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OneNOAA Science Seminars


[Seminar Partner's contacts]

[2008 OneNOAA Science Seminars] [2010 OneNOAA Science Seminars]

Web page last updated: Monday, April 18, 2011 10:05 AM ETZ
(600+ OneNOAA science seminars since 2004; Web-based summary statistics 2009)

Please join us for our upcoming OneNOAA science discussion seminars. The OneNOAA Science seminars are a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to pool seminars of common interest to help share science and management information and to promote constructive dialogue between scientists, educators, and resource managers.

i-access to our OneNOAA science seminar announcements:

1. Join our weekly e-mail seminar announcement [nominally, one summary email sent on Mondays]. To join our email list contact Hernan Garcia or a OneNOAA seminar partner.
2. Online OneNOAA web access: http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/ (Maintained by Hernan Garcia)
3. GoogleCalendar online public access: GoogleCalendar* (Maintained by Felix A. Martinez)
4. Archive of previous OneNOAA science discussion seminars (by calendar year): [2008], [2007], [2006], [2005], [2004].
5. Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar RSS feed.
6. Interested in becoming a OneNOAA science seminar partner? or submit a OneNOAA seminar announcement?
7. Note: All seminars subject to title, location, date, and time changes without notice. Please check the OneNOAA seminar web page for the latest seminar updates. Unless otherwised indicated, seminars are open to the public. The contents of the OneNOAA Science Seminars web page do not reflect any position of the Federeal Government or NOAA. References to trade names or commercial entities do not imply endorsement of any kind. Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

You can subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminars moderated email list by sending an email message to: OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body (don't include the quotes) or visit https://list.woc.noaa.gov/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/onenoaascienceseminars and fill in the required fields (e.g., your email address). You can subscribe or unsuscribe at any time from the list.

General notes about the OneNOAA science seminars:

  • Please check for seminar additions and changes (i.e., cancelations, etc.).
    rss feed Subscribe to RSS feed    [ What is RSS? - How do I use RSS? ]
  • Constructive suggestions for improving the content of the seminar series are welcome [Please contact Hernan Garcia or a seminar partner].
  • All NOAA offices/divisions are welcome to participate and/or join as seminar partners (Joining is easy, see seminar format).
  • Please share the seminar announcements with anyone interested. Please notify us of any errors that you find so that we can correct them.
  • Remote access to seminars is available when indicated via web/phone access. When available, seminar presentations will be available for download (see Notes for each seminar).

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NODC theme International Polar Year seminar series in 2009:

NOAA work in the high latitudes and the International Polar Year 2007-2008
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html#IPYSeminars

In appreciation of the scientific advancements and fundamental role of the high latitude regions in global climate change, economics, and society, The National Oceanographic Data Center (NODC) is sponsoring a series of seminars by NOAA scientists, resource policy managers, educators, and other workers involved in Arctic and/or Antarctic as part of an upcoming NOAA work in the high latitudes and the International Polar Year 2007-2008 seminar series to be held starting March 2009 at various locations in the Silver Spring Metro Center Complex (SSMC), Silver Spring, MD). However, some seminars will take place at other locations via a combination of web and phone access. If possible, seminar audio will be available via podcast together with the seminar slides following the seminar. Please see details in the links below. All NOAA staff are welcome to present a seminar and participate.

Details: http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/docs/Polar/Polar_Seminars.pdf
Poster: http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/docs/Polar/Polar_poster1.pdf

List of invited speakers (final schedule is not yet final):

Seminar #1. When: March 12: John Bortniak (NOAA NMFS). Seminar Title: Recollections on Wintering Over at The South Pole 1979 on The 30 Year Anniversary. Download: presentation [PDF ; ~5 MB] and podcast audio [MP3; ~94 MB, WMA ~30 MB]. Seminar details:http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html#OneNOAASeminar_IPY_12March2009_John_Bortniak

Seminar #2. When: March 18: Dr. Kathy Crane (NOAA Arctic Research Office): Seminar Title: Collaborative NOAA-Russia Ocean Observations in The Bering and Chukchi Seas. Download: presentation [PDF ~5.2 MB] and podcast audio [MP3 ~57 MB; WMA ~17 MB]. Seminar details:http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html#OneNOAASeminar_IPY_Kathy_Crane

Seminar #3. When: April 03: Dr. Yi Ming (NOAA GFDL). Seminar Title: Formation and Climate Impacts of Arctic Haze. Seminar details:http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html#OneNOAASeminar_IPY_Yi_Min

Seminar #4. When: April 15: Dr. Igor Krupnik (Smithsonian Institution) - Seminar Title: IPY and Indigenous People: Local Knowledge Contributes to the Study of Arctic Change. Download: presentation [PDF] and podcast audio [WMA]. Seminar details: http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html#OneNOAASeminar_IPY_15Apr2009_Igor_Krupni

Seminar #5. When: April 24: Dr. Rebecca A. Woodgate (University of Washington). Seminar Title: Changes In The Bering Strait - Pacific Gateway To The Arctic. Seminar available via webcast/phone. Download: podcast audio [WMA]. Seminar details: http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html#OneNOAASeminar_IPY_24Apr2009_Rebecca_Woodgate

Seminar #6. When: April 28: Dr. Susan Solomon (NOAA ESRL). Seminar Title: Ozone Depletion, Greenhouse Gases, and the Special Case of Antarctic Climate Change. Download: presentation [PDF ~16 MB] and audio podcast [WMA ~30.5 MB]. Where: SSMC-3 4th Floor, Room 4527. Seminar details: http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html#OneNOAASeminar_IPY_28Apr2009_Susan_Solomon

Seminar #7. When: April 30: Dr. Kelly K. Falkner (National Science Foundation). Seminar Title: The Antarctic Integrated System Science on the Antarctic Peninsula. Where: SSMC-3 2nd Floor, NOAA Central Library. Download: presentation [PDF]. Seminar details: http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html#OneNOAASeminar_IPY_30Apr2009_Kelly_Falkner

Seminar #8. When: May 6 : Dr. Dan Seidov and Dr. Igor Smolyar (NOAA NODC). Seminar Title: Barents Sea Warming. Where: SSMC-3 2nd Floor, NOAA Central Library. Seminar details: http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html#OneNOAASeminar_IPY_06May2009_Seidov_Smolyar

Seminar #9. When: May 7 : Jon Kurland (NOAA Fisheries, Alaska Region) and Mike Sigler (NOAA Fisheries, Alaska Fisheries Science Center). Seminar Title: NOAA’s Role in the Science and Management of Arctic Fish and Marine Mammals. Where: SSMC-3 2nd Floor, NOAA Central Library. Download: presentation [PDF ~7.9 MB]. Seminar details: http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html#OneNOAASeminar_IPY_Kurland_Sigler

Seminar #10. When: May 14: Dr. John Walsh (University Alaska Fairbanks). Seminar Title: Recent Arctic climate change: Observations and model simulations. Where: SSMC-3 2nd Floor, NOAA Central Library. Download: presentation [PDF ~9.3 MB]. Seminar details: http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html#OneNOAASeminar_IPY_14May2009_John_Walsh

Seminar #11. When: May 27: Dr. Taneil Uttal (NOAA ESRL). Seminar Title: The International Arctic System for Observing the Atmosphere. Where: SSMC-3 2nd Floor, NOAA Central Library. Download: Download presentation [PDF, ~ 5.5 MB; PPT, ~ 12.8 MB). Seminar details: http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html#OneNOAASeminar_27May2009_Uttal

Seminar #12. When: May 28: Dr. John Cloud (NOAA Central Library Silver Spring). Seminar Title: How NOAA got to High Latitudes in the First Place: George Davidson of the Coast Survey, and Koh-klux, and Alaska. Where: SSMC-3 2nd Floor, NOAA Central Library. Seminar details: http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html#OneNOAASeminar_IPY_John_Cloud

Seminar #13. When: May 29: Dr. Pablo Clemente-Colón (U.S. National/Naval Ice Center). Seminar Title: "Hielo en el Mar" - The National Ice Center Activities During the International Polar Year. Where: SSMC-3 2nd Floor, NOAA Central Library. Download: presentation [PDF, ~17.4 MB]. Seminar details: http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html#OneNOAASeminar_29May2009_Clemente

Seminar #14. When: June 17: Dr. Jackie M. Grebmeier (Chesapeake Biological Laboratory). Seminar Title: Ecosystem Status and Trends on Continental Shelves and Slope Regions in the Pacific Arctic Sector. Where: SSMC-3 2nd Floor, NOAA Central Library. Seminar details: http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html#OneNOAASeminar_17Jun2009_Grebmeier

Seminar #15. When: July 01: Anna Fiolek (NOAA Central Library). Seminar Title: Polar Resources in the NOAA Central Library Network. SSMC-3 2nd Floor, NOAA Central Library. Seminar details: http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html#OneNOAASeminar_01Jul2009_Fiolek

ending confirmation/scheduling of seminar dates:

When: TBD: Julie Gourley (U.S. State Dept.). Seminar Title: The new US Arctic Policy
When: TBD: Jeremy Potter (NOAA Program Coordination Office). Seminar Title: TBD
When: TBD (~June): Dr. John A. Calder (NOAA Arctic Research, Climate Program Office). Seminar Title: TBD

When: May 21 (POSTPONED) : Albert. E. Theberge Jr. (NOAA Central Library Silver Spring). Seminar Title: NOAA Ancestors In The Polar Regions 1860-1970. Where: SSMC-3 2nd Floor, NOAA Central Library. Seminar details: http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html#OneNOAASeminar_IPY_Albert_Theberge

When: June 11 (POSTPONED): Dr. Jawed Hameedi (NOAA NOS/NCCOS). Seminar Title: Assessing human health impacts of environmental contamination in the U.S. Arctic. Where: SSMC-3 2nd Floor, NOAA Central Library. Seminar details: http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html#OneNOAASeminar_11Jun2009_Hameedi


