviro_Modeling; PDF format]
OneNOAA Science Seminar Date Added and Listserv Subscription information:
OneNOAA Science Seminars added Monday, July 12, 2010 6:47 AM / Last edited Thursday, July 15, 2010 7:08 AM. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can subscribe to the weekly email of OneNOAA Science Seminars by visiting https://list.woc.noaa.gov/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/onenoaascienceseminars and filling in your email address or by sending an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body (don't include the quotes). You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series please contact Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov. Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].


Alaska Climate Dispatch: A State-wide Seasinal Summary and Outlook

Date/Time/Location/Seminar Sponsor:
Tuesday, 13 July 2010; 10:00-11:00h Alaska Local Time [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time] (Seminar location: Denali Building, 3352 College Rd., Fairbanks, Alaska; OneNOAA Science Seminar sponsored by: ACCAP).
Speaker(s):
John Walsh (International Arctic Research Center); Sarah Trainor (ACCAP); and Gerd Wendler (Alaska Climate Research Center)
Speaker e-mail(s):
jwalsh@iarc.uaf.edu
Abstract:
The Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy is developing a prototype climate information tool in partnership with the Alaska Climate Research Center, SEARCH Sea Ice Outlook, National Centers for Environmental Prediction, and the National Weather Service. The quarterly Alaska Climate Dispatch will provide seasonal weather and climate summaries as well as Alaska weather, wildfire, and sea ice outlooks in one easily accessible document. It will be distributed electronically and made available on the ACCAP website. Please join us for a preview of this new tool and discussion about how it can best serve your seasonal weather and climate information needs to be most useful to you.
Remote Access and Notes:
How to Participate / Log-In to the Alaska Climate Webinar: 1) Dial:1-800-893-8850; 2) When prompted, enter the PIN code: 7531823. PLEASE MUTE YOUR PHONE DURING THE PRESENTATION. The audio is very sensitive and your external conversations and typing can be heard by other participants and disrupt the presentation. Thank You. If you need to take another call during the Webinar, PLEASE DO NOT PUT THE CALL ON HOLD. Rather, hang up and call back in after you have taken your other call. If the call is put on hold, we will hear the on-hold music and it will disrupt the presentation. To view the presentation: 1) Point your web browser to: http://www.shareitnow.com; 2) Click on the blue ‘Join a Meeting’ button on the left side bar; 3) For Presenter ID enter: accap@uaf.edu. If you do not see anything on your screen, click on the refresh button on the top bar. For optimal viewing, we suggest selecting 'Always resize to fit window (max 100%)' under 'View.' ACCAP and SNAP offices are located on the second floor of the Denali Building, 3352 College Rd., Fairbanks. Please let us know if you intend to come in person.For further information please contact Brook Gamble, Outreach and Education Specialist, (907) 474-7812, accap@uaf.edu.
OneNOAA Science Seminar Date Added and Listserv Subscription information:
OneNOAA Science Seminars added Tuesday, July 6, 2010 6:48 AM. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can subscribe to the weekly email of OneNOAA Science Seminars by visiting https://list.woc.noaa.gov/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/onenoaascienceseminars and filling in your email address or by sending an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body (don't include the quotes). You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series please contact Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov. Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].
OneNOAA Science Seminars 2010 (by month): Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Back to top

The Development of a New Ocean Circulation Model in the Sigma Coordinate System and its Application to North Atlantic Ocean

Date/Time/Location/Seminar Sponsor:
Wednesady, 14 July 2010; 11:00-12:00 ETZ [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time] (Seminar location: SSMC-3 (1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD, 20910), 4th Floor, Small Conference Room 4817; OneNOAA Science Seminar sponsored by: NOAA NODC).
Speaker(s):
Dr. Gary A. Zarillo (Professor of oceanography, Department of Marine and Environmental Systems, Florida Institute of Technology)
Speaker e-mail(s):
zarillo@fit.edu
Abstract:
A primitive equation model on the σ-coordinate was formulated to remove the limitations of the σ-coordinate model calculations over the steep bottom topography. Experiments in a numerical basin having steep seamount topography are conducted to examine the differences between the conventional σ-coordinate models and the new model termed the Florida Tech Ocean Model (FOM). The new model is applied with full bottom topography to the limited regional area of the North Atlantic Ocean including the Florida Current, the Gulf Stream, and the Gulf Stream System. Over the steep bottom topography the FOM is found to be more numerically stable compared with conventional model formulations. During the model simulations prognostic variables such as temperature and velocity attained a quasi-steady state, however, simulations with a conventional model formulation produced transient results and in some test cases calculations over steep topography did not converge to numerical stability. These differences are attributed to the formulation of the governing equations rather than to numerical solution schemes, which
were identical in both models. The newly implemented model realistically simulates the complicate ocean features in the limited regional area of the North Atlantic Ocean. The major surface currents such as the western boundary current of the Florida Current and the Slope Water, the Gulf Stream and its System, and the recirculatory current system are simulated without numerical instability over long-term integrations. The Deep Western Boundary Current (DWBC) along the continental rise is also simulated with little seasonal change. Predicted seasonal variability of surface temperature and volume transports of Gulf Stream System were comparable to published estimates based on observational data.
Remote Access and Notes:
For Webcast access: 1) go to http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?i=744868915&p=science&t=c; 2) type in other required fields (i.e., your name, e-mail, organization; meeting number is 744868915; password is "science" -without quotation marks, password is case sensitive- ); 3) indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy; 4) click on Proceed. For phone access: toll free dial 877-725-4068 using a touch-tone phone; when prompted enter participant code 8634769 followed by a "#" (Please mute your phone during the presentation or toggle *6 otherwise it produces a sound feedback and we will disconnect everyone). Please note that phone access is limited to 50 connections on a first-come-first served basis. Webcast & phone access will start approximately 5 min before the seminar. If you are a first time user of mymeetings, you may want to check your system requirements prior to attending the webcast. For general questions about this seminar, please contact Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov and Jo-Ann.Rosario-Llantin@noaa.gov.
About the speaker(s):
Dr. Zarillo has more than 35 years of experience in coastal processes, marine geology and physical oceanography. He has conducted applied and basic research on tidal inlet hydraulics, dynamics of barrier island systems, sediment transport mechanics environments, and the hydrodynamics of coastal and estuarine environments. He has dedicated the past 21 years of his career on the application of numerical models to the prediction of hydrodynamics, sediment transport, and water quality in shallow marine environments. Dr. Zarillo also has extensive experience the application of statistics and time-series analysis to environmental studies and the application of remote sensing methods in coastal and terrestrial areas.
Web link to download Presentation(s):
[Click OneNOAAScience_14Jul2010_Gary_Zarillo_FOM; PDF format]
OneNOAA Science Seminar Date Added and Listserv Subscription information:
OneNOAA Science Seminars added Monday, July 12, 2010 6:47 AM / Last edited Thursday, July 15, 2010 7:10 AM. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can subscribe to the weekly email of OneNOAA Science Seminars by visiting https://list.woc.noaa.gov/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/onenoaascienceseminars and filling in your email address or by sending an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body (don't include the quotes). You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series please contact Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov. Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

Monitoring and Modeling Water Quality in an Urban Watershed

Date/Time/Location/Seminar Sponsor:
Wednesday, 14 July 2010; 12:00-12:30 ETZ [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time] (Seminar location: SSMC-3 (1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD, 20910), 2nd Floor; OneNOAA Science Seminar sponsored by: Sea Grant Knauss Fellows Brown Bag Series).
Speaker(s):
Keith Cialino (Sea Grant Knauss Fellow, NMFS/OAA)
Speaker e-mail(s):
keith.cialino@noaa.gov
Abstract:
This presentation will discuss a research plan for conducting high resolution sampling within a watershed to assess the influence of stormwater runoff on water quality. The research project intends to: create an adaptive monitoring network in a watershed to capture rain events; integrate hydrological flows and water quality information into a predictive watershed model; and extend these approaches to a second urban watershed/estuary to determine the validity of the approach. Ways to communicate the results of the research to decision makers will also be discussed.
About The Speaker:
Keith Cialino is a Ph.D. candidate in the Environmental, Earth, and Ocean Sciences program at the University of Massachusetts Boston. He is currently a Sea Grant Knauss Fellow working in the National Marine Fisheries Service Office of International Affairs.
Remote Access and Notes:
Remote access via webinar: 1. Go to http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?sigKey=mymeetings&i=742656968&=brownbag&t=c; 2. Enter the required fields; 3. Indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy; 4. Click on Proceed. 5. passcode: brownbag. Audio: Dial 866-833-7307; participant passcode: 8986360. Please note: remote access is limited to first 50 participants. For further information about this seminar please contact Mary.Lou.Cumberpatch@noaa.gov (301-713-2600 Ext. 129) or Albert.E.Theberge.Jr@noaa.gov (301-713-2600 Ext. 115). For information about the Sea Grant Knauss Fellows Brown Bag Series please contact Wendy.Morrison@noaa.gov.
OneNOAA Science Seminar Date Added and Listserv Subscription information:
OneNOAA Science Seminars added Tuesday, May 4, 2010 1:23 PM / Last edited Wednesday, July 7, 2010 1:06 PM. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can subscribe to the weekly email of OneNOAA Science Seminars by visiting https://list.woc.noaa.gov/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/onenoaascienceseminars and filling in your email address or by sending an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body (don't include the quotes). You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series please contact Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov. Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].
OneNOAA Science Seminars 2010 (by month): Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Back to top


Willingness-to-Pay for Ecosystem Services: Do Payment Elicitation Mechanisms Matter?