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January 2009

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Other OneNOAA Science Seminars: Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec

(Total number of OneNOAA Science seminars in January 2009: 6)

Review of AMS Annual Meeting Abstracts 1-slide briefings by STAR Scientists

Date/Location:
Friday, 09 January 2009, 11:30- 14:30 ETZ (World Weather Building, Room 707, Camp Springs, MD; NESDIS-STAR seminar)
Speaker(s):
STAR Scientists presenting at the annual AMS Meeting
Abstract:
Come learn about the excellent work being performed at STAR and presented at the various symposia in Phoenix, Arizona: 89th American Meteorological Society Annual Meeting, Phoenix, AZ, 11-15 January 2009.
Remote Access & Notes:
Phone Access: 1.866.541.9958; Passcode: 2531766. World Weather Building Science Center, 5200 Auth Road, Camp Springs, MD 20746. For further information plase contact Bruce Ramsay (301) 405-9205
Download Presentation(s):
Download presentations [PDF, ~4.3 MB]
OneNOAA Seminar Added:
OneNOAA Science Seminar added Wednesday, January 7, 2009 7:27 AM / Last modified Wednesday, January 14, 2009 12:21 PM
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html



Alaska Climate In The Modern Era

Date/Location:
Wednesday, 21 January 2009; 10:00-11:00am Alaska Daylight/Standard Time (seminar via teleconference only)
Speaker(s):
Rick Thoman (NOAA NWS)
Abstract:
What is the difference between climate and weather? How does the extent and limitation of instrument records in Alaska influence climate observations? What is the Pacific Decadal Oscillation and how does it influence climate variability in Alaska? Join us for this ACCAP teleconference to learn the answers to these questions and more.
Remote Access & Notes:

To Participate / Log-In to the Alaska Climate Teleconference: http://www.uaf.edu/accap/teleconference.htm. Teleconference: 1) Dial:1-800-893-8850; 2) When prompted, enter the PIN code: 7531823. To view the presentation during a teleconference: 1) Point your web browser to: http://www.shareitnow.com; 2) Click on the blue *Join a Meeting* button on the left side bar. 3) For Presenter ID enter: accap@uaf.edu. To join us in person: If you are in Fairbanks, join us in person on the UAF campus in the Duckering Building Room 535. Map: http://www.uaf.edu/campusmap/ (purple zone). For more information about the Alaska Climate Teleconferences and the Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy, please contact Sarah Trainor ( (907) 474-7878, accap@uaf.edu ) or visit our website: www.uaf.edu/accap.

Download Presentation(s):
Download presentation [PDF, ~1.5 MB]
OneNOAA Seminar Added:
OneNOAA Science Seminar added Wednesday, January 7, 2009 7:16 AM / Last edited on Wednesday, January 14, 2009 6:50 AM
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html



Progress in Climate Science: NOAA's Tropical Moored Buoy Array Program

Date/Location:
Monday, 26 January 2009, 12:00-13:00 ETZ (SSMC-3, 2nd Floor, NOAA Central Library, NODC Seminar)
Speaker(s):
Dr. Michael J. McPhaden (NOAA/Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory, Seattle, Washington)
E-mail(s):
michael.j.mcphaden@noaa.gov
Abstract:
NOAA's Tropical Moored Buoy Array Program is a coordinated, multi-national effort to implement a sustained moored buoy observing system in the global tropics for climate research and prediction. The array addresses NOAA Strategic Plan goal of "Understanding climate variability and change to enhance society's ability to plan and respond." This presentation will review the scientific background motivating development of the program, highlight progress in understanding and forecasting climate variability originating in the tropics, and describe plans for completing and sustaining the array.
Remote Access & Notes:
For Webcast access: 1) go to http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?i=741283869&p=nodc1315&t=c; 2) type in other required fields (i.e., your name, e-mail, organization; meeting number is 741283869; password is "nodc1315" -password is case sensitive- ); 3) indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy; 4) click on Proceed. For phone access: toll free dial 877-916-2513 using a touch-tone phone; when prompted enter participant code 5877174 followed by a "#". Please note that webcast & phone access is limited to 50 connections on a first-come-first served basis. For general questions about this seminar, please contact Hernan Garcia (Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov), Olga.Baranova (Olga.Baranova@noaa.gov), Mary Lou Cumberpatch (Mary.Lou.Cumberpatch@noaa.gov) or Skip Theberge (Albert.E.Theberge.Jr@noaa.gov).
Notes about the speaker(s):
http://www.pmel.noaa.gov/tao/proj_over/mmcv.html
Download Presentation(s):
Download power point presentation [PDF].
OneNOAA Seminar Added:
OneNOAA Science Seminar added Wednesday, January 21, 2009 8:38 AM / Last updated Monday, February 2, 2009 8:48 AM
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html



Vaquita Expedition 2008 Developing acoustic monitoring for the world’s most endangered marine mammal

Date/Location:
Monday, 26 January 2009; 11:00-12:00 PTZ (SSMC-3, Room 14836; NOAA Fisheries Seminar)
Speaker(s):
Dr. Barbara Taylor (SWFSC Protected Resources Division)
E-mail(s):
Barbara.Taylor@noaa.gov
Abstract:
Mexico has invested over $18 million dollars to save this species. Vaquita Expedition 2008 brought an international team of scientists together to help Mexico better monitor this species using the latest acoustic technologies. Dr. Taylor relates the many successes of the Expedition and explains why there is new cause for optimism. See http://swfsc.noaa.gov/prd-vaquita.aspx
Remote Access & Notes:
For further information, please contact Dr. Lisa T. Ballance (Director Protected Resources Division, Southwest Fisheries Science Center, NOAA Fisheries; lisa.ballance@noaa.gov; Phone: 858-546-7173) or Steven Swartz (Steven.Swartz@noaa.gov).
Download Presentation(s):
Download seminar flier announcement [PDF]
OneNOAA Seminar Added:
OneNOAA Science Seminar added Thursday, January 22, 2009 6:37 AM
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html



Comparative evaluation between Feng Yun 1D, NOAA AVHRR, MODIS and LandSat 5 TM images working as a satellite constellation for burned areas detection on Paraná Medio Flooding Valley in Argentina

Date/Location:
Tuesday, 27 January 2009; 12:00-13:00 ETZ (SSMC-3, 2nd Floor, NOAA Central Library Silver Spring Seminar)
Speaker(s):
Carlos Cotlier (University of Rosario, Argentina)
Abstract:
Bushes and natural vegetation are burned on the islands belonging to the Paraná River Flooding Valley to obtain soft grass for cattle raising, burning has been intensified in the last years, destruction of a wild wetlands with unique characteristic are done. Because of the unique characteristics, this flora and fauna reservation should be protected by monitoring against indiscriminate burning. The use of NDII (Normalized Difference Infrared Index) and BAI (Burned Area Index) indexes are applied for the analysis of the affected areas and images were created with infrared bands combinations.
Remote Access & Notes:
For further information please contact Mary Lou Cumberpatch (Mary.Lou.Cumberpatch@noaa.gov; 301-713-2600 Ext. 129) or Skip Theberge (Albert.E.Theberge.Jr@noaa.gov; 301-713-2600 Ext. 115).
Download Presentation(s):
Download power point presentation [PPT]
OneNOAA Seminar Added:
OneNOAA Science Seminar added Wednesday, January 21, 2009 6:28 AM
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html



Oysters and Breast Cancer

Date/Location:
Thursday, 29 January 2009; 12:00-13:00 ETZ (SSMC-3, 2nd Floor, NOAA Central Library, NOAA OAR Office of SeaGrant Seminar)
Speaker(s):
Dr. Jack Losso (LSU)
Abstract:
A compound in the fats found in Louisiana oysters could be a key ingredient in treating and preventing cancer according to LSU AgCenter food science researcher Dr. Jack Losso. Dr. Losso has found that ceramide found in oysters can restrict blood vessel growth and development of cancer cells in test tubes. It can also inhibit blood vessel growth in rats. By preventing the formation of blood vessels, called angiogenesis, the compound keeps cancer cells from multiplying because they can’t grow without nutrients from the blood. Ceramide works on human breast cancer cells both in test tubes and in laboratory rats. When breast cancer cells come in contact with ceramide, they begin dying within 48-hours. These findings and other significant human health findings related to oysters will be presented at this seminar.
Remote Access & Notes:
For further information please contact Mary Lou Cumberpatch (Mary.Lou.Cumberpatch@noaa.gov; 301-713-2600 Ext. 129) or Skip Theberge (Albert.E.Theberge.Jr@noaa.gov; 301-713-2600 Ext. 115).
OneNOAA Seminar Added:
OneNOAA Science Seminar added Thursday, January 22, 2009 2:42 PM
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html

 


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February 2009

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Other OneNOAA Science Seminars: Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec

(Total number of OneNOAA Science seminars in February 2009: 13)



Storm Surge Modeling and Forecasting using MIKE 21 and MIKE FLOOD

Date/Location:
Tuesday 03 February 2009; 14:00-15:00 ETZ (SSMC-2, Room 8246, NWS/OHDRMS seminar)
Speaker(s):
Dr. Ole Petersen, (DHI, Denmark) and Mr. Dale Kerper (DHI, Inc., USA)
Abstract:
The talk will begin with a brief presentation of DHI (who they are, where they are and what they do), followed by a presentation of the MIKE 21 modeling system. The focus will be on forecasting and on storm surge and flood modeling in estuaries and rivers. The presentation will include a description of the MIKE FLOOD modeling system, a diverse modeling system where 1D and 2D models are dynamically coupled. The background and methods used for the models will be discussed, and some of the relevant features of the modeling system presented. The model has been applied in many different projects and a few relevant cases will be shown including flood warning in Venice, Italy and cyclone warning in Bangladesh.
Remote Access & Notes:
Seminar available via Webinar Reserve your Webinar seat now at: https://www1.gotomeeting.com/register/184062281. Remote participants must use this link to receive connection information. After registering you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the Webinar. For further information please contact ken.pavelle@noaa.gov.
About The Speaker(s):

Dr. Ole Petersen works for DHI in Denmark, and has nearly 25 years of comprehensive experience in modeling estuarine problems, both numerically and physically. The fields of interest comprise hydrodynamics, stratified flows, sediment transport and morphology with focus on cohesive sediments. He has coordinated and participated as a core member of development teams of hydrodynamic models with focus on two- and three-dimensional estuarine models of stratified flows and sediment transport. He has a substantial academic and research record, has coordinated international research projects, acted as lecturer and external examiner for Danish universities and as reviewer for several international journals and science foundations.