Date/Time/Location/Seminar Sponsor:
Wednesday, 14 July 2010; 12:30-13:00 ETZ [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time] (Seminar location: SSMC-3 (1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD, 20910), 2nd Floor; OneNOAA Science Seminar sponsored by: Sea Grant Knauss Fellows Brown Bag Series).
Speaker(s):
Jacky Haskell (Sea Grant Knauss Fellow, OAR/NSGCP)
Speaker e-mail(s):
jacky.haskell@noaa.gov
Abstract:
Many ecosystem services, such as wildlife habitat and scenic views, are examples of public goods that may be produced by private landowners. These landowners privately manage their property and may face an opportunity cost if they choose to enhance ecosystem services. Many payments for ecosystem services programs exist, but few have attempted to transfer private payments from consumers to producers; as a result, ecosystem services frequently are not provided at levels that would most benefit society. One solution to this problem is to create a market for ecosystem services. This study employs a stated preference choice experiment framework to examine the tradeoffs between forest ecosystem services in Rhode Island and to compare the performance of payment elicitation mechanisms that can be used in a market for ecosystem services.
Remote Access and Notes:
Remote access via webinar: 1. Go to http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?sigKey=mymeetings&i=742656968&=brownbag&t=c; 2. Enter the required fields; 3. Indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy; 4. Click on Proceed. 5. passcode: brownbag. Audio: Dial 866-833-7307; participant passcode: 8986360. Please note: remote access is limited to first 50 participants. For further information about this seminar please contact Mary.Lou.Cumberpatch@noaa.gov (301-713-2600 Ext. 129) or Albert.E.Theberge.Jr@noaa.gov (301-713-2600 Ext. 115). For information about the Sea Grant Knauss Fellows Brown Bag Series please contact Wendy.Morrison@noaa.gov.
About The Speaker:
Jacky Haskell is a Knauss Fellow, Coordinator for Safe Sustainable Seafood Supply and Healthy Coastal Ecosystems Focus Areas, NOAA Sea Grant
OneNOAA Science Seminar Date Added and Listserv Subscription information:
OneNOAA Science Seminars added Tuesday, May 4, 2010 1:23 PM / Last edited Wednesday, May 12, 2010 11:02 AM. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can subscribe to the weekly email of OneNOAA Science Seminars by visiting https://list.woc.noaa.gov/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/onenoaascienceseminars and filling in your email address or by sending an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body (don't include the quotes). You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series please contact Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov. Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].
OneNOAA Science Seminars 2010 (by month): Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Back to top

Summer-Time Shelf-Slope exchange Processes On The New Jersey Shelf

Date/Time/Location/Seminar Sponsor:
Thursday, 15 July 2010; 11:00-12:00 ETZ [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time] (Seminar location: New Jersey Marine Science Consortium (NJMSC, Bldg. 22) Conference Room, 22 Magruder Road, Fort Hancock, NJ 07732; OneNOAA Science Seminar sponsored by: James J. Howard Marine Sciences Laboratory Seminar Series).
Speaker(s):
Dr. Donglai Gong (Rutgers University)
Speakers email:
donglai@marine.rutgers.edu
Abstract:
Shelf transport and shelf-slope exchange processes are driven by a combination of meteorological, oceanographic and topographic forcing mechanisms. The response of the water column to a particular set of forcings can lead to either cross-shelf dominated or along-shelf dominated shelf transport, lasting from tidal to seasonal time scales. Using data from a coastal ocean observatory, this study investigates how different physical forcing mechanisms such as topography, changing seasons, wind stress, storms, slopewater eddies/rings, river plumes and large scale alongshelf forcing affect the hydrography and circulation at the mid- to outer New Jersey Shelf. Lagrangian analysis using the ocean observatory data explores the potential transport pathways of offshore tracers/pollutants along the Mid-Atlantic Bight.
Remote Access and Notes:
Webex access: 1. Go to https://nmfs-st.webex.com/nmfs-st/j.php?ED=144739232&UID=0; 2. Enter your name and email address; 3. Enter the meeting password: (This meeting does not require a password.); 4. Click "Join". To join the teleconference: 1. Dial the toll-free number: 866-658-9153; 2. Enter the pass code: 3373926 followed by the # sign. There is a 25 participant limit for the Webex Seminar Series (including the host). This WebEx service includes a feature that allows audio and any documents and other materials exchanged or viewed during the session to be recorded. By joining this session, you automatically consent to such recordings. If you do not consent to the recording, do not join the session. Seminar takes place at New Jersey Marine Science Consortium (NJMSC, Bldg. 22) Conference Room, 22 Magruder Road, Fort Hancock, NJ 07732. For further information please contact Ashok Deshpande (Ashok.Deshpande@noaa.gov).
About the speaker(s):
B.S. in Physics from Rutgers University (2001); M.S. in Physics from MIT (2004); Ph.D in Oceanography from Rutgers University, Advisor: Dr. Scott M. Glenn (2010).
OneNOAA Science Seminar Date Added and Listserv Subscription information:
OneNOAA Science Seminars added Tuesday, June 29, 2010 7:53 AM / Last edited Monday, July 12, 2010 6:56 AM. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can subscribe to the weekly email of OneNOAA Science Seminars by visiting https://list.woc.noaa.gov/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/onenoaascienceseminars and filling in your email address or by sending an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body (don't include the quotes). You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series please contact Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov. Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].
OneNOAA Science Seminars 2010 (by month): Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Back to top


Atlantic – Pacific Relationships of Deep-Sea Octocorals

Date/Time/Location/Seminar Sponsor:
Monday, 19 July 2010; 12:00-13:00 ETZ [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time] (Seminar location: SSMC-3 (1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD, 20910), 2nd Floor; OneNOAA Science Seminar sponsored by: Office of Habitat Conservation).
Speaker(s):
Les Watling (Professor of Zoology, University of Hawaii at Manoa)
Speaker e-mail(s):
watling@hawaii.edu
Abstract:
We have been sampling deep-sea octocorals in the Atlantic since 2001 and in the Pacific since 1995. Samples were first obtained on an opportunistic basis, but since 2003 our expeditions have been funded by NOAA Ocean Exploration in the Atlantic, and the Papahanaumokuakea Marine National Monument and the National Marine Fisheries Service in the Pacific. All octocorals obtained are preserved for both molecular and morphological analysis. Early on we noticed the genetic signature of some gorgonians from the Atlantic were very similar to others from off Hawaii. Morphologically, these specimens were almost indistinguishable. We now have documented a large number of these sister taxa in several families. Most represent undescribed species. Hypotheses explaining the existence of these sister taxa will be offered and evaluated. The most promising explanation involves understanding palaeo-circulation of deep water in the Atlantic and Pacific and the fate of the land mass separating them.
About The Speaker:
Les Watling is Professor of Zoology at the University of Hawaii at Manoa. Previously he was Professor of Oceanography at the University of Maine’s Darling Marine Center. His interests range from ecology of marine sediment communities, community analysis of seamounts in the deep-sea, global biogeography of bathyal and abyssal areas of the ocean, to taxonomy of small crustaceans and large deep-sea octocorals. Currently he is working on describing new species of deep-sea octocorals from seamounts in the Northwest Atlantic and the NW Hawaiian Islands, compiling global databases for GIS analysis of distributions of deep-sea octocorals, and completing an analysis of octocoral communities from seamounts in the NW Atlantic. He is a very happy fellow when at sea, or preferably, deep within it. Since 1980, Watling has completed 28 research cruises in the Atlantic, Pacific, Antarctic, and Indian Oceans. He has also made more than 20 dives in research submersibles and been involved in almost 100 dive days using remotely operated vehicles (ROVs) at depths as deep as 4000 m. Images and videos from most cruises since 2003 can be viewed on NOAAs Ocean Exploration web site (oceanexplorer.noaa.gov) [Click http://www.hawaii.edu/zoology/faculty/watling.htm]
Remote Access and Notes:
Remote access via webinar: 1. Go to http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?sigKey=mymeetings&i=742656968&=brownbag&t=c; 2. Enter the required fields; 3. Indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy; 4. Click on Proceed. 5. passcode: brownbag. Audio: Dial 866-833-7307; participant passcode: 8986360. Please note: remote access is limited to first 50 participants. For further information about this seminar please contact Brenda.Rupli@noaa.gov, Mary.Lou.Cumberpatch@noaa.gov (301-713-2600 Ext. 129) or Albert.E.Theberge.Jr@noaa.gov (301-713-2600 Ext. 115).
OneNOAA Science Seminar Date Added and Listserv Subscription information:
OneNOAA Science Seminars added Wednesday, July 7, 2010 9:10 AM. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can subscribe to the weekly email of OneNOAA Science Seminars by visiting https://list.woc.noaa.gov/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/onenoaascienceseminars and filling in your email address or by sending an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body (don't include the quotes). You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series please contact Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov. Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].
OneNOAA Science Seminars 2010 (by month): Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Back to top


Moving Towards Gridded Precipitation Forcings in The Community Hydrologic Prediction System (CHPS) Era

Date/Time/Location/Seminar Sponsor:
Monday, 19 July 2010; 14:30-15:30 ETZ [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time] (Seminar location: SSMC-2, 8th Floor, Room 8246; OneNOAA Science Seminar sponsored by: Office of Hydrologic Development).
Speaker(s):
David Kitzmiller (Office of Hydrologic Development, National Weather Service, NOAA)
Speaker e-mail(s):
david.kitzmiller@noaa.gov
Abstract:
Two of the major challenges facing National Weather Service hydrologists in the next few years are: A transition to use of gridded, rather than point, observations and forecasts; Development of a high-spatial resolution, gridded hourly precipitation record spanning multiple decades, suitable for calibration of distributed hydrologic models. The first challenge will be illustrated through a summary of findings from four River Forecast Centers (RFCs) that are on an accelerated path to transition their operations from the National Weather Service River Forecast System (NWSRFS) to the Community Hydrologic Prediction System (CHPS). As part of this transition, all basin-average precipitation, temperature, and evapotranspiration forcings will be derived from grids, rather than from point observations and forecasts interpreted as basin averages. Parallel analyses created by staff at these RFCs show that the statistical effects of this change vary from rather minor to dramatic, depending on climatology and terrain. These findings will also be used to illustrate the second challenge, that of developing a statistically stable gridded precipitation record, suitable for use in operational hydrologic models, from a variety of sensor platforms and an observation network that have changed dramatically since 1960. Important constraints on such a dataset are that it not be biased merely by changes in the observing network, and that its characteristics over the period consistently reflect the current state of real-time observations. An initial discussion of these issues was initiated at the AMS annual meeting by Dr. John Schaake and others in the NOAA community. This presentation will include a summary of current approaches to retrospective and real-time analysis, to stimulate further discussion on how the final goal might be achieved.
Remote Access and Notes:
Remote access via webinar: Space is limited. Reserve your Webinar seat now at: https://www1.gotomeeting.com/register/408977409. After registering you’ll receive login instructions via email. Teleconference number (866) 804-8142 passcode 2937055. For questions please contact ken.pavelle@noaa.gov.
OneNOAA Science Seminar Date Added and Listserv Subscription information:
OneNOAA Science Seminars added Thursday, July 15, 2010 9:57 AM. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can subscribe to the weekly email of OneNOAA Science Seminars by visiting https://list.woc.noaa.gov/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/onenoaascienceseminars and filling in your email address or by sending an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body (don't include the quotes). You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series please contact Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov. Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].
OneNOAA Science Seminars 2010 (by month): Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Back to top


Algorithm Development Library Overview

Date/Time/Location/Seminar Sponsor:
Tuesday, 20 July 2010; 14:00 – 15:30h ETZ [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time] (Seminar location: World Weather Building, Room 707, Camp Springs, MD (see google map location); OneNOAA Science Seminar sponsored by: NOAA STAR).
Speaker(s):
Kerry Grant [Chief Engineer for National Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellite System (NPOESS) Ground Segments]
Abstract:
The Algorithm Development Library is a new tool designed to reduce the time and effort required to implement science algorithms into operational environments. The Phase 1 development effort has just completed, providing a capability that will be used by NPP algorithm developers, the NPP Cal/Val team, and others to update and improve science algorithms for operational use in the IDPS. Phase 1 was a proof-of-concept, demonstrating significant savings in the science-to-operational conversion process. This briefing will discuss the ADL concept, its use, and the results of the Phase 1 study, and provide an overview of the Phase 2 activities and schedule.
Remote Access and Notes:
Phone access: US participants: 866-832-9297; International participants: 203-566-7610; Passcode: 6070416 (see http://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/seminars.php). For questions please contact Jerry Zhan (xiwu.zhan@noaa.gov; 301-763-8042 Ext 148) or Danette Warren (danette.warren@noaa.gov, 301-763-8042 Ext 104)
OneNOAA Science Seminar Date Added and Listserv Subscription information:
OneNOAA Science Seminars added Monday, June 21, 2010 8:06 AM. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can subscribe to the weekly email of OneNOAA Science Seminars by visiting https://list.woc.noaa.gov/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/onenoaascienceseminars and filling in your email address or by sending an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body (don't include the quotes). You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series please contact Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov. Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].
OneNOAA Science Seminars 2010 (by month): Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Back to top


Tropical Pacific Ocean in a Warming Climate

Date/Time/Location/Seminar Sponsor:
Tuesday, 20 July 2010, 12:00-13:00h [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time] (Seminar location: World Weather Building, Room 707, 5200 Auth Road, Camp Springs, MD 20746; OneNOAA Science Seminar sponsored by: NCEP Environmental Modelling Center).
Speaker(s):
David Wang (Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory)
Abstract:
The tropical Pacific region is an essential part of global climate system. Recent studies suggest a number of robust global warming signatures in the tropical Pacific region, particularly the weakening of the Walker circulation. The present study further investigates the response of the tropical Pacific Ocean to future greenhouse warming in three aspects: the shallow meridional overturning circulation or subtropical cell (STC), the ventilation of the equatorial thermocline and undercurrent (EUC), and the regional sea level, in the framework of CMIP3 multi-model climate projection. First, it is found there is a contrasting tendency for the STC to be weakening (strengthening) in the northern (southern) hemisphere in the 21st century, consistent with large-scale surface wind change under global warming. The pycnocline transport convergence, as the equatorward branch of the STC, exhibits a robust weakening of about 3 Sv. The weakening mainly takes place in the ocean interior, consistent with the zonal slackening of the tropical pycnocline, whereas the change of the pycnocline transport along the western boundary is relatively small, affected by the shoaling of the pycnocline base. In addition, the Indonesian throughflow transport above the pycnocline base shows a robust weakening of about 1.5 Sv. Second, the source regions and transit time distributions of the EUC water are investigated using a simulated adjoint passive tracer for both the present-day climate and a warmer climate. Several major source regions are identified and associated with different transit times. In a warmer climate, the distribution of source waters are largely unchanged and the transit time becomes slightly younger. The warming of the EUC water can be traced back to the extra-tropical surface warming. Finally, it is found that the projected sea level change in the tropical Pacific region can be well reproduced by a linear, wind-driven model that embodies only baroclinic wave dynamics, especially when both the surface wind change and ocean stratification change are taken into account.
Remote Access and Notes:
Remote access TBD. We can arrange teleconference if we are notified at least three days in advance. We will provide phone number and password. Other wise we can accomodate only one line. For further information please contact Dave Behringer (david.behringer@noaa.gov; 301-763-8000 x7254)
OneNOAA Science Seminar Date Added and Listserv Subscription information:
OneNOAA Science Seminars added Thursday, July 1, 2010 10:31 AM / Last edited Tuesday, July 6, 2010 6:54 AM. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can subscribe to the weekly email of OneNOAA Science Seminars by visiting https://list.woc.noaa.gov/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/onenoaascienceseminars and filling in your email address or by sending an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body (don't include the quotes). You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series please contact Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov. Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].
OneNOAA Science Seminars 2010 (by month): Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Back to top


The GMAO Data Assimilation System: Status and Future Directions [Seminar POSTPONED]

Date/Time/Location/Seminar Sponsor:
Wednesday, 21 July 2010; [Seminar POSTPONED] [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time] (Seminar location: World Weather Building, Room 707, 5200 Auth Road, Camp Springs, MD 20746; OneNOAA Science Seminar sponsored by: JCSDA).
Speaker(s):
Ricardo Todling (NASA/GSFC/Global Modeling and Assimilation Office)
Speaker e-mail:
Ricardo.Todling-1@nasa.gov
Abstract:
TBD
Remote Access and Notes:
Video: 1. Click on JCSDA Seminar; 2. Enter your name and email address; 3. Enter the meeting password: JCSDAseminar2010; 4. Click "Join Now"; 5. Follow the instructions that appear on your screen. Audio: USA participants: 1-866-715-2479, Passcode: 9457557, International: 1-517-345-5260 (see http://www.jcsda.noaa.gov/JCSDASeminars.php). For questions please contact George Ohring (George.Ohring@noaa.gov).
Web link to download Presentation(s):
Available at http://www.jcsda.noaa.gov/JCSDASeminars.php the day before the talk.
OneNOAA Science Seminar Date Added and Listserv Subscription information:
OneNOAA Science Seminars added Thursday, February 18, 2010 6:37 AM / Last updated Monday, July 12, 2010 10:20 AM. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can subscribe to the weekly email of OneNOAA Science Seminars by visiting https://list.woc.noaa.gov/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/onenoaascienceseminars and filling in your email address or by sending an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body (don't include the quotes). You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series please contact Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov. Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].
OneNOAA Science Seminars 2010 (by month): Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Back to top


The Maritime Industry: Friend or Foe?

Date/Time/Location/Seminar Sponsor:
Wednesday, 21 July 2010; 12:00-13:00 ETZ [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time] (Seminar location: SSMC-3 (1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD, 20910), 2nd Floor; OneNOAA Science Seminar sponsored by: NOAA International Law Office of General Counsel ).
Speaker(s):
Kathy Metcalf (Director of Maritime Affairs, Chamber of Shipping of America)
Abstract:
This presentation will discuss topics where the American Chamber of Shipping and NOAA have worked collaboratively to reach a common agreed-upon goal, such as with respect to ballast water management, particularly sensitive sea areas, North Atlantic right whale ship strike avoidance measures, marine debris and commercial shipping noise.
Remote Access and Notes:
Remote access via webinar: 1. Go to http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?sigKey=mymeetings&i=742656968&=brownbag&t=c; 2. Enter the required fields; 3. Indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy; 4. Click on Proceed. 5. passcode: brownbag. Audio: Dial 866-833-7307; participant passcode: 8986360. Please note: remote access is limited to first 50 participants. For further information about this seminar please contact Mary.Lou.Cumberpatch@noaa.gov (301-713-2600 Ext. 129) or Albert.E.Theberge.Jr@noaa.gov (301-713-2600 Ext. 115).
OneNOAA Science Seminar Date Added and Listserv Subscription information:
OneNOAA Science Seminars added Friday, June 25, 2010 9:42 AM. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can subscribe to the weekly email of OneNOAA Science Seminars by visiting https://list.woc.noaa.gov/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/onenoaascienceseminars and filling in your email address or by sending an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body (don't include the quotes). You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series please contact Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov. Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].
OneNOAA Science Seminars 2010 (by month): Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Back to top


Planet Earth video "Deep Ocean"

Date/Time/Location/Seminar Sponsor:
Wednesday, 21 July 2010; 12:00-13:00 ETZ [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time] (Seminar location: SSMC-4 (1305 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD, 20910); 8th Floor, Room 8150; OneNOAA Science Seminar sponsored by: NCCOS People Committee).
Abstract:
Brown bag lunch and a viewing of the Deep Ocean from the Discovery’s Planet Earth Series. Please join us for the stunning graphics of this amazing video production showcasing the depths of the planet's oceans.
Remote Access and Notes:
No remote access available. For further information please contact Laurie.Golden@noaa.gov
OneNOAA Science Seminar Date Added and Listserv Subscription information:
OneNOAA Science Seminars added Thursday, July 8, 2010 7:25 AM. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can subscribe to the weekly email of OneNOAA Science Seminars by visiting https://list.woc.noaa.gov/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/onenoaascienceseminars and filling in your email address or by sending an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body (don't include the quotes). You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series please contact Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov. Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].
OneNOAA Science Seminars 2010 (by month): Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Back to top


Overview of NRL's Mesoscale Modeling System and Research

Date/Time/Location/Seminar Sponsor:
Wednesday, 21 July 2010, 12:00-13:00h [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time] (Seminar location: World Weather Building, Room 707, 5200 Auth Road, Camp Springs, MD 20746; OneNOAA Science Seminar sponsored by: NCEP Environmental Modelling Center).
Speaker(s):
Jim Doyle (NRL, Monterey)
Abstract:
An overview of recent developments in NRL's mesoscale modeling and research group will be presented. Topics briefly presented will include an update on the Coupled Ocean/Atmosphere Mesoscale Prediction System (COAMPS®) and COAMPS research and development topics including: a) a 3-way coupled version of COAMPS to represent the atmosphere-ocean circulation-ocean wave interactions using the Earth System Modeling Framework (ESMF), b) a mesoscale coupled ensemble capability to provide probabilistic mesoscale guidance, c) a high-resolution tropical cyclone model capability (COAMPS-TC) designed to provide track, structure and intensity forecasts and application as part of the Hurricane Forecast Intensity Project (HFIP), d) new advancements in the representation of boundary layer and microphysical processes targeted for high-resolution modeling, e) embedded sub-models for land surface, urban, and aerosol processes, and f) advanced adjoint and EnKF tools for mesoscale predictability and data assimilation. An overview will be provided of the COAMPS applications as part of the recent major field programs T-PARC/TCS-08 and VOCALS and participation in the HFIP multi-model ensemble. A discussion of the future plans for the Navy's mesoscale modeling system will be presented including a summary of the recent development of a new nonhydrostatic dynamical core.
Remote Access and Notes:
To join the Gotomeeting: http://www.JoinGoToMeeting.com. Then type meeting ID. Meeting ID:980-927-283; Dial Inn Number: 866-685-5896, 1-517-244-5890. PARTICIPANT PASSCODE: 8108134. For further information please contact Bill Lapenta (301) 763-8000 Ext 7200 (bill.lapenta@noaa.gov). All non NOAA visitors need to contact Janet.Johnson@noaa.gov. If you do not have US citizenship or permanent residency, you must contact Janet Johnson at least one working day before the seminar so she can arrange building access for you. Direction to NOAA Science Center (Formerly World Weather Building) http://www.emc.ncep.noaa.gov/seminars/note/directions.html.
OneNOAA Science Seminar Date Added and Listserv Subscription information:
OneNOAA Science Seminars added Tuesday, July 20, 2010 6:57 AM. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can subscribe to the weekly email of OneNOAA Science Seminars by visiting https://list.woc.noaa.gov/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/onenoaascienceseminars and filling in your email address or by sending an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body (don't include the quotes). You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series please contact Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov. Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].
OneNOAA Science Seminars 2010 (by month): Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Back to top