Mr. Dale Kerper works for DHI in Encinitas, CA and has nearly 20 years of modeling experiences in a wide variety of fields, including offshore, coastal, estuarine and riverine environments. Recent experience has focused on tides, storm surge, wave modeling, including overland flow for flood inundation studies. Mr. Kerper has performed and reviewed numerous flood studies for FEMA in coastal, riverine and alluvial environments, and is an acting reviewer for FEMA for the ongoing restudies of Louisiana and Texas coastlines. Relevant past experiences includes implementing a storm surge modeling system for the City of Venice Flood Warning System, and recently assisting LSU with implementing a Wave Forecast System for the Gulf of Mexico.

OneNOAA Seminar Added:
OneNOAA Science Seminar added Wednesday January 21, 2009 9:05 AM / Last edited Monday February 2, 2009 12:58 PM
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html



Endnote training for NOAA staff

Date/Location:
Wednesday, 04 February 2009; Two sessions: 10:00-12:00 and 13:00-15:00 ETZ (SSMC-3, 2nd Floor, NOAA Central Library Silver Spring Seminar)
Speaker(s):
Doug Nguygen (Thomson Reuters)
E-mail(s):
doug.nguyen@thomsonreuters.com
Abstract:
Endnote (http://www.endnote.com/) is a bibliographic management tool that allows researchers, students, and librarians to search online bibliographic databases, organize their references, images and PDFs, and create bibliographies and figure lists instantly. This class will cover all the basics of using Endnote, Endnote for Web, and using Endnote to insert and cite references as you type your paper. NOAA has a site-wide license for Endnote. To download Endnote, see NOAA NITES site (http://www.nites.noaa.gov/bpa/display.asp?bpaID=6). Registration is required: Send an email to Library.Reference@noaa.gov to reserve your spot in either the 10-12 session or the 1-3 session.
Remote Access & Notes:
Endnote training session is open only to NOAA employees or contractors working full-time at a NOAA facility. Remote access: The presentations will also be available remotely as a webinar. Registration is needed. Please send an email to Library.Reference@noaa.gov to register for the webinar. Indicate if you will be attending the 10-12 session or the 1-3 session. Information on how to access the webinar will be mailed to you in advance of the February 4 date. For further information please contact Mary Lou Cumberpatch (Mary.Lou.Cumberpatch@noaa.gov; 301-713-2600 Ext. 129) or Skip Theberge (Albert.E.Theberge.Jr@noaa.gov; 301-713-2600 Ext. 115).
About the speaker(s):
Doug Nguyen, Customer Education Specialist, ResearchSoft, Scientific Thomson Reuters, O: +1 415 344 3985. doug.nguyen@thomsonreuters.com, thomsonreuters.com.
OneNOAA Seminar Added:
OneNOAA Science Seminar added Friday, January 2, 2009 11:54 AM / Last updated Monday, February 2, 2009 8:51 AM
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html



Ocean Surface Roughness Measurement from CALIPSO and its Application in Wind and Air-Sea Gas Exchange

Date/Location:
Wednesday, 04 February 2009, 9:00-10:00 ETZ (NOAA Science Center, World Weather Building, Room 707, Camp Springs, MD; NESDIS-STAR seminar)
Speaker(s):
Dr. Yongxiang Hu (NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, VA)
E-mail(s):
Yongxiang.Hu-1@nasa.gov
Abstract:

Uncertainty associated with vertical gas exchange at ocean surface is a major contributor of uncertainty in global carbon budget assessment. The estimate of ocean carbon uptake varies from 1.1 PgC/yr (Liss and Merlivat (1986) to 3.3 PgC/yr (Wanninkhof and McGillis, 1999) as a result of difference in air-sea gas exchange estimates. High resolution lidar measurements of ocean surface roughness may lead to significant reduction in global air-sea gas exchange uncertainty. Air-sea exchange is linearly proportional to wave slopes at all wave scales (wave number ranging from 50 to 800 rad/m), especially the smaller scale waves such as capillary waves (Frew et al., 2003). The air-sea gas exchange is currently parameterized to wind information associated with microwave measurements (such as QuikScat and AMSR-E). Microwave measurement of ocean surface roughness is directly related to lower frequency surface waves (<50 rad/m). The link between microwave measurement and higher frequency waves is nonlinear. At shorter wavelengths (1 micron), lidar measures wave slope variance of all waves more directly. Thus it provides direct and accurate gas exchange information. High resolution near surface wind speed can also be derived from the lidar ocean surface roughness measurements (Hu et al. 2008). One of the shortcomings of satellite based lidar measurement (such as CALIPSO) is its limited spatial coverage (nadir or near nadir only). It is thus highly desirable to study global gas exchange and near surface wind with combine lidar/SAR measurements since SAR provides high spatial ocean surface backscatter at a wider swath. This talk intends to introduce the lidar ocean surface roughness measurements from CALIPSO, and to initiate discussions on potential collaborations between NOAA and NASA in the field of high resolution near surface wind and gas exchange studies with combined lidar/SAR measurements.

Remote Access & Notes:
For questions about this seminar please contact Jerry Zhan, (301) 763-8042 x148 and Delshaun Adams, (301) 763-8044 x104. World Weather Building Science Center, 5200 Auth Road, Camp Springs, MD 20746.
Notes about the speaker(s):
http://asd-www.larc.nasa.gov/people_html/hu.html
Download Presentation(s):
Download presentation [PDF]
OneNOAA Seminar Added:
OneNOAA Science Seminar added Monday, February 2, 2009 8:58 AM / Last edited Wednesday, February 4, 2009 10:04 AM
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html



Ecological Forecasting: Climate Change and Intertidal Biogeography

Date/Location:
Wednesday, 04 February 2009; 12:00 13:00 ETZ (SSMC-4, Room 8150, NOS seminar)
Speaker(s):
David S. Wethey (Department of Biological Sciences, University of South Carolina)
Email(s):
wethey@biol.sc.edu
Abstract:
This talk will provide an overview of mechanistic links between climate, geography and population biology of dominant large estuarine species, in order to forecast the impact of climate change on the suitability of estuaries and rocky intertidal shores as nursery grounds for commercially and recreationally important marine species. We have developed models that are used to identify hot spots and cold spots on the coastlines that should be the most sensitive to environmental change, either from long term global warming, or from decadal scale processes like El Nino. The hot spots are locations where natural resource managers and planners should expect to see local mass die-offs, and shifts in population distributions. The ecological forecasts use the NOAH land surface model, NOAA operational models (GFS, NAM, Wavewatch III), sea surface temperature analyses (GHRSST), and tide models. Longer term forecasts are made using NOAA climate forecasts (CFS) and climate scenarios (GFDL). Nowcasts are made from temperature gradients measured by polar and geostationary satellite platforms.

Our forecasting and hindcasting models have been verified with observations from biomimetic data loggers in rocky and sedimentary habitats in the National Estuarine Research Reserves. Our forecasting tools have successfully predicted reproductive success and failure, and mass die-offs in important estuarine species. We have successfully modeled continental scale changes in the geographic limits of species on time scales of 100 years. These results have been verified with 100 years of biogeographic data and our own shore surveys. We will discuss the implications of these results for the establishment of monitoring sites in the Biodiversity Observation Network, proposed for inclusion in the Group on Earth Observations.
Remote Access & Notes:
Presentations are available remotely via a combination of phone & webcast. Please be aware that remote access is limited to 50 connections on a first-come-first served basis, so we cannot guarantee participation. To participate remotely you must: 1) Dial 866-541-1377, and then wait for instructions. When prompted enter passcode 142625 followed by the # sign. Please use your phone’s mute button (or toggle *6) during the presentation until you are ready to ask questions. 2) Go to the webcast site at http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?i=746752585&p=&t=c 3) Enter meeting number 746752585 if needed. No passcode is required. 4) Enter other required fields. 5) Indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy and click Proceed. For questions: contact Felix Martinez (Felix.Martinez@noaa.gov).
OneNOAA Seminar Added:
OneNOAA Science Seminar added Friday, January 30, 2009 18:35 PM
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html



The Yukon River Basin Water Quality Monitoring Program: Partnership between Government and Grassroots at the National and International Levels

Date/Location:
Thursday, 05 February 2009; 12:00 – 13:00 ETZ (SSMC-4, Room #9153, NOS seminar)
Speaker(s):
Bryan Kahrohnyakdahdyeh Maracle (Lead Scientist, Yukon River Inter-Tribal Watershed Council)
E-mail(s):
bmaracle@yritwc.org
Abstract:
Forging the largest international treaty between First Nations, sixty-six tribes and First Nations of Alaska and the Yukon Territory have joined to create the Yukon River Inter-Tribal Watershed Council (YRITWC) to reinforce their collective interest and stewardship of the Yukon River. YRITWC’s mission is to monitor, preserve, and protect the health of the Yukon River Basin, a goal which is made complex by the four major jurisdictional factions in this area. First Nations of the Yukon Territory, Alaska Natives, the United States, and Canada all have a stake in the watershed. The tribe’s self-determination in conjunction with its control of human and natural resources offer unique advantages, and challenges, for successful monitoring. Issues include establishing primary jurisdiction, allocating resources to the monitoring effort, and setting protocols with a defined management standard of quality.