Impact of New Global Models and Ensemble Prediction Systems on Consensus TC Track Forecasts

Date/Time/Location/Seminar Sponsor:
Thursday, 22 July 2010, 12:00-13:00h [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time] (Seminar location: NOAA Science Center (World Weather Building), Room 209, 5200 Auth Road, Camp Springs, MD 20746; OneNOAA Science Seminar sponsored by: NCEP Environmental Modelling Center).
Speaker(s):
Jim Goerss (NRL, Monterey)
Abstract:
The interpolated versions of seven high-quality TC track forecast models are routinely available to the forecasters at NHC. The seven models are: GFS, GFDL, and the Hurricane WRF (AVNI, GFDI, and HWFI; NCEP); NOGAPS and GFDN (NGPI and GFNI; FNMOC); the UKMO global model (EGRI); and the ECMWF global model (EMXI). The operational consensus forecast aid, TVCN, is formed by giving equal weight to the available forecasts from AVNI, GFDI, HWFI, NGPI, GFNI, EGRI, and EMXI. Prior to the start of the 2009 season, upgrades were made to the Canadian global model (CMC). During the course of the season it was found that the TC track forecasts in the Atlantic for CMC were much improved over previous seasons. As part of the Hurricane Forecast Improvement Project Demonstration, a number of ensembles were run using different configurations of the NOAA/ESRL FIM (a global model using a flow-following vertical coordinate, finite-volume numerics, and an icosahedral global grid). Interpolated versions of these new models and their ensemble means were computed for the Atlantic and eastern North Pacific for the 2009 season. The TC track forecast performance of these models and ensemble means are compared with that for the TVCN models. Finally, a number of experimental consensus forecast aids are formed combining these models and ensemble means with the TVCN models and their TC track forecast performance is compared with that for TVCN.
Remote Access and Notes:
To join the Gotomeeting: http://www.JoinGoToMeeting.com. Then type meeting ID. Meeting ID: 114 456-074. Dial Inn Number: 866-685-5896, 1-517-244-5890
PARTICIPANT PASSCODE: 8108134 For further information please contact Bill Lapenta (301) 763-8000 Ext 7200 (bill.lapenta@noaa.gov). All non NOAA visitors need to contact Janet.Johnson@noaa.gov. If you do not have US citizenship or permanent residency, you must contact Janet Johnson at least one working day before the seminar so she can arrange building access for you. Direction to NOAA Science Center (Formerly World Weather Building) http://www.emc.ncep.noaa.gov/seminars/note/directions.html.
OneNOAA Science Seminar Date Added and Listserv Subscription information:
OneNOAA Science Seminars added Tuesday, July 20, 2010 6:57 AM. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can subscribe to the weekly email of OneNOAA Science Seminars by visiting https://list.woc.noaa.gov/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/onenoaascienceseminars and filling in your email address or by sending an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body (don't include the quotes). You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series please contact Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov. Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].
OneNOAA Science Seminars 2010 (by month): Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Back to top


A Comparison of Ocean Freshwater Volume Estimates From Satellite Gravimetry and in situ Salinity

Date/Time/Location/Seminar Sponsor:
Wednesady, 28 July 2010; 11:00-12:00 ETZ [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time] (Seminar location: SSMC-3 (1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD, 20910), 4th Floor, Room 4817; OneNOAA Science Seminar sponsored by: NOAA NODC).
Speaker(s):
Rebecca Cumbie (Ernest F. Hollings Undergraduate Scholarship Program, undergraduate student at North Carolina State University)
Speaker e-mail(s):
Rebecca.Cumbie@noaa.gov
Abstract:
Net global ocean freshwater volume (FV) was calculated for the period 2002-2008 using mass estimates from the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) and in situ salinity (S) measurements from the World Ocean Database 2009. The results show strong seasonal cycles for each hemisphere with average amplitudes of ~35-40 ×10^3 km^3/yr shown by S data and ~3-5 ×10^3 km^3/yr shown by GRACE data. The magnitudes of FV using GRACE data (~ ±4 ×10^3 km^3/month) are close to 10 times smaller than the magnitudes of FV using S data (~ ±33 ×10^3 km^3/month). For the global ocean, GRACE data show a slightly negative decrease in FV (~ -88 km^3/yr) while S data show an increase (~2278 km^3/yr) that is roughly three times the value of previous estimates (~430-790 km^3/yr). Our FV rates suggest that the northern hemisphere is losing freshwater (approximate rates are -108 km^3/yr for GRACE data and -461 km3/yr for S data) and the southern hemisphere is gaining freshwater (approximate rates are 20 km^3/yr for GRACE data and 2737 km^3/yr for S data). This project contributes to our understanding of the Thermohaline Circulation and sea level rise. Further investigation is needed to: (1) validate the FV values, (2) to reconcile the difference between the GRACE and S budgets, and (3) perform an error analysis.

1. Cazenave, A., Dominh, K., Guinehut, S., Berthier, E., Llovel, W., Ramillien, G., Ablain, M., Larnicol, G., 2008. Sea level budget over 2003-2008: A reevaluation from GRACE space gravimetry, satellite altimetry, and Argo. Glob. Planet. Change 65, 83-88.

Willis, J., Chambers, D., Nerem, R., 2008. Assesing the globally averaged sea level budget on seasonal to interannual time scales. J. Geophys. Res., 113, C06015. doi:10.1029/2007JC004517.

Remote Access and Notes:
For Webcast access: 1) go to http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?i=744868915&p=science&t=c; 2) type in other required fields (i.e., your name, e-mail, organization; meeting number is 744868915; password is "science" -without quotation marks, password is case sensitive- ); 3) indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy; 4) click on Proceed. For phone access: toll free dial 877-725-4068 using a touch-tone phone; when prompted enter participant code 8634769 followed by a "#" (Please mute your phone during the presentation or toggle *6 otherwise it produces a sound feedback and we will disconnect everyone). Please note that phone access is limited to 50 connections on a first-come-first served basis. Webcast & phone access will start approximately 5 min before the seminar. If you are a first time user of mymeetings, you may want to check your system requirements prior to attending the webcast. For general questions about this seminar, please contact Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov.
About the speaker(s):
Rebecca Cumbie is a Ernest F. Hollings Undergraduate Scholar who has been interning at the NOAA Ocean Climate Laboratory this summer. She is currently an undergraduate student at North Carolina State University where she is majoring in Meteorology and Applied Mathematics. After graduation she plans to continue onto graduate school to study Meteorology, likely with a focus in Marine or Tropical Meteorology.
OneNOAA Science Seminar Date Added and Listserv Subscription information:
OneNOAA Science Seminars added Friday, July 23, 2010 3:26 PM. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can subscribe to the weekly email of OneNOAA Science Seminars by visiting https://list.woc.noaa.gov/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/onenoaascienceseminars and filling in your email address or by sending an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body (don't include the quotes). You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series please contact Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov. Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].
OneNOAA Science Seminars 2010 (by month): Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Back to top

Stable Nitrogen Isotopes (δ15N) in the Eastern Oyster (Crassostrea virginica) as an Indicator of Nitrogen Source