The Yukon River Basin consists of 330,000 square miles, with one-third in the Canadian Yukon Territory and two-thirds in Alaska. From 2000 to 2005, the United States Geological Survey (USGS) conducted a study of the Basin to establish baseline water quality conditions. The collaboration of the USGS and Environment Canada (EC) was essential for understanding variations in water quality as the Yukon flows from the Canadian headwaters to the Bering Sea.

In 2004, YRITWC and USGS began partnering to continue and extend water quality monitoring into a long-term database. YRITWC worked with USGS to develop sampling methods, protocols and a training structure modeled after USGS methods (USGS, TWRI, Book 9). In March 2006, YRITWC began monitoring the Yukon River Basin, funded by an Administration for Native Americans (ANA) grant for regulatory enhancement. Sample sites were established between Dawson City, Yukon Territory, and Pilot Station, Alaska. Discretionary funds were used to establish the Dawson City site. The scope of the Yukon Territory monitoring effort is determined, to a large degree, by available funding. In early 2007, YRITWC received a grant from EC to conduct a workshop with EC, USGS, Yukon Territory Government, and Water Survey of Canada. At the workshop, interested native tribes joined the YRITWC to assist in ongoing water quality monitoring efforts. In early 2008, YRITWC secured a grant through the Northern Strategies Trust of Canada and began a partnership with the Yukon Territory Government (YTG). This partnership extended the monitoring project to cover the Yukon Territory. The expansion of the project has lead to the first time in history that water quality will be seen in a single ‘snapshot’ at the large basin scale.

Remote Access & Notes:
Presentations are available remotely via a combination of phone & webcast. Please be aware that remote access is limited to 50 connections on a first-come-first served basis, so we cannot guarantee participation. To participate remotely you must: 1) Dial 866-541-1377, and then wait for instructions. When prompted enter passcode 142625 followed by the # sign. Please use your phone’s mute button (or toggle *6) during the presentation until you are ready to ask questions. 2) Go to the webcast site at http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?i=746752585&p=&t=c 3) Enter meeting number 746752585 if needed. No passcode is required. 4) Enter other required fields. 5) Indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy and click Proceed. For questions: contact Felix Martinez (Felix.Martinez@noaa.gov).
Web link to this OneNOAA science seminar announcement
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html#OneNOAASeminar_05Feb2009_Maracle
OneNOAA Seminar Added:
OneNOAA Science Seminar added Friday, January 23, 2009 7:57 AM
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html



Climate Change and Tourism in Alaska

Date/Location:
Tuesday, 10 February 2009; 10:00-11:00am Alaska Daylight/Standard Time ( RISA/ACCAP seminar via teleconference only )
Speaker(s):
Dr. John Walsh (University of Alaska)
Abstract:
Recent research at the Universities of Illinois and Alaska has investigated the links between climate warming and tourism demand. A tourism climate index was created to capture weather information relevant to tourist activity at a particular location. Join us to learn about trends in the season length and frequency of weather conducive to sight seeing and skiing in southcentral and southwest Alaska and to learn how this climate index for tourism can be applied in other tourist activities and locations in Alaska.
Remote Access & Notes:

To Participate / Log-In to the Alaska Climate Teleconference: http://www.uaf.edu/accap/teleconference.htm. Teleconference: 1) Dial:1-800-893-8850; 2) When prompted, enter the PIN code: 7531823. To view the presentation during a teleconference: 1) Point your web browser to: http://www.shareitnow.com; 2) Click on the blue *Join a Meeting* button on the left side bar. 3) For Presenter ID enter: accap@uaf.edu. To join us in person: If you are in Fairbanks, join us in person on the UAF campus in the Duckering Building Room 535. Map: http://www.uaf.edu/campusmap/ (purple zone). For more information about the Alaska Climate Teleconferences and the Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy, please contact Sarah Trainor ( (907) 474-7878, accap@uaf.edu ) or visit our website: www.uaf.edu/accap.

Download Presentation(s):
Download presentation [PDF]
Web link to this OneNOAA science seminar announcement
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html#OneNOAASeminar_10Feb2009_Walsh
OneNOAA Seminar Added:
OneNOAA Science Seminar added Wednesday, January 7, 2009 7:18 AM / Last edited Wednesday, February 11, 2009 6:46 AM
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html



Impact of Solid Wastes on the Atmosphere and on Coastal Areas of Developing Countries: Issues and Emerging Solutions

Date/Location:
Wednesday, 11 February 2009; 11:00-12:00 ETZ (SSMC-3, 4th Floor, Room 4817, NODC Seminar)
Speaker(s):
Martin Medina, Ph.D. (NESDIS, International Relations Specialist)
E-mail(s):
Martin.Medina@noaa.gov
Abstract:
Human societies use a wide array of inputs in order to satisfy their needs: water, energy, wood, metals, plastics, glass, and so on. The processes of production and consumption generate large amounts of solid wastes. Solid wastes need to be collected, transported, and disposed of in order to prevent a negative environmental impact. Developed countries have in place the infrastructure and methods that minimize pollution and the risks to human health and the environment associated with wastes. Developing countries, however, often lack the resources to manage their wastes in an environmentally sound manner. Many developing countries are unable to collect all the wastes generated, and of these only a fraction receive final proper disposal. Insufficient collection and improper final disposal of wastes constitute a source of air, water, and land pollution, and pose risks to human health and the environment. This seminar examines the environmental impact of the improper management of solid wastes on the atmosphere and on coastal areas of developing countries. Recent evidence from Asia and Latin America will be briefly discussed, as well as the emergence of win-win efforts that improve waste management, create jobs, reduce poverty, diminish pollution and reduce emissions of greenhouse gases.
Remote Access & Notes:
For Webcast access: 1) go to http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?i=741283869&p=nodc1315&t=c; 2) type in other required fields (i.e., your name, e-mail, organization; meeting number is 741283869; password is "nodc1315" -password is case sensitive- ); 3) indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy; 4) click on Proceed. For phone access: toll free dial 877-916-2513 using a touch-tone phone; when prompted enter participant code 5877174 followed by a "#". Please note that webcast & phone access is limited to 50 connections on a first-come-first served basis. Space in conference Room 4817 in SSMC-3 is limited to about 20-25 people. For general questions about this seminar, please contact Hernan Garcia (Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov).
Notes about the speaker(s):

Martin Medina received a Ph.D. in Environmental Studies from Yale University and a Master's in Ecology from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He has received several international awards for his work, including 4 consecutive from the Global Development Network, the world's largest competition in development research. Author of a book on waste management and recycling in developing countries and of a recent piece in Foreign Policy magazine.

Download Presentation(s):
Download presentation [PDF, ~10.5 MB]
Web link to this OneNOAA science seminar announcement
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html#OneNOAASeminar_11Feb2009_Martin_Medina
OneNOAA Seminar Added:
OneNOAA Science Seminar added Monday, February 2, 2009 11:54 AM / Last edited Wednesday, February 11, 2009 12:16 PM
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html


National Cancer Institute's Marine Collection Programs: Problems, pratfalls and lessons learned

Date/Location:
Wednesday, 11 February 2009; 12:00-13:00 (SSMC-3, 2nd Floor, NOAA Central Library Silver Spring Seminar)
Speaker(s):
Dr. David J. Newman, D.Phil. (Chief, Natural Products Branch, National Cancer Institute)
Abstract:
The National Cancer Institute's Natural Products Branch (http://dtp.nci.nih.gov/branches/npb/index.html) located at Fort Detrick, Maryland, is a high-tech prospector for natural marine products which could help fight or cure cancer. Dr. Newman, a world leader in this line of investigation, will discuss the work of the Natural Products Branch which acquires crude natural materials from both terrestrial and marine environments, usually via competitive contracts world-wide, for extraction and screening of chemicals and compounds which could be of value in the fight against cancer. The responsibilities of his research branch include the selection and evaluation of the materials to be tested, and the procurement of large quantities of raw materials necessary to produce sufficient quantities of those active agents selected for preclinical and clinical evaluation.
Remote Access & Notes:
Telephone: 866-631-5469; passcode: 3958086. For further information about this seminar please contact Mary Lou Cumberpatch (Mary.Lou.Cumberpatch@noaa.gov; 301-713-2600 Ext. 129) or Skip Theberge (Albert.E.Theberge.Jr@noaa.gov; 301-713-2600 Ext. 115).
Download Presentation(s):
Download power point presentation [PPT]
OneNOAA Seminar Added:
OneNOAA Science Seminar added Wednesday, February 4, 2009 6:28 AM / Last edited Wednesday, February 11, 2009 12:16 PM
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html



Sea-Level Rise and Wetland Design at Poplar Island, MD

Date/Location:
Wednesday, 18 February 2009; 12:00 – 13:00 ETZ (SSMC-4, Room #8150, NOS seminar)
Speaker(s):
Justin Callahan (U.S. Army Corps of Engineers)
E-mail(s):
Justin.Callahan@usace.army.mil
Abstract:
Increases in relative sea-level may pose a significant risk to the success of constructed wetlands within the Chesapeake Bay. This presentation will examine current USACE design guidance, predicted scenarios for a constructed wetland at Poplar Island, and wetland design/development strategies that account for projected sea-level rise.
Remote Access & Notes:
Presentations are available remotely via a combination of phone & webcast. Please be aware that remote access is limited to 50 connections on a first-come-first served basis, so we cannot guarantee participation. To participate remotely you must: 1) Dial 866-541-1377, and then wait for instructions. When prompted enter passcode 142625 followed by the # sign. Please use your phone’s mute button (or toggle *6) during the presentation until you are ready to ask questions. 2) Go to the webcast site at http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?i=746752585&p=&t=c 3) Enter meeting number 746752585 if needed. No passcode is required. 4) Enter other required fields. 5) Indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy and click Proceed. For questions: contact Felix Martinez (Felix.Martinez@noaa.gov).
Download Presentation(s):
TBD
OneNOAA Seminar Added:
OneNOAA Science Seminar added Friday, February 6, 2009 6:58 AM
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html



Regional Data Assimilation of AIRS Observations at the SPoRT Center

Date/Location:
Wednesday, 18 February 2009, 14:00-15:00 ETZ (World Weather Building, Room 707, Camp Springs, MD; JCSDA seminar)
Speaker(s):
Will McCarthy & Brad Zavodsky (NASA/MSFC Short-term Prediction Research and Transition Center [SPoRT])
Abstract:
The hyperspectral nature of AIRS provides high-quality soundings that, along with their asynoptic observation time over North America, are attractive sources to fill the spatial and temporal data voids in upper air temperature and moisture measurements for use in data assimilation and numerical weather prediction. Observations from AIRS can be assimilated either as direct radiances or retrieved thermodynamic profiles, and the Short-Term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) Center at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center has used both data types to improve short-term (0-48h), regional forecasts. Working with both types of data has its challenges and limitations. This presentation is aimed at sharing SPoRT's experiences using AIRS radiances and retrieved profiles in regional data assimilation activities by showing that proper handling of issues—including cloud contamination and land emissivity characterization—are necessary to produce optimal analyses and forecasts. Additionally, results of these data assimilation activities and future work will be shared.
Remote Access & Notes:
This seminar was originally scheduled for Wednesday, 21 January 2009. The new date is 18 February 2009. Phone Access: Domestic: 1.800.779.2712, International: 1.212.287.1661; Passcode: 33748. For questions please contact Christina Bacon (301-763-8154 x 188; Christina.Bacon@noaa.gov)
Download Presentation(s):
Download presentation [PDF]
Notes about the speaker(s):
About Brad Zavodsky (http://weather.msfc.nasa.gov/sport/staff/btz.html)
OneNOAA Seminar Added:
OneNOAA Science Seminar added Monday, December 8, 2008 10:14 AM / Last edited Monday, February 9, 2009 6:27 AM
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html



Free Consulting Services – Resources and Solutions You Can Leverage to Enhance Your Organizational and Staff Effectiveness

Date/Location:
Thursday, 19 February 2009; 12:00 - 13:00 ETZ (SSMC-3, 2nd Floor, NOAA Central Library Silver Spring Seminar)
Speaker(s):
Steve Springer (Director of the Human Capital Planning Division, Corporate & Strategic Initiatives (CSI), of NOAA’s Office of Workforce Management)
E-mail(s):
stephen.springer@noaa.gov
Abstract:
There are numerous questions NOAA managers must face when it comes to managing their staff:

* How do I retain valuable employees?
* How do I find the right candidates for open positions, or what kinds of employment programs are available to help me fill those positions?
* What kind of employees, how many, and what skill sets will I need next year or perhaps in 5 to 10 years?
* How can I most effectively and efficiently train my staff especially when they are in different locations?

If you arent sure of the answers to these and other workforce-related questions, CSI can help. As part of its commitment to have the scientific, technical, and mission support expertise necessary to accomplish its mission, NOAAs Workforce Management Office established CSI. CSI employs internal consultants with a wide variety of specialized expertise areas like recruiting, workforce planning, competency modeling, instructor-led training, e-Learning, alternative dispute resolution, and instructional design. This presentation will provide an overview of the various services CSI provides and give NOAA managers the tools they need to develop, value and sustain a world-class workforce.

Remote Access & Notes:
For further information about this seminar please contact Mary Lou Cumberpatch (Mary.Lou.Cumberpatch@noaa.gov; 301-713-2600 Ext. 129) or Skip Theberge (Albert.E.Theberge.Jr@noaa.gov; 301-713-2600 Ext. 115).
Download Presentation(s):
Download power point presentation [PPT]
Notes about the speaker(s):
Mr. Springer has over 20 years of experience in both the private and public sectors helping organizations use their most valuable resource, people, more effectively. He has worked as both an internal and an external consultant to a wide range of organizations including Fortune 100 companies, local and Federal public sector organizations, and national associations. His areas of expertise include performance management, competency modeling, career development, staffing, compensation/classification, and organizational development.
Web link to this OneNOAA science seminar announcement
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html#OneNOAASeminar_19Feb2009_Springer
OneNOAA Seminar Added:
OneNOAA Science Seminar added Friday, January 2, 2009 11:16 AM / Last edited Wednesday, February 4, 2009 6:34 AM
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html



The CERES S’COOL Project: Bringing Cloud Science and Satellite Data To The K-12 Classroom

Date/Location:
Monday, 23 February 2009; 12:00-13:00 ETZ (SSMC-3, 2nd Floor, NOAA Central Library Silver Spring Seminar)
Speaker(s):
Dr. Lin H. Chambers (NASA Langley Research Center)
Abstract:
This presentation will provide an introduction to the CERES S'COOL Project, a 12-year-old NASA K-12 education project which brings the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) project into schools to motivate authentic science experiences for students. The project emphasizes sky and weather observations, introduces remote sensing and validation, and involves students as part of the CERES research team.
Remote Access & Notes:
Phone/teleconference: 866-631-5469; passcode: 3958086. For further information about this seminar please contact Mary Lou Cumberpatch (Mary.Lou.Cumberpatch@noaa.gov; 301-713-2600 Ext. 129) or Skip Theberge (Albert.E.Theberge.Jr@noaa.gov; 301-713-2600 Ext. 115).
Download Presentation(s):
Download power point slides [PPT]
Notes about the speaker(s):
Dr. Chambers is a physical scientist in the Climate Science Branch at the NASA Langley Research Center. She received her Ph.D. in Aerospace Engineering from North Carolina State University in 1991. Dr. Chambers has worked in a variety of radiative transfer applications, including nonequilibrium flows and cloud inhomogeneity effects. She is a member of the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) Science Team. Research activities have focussed on assessing the effect of inhomogenous clouds on satellite remote sensing and cloud/radiation parameterizations, as well as on better understanding the radiative properties of Tropical cloud systems. Dr. Chambers is also director of the outreach component of the CERES effort, the Students' Cloud Observations On-Line (S'COOL) Project, and she was the Contrail Scientist for the GLOBE program. She leads the MY NASA DATA project at the Langley Atmospheric Science Data Ceter to make real NASA earth-observing data accessible to the K-12 and citizen science community.
Web link to this OneNOAA science seminar announcement
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html#OneNOAASeminar_23Feb2009_Chambers
OneNOAA Seminar Added:
OneNOAA Science Seminar added Wednesday February 18, 2009 6:56 AM / Last edited Monday, February 23, 2009 2:56 PM
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html



Seminar 1: Conservation Action Plans in CNMI
Seminar 2: American Samoa Population Growth and its Impacts on Coastal Resources
Seminar 3: RARE Pride Environmental Campaign in Guam

Date/Location:
Thursday, 26 February 2009; 12:00-13:00 ETZ (SSMC-3, 2nd Floor, NOAA Central Library Silver Spring Seminar)
Speaker(s):
Kathleen M. Herrmann, Alyssa Edwards, and Elaina Todd
Abstract(s):

Seminar 1 (speaker: Kathleen M. Herrmann). Ms. Herrmann has facilitated the completion of a Conservation Action Plan for Laolao Bay and is working with agency staff to implement the plan. She is facilitating a capacity building training for local staff to design and implement socioeconomic monitoring in Laolao Bay. She has also facilitated the Talakhaya Watershed Restoration project; a multiagency partnership which in 2008 planted 31,473 seedlings, employed 25 community members through the Luta Livelihoods Initiative, and has documented statistically significant improvement on adjacent coral reefs.

Seminar 2 (speaker: Alyssa Edwards): An ecological treasure in the South Pacific, the U.S. Territory of American Samoa consists of five volcanic islands, plus two atolls, all of which are surrounded by fringes of coral reefs. American Samoa is the only jurisdiction to identify population pressure as a key threat to local coral reefs. NOAA Coral Reef Management Fellow Alyssa Edwards is currently working with the government's Coral Reef Advisory Group to identify ways of reducing rapid population growth and its impact on coastal resources.

Seminar 3 (speaker: Elaina Todd). Elaina works with the Guam Coastal Management Program where she coordinated the Guam Year of the Reef, planning a recreational user stewardship workshop, coral bleaching training, children’s snorkeling & educational fair and the grand finale event including a free screening of the 11th hour, a reef stewardship awards ceremony and movie in the park for kids! She is currently training at Georgetown University to launch a Rare Pride campaign focused on conserving Guam’s coral reefs.