Date/Time/Location/Seminar Sponsor:
Wednesday, 28 July 2010, 12:00–1:00 ETZ [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time] (Seminar location: SSMC-4 (1305 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD, 20910), 8th Floor, Room 8150; OneNOAA Science Seminar sponsored by: NOAA NOS).
Speaker(s):
Ben Fertig
Speaker e-mail(s):
bfertig@umces.edu
Abstract:
This seminar demonstrates that stable nitrogen isotopes (δ15N) in oysters (Crassostrea virginica) can identify anthropogenic nitrogen sources (a cause of degraded water quality) at multiple spatial scales in Chesapeake and Maryland’s Coastal Bays. Fieldwork, monitoring and land use data, spatial analyses, and modeling techniques were employed. Due to minimal tissue δ15N variations between individuals as replicates (standard error < 0.5 ‰), a sample size of five individuals optimally balanced error with effort. Transplantation verified convergence of oyster δ15N after changes in nitrogen source while modeling quantified temporal integration (four months for muscle, two to three months for gill and mantle) and measurements over two years demonstrated seasonal δ15N increases in seston (summer) and oysters (winter). At the small scale (10s km^2), oysters in Monie Bay’s creeks (varying by watershed land use) found anthropogenic nitrogen transported to Monie Bay from Wicomico River whose watershed was dominated by poultry manure (3.7 × 10^6 kg N yr^-1), not sewage (2.0 × 10^5 kg N yr^-1) or septic (1.1 × 10^5 kg N yr^-1), which has large implications for Delmarva Peninsula: home to 4,630 poultry feeding houses and thus a potential nitrogen input ratio from poultry:humans of ~ 48:1. Water quality in Maryland’s Coastal Bays (medium spatial scale, 100s km^2) was susceptible to terrestrially derived nitrogen, particularly after rainfall, which macroalgae (Gracilaria sp.) δ15N responded to quickly but did not detect spatial patterns while oyster δ15N responded slowly and exhibited a slight fine-scale spatial gradient. Broadly in Chesapeake Bay (large scale, 10,000s km2), oyster δ15N related to land use, stream and tributary water quality, and it tracked tributary wastewater plumes (sometimes tidally advected upstream) but the overall oyster δ15N gradient (16.0‰ in Eastern Bay, 8.3‰ in Lynnhaven River) decreased with flushing time, with increased salinity, and with increased shell height so δ15N required correction factors for bay-wide interpretation. Denitrification also remains potentially confounding as this process elevates nitrate δ15N signals, potentially before assimilation by oysters (via plankton). Nevertheless, oyster δ15N is a simple, powerful tool for indicating nitrogen sources at multiple spatial and temporal scales. Utility of spatial integration is encouraged for the future.
About The Speaker:
Ben Fertig recently received a Ph.D. in Ecology from the Marine, Estuarine, and Environmental Science Program at the University of Maryland, College Park. Studying under Drs. Bill Dennison and Tim Carruthers at the Integration and Application Network (www.ian.umces.edu), Dr. Fertig focused on anthropogenic influences on estuarine ecosystems, biological indicators of eutrophication, stable nitrogen isotope techniques, spatial analysis, ecosystem health assessment, science applications for environmental management, and science communication. During his graduate career, he was a recipient of three successive NERRS Graduate Research Fellowships and a Maryland Coastal Bays Program Implementation Grant, all of which resulted in publishing two journal articles, contributions to three book chapters, and a dozen presentations.
Remote Access and Notes:
Presentations are available remotely via a combination of phone & webcast. Please be aware that remote access is limited to 50 connections on a first-come-first served basis, so we cannot guarantee participation. To participate remotely you must: 1) Dial toll-free 1-877-708-1667. When prompted enter passcode 7028688 followed by the # sign. Please use your phone’s mute button (or toggle *6) during the presentation until you are ready to ask questions. 2) Go to the webcast site at http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?sigKey=mymeetings&i=744925156&p=&t=c; 3) Enter meeting number 744925156 if needed. No passcode is required. 4) Enter other required fields. 5) Indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy and click Proceed. For questions: contact Tracy Gill (tracy.gill@noaa.gov).
OneNOAA Science Seminar Date Added and Listserv Subscription information:
OneNOAA Science Seminars added Thursday, July 1, 2010 12:59 PM. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can subscribe to the weekly email of OneNOAA Science Seminars by visiting https://list.woc.noaa.gov/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/onenoaascienceseminars and filling in your email address or by sending an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body (don't include the quotes). You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series please contact Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov. Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].
OneNOAA Science Seminars 2010 (by month): Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Back to top


Measurement and Modeling of Multi-Generational Gene Flow From Transgenic to Wild Fish Under Varying Environments

Date/Time/Location/Seminar Sponsor:
Wednesday, 28 July 2010; 12:00-12:30 ETZ [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time] (Seminar location: SSMC-3 (1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD, 20910), 2nd Floor; OneNOAA Science Seminar sponsored by: Sea Grant Knauss Fellows Brown Bag Series).
Speaker(s):
Kelly Pennington (Sea Grant Knauss Fellow)
Abstract:
Transgenic fishes are nearing commercialization for aquaculture around the world. Farmed transgenic fish would likely escape from typical production facilities and interbreed with wild relatives. Models could help risk assessors predict the likelihood and consequences of transgene flow; however, predictions from existing models have not been confirmed using real populations of transgenic fish. We introduced growth-enhanced transgenic Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes) and wild-type medaka into four environments: (A) high food availability, no predation; (B) high food availability, simulated predation; (C) low food availability, no predation; and (D) low food availability, simulated predation. We maintained 24 populations of wild-type and transgenic fish under these environments for approximately three generations and measured population size and frequency of transgenic fish at 210 days. In experimental populations, final transgenic population size was greater in Environment A than in all other Environments. The final frequency of transgenic fish in Environment A was greater than that in Environment C or D. Both models predicted that transgenic fish frequency in Environment A would be the highest, but also overestimated the frequency of transgenic fish compared to observed results. We created deterministic and stochastic versions of a demographic simulation model, parameterized with fitness trait values collected under the same environmental conditions, to predict frequency of transgenic fish under each environment, and compared observed results to model predictions. Models predicted transgenic fish frequencies that overlapped with observations in Environments B and C but not in the more extreme Environments A and D. Our results illustrate the danger of measuring fitness traits in one sterile environment to parameterize a deterministic model, and using model outcomes to inform risk assessment decisions. We recommend building uncertainty analysis into gene flow models, at least by incorporating parameter variability, and confirming model predictions with data collected under relevant environmental conditions before using such models to inform ecological risk assessments.
Remote Access and Notes:
Remote access via webinar: 1. Go to http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?sigKey=mymeetings&i=742656968&=brownbag&t=c; 2. Enter the required fields; 3. Indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy; 4. Click on Proceed. 5. passcode: brownbag. Audio: Dial 866-833-7307; participant passcode: 8986360. Please note: remote access is limited to first 50 participants. For further information about this seminar please contact Mary.Lou.Cumberpatch@noaa.gov (301-713-2600 Ext. 129) or Albert.E.Theberge.Jr@noaa.gov (301-713-2600 Ext. 115). For information about the Sea Grant Knauss Fellows Brown Bag Series please contact Wendy.Morrison@noaa.gov.
About The Speaker:
Kelly has a Ph.D. in Conservation Biology from the University of Minnesota. She is currently a Knauss Sea Grant Fellow in the U.S. Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation.
OneNOAA Science Seminar Date Added and Listserv Subscription information:
OneNOAA Science Seminars added Tuesday, May 4, 2010 1:23 PM / Last updated Wednesday, July 21, 2010 7:43 AM. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can subscribe to the weekly email of OneNOAA Science Seminars by visiting https://list.woc.noaa.gov/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/onenoaascienceseminars and filling in your email address or by sending an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body (don't include the quotes). You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series please contact Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov. Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].
OneNOAA Science Seminars 2010 (by month): Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Back to top


Molecular Phsiology and Stress Responses of the Pacific White Shrimp, Litopenaeus vannamei: Impacts of Hypoxia and Hypercapnic Hyposia

Date/Time/Location/Seminar Sponsor:
Wednesday, 28 July 2010; 12:30-13:00 ETZ [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time] (Seminar location: SSMC-3 (1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD, 20910), 2nd Floor; OneNOAA Science Seminar sponsored by: Sea Grant Knauss Fellows Brown Bag Series).
Speaker(s):
Kolo Rathburn (Sea Grant Knauss Fellow)
Abstract:
Many crustaceans inhabit estuarine ecosystems where they are frequently exposed to hypoxia (H) and elevated levels of CO2 (hypercapnia). These factors may impair the ability of crustaceans to maintain optimal metabolic processes and immune defense. Marine crustaceans employ various tactics to cope with environmental hypoxia and hypercapnia, which can require changes in biochemistry such as altered activities and concentrations of metabolic enzymes. Furthermore, by regulating their gene expression marine crustaceans may coordinate specific and general stress responses to H and hypercapnic H (HH) which may include metabolic depression. The molecular mechanisms that underlie these responses to H and HH stress in marine crustaceans are poorly understood. This study set out to determine the impacts of moderate H and HH on the basic physiology of the Pacific white shrimp, L. vannamei. We tested the hypothesis that H and HH elicit down-regulation of genes associated with metabolic depression, specifically protein synthesis and transcription, as well as immune defense. Shrimp were held in H, HH, or normoxia (N) for 4 h or 24 h. RNA from hepatopancreas of individual animals was hybridized to microarrays containing 21,864 unigenes expressed by L. vannamei. Transcriptional profiles of H and HH animals were compared to respective 4 and 24 h N controls. Genes involved in amino acid metabolism, RNA metabolism, and translation (including numerous tRNA synthetases) were down-regulated in 4 h H, 24 h H and 4 h HH shrimp. Few regulated genes could be assigned to immune defense, except for several in 24 h H shrimp, which included immune genes encoding crustins and penaeidins. Additionally, unique patterns of gene expression such as increased lipid metabolism and initiation of apoptosis were tied to specific treatments and times, revealing effects of duration and added CO2 stress in altering the transcriptome of L. vannamei. Overall, these results suggest that crustacean molecular responses to environmental changes in O2 and CO2 pressure involve both general and stress-specific gene sets, with characteristic shifts to metabolic depression. This work contributes insight to the effects human perturbations might have on estuarine organisms.
About The Speaker
Charles Kolo Rathburn, graduated from Chaminade University of Hononlulu with a B.S. Biology 2005. Worked for one year as field and laboratory technician at the Hollings Marine Lab in Charleston, SC as part of the Oceans and Human Health Initiative classifying tidal creek health in the southeastern United States. I was part of a team developing a model to class tidal creek health based on gene expression of oysters collected from ecosystems of varying human perturbation. Attended graduate school at the College of Charleston, Graduate Program in Marine Biology and received an M.S. in Marine Biology in Dec 2009. I now work for Senator Roger Wicker of Mississippi as a Sea Grant Legislative Fellow - my life has been consumed by the oil spill.
Remote Access and Notes:
Remote access via webinar: 1. Go to http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?sigKey=mymeetings&i=742656968&=brownbag&t=c; 2. Enter the required fields; 3. Indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy; 4. Click on Proceed. 5. passcode: brownbag. Audio: Dial 866-833-7307; participant passcode: 8986360. Please note: remote access is limited to first 50 participants. For further information about this seminar please contact Mary.Lou.Cumberpatch@noaa.gov (301-713-2600 Ext. 129) or Albert.E.Theberge.Jr@noaa.gov (301-713-2600 Ext. 115). For information about the Sea Grant Knauss Fellows Brown Bag Series please contact Wendy.Morrison@noaa.gov.
OneNOAA Science Seminar Date Added and Listserv Subscription information:
OneNOAA Science Seminars added Tuesday, May 4, 2010 1:23 PM / Last edited Friday, July 23, 2010 3:18 PM. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can subscribe to the weekly email of OneNOAA Science Seminars by visiting https://list.woc.noaa.gov/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/onenoaascienceseminars and filling in your email address or by sending an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body (don't include the quotes). You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series please contact Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov. Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].
OneNOAA Science Seminars 2010 (by month): Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Back to top


Microalgal Diets, Fatty Acid Composition, Growth and Stress Response of Bivalved Molluscs