Remote Access & Notes:
Phone/teleconference: 866-631-5469; passcode: 3958086. For further information about this seminar please contact Mary Lou Cumberpatch Mary.Lou.Cumberpatch@noaa.gov; 301-713-2600 Ext. 129) or Skip Theberge (Albert.E.Theberge.Jr@noaa.gov; 301-713-2600 Ext. 115).
Notes about the speaker(s):
Three of NOAA's Coral Management Fellows from the Pacific will be giving a lecture about their program-supported environmental work in the region.
Web link to this OneNOAA science seminar announcement
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html#OneNOAASeminar_26Feb2009_Herrmann_etal
OneNOAA Seminar Added:
OneNOAA Science Seminar added Friday, February 20, 2009 2:25 PM
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html

 


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March 2009

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Other OneNOAA Science Seminars: Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec

(Total number of OneNOAA Science seminars in March 2009: 22)



Interactive Earth: Tools for Earth System Science program

Date/Location:
Wednesday, 11 March 2009; 11:30-13:00 ETZ (SSMC-3, 2nd Floor, NOAA Central Library Silver Spring Seminar)
Speaker(s):
Dr. Kirk Bergstrom (WordLink)
Abstract:
TBD. Dr. Kirk Bergstrom will present the NSF-funded "Interactive Earth: Tools for Earth System Science" program.
Remote Access & Notes:
For further information about this seminar please contact Mary Lou Cumberpatch (Mary.Lou.Cumberpatch@noaa.gov; 301-713-2600 Ext. 129) or Skip Theberge (Albert.E.Theberge.Jr@noaa.gov; 301-713-2600 Ext. 115).
Notes about the speaker(s):
Dr. Kirk Bergstrom is founder and President of WorldLink, a media and education group based in San Francisco, California. In this capacity, he has directed special projects for the National Science Foundation, PBS, Walt Disney Imagineering, State of the World Forum, California Science Center, and Tech Museum of Innovation. Recently, Kirk completed production on a new PBS special entitled Nourish: Food + Community which explores the possibilities of a sustainable food system. He also directed the award-winning PBS program Power Shift: Energy + Sustainability and a companion traveling exhibit. Kirk received two national Emmy Awards for his film Spaceship Earth: Our Global Environment. Dr. Bergstrom also serves as principal investigator of a NSF-funded project entitled Interactive Earth: Tools for Earth System Science. A digital mapping tool, the program includes more than 100 global data sets and an interdisciplinary curriculum organized around real-world issues. He also designed the Eye on Earth multimedia exhibit that explores the art and science of remote sensing. Kirk’s work in interactive media originated in 1982 with the critically acclaimed Los Angeles TeleVote, one of the first large-scale experimentsin teledemocracy. In 1985, he was invited by Walt Disney Imagineering to participate in designing future interactive facilities and exhibits for the EPCOT theme park in Florida. From 1992-96, Kirk served as Executive Director of the Global Youth Summit, a week-long educational program that brings together young leaders from around the world. Convened in Rio de Janeiro during the 1992 Earth Summit and later in San Francisco as part of the State of the World Forum, the Global Youth Summit has served youth from over 40 nations. Kirk earned a B.A. degree in Cinema Production from the University of Southern California and a M.A. in Futures Studies from the University of Hawaii. He received his Doctorate in Education from the University of San Francisco.
Web link to this OneNOAA science seminar announcement
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html#OneNOAASeminar_11Mar2009_Bergstrom
OneNOAA Seminar Added:
OneNOAA Science Seminar added Friday, February 27, 2009 1:59 PM
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html



The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission and Falling Snow Algorithm Development

Date/Location:
Wednesday, 11 March 2009; 14:00-15:00 ETZ (World Weather Building, Room 707, Camp Springs, MD; JCSDA seminar)
Speaker(s):
Gail Skofronick Jackson (Deputy Project Scientist for GPM) and Arthur Y. Hou (Project Scientist for GPM) [NASA/GSFC]
Abstract:

High spatial and temporal resolution global precipitation estimates are important for understanding the Earth’s energy and water cycles. Thus, the upcoming NASA/JAXA Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission seeks to estimate precipitation (falling snow as well as liquid rain) globally using physically-based retrieval approaches. The GPM concept centers on deploying a Core spacecraft carrying a dual-frequency precipitation radar and a microwave radiometric imager with channels from 10 to 183 GHz to serve as a precipitation physics observatory and a calibration reference to unify a constellation of dedicated and operational passive microwave sensors. A summary of the GPM mission, scientific objectives, and sensors will be provided. Next, progress and challenges associated with early development work for GPM snowfall detection and estimation will be presented. The focus is on NOAA’s AMSU-B (MHS) radiometer data and field campaign data collected during the Canadian CloudSat/CALIPSO Validation Project (C3VP) from Oct 2006 to March 2007. Approaches for detecting falling snow and obtaining surface emissivity will be reviewed. This seminar will show that surface emission contributions to the satellite observed brightness temperatures over land can add uncertainty in detecting and estimating falling snow. It will also discuss mitigation approaches for reducing these uncertainties. The above work and future work to incorporate knowledge about falling snow retrievals into the framework of the expected GPM Bayesian retrievals will be described during this presentation.

Remote Access & Notes:

Phone Access: Toll free 1-866-715-2479 Passcode: 9457557 ; International: 1-517-345-5260. For questions please contact Christina Bacon (301-763-8154 x 188; Christina.Bacon@noaa.gov).

Download Presentation(s):
Download presentation [PDF]
Notes about the speaker(s):
http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/hurricanes/bios/jackson_bio.html
Web link to this OneNOAA science seminar announcement
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html#OneNOAASeminar_11Mar2009_Jackson
OneNOAA Seminar Added:
OneNOAA Science Seminar added Friday, January 2, 2009 11:16 AM / Last edited Tuesday, March 10, 2009 11:14 AM
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html


High Resolution Radar Precipitation Evaluation

Date/Location:
Wednesday 11 March, 2008, 13:30-14:30 Eastern Daylight Time (SSMC-2, room 8246, OHD/HSMB/HG Seminar)
Speaker(s):
Shaorong Wu, Feng Ding, Dave Riley, David Kitzmiller, and Dennis Miller
Abstract:
The Weather Surveillance Radar-1988 Doppler (WSR-88D) has recently been enhanced to process base reflectivity data at 8 times the spatial resolution of its legacy counterpart (250 m x ~0.5º vs. 1000 m x ~1.0 º). While this “super-resolution” will only be applied to some base products in the initial phase of implementation, there is a question as to whether radar-based precipitation estimates generated at these higher resolutions will yield improved accuracy in quantitative precipitation estimates and forecasts (QPE and QPF) at the surface. What may at first seem to be an intuitively logical finding may be offset by several factors that are known to cause discrepancies between QPE and the amounts and distribution of rainfall realized at the ground, including sub-beam advection, evaporation, and hydrometeor interactions. The relative impact of these factors may be exacerbated when QPEs are analyzed at finer spatial scales. In order to investigate this question prior to operational implementation of finer-resolution QPE products, we carried out a study to perform rain gauge-radar statistical comparisons over a span of discrete radar resolutions, ranging from approximately that of the legacy WSR 88D to nearly that of the new "super-resolution". Utilizing a methodology analogous to that of the WSR-88D Precipitation Processing System (PPS), we determined complementary datasets of both one-hourly radar and gauge-rainfall estimates, from data that was collected while a multi-sensor, experimental system was in place in central Florida during the summer of 1998 (the radar data was supplied by NCAR’s S-band, dual polar, Doppler radar, known as “S Pol”, while the rain gauge data was supplied by NASA’s dense, Tropical Rainfall Measurement Mission-Ground Validation (TRMM-GV) network). After numerous quality control procedures were applied, a set of gauge-radar correlation and error measures were determined over 96 data hours at each of six, discrete radar-spatial resolutions, ranging from the highest available in the S-Pol system (i.e. 150m x 1.0º) to one close to that of the legacy WSR-88D (i.e. 900m x 1.0º). Three stages of analyses were performed: first, on a point-by-point basis utilizing the complete set of rain gauges; then on sub-sets of closely spaced clusters of gauges to determine if the radar is capable of reproducing fine-scale rainfall patterns over what could be considered multiple, small basins of stream networks; and finally on the same, closely spaced clusters with the gauge values averaged together as mean areal precipitation (MAP) amounts. Examination of these statistics indicates that there is generally little difference across the range of spatial resolutions analyzed; however, the better statistical results were predominantly found at the coarser resolutions. These results imply that, in the cases studied, sub-beam factors offset potential increases in informational content about 1-hour rainfall that might be realized from the determination of QPEs at smaller radar sampling volumes (at least within the constraints of current radar sampling strategies such as 5-minute volumetric scanning).
Remote Access & Notes:
Conference Call: 888-394-4822, Passcode 10048. GotoMeeting: https://www1.gotomeeting.com/join/759848946/106265164. For questions about this seminar please contact Dennis.Miller@noaa.gov
Web link to this OneNOAA science seminar announcement
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html#OneNOAASeminar_OneNOAASeminar_11Mar2009_Wu_etal
OneNOAA Seminar Added:
OneNOAA Science Seminar added Monday March 9, 2009 6:42 AM /Last edited Tuesday, March 10, 2009 11:12 AM
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html



Recollections on Wintering Over at The South Pole 1979 on The 30 Year Anniversary

Date/Location:
Thursday, 12 March 2009; 12:00-13:00 ETZ (SSMC-3, 2nd Floor, NOAA Central Library Silver Spring, NODC Seminar)
A NODC seminar as part of the "NOAA work in the high latitudes and the International Polar Year 2007-2008 seminar series"
For further information about the IPY seminars see: http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html#IPYSeminars
Speaker(s):
John C. Bortniak [Commander NOAA Corps (Retired); NOAA's National Marine Fisheries Service]
E-mail(s):
john.bortniak@noaa.gov
Abstract:
A pictorial recollection on wintering over at the South Pole in 1979 on the 30 year anniversary.
Remote Access & Notes:
For Webcast access: 1) go to http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?i=741283869&p=nodc1315&t=c; 2) type in other required fields (i.e., your name, e-mail, organization; meeting number is 741283869; password is "nodc1315" -password is case sensitive- ); 3) indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy; 4) click on Proceed. For phone access: toll free dial 877-916-2513 using a touch-tone phone; when prompted enter participant code 5877174 followed by a "#" (Please mute your phone during the presentation). Please note that webcast & phone access is limited to 50 connections on a first-come-first served basis. Webcast & phone access will start approximately 5 min before the seminar. If possible, seminar audio will be available via podcast together with the seminar slides following the seminar. For general questions about this seminar, please contact Hernan Garcia (Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov), Mary Lou Cumberpatch (Mary.Lou.Cumberpatch@noaa.gov) or Skip Theberge (Albert.E.Theberge.Jr@noaa.gov).
Notes about the speaker(s):
http://www.photolib.noaa.gov/meet_jb.html
Download Presentation(s):
Download presentation [PDF ; ~5 MB] and podcast audio [MP3; ~94 MB, WMA ~30 MB].
Web link to this OneNOAA science seminar announcement
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html#OneNOAASeminar_IPY_12March2009_John_Bortniak
OneNOAA Seminar Added:
OneNOAA Science Seminar added Tuesday, February 17, 2009 11:19 AM / last edited Wednesday, March 18, 2009 7:04 AM
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html