Date/Time/Location/Seminar Sponsor:
Thursday, 29 July 2010; 11:00-12:00 ETZ [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time] (Seminar location: New Jersey Marine Science Consortium (NJMSC, Bldg. 22) Conference Room, 22 Magruder Road, Fort Hancock, NJ 07732; OneNOAA Science Seminar sponsored by: James J. Howard Marine Sciences Laboratory Seminar Series).
Speaker(s):
Dr. Lisa Milke (Milford Laboratory NOAA Fisheries/NEFSC - Milford, CT)
Speakers email:
lisa.milke@noaa.gov
Abstract:
Scallops often express poor growth and survival in hatcheries during post-settlement stages; a period of substantial morphogenesis of feeding organs. The dietary requirements of these stages are largely unknown, and therefore multi-species algal diets are often provided to ensure growth and survival. However, the cost of algal culture is high and therefore our objectives were to 1) identify high-performance algal diets, involving a minimum number of species and 2) to determine algal properties (with special focus on fatty acids) which may contribute to differences in scallop growth. Two commercially important scallop species, bay scallops, Argopecten irradians and sea scallops, Placopecten magellanicus, were grown in recirculating systems during five separate trials, each lasting 3-4 weeks. Scallops were offered unialgal and binary diets consisting of one of three diatoms and one of three flagellates. Chaetoceros muelleri (CHGRA) in combination with either Pavlova spp. (CCMP strain 459; Pav 459) or Pavlova pinguis, consistently ranked among the best diets for both scallop species. Growth response appears largely related to two n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA): arachidonic (AA) found in CHGRA and docosapentaenoic acid (DPA) provided by Pav 459 and P. pinguis. The metabolic role of AA was further examined by offering AA-supplemented algal diets to bay scallop larvae and juveniles. Although growth was unaffected by AA additions, it did appear to impact stress response as identified by hemocyte morphology. Alternative biochemical measures of stress response, such as cortisol and dopamine, are currently under development for implementation in similar studies. A brief overview of these, and other ongoing physiological studies at the Milford Laboratory, will also be presented.
Remote Access and Notes:
Webex access: To join the Webex Seminar Series online (Now from iPhones too!): 1. Go to https://nmfs-st.webex.com/nmfs-st/j.php?ED=145092447&UID=0; 2. Enter your name and email address; 3. Enter the meeting password: (This meeting does not require a password); 4. Click "Join". To join the teleconference: 1. Dial the toll-free number: 866-658-9153; 2. Enter the pass code: 3373926 followed by the # sign. PLEASE NOTE: There is a 25 participant limit for the Webex Seminar Series (including the host). . Seminar takes place at New Jersey Marine Science Consortium (NJMSC, Bldg. 22) Conference Room, 22 Magruder Road, Fort Hancock, NJ 07732. For further information please contact Vincent Guida (Vincent.Guida@noaa.gov)and Ashok Deshpande (Ashok.Deshpande@noaa.gov).
About the speaker(s):
Dr. Lisa Milke is a Research Fishery Biologist at the NOAA Fisheries Service’s Milford Laboratory in Milford, CT. She received a Ph.D. from Dalhousie University, a M.S. from the University of Connecticut and B.S. degrees from Salisbury University and University of Maryland Eastern Shore. Her background is in shellfish physiology with thesis and dissertation topics including adult bivalve feeding physiology and the nutritional requirements of postlarval bay and sea scallops. Current research interests include bay scallop overwintering, ontogenetic changes in digestive enzyme activity in postlarval scallops and biochemical indices of stress in bivalves. She is also the co-organizer of the annual Milford Aquaculture Seminar.
OneNOAA Science Seminar Date Added and Listserv Subscription information:
OneNOAA Science Seminars added Thursday, July 8, 2010 7:33 AM / Last updated Monday, July 26, 2010 12:02 PM. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can subscribe to the weekly email of OneNOAA Science Seminars by visiting https://list.woc.noaa.gov/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/onenoaascienceseminars and filling in your email address or by sending an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body (don't include the quotes). You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series please contact Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov. Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].
OneNOAA Science Seminars 2010 (by month): Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Back to top


Diagnostic Analysis of Hydrologic Models

Date/Time/Location/Seminar Sponsor:
Thursday, 29 July 2010; 13:00-14:00 ETZ [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time] (Seminar location: SSMC-2 (1325 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD, 20910), 8th Floor, Room 8246; OneNOAA Science Seminar sponsored by: NWS Office of Hydrologic Development).
Speaker(s):
Thorsten Wagener and Patrick Reed (Penn State University)
Abstract:
Thorsten Wagener and Patrick Reed of Penn Statue U. have recently started a new NSF-funded project on diagnostic analysis of hydrological models. Their work will focus on a new diagnostic framework to understand model uncertainties and limitations as well as the value of observations to reduce such uncertainties.
Remote Access and Notes:
Conference Call: (866) 713-2373, passcode 9960047. GotoMeeting: https://www1.gotomeeting.com/join/738350553. Remote access will be limited to 20 connections. Please contact Ken Pavelle (ken.pavelle@noaa.gov)at 301-713-0640 Ext 183 if you have any questions.
OneNOAA Science Seminar Date Added and Listserv Subscription information:
OneNOAA Science Seminars added Wednesday, July 28, 2010 7:26 AM. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can subscribe to the weekly email of OneNOAA Science Seminars by visiting https://list.woc.noaa.gov/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/onenoaascienceseminars and filling in your email address or by sending an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body (don't include the quotes). You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series please contact Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov. Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].
OneNOAA Science Seminars 2010 (by month): Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Back to top


Living in Fear: An Individual Based Model of a Killer Whale-Dusky Dolphin Behavioral Game (Seminar POSTPONED)

Date/Time/Location/Seminar Sponsor:
Thursday, 29 July 2010; 12:00-13:00 ETZ [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time] (Seminar location: SSMC-3 (1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD, 20910), 2nd Floor; OneNOAA Science Seminar sponsored by: NOAA NODC Central Library).
Speaker(s):
Mridula Srinivasan (Program Manager/Marine Biologist, National Marine Fisheries Service)
Speaker's email:
mridula.srinivasan@noaa.gov
Abstract:
Dolphins are apex predators, but occasionally they are prey to a more powerful predator like the killer whale (Orcinus orca). While killer whales may seek other prey, they can intimidate dolphins into making different lifestyle choices about when and where to rest, or when to feed. These anti-predator choices can occur because of predator threats rather than actual predator presence. Alternatively, due to heightened and imminent predation threat, dolphins may use drastic tactics to flee or hide to avoid a deadly encounter. Off Kaikoura, New Zealand, dusky dolphins (Lagenorhynchus obscurus) adopt short and long-term anti-predator strategies to avoid potential killer whale attacks. We developed a spatially explicit, individual-based model (IBM) to capture the dynamic behavioral interaction between a fierce predator and a scared prey, and to elucidate evolutionary costs vs. benefits of making anti-predator decisions. Despite species and habitat specific questions driving model development, the model can be adapted to different species and environments to answer complex ecological questions including predator-prey relationships.
Remote Access and Notes:
Remote access via webinar: 1. Go to http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?sigKey=mymeetings&i=742656968&=brownbag&t=c; 2. Enter the required fields; 3. Indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy; 4. Click on Proceed. 5. passcode: brownbag. Audio: Dial 866-833-7307; participant passcode: 8986360. Please note: remote access is limited to first 50 participants. For further information about this seminar please contact Mary.Lou.Cumberpatch@noaa.gov (301-713-2600 Ext. 129) or Albert.E.Theberge.Jr@noaa.gov (301-713-2600 Ext. 115).
OneNOAA Science Seminar Date Added and Listserv Subscription information:
OneNOAA Science Seminars added Friday, June 25, 2010 9:53 AM. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can subscribe to the weekly email of OneNOAA Science Seminars by visiting https://list.woc.noaa.gov/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/onenoaascienceseminars and filling in your email address or by sending an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body (don't include the quotes). You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series please contact Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov. Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].
OneNOAA Science Seminars 2010 (by month): Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Back to top


Dolphin Conservation Research in Sarasota Bay, Florida: Lessons from 4 Decades and 5 Generations

Date/Time/Location/Seminar Sponsor:
Thursday, 29 July 2010; 14:00-15:00h ETZ [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time] (Seminar location: Dolphin Conference Room at the NMFS Southeast Regional Office, 263 13th Avenue S., St Petersburg, Fl 33701; OneNOAA Science Seminar sponsored by: NMFS Speaker Series).
Speaker(s):
Dr. Randall Wells (Chicago Zoological Society)
Abstract:
Randall Wells directs the world’s longest-running study of dolphins, the Sarasota Dolphin Research Program (SDRP). He began studying bottlenose dolphins in Sarasota Bay, Florida, as a high school volunteer at Mote Marine Laboratory in 1970. He received his BA in Zoology from the University of South Florida in 1975, his Master’s in Zoology from the University of Florida in 1978, and his PhD in Biology from the University of California, Santa Cruz in 1986. He has worked with the Chicago Zoological Society since 1989, where he currently is a Senior Conservation Scientist managing Mote Marine Laboratory’s Dolphin Research Program. His current research program uses a collaborative approach to examine the behavior, social structure, life history, ecology, health, and population biology of bottlenose dolphins along the central west coast of Florida, with studies focusing on five generations of a locally resident 160-member dolphin community. Recent research topics include the effects of human activities on coastal dolphins, such as boat traffic, fishing activities, human feeding of wild dolphins, and environmental contaminants. A question and answer session will follow the presentation.
Remote Access and Notes:
To participate in person: The presentation will be hosted in the Dolphin Conference Room at the NMFS Southeast Regional Office, 263 13th Avenue S., St Petersburg, Fl 33701. To participate via Webinar: Please register prior to the scheduled time of 2 pm EST to receive the connection link. Space is limited. Reserve your Webinar seat now at: https://www1.gotomeeting.com/register/853685616. After registering you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the Webinar. You can also call into a teleconference and for the question and answer period following the presentation. Teleconference: 866-770-5402
Passcode: 2338527. For more information contact Kyle Baker (kyle.baker@noaa.gov) or Stacey Horstman (stacey.horstman@noaa.gov) at 727-824-5312.
OneNOAA Science Seminar Date Added and Listserv Subscription information:
OneNOAA Science Seminars added Wednesday, July 21, 2010 1:55 PM. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can subscribe to the weekly email of OneNOAA Science Seminars by visiting https://list.woc.noaa.gov/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/onenoaascienceseminars and filling in your email address or by sending an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body (don't include the quotes). You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series please contact Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov. Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].


NOAA Townhall Meeting

Townhall Meeting: Please join NOAA Administrator Dr. Jane Lubchenco and members of NOAA’s leadership team for a town hall meeting on July 30th to discuss the President’s new National Policy for the Stewardship of the Oceans, Coasts, and Great Lakes.