Commercial Open Ocean Fish Farming in The United States

Date/Location:
Thursday, 12 March 2009; 12:00-13:00 ETZ (SSMC-3, 14th Floor, Room 14836, NOAA Aquaculture Seminar)
Speaker(s):
Neil Sims (Kona Blue Water Farms, Hawaii)
Abstract:
Neil Sims of Kona Blue Water Farms in Hawaii will give a presentation and answer questions about commercial open ocean fish farming in the United States.
Remote Access & Notes:
For more information about this seminar please contact Kate.Naughten@noaa.gov [(301) 713-9079, ext. 218].
Notes about the speaker(s):
As a marine biologist, Mr. Sims is keenly aware of the challenges facing our oceans and our ocean fisheries. As one of the few open ocean fish farmers in the U.S., he is also well aware of the benefits and challenges of farming the seas. He is one of the first U.S. fish farmers to fight for and earn the “green” designation for a farmed marine fish. Q&A will follow the presentation.
Web link to this OneNOAA science seminar announcement
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html#OneNOAASeminar_12Mar2009_Sims
OneNOAA Seminar Added:
OneNOAA Science Seminar added Tuesday March 10, 2009 10:17 AM
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html



“MOBY” The Marine Optical Buoy

Date/Location:
Friday, 13 March 2009; 10:00-11:00 ETZ (NOAA Science Center, World Weather Building, Room 707, Camp Springs, MD; NESDIS-STAR seminar)
Speaker(s):
Mark Yarbrough (Moss Landing Marine Laboratories, Honolulu, HI)
E-mail(s):
yarbrough@mlml.calstate.edu
Abstract:
For over a decade the Marine Optical Buoy (MOBY) has been the primary vicarious calibration facility for satellite ocean color observations. Approximately 5% of the ocean color signal that is measured by a satellite (Lt) originates from the sea surface. Thus, we must resolve small variations in a large signal to derive any meaningful information from ocean color satellite imagery. In order to measure ocean color with the accuracies necessary to meet NOAA’s mission goal requirements, vicarious calibration using highly calibrated and well characterized instrumentation is required. MOBY has provided this level of high quality measurements since the launch of SeaWiFS in 1997. MOBY is located in coastal Hawaiian waters near the island of Lanai, and has collected near continuous upwelled submarine light measurements that are used to calculate the water-leaving radiances that are measured by satellite. MOBY calibrations are NIST traceable and provide a vital climate quality data link between SeaWiFS, MODIS and foreign sensors and will continue that connection into the VIIRS NPP/NPOESS era. This talk will present the history and need for MOBY, provide details into the operations and calibrations of MOBY, and will give plans for a technology refresh in the near future.
Remote Access & Notes:
Phone Access: 1-888-606-5911; Passcode: 65845. For questions about this seminar please contact Jerry Zhan [(301) 763-8042 x148; Xiwu.Zhan@noaa.gov], Delshaun Adams [(301) 763-8044 x104; Delshaun.Adams@NOAA.gov], Mike Ondrusek [michael.ondrusek@noaa.gov]. World Weather Building Science Center, 5200 Auth Road, Camp Springs, MD 20746.
Download Presentation(s):
Download presentation [PDF]
Web link to this OneNOAA science seminar announcement
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html#OneNOAASeminar_13Mar2009_Yarbrough
OneNOAA Seminar Added:
OneNOAA Science Seminar added Friday, February 27, 2009 10:52 AM / Last edited Monday, March 16, 2009 7:25 AM
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html



Basin-scale Habitat Studies in The Eastern Bering Sea – Defining Essential Fish Habitat (EFH) Through The Eyes of Fish

Date/Location:
Tuesday, 17 March 2009; 14:00-15:00 ETZ (SSMC-3, 13 Floor, Room 13836, IOCM Seminar)
Speaker(s):
Dr. Robert (Bob) A. McConnaughey (NOAA Fisheries, Alaska Fisheries Science Center, Seattle, Washington)
E-mail(s):
Bob.McConnaughey@noaa.gov
Abstract:
Essential fish habitat (EFH) mandates were added to the Magnuson-Stevens Fishery Conservation and Management Act in 1996. Included were requirements to define “those waters and substrate necessary to fish for spawning, feeding or growth to maturity” for all life stages of all federally managed species in the U.S. EEZ. The obvious importance and the broad scope of the mandate require an objective and efficient approach to the problem. A variety of methods have been used to define the habitats of marine species. Some rely on purely geophysical characterizations but these are overly simplistic and may ignore significant factors, such as temperature, that affect species distributions. Similarly, standardized habitat-classification schemes are too restrictive in that they do not adequately account for the continuous nature of environmental variability or the associated continuous biological responses. In the eastern Bering Sea (EBS), we are using abundance estimates from annual bottom trawl surveys combined with synoptic environmental data to develop basin-scale continuous-valued habitat models for groundfish and benthic invertebrates. The resulting habitat definitions are objective and have quantifiable uncertainty. Predictions are possible and useful performance metrics can be developed when considering new environmental inputs. Models are developed with an iterative process that first assembles existing data to build 1st generation models. Promising new predictors are then evaluated in limited-scale pilot studies, followed by a direct comparison of alternative sampling tools. Finally, the most cost-effective tool is used to map the new variable over the shelf and the existing model for each species is updated to complete the iteration. The team conducting this research consists of biologists, a hydrographer, a physical scientist, and a biometrician from the RACE Division, with significant technical support by other branches of NOAA, University of New Hampshire engineers, Navy technicians and various marine technology manufacturers. This talk will illustrate our methods and findings by presenting a series of recent projects investigating whether our habitat models for the EBS can be improved with quantitative information about seafloor characteristics.
Remote Access & Notes:
Webinar: To register https://www1.gotomeeting.com/register/902084560. After registering you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the Webinar. For questions about this seminar please contact James.Thomas@noaa.gov or Katherine.Smith@noaa.gov.
Web link to this OneNOAA science seminar announcement
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html#OneNOAASeminar_17Mar2009_McConnaughey
OneNOAA Seminar Added:
OneNOAA Science Seminar added Thursday, February 26, 2009 1:36 PM / Last edited Wednesday, March 4, 2009 10:16 AM
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html



The Alaska Marine Information System Project Browser And Database

Date/Location:
Tuesday, 17 March 2009; 10:00-11:00 am Alaska Local Time (RISA/ACCAP seminar via teleconference)
Speaker(s):
Dr. Mark Johnson (University of Alaska Fairbanks) and Dr. Molly McCammon (Alaska Ocean Observing System)
E-mail(s):
mccammon@aoos.org
Abstract:
The Alaska Ocean Observing System and the North Pacific Research Board are collaborating to develop the Alaska Marine Information System (AMIS) to catalog and display project information and data. The AMIS Project Browser allows users to search for projects and data by geography, time, funding agency, principal investigator, and data types. AMIS also provides visualization tools for displaying past, current and future projects with their geographic areas and sampling locations displayed on a map. AMIS provides users with data and the project metadata to download. AMIS enhances coordination and efficient use of funding resources by linking visually and through text the status of projects across Alaska. Join us in this teleconference to learn how to use and contribute to the AMIS project.
Remote Access & Notes:
To Participate / Log-In to the Alaska Climate Teleconference: http://www.uaf.edu/accap/teleconference.htm. Teleconference: 1) Dial:1-800-893-8850; 2) When prompted, enter the PIN code: 7531823. To view the presentation during a teleconference: 1) Point your web browser to: http://www.shareitnow.com; 2) Click on the blue *Join a Meeting* button on the left side bar. 3) For Presenter ID enter: accap@uaf.edu. To join us in person: If you are in Fairbanks, join us in person on the UAF campus in the Duckering Building Room 535. Map: http://www.uaf.edu/campusmap/ (purple zone). For more information about the Alaska Climate Teleconferences and the Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy, please contact Brook Gamble, Outreach and Education Specialist, (907) 474-7812, accap@uaf.edu] or visit www.uaf.edu/accap.
Download Presentation(s):
Download presentation [PDF]
Web link to this OneNOAA science seminar announcement
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html#OneNOAASeminar_17Mar2009_Johnson
OneNOAA Seminar Added:
OneNOAA Science Seminar added Friday, February 6, 2009 6:58 AM / Last edited Wednesday, March 4, 2009 7:21 AM
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html



Predicting Coral Bleaching From Satellite Retrievals of Sea Surface Light and Temperature