Date/Time/Location/Seminar Sponsor:
Friday, 30 July 2010; 13:30-15:30h ETZ [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time] (Seminar location: NOAA Science Center Auditorium (1301 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD, 20910), Silver Spring, Md.; OneNOAA Science Seminar sponsored by: NOAA).
Speaker(s):
NOAA Administrator Dr. Jane Lubchenco and members of NOAA’s leadership team
Abstract:
President Obama’s new National Policy for the Stewardship of the Oceans, Coasts, and Great Lakes is a major milestone for NOAA. This town hall meeting is an excellent opportunity for you to learn more about the policy and how it will affect NOAA’s priorities. We’ll also be holding a special Q&A session during the meeting. [For those of you unable to attend the meeting in person, we’ve set up a special e-mail box where you can send your questions: townhall.oceanpolicy@noaa.gov. We’ll also be taking questions from those of you listening by phone. We’ll do our best to answer as many questions as time allows.] You will also find the final recommendations of the Ocean Policy Task Force, the President’s Executive Order, and other materials online at: http://www.whitehouse.gov/administration/eop/oceans.
Access to webcast:
The webcast of NOAA Administrator Dr. Jane Lubchenco and members of NOAA’s leadership team at the town hall meeting held on July 30th regarding the President’s new National Policy for the Stewardship of the Oceans, Coasts, and Great Lakes, is now available online for NOAA employees and contractors. Please visit http://www.noaa.gov/townhall for access to the webcast and powerpoint. You will also find the final recommendations of the Ocean Policy Task Force, the President’s Executive Order, and other materials online at: www.whitehouse.gov/oceans.
Remote Access and Notes:
For those attending in person (NOAA) , please coordinate with your supervisor and arrive no later than 1:15p.m. Seating is limited and is on a first-come, first-served basis — we encourage you to get there early.* # Live webcast: This event will be webcast live and archived online for viewing by all NOAA staff. To access the webcast, please visit: http://www.noaa.gov/townhall. # Listen-in number: A call-in option is also available. To listen to the town hall meeting, dial 888-603-6971 and provide the pass code “NOCEAN.” Once you have entered the call you will hear music until Dr. Lubchenco begins the meeting. *The town hall meeting is physically accessible to people with disabilities, and sign language interpreters will be provided. Other requests for accommodations should be directed to Danielle Rioux at Danielle.Rioux@noaa.gov.
OneNOAA Science Seminar Date Added and Listserv Subscription information:
OneNOAA Science Seminars added Wednesday, July 28, 2010 7:27 AM / Last updated Monday, August 9, 2010 9:52 AM. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can subscribe to the weekly email of OneNOAA Science Seminars by visiting https://list.woc.noaa.gov/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/onenoaascienceseminars and filling in your email address or by sending an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body (don't include the quotes). You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series please contact Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov. Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

 

 

 


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August 2010

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OneNOAA Science Seminars 2010: Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
(Total number of OneNOAA Science seminars in July 2010: TBD)

 

 



GIS – So Much More That Just Making Maps! Fundamentals and Applications of GIS in a National Park

Date/Time/Location/Seminar Sponsor:
Tuesday, 03 August 2010; 11:00-12:00 ETZ [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time] (Seminar location: New Jersey Marine Science Consortium (NJMSC, Bldg. 22) Conference Room, 22 Magruder Road, Fort Hancock, NJ 07732; OneNOAA Science Seminar sponsored by: James J. Howard Marine Sciences Laboratory Seminar Series).
Speaker(s):
Mark Christiano (National Park Service - Gateway National Recreation Area)
Abstract:
Geographic Information Systems (GIS) have become a fundamental part of all of our lives. We find GIS in small things like helping us find the local pizza places on our phone to the analyzing socioeconomic trends in the U.S. Census data. GIS has become a valuable tool in all aspects of life especially in science. During this presentation we will cover what makes GIS such an important tool and how it works. We will also discuss the role of remote sensing and global positioning systems as part of GIS. Mark will show an example of how GIS is being used in the National Park Service and what local projects GIS plays a role in at Gateway National Recreation Area.
Remote Access and Notes:
To join the Webex Seminar Series online (Now from iPhones too!): 1. Go to Go to https://nmfs-st.webex.com/nmfs-st/j.php?ED=145252017&UID=0; 2. Enter your name and email address; 3. Enter the meeting password: (This meeting does not require a password); 4. Click "Join". To join the teleconference: 1. Dial the toll-free number: 866-658-9153; 2. Enter the pass code: 3373926 followed by the # sign. PLEASE NOTE: There is a 25 participant limit for the Webex Seminar Series (including the host). . Seminar takes place at New Jersey Marine Science Consortium (NJMSC, Bldg. 22) Conference Room, 22 Magruder Road, Fort Hancock, NJ 07732. For further information please contact Rich Langton (Rich.Langton@noaa.gov) and Ashok Deshpande (Ashok.Deshpande@noaa.gov).
About the speaker(s):
Mark Christiano received his BS in Environmental Science from the University of Connecticut (2000). After graduating he spent some time as an urban planner and surveyor for a private company in Stamford CT. He then returned to academia in 2003 and graduated in 2005 from the University of Rhode Island (URI) with a Masters in Remote Sensing and Spatial Analysis. As part of his program, Mark developed a protocol for the National Park Service to use high resolution satellite imagery to map the salt marshes of Jamaica Bay. After graduating he was asked to stay at URI as a research associate in the Environmental Data Center (EDC). He was an adjunct professor in the Landscape Architecture department of URI where he designed and taught their GIS undergraduate class. In 2008 Mark left the EDC and joined the National Park Service as the GIS Specialist at Gateway National Recreation Area. Mark’s maps and projects have been published in newspapers, map collections, and scientific papers.
OneNOAA Science Seminar Date Added and Listserv Subscription information:
OneNOAA Science Seminars added Thursday, July 15, 2010 7:27 AM / Last edited Monday, August 2, 2010 9:24 AM. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can subscribe to the weekly email of OneNOAA Science Seminars by visiting https://list.woc.noaa.gov/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/onenoaascienceseminars and filling in your email address or by sending an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body (don't include the quotes). You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series please contact Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov. Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].
OneNOAA Science Seminars 2010 (by month): Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Back to top


Ensemble Nowcasts of Rainfall

Date/Time/Location/Seminar Sponsor:
Thursday, 05 August 2010; 15:00-16:00h ETZ [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time] (Seminar location: SSMC-2 (1325 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD, 20910, USA), 8th Floor, Room 8246; OneNOAA Science Seminar sponsored by: NWS Office of Hydrologic Development).
Speaker(s):
Alan Seed (Bureau of Meteorology, Melbourne, Australia)
Abstract:
Forecasting rainfall up to several hours ahead and at kilometre resolution is an uncertain business due to the uncertainty in the initial rainfall estimates that are used in the forecast procedure and the rapid temporal evolution of the rain field at the scales that are relevant to hydrological prediction at these lead times. The skill of deterministic forecasts of extreme rainfall is particularly low, even at 1 hour of lead time, so it is appropriate to recognise this and move towards a probabilistic approach that uses ensembles to represent forecast uncertainty to the end user. The Australian Bureau of Meteorology together with the Met Office (U.K.) has developed the Short Term Ensemble Prediction System (STEPS) that uses a stochastic space-time model for rainfall and observation errors to generate ensembles of rainfall forecasts. The Bureau uses STEPS to generate a 45-member ensemble of rainfall nowcasts out to 2 hours at 6 min, 1 km resolution over a 300 km domain, updated every 6 minutes, based on radar rainfall estimates only. The Met Office uses STEPS to blend the radar nowcast with NWP rainfall forecasts so as to generate ensembles out to 6 hours at 15 min, 2 km resolution over a 1000 km domain, updated every hour. This talk will present an outline of STEPS, examples of the forecasts and products that are generated operationally in Australia, verification statistics, and a discussion of how the Bureau plans to use STEPS as part of a flash flood forecasting service.
Remote Access and Notes:
We have decided to change Thursday's GotoMeeting into a Webinar. Reserve your Webinar seat now at: https://www1.gotomeeting.com/register/113164601. After registering you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the Webinar. For further information please contact Ken Pavelle 301-713-0640 Ext183 (ken.pavelle@noaa.gov).
OneNOAA Science Seminar Date Added and Listserv Subscription information:
OneNOAA Science Seminars added Thursday, July 1, 2010 10:42 AM /Last updated Tuesday, August 3, 2010 1:39 PM. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can subscribe to the weekly email of OneNOAA Science Seminars by visiting https://list.woc.noaa.gov/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/onenoaascienceseminars and filling in your email address or by sending an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body (don't include the quotes). You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series please contact Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov. Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].
OneNOAA Science Seminars 2010 (by month): Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Back to top


Seasonal Climate Forecasts from a Suite of 16 Coupled Atmosphere Ocean Models

Date/Time/Location/Seminar Sponsor:
Tuesday, 10 August 2010; 12:00-13:00 ETZ [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time] (Seminar location: World Weather Building, Room 707, 5200 Auth Road, Camp Springs, MD 20746; OneNOAA Science Seminar sponsored by: NCEP Environmental Modelling Center).
Speaker(s):
Dr. Tiruvalum N. Krishnamurti (The Florida State University)
Abstract:
The seasonal forecast result from as many as sixteen state of the art coupled atmosphere-ocean models using a downscaling component, with respect to observed rainfall estimates, enables the forecasts of each model to be bias corrected to a common 25 km resolution. During the forecast phase, the forecasts from all of these models make use of the downscaling statistics of the training phase and these are next passed on for the construction of a multimodel superensemble. This combination of methods provides a major improvement for the rainfall climatology and anomalies during the forecast phase. A major result of FSU findings is that the long term mean climatology of the superensemble based rainfall is recovered to a correlation of nearly 1.0 with respect to the observed counterpart. This study makes use of the Yatagai tabulations of daily observed gauge rainfall at 25 km resolution. for a 43 year period, and is based on nearly 10,000 sites. The models, in general, do not forecast any heavy rains, in excess of roughly 18 mm/day. That gets accounted for as a systematic error by the bias removed ensemble mean and the superensemble during the training phase. At these locations the observed rains are heavy and are provided at the grid points. The model rains are non zero but are exceedingly small, the bias corrected ensemble mean and the superensemble statistics corrects for this systematic departure of model rains. This high skill for climatology is important for addressing the rainfall anomaly forecasts, those are defined in terms of departures from the observed (rather than a model based) climatology Skill of rainfall anomaly forecasts utilize both deterministic and probabilistic skill measures such as the rms errors, anomaly correlations, equitable threat scores and the Brier skill scores. The skills of the anomaly forecasts are not anywhere near those we noted for the climatology. The multimodel superensemble capitalizes on the persistence of errors of poorer models. The superensemble forecasts of rainfall anomalies invariably carry the highest skills compared to all the member models globally and regionally. Unlike the scatter plot of the superensemble versus the climatogical rains, the behavior of the rainfall anomalies is quite different. For the anomalies the correlations of the observed to the predicted season long rains for the 16 member models range from -0.10 to 0.65. The superensemble is able to elevate that correlation to 0.70. Very similar results were obtained for winter seasons as well. The implication of these results are very significant, i.e. in an operational forecast environment, a priori one might not know, after a forecast is issued, which single model might carry the best forecast for a coming season, however having a superensemble forecast of the rainfall anomaly provides one with some assurance of having the best available forecast. The probabilistic skills show that the superensemble based forecasts carry a much higher reliability score (Briar skill score) compared to all member models. Post processing of multimodel forecasts using ensemble strategies is an important area of future research for the seasonal climate anomaly forecasts.
Download Presentation:
[Click http://www.emc.ncep.noaa.gov/seminars/presentations/2010/Krish-ncep_emc_081010.ppt]
Remote Access and Notes:
Webex access: Meeting ID: 334-216-282; Dial 914-339-0016; Access Code: 334-216-282. Contact persons: Hua Lu Pan (301) 763-8000 Ext 7234 (hualu.pan@noaa.gov) and Vijay Tallapragada (301) 763-8000 Ext 7232 (vijay.tallapragada@noaa.gov).
OneNOAA Science Seminar Date Added and Listserv Subscription information:
OneNOAA Science Seminars added Tuesday, August 3, 2010 7:12 AM / Last updated Wednesday, August 11, 2010 9:06 AM. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can subscribe to the weekly email of OneNOAA Science Seminars by visiting https://list.woc.noaa.gov/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/onenoaascienceseminars and filling in your email address or by sending an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body (don't include the quotes). You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series please contact Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov. Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].
OneNOAA Science Seminars 2010 (by month): Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Back to top

The Inner Workings of a Market for Transferable Fishing Privileges in the Florida Spiny Lobster Fishery

Date/Time/Location/Seminar Sponsor:
Wednesday, 11 August 2010; 12:00-12:30 ETZ [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time] (Seminar location: SSMC-3 (1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD, 20910), 2nd Floor; OneNOAA Science Seminar sponsored by: Sea Grant Knauss Fellows Brown Bag Series).
Speaker(s):
Kari MacLaughlin (Sea Grant Knauss Fellow)
Abstract:
With the national policy on catch shares in progress in the United States and increasing use of transferable fishing privileges in fisheries worldwide, it is important to understand how the markets created by these programs function in the real world. This paper, part of my dissertation research, presents information collected from interviews with Florida spiny lobster fishermen on how the market for transferable fishing privileges (called lobster trap certificates in this program) works, how they make decisions to buy and sell certificates, and their perceptions of the program. The interviews indicate that the fishermen participate in the market in ways we expect, but may be hindered by cultural and social differences that impede transfers; program provisions that affect decision-making in transfers; and the emergence of brokers in the market. The study also revealed how information about certificate prices and availability circulates within and between fishing communities, and how this affects the market and the outcomes of the program. When compared to results from previous analyses of transactions data, the interviews also provide information on validity of conclusions, and offers alternative explanations uncovered when the fishermen themselves explain the trap certificate market. The results of this paper suggest that management and regulating agencies should directly address these issues that could affect the market when developing and amending transferable fishing rights programs. Additionally, it exemplifies the importance of combining interviews with fishermen with economic analyses in monitoring and evaluation in order to gain a better understanding of how these programs work.
About The Speaker:
Kari MacLauchlin completed a B.S. in Ecology at the University of Georgia and an M.S. in Interdisciplinary Ecology from University of Florida. She will complete her PhD in the Interdisciplinary Ecology program, with a concentration in Anthropology, in December 2010. Currently she is a Knauss fellow in the NOAA Fisheries Office of Policy.
Remote Access and Notes:
Remote access via webinar: 1. Go to http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?sigKey=mymeetings&i=742656968&=brownbag&t=c; 2. Enter the required fields; 3. Indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy; 4. Click on Proceed. 5. passcode: brownbag. Audio: Dial 866-833-7307; participant passcode: 8986360. Please note: remote access is limited to first 50 participants. For further information about this seminar please contact Mary.Lou.Cumberpatch@noaa.gov (301-713-2600 Ext. 129) or Albert.E.Theberge.Jr@noaa.gov (301-713-2600 Ext. 115). For information about the Sea Grant Knauss Fellows Brown Bag Series please contact Wendy.Morrison@noaa.gov.
OneNOAA Science Seminar Date Added and Listserv Subscription information:
OneNOAA Science Seminars added Friday, August 6, 2010 3:16 PM . To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can subscribe to the weekly email of OneNOAA Science Seminars by visiting https://list.woc.noaa.gov/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/onenoaascienceseminars and filling in your email address or by sending an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body (don't include the quotes). You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series please contact Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov. Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].
OneNOAA Science Seminars 2010 (by month): Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Back to top


The Effects of Early Life History on Recruitment and Early Juvenile Survival of a Coral Reef Fish in The Florida Keys

Date/Time/Location/Seminar Sponsor:
Wednesday, 11 August 2010; 12:30-13:00 ETZ [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time] (Seminar location: SSMC-3 (1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD, 20910), 2nd Floor; OneNOAA Science Seminar sponsored by: Sea Grant Knauss Fellows Brown Bag Series).
Speaker(s):
Tauna Rankin (Sea Grant Knauss Fellow)
Speaker e-mail:
tauna.rankin@noaa.gov
Abstract:
Processes that influence the early life stages of fishes can significantly impact population dynamics, yet they continue to be poorly understood. Knowledge of what mechanisms influence recruitment and subsequent juvenile survival may provide important information for predicting year-class strength. This dissertation examined relationships between the environment, early life history traits (ELHTs), behavior, and post-settlement survival for a coral reef fish, Stegastes partitus, in the upper Florida Keys. Otolith analysis of settlers and recruits coupled with environmental data revealed that S. partitus surviving the early juvenile period settled at larger sizes and grew slower post-settlement. Water temperature influenced these ELHTs as well as mortality. Behavioral observations of newly settled juveniles revealed that the relationship between size-at-settlement, early juvenile growth and survival is behaviorally-mediated. A six-year time series of recruitment densities revealed substantial temporal and spatial variability in recruitment. As a whole, these results reveal processes associated with larval supply and post-settlement life that collectively shape the composition of recruits.
About The Speaker:
Tauna earned her PhD in marine biology and fisheries from the Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science at the University of Miami. She is currently serving a Knauss fellowship in the Coral Reef Conservation Program within the Office of Habitat Conservation, Habitat Protection Division.
Remote Access and Notes:
Remote access via webinar: 1. Go to http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?sigKey=mymeetings&i=742656968&=brownbag&t=c; 2. Enter the required fields; 3. Indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy; 4. Click on Proceed. 5. passcode: brownbag. Audio: Dial 866-833-7307; participant passcode: 8986360. Please note: remote access is limited to first 50 participants. For further information about this seminar please contact Mary.Lou.Cumberpatch@noaa.gov (301-713-2600 Ext. 129) or Albert.E.Theberge.Jr@noaa.gov (301-713-2600 Ext. 115). For information about the Sea Grant Knauss Fellows Brown Bag Series please contact Wendy.Morrison@noaa.gov.
OneNOAA Science Seminar Date Added and Listserv Subscription information:
OneNOAA Science Seminars added Tuesday, May 4, 2010 1:23 PM / Last modified Friday, August 6, 2010 3:19 PM. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can subscribe to the weekly email of OneNOAA Science Seminars by visiting https://list.woc.noaa.gov/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/onenoaascienceseminars and filling in your email address or by sending an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body (don't include the quotes). You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series please contact Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov. Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].
OneNOAA Science Seminars 2010 (by month): Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Back to top


Story Proof: The Science Behind the Power of Story

Date/Time/Location/Seminar Sponsor:
Wednesday, 11 August 2010; 10:00-11:30 ETZ [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time] (Seminar location: NOAA Science Center, Silver Spring Metro Complex, 1305 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD; OneNOAA Science Seminar sponsored by: NOAA Climate Program Office and ClimateWatch Magazine).
Speaker(s):
Kendall Haven (http://www.kendallhaven.com/)
E-mail:
kendallhaven@sbcglobal.net
Abstract:
Storytelling is often described as “Best Practice” for science outreach communication. Effective stories change beliefs and attitudes. They sway popular and decision-maker opinions and mindset. But why? When compared to delivering the same information through other narrative structures, what is it about the form and structure of story that:

• Makes people listen more attentively (pay attention),
• Makes them understand information and concepts better,
• Creates more accurate and personal meaning from information,
• Creates relevance and context for story information and concepts,
• Makes people remember information and concepts better and more accurately,
• Helps people recall information out of memory more readily and accurately.

Neural and psychological research over the past fifteen years has confirmed that story architecture accomplishes each of these feats.
Two key questions emerge:
1. Why?
2. What does this research conclude that defines and characterizes the structure of effective stories?
Finally (and most importantly) what does that mean for scientists who want to communicate their findings and results?

This session explores what science has shown us about the explicit elements of effective story architecture and how to harness their communications power to make your points and case. Neural sciences have revealed an exacting and explicit definition for story architecture that links directly to how human brains and minds process incoming narrative information. In this session I will demonstrate both the elements and limits of that structure and lay out the process for using it to improve the success of science outreach communication.

Specifically, attendees will receive:

1) A summary of the science behind effective story structure: how does the human mind process incoming narrative information—and what does that mean for you and your message/information?
2) The identify of, and a demonstration of, the Eight Essential Elements of story structure: what they are, what they do, and how you effectively use them to design, organize, and structure your communication.
3) A brief review of the major misconceptions (myths) about story—that is, what a story Isn't (and why the word "story" carries such negative connotation—and yet, at the same time, generates such incredible allure and power).
4) An introduction to why it is essential to consider the intended audience for each story
5) An overview of the Process—how to effectively apply the core architectural elements of story to create memorable and powerful central themes and lasting images for your communication whether or no