Date/Location:
Wednesday, 18 March 2009; 09:00 – 10:00 ETZ (World Weather Building Room 209, 5200 Auth Rd, Camp Springs, MD 20746; NESDIS-STAR seminar)
Speaker(s):
Dr. William Skirving (NOAA-NESDIS-STAR-SOCD Coral Reef Watch)
E-mail(s):
william.skirving@noaa.gov
Abstract:
Coral Reef Watch (CRW) has been widely praised for its coral bleaching product suite. It has been extensively used by US and international reef managers and lawmakers to predict and understand the onset and severity of mass coral bleaching. The current suite of algorithms is based solely on satellite sea surface temperature (SST) retrievals. While they accurately predict the onset of coral bleaching and give a good indication of the severity of the event, they do not accurately predict mortality and have no ability to distinguish differential responses among various coral species. What we know as thermal coral bleaching is caused by accumulated light stress, and the sensitivity of corals to light is modulated by temperature. As SST is a function of incoming solar radiation, the current CRW SST-based product suite indirectly includes light. Our knowledge of coral physiology has come a long way in the last decade and most of the processes causing coral bleaching are now much better understood. The international World Bank/GEF funded Coral Reef Targeted Research programme provided CRW with the opportunity to team up with the world’s foremost experts in coral physiology of coral bleaching and begin the development of a satellite product that combines light and temperature. At the same time, work at STAR has made satellite measures of surface light over the oceans possible. It is hoped that this product will improve our ability to predict the severity and mortality of coral bleaching and will also provide information on the levels of stress needed to bleach various species. This seminar will describe the algorithm, which is soon to be implemented as an experimental satellite product.
Remote Access & Notes:
Phone access: TBD. For questions please contact Tyler Christensen (301-713-2857 x 127; Tyler.Christensen@noaa.gov); Jerry Zhan (301-763-8042 x 148; Xiwu.Zhan@noaa.gov). World Weather Building Room 209, 5200 Auth Rd, Camp Springs, MD 20746.
Download Presentation(s):
Download presentation [PDF]
Web link to this OneNOAA science seminar announcement
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html#OneNOAASeminar_18Mar2009_Skirving
OneNOAA Seminar Added:
OneNOAA Science Seminar added Monday, March 16, 2009 7:17 AM
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html



Collaborative NOAA-Russia Ocean Observations in The Bering and Chukchi Seas

Date/Location:
Wednesday, 18 March 2009; 12:00-13:00 ETZ (SSMC-3, 2nd Floor, NOAA Central Library Silver Spring, NODC Seminar)
A NODC seminar as part of the "NOAA work in the high latitudes and the International Polar Year 2007-2008 seminar series"
For further information about the IPY seminars see: http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html#IPYSeminars
Speaker(s):
Dr. Kathy Crane (Program Manager NOAA Arctic Research office, Climate Program Office)
E-mail(s):
Kathy.Crane@noaa.gov
Abstract:
A discussion of the ongoing NOAA-Russia ocean observing system in the Arctic Basin.
Remote Access & Notes:
For Webcast access: 1) go to http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?i=741283869&p=nodc1315&t=c; 2) type in other required fields (i.e., your name, e-mail, organization; meeting number is 741283869; password is "nodc1315" -password is case sensitive- ); 3) indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy; 4) click on Proceed. For phone access: toll free dial 877-916-2513 using a touch-tone phone; when prompted enter participant code 5877174 followed by a "#" (Please mute your phone during the presentation). Please note that webcast & phone access is limited to 50 connections on a first-come-first served basis. Webcast & phone access will start approximately 5 min before the seminar. If possible, seminar audio will be available via podcast together with the seminar slides following the seminar. For general questions about this seminar, please contact Hernan Garcia (Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov), Mary Lou Cumberpatch (Mary.Lou.Cumberpatch@noaa.gov) or Skip Theberge (Albert.E.Theberge.Jr@noaa.gov).
Notes about the speaker(s):

Dr. Crane has worked in Arctic Research and Management since 1980. Her early research centered around the tectonic evolution of the Arctic Ocean Basin, and the study of Arctic methane hydrates. She participated in numerous expeditions with Norway, Sweden, Russia, Canada and the USA in this region. In 1992, Dr. Crane worked with the Environmental Defense Fund to develop the first "Arctic At Risk " program in the United States. As the Soviet Union transformed into the Russian Federation, she helped to facilitate many international collaborative efforts with Russian scientists leading to the present- day Russian American Long-term Census of the Arctic. Dr. Crane received her PhD in 1977 at the Scripps Institution Of Oceanography, carried out post-doctoral research at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, and later was a researcher at the Lamont- Doherty Earth Observatory of Columbia University. In 1985 - 2002 Dr. Crane became an Associate and then Full Professor of Geology at Hunter College of the City University of New York. In 2002 she accepted the position of Program Manager in NOAA's Arctic Research Office.

Download Presentation(s):
Download presentation [PDF ~5.2 MB] and podcast audio [MP3 ~57 MB; WMA ~17 MB]
Web link to this OneNOAA science seminar announcement
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html#OneNOAASeminar_IPY_Kathy_Crane
OneNOAA Seminar Added:
OneNOAA Science Seminar added Wednesday February 18, 2009 3:08 PM / Last edited Monday, March 23, 2009 7:36 AM
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html



Monitoring the Meridional Overturning Circulation

Date/Location:
Wednesday, 18 March 2009; 12:00-13:00 ETZ (World Weather Building, Room 707, Camp Springs, MD; NESDIS-STAR seminar)
Speaker(s):
Dr. Molly Baringer (NOAA / OAR / Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory)
E-mail(s):
Molly.Baringer@noaa.gov
Abstract:
Climate models suggest that the meridional overturning circulation (MOC) in the Atlantic, and the accompanying oceanic heat flux, vary considerably on interannual time scales. In addition to abrupt climate change scenarios in which the MOC can virtually shut off (Manabe and Stouffer, 1993; Vellinga and Wood, 2002), the "normal" interdecadal variation may range from 20% to 30% of its long-term mean value, according to some models (e.g., Hakkinen, 1999). However, until recently no direct measurement system had been put in place that could provide regular estimates of the meridional overturning circulation to determine its natural variability or to assess these model predictions. Such a system is now deployed along 26.5°N in the Atlantic as part of the joint U.K./U.S. RAPID-MOCHA program, which has been continuously observing the MOC since March 2004. This presentation will describe this program and the scientific results achieved so far.
Remote Access & Notes:
Phone access: 1-866-541-9958; passcode: 2531766. For further information please contact Bruce Ramsay (301-405-9205; Bruce.H.Ramsay@noaa.gov)
Download Presentation(s):
Download presentation [PDF]
Web link to this OneNOAA science seminar announcement
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html#OneNOAASeminar_18Mar2009_Baringer
About he speaker(s):
http://www.aoml.noaa.gov/phod/people/baringer.html
OneNOAA Seminar Added:
OneNOAA Science Seminar added Wednesday, March 4, 2009 6:52 AM / Last updated Wednesday, March 18, 2009 9:19 AM
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html



Modeling Climate-to-Fish-to-Fishers: Yes We Can!

Date/Location:
Wednesday, 18 March 2009; 12:00 – 13:00 ETZ (SSMC-4, Room #8150, NOS seminar)
Speaker(s):
Enrique Curchitser (Institute of Marine and Coastal Sciences, Rutgers University) and Thomas (Zack) Powell (University of California at Berkeley)
E-mail(s):
enrique@marine.rutgers.edu
Abstract:
There are many challenges to developing Earth System, or end-to-end, models. Some of the challenges are technical: How to represent the widest possible range of relevant physical and biological scales and processes given limited computational resources. Some are conceptual: How many nutrients, phyto- and zoo-plankton functional groups are needed for a given application, how to account for species migration and adaptability and how to explore the relative roles of climate and fishing pressure on fish populations. In this talk we focus on two aspects of an emerging endto-end model: 1. Downscaling of the climate system to regional scales and 2. The development of a fully integrated ecosystem model that includes fish and fishers. The climate downscaling is based on a two-way coupled climate (NCAR-CCSM) and regional (ROMS) models. We will describe the strategies adopted for the coupling and the usefulness of the system for downscaled climate projections. The ecosystem model we present is based on the NEMURO family of ecosystem models. It includes a lower trophic level NPZD model tightly coupled to an individual based model, currently implemented for sardine and anchovy. The ecosystem model is being developed as a tightly coupled module of the regional physical model ROMS. We discuss the challenges that arise from this integration, and present some early results from the ongoing work.
Remote Access & Notes:
Presentations are available remotely via a combination of phone & webcast. Please be aware that remote access is limited to 50 connections on a first-come-first served basis, so we cannot guarantee participation. To participate remotely you must: 1) Dial 866-541-1377, and then wait for instructions. When prompted enter passcode 142625 followed by the # sign. Please use your phone’s mute button (or toggle *6) during the presentation until you are ready to ask questions. 2) Go to the webcast site at http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?i=746752585&p=&t=c 3) Enter meeting number 746752585 if needed. No passcode is required. 4) Enter other required fields. 5) Indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy and click Proceed. For questions: contact Felix Martinez (Felix.Martinez@noaa.gov).
  Download presentation in quicktime movie (You advance the slides by clicking on each frame) [MOV ~ 12.3 MB]
Web link to this OneNOAA science seminar announcement
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html#OneNOAASeminar_18Mar2009_Curchitser
OneNOAA Seminar Added:
OneNOAA Science Seminar added Thursday March 5, 2009 11:12 AM / Last edited: Friday, April 3, 2009 2:06 PM
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html



Assessing Stock Structure and Movements in Relation to Naval Exercises and Fisheries: A Multi-species Satellite Tagging Effort with Hawaiian Odontocetes

Date/Location:
Wednesday, 18 March 2009; 13:00-14:00 ETZ (SSMC-3, Room 13836, NOAA Office of Protected Resources Seminar)
Speaker(s):
Dr. Robin W. Baird (Cascadia Research Collective)
E-mail(s):
rwbaird@cascadiaresearch.org
Abstract:
Knowledge of movements and stock structure of most species of small and medium-sized cetaceans is limited due to biased survey coverage and/or the difficulty in detecting, approaching and identifying individuals. Assessing reactions of individual cetaceans in response to naval sonar use is equally problematic – individuals likely react at distances much greater than can be documented from vessels using sonar, and determining reactions requires information on the individuals prior to, during, and after sonar use. While this may be easier for some species, for cryptic, long-diving, or rarely encountered species, documenting observations from vessels, or deploying short-term tags immediately prior to a naval exercise, will be a long-term endeavor, to say the least. We are using recently developed remotely-deployed satellite tags on six species of small and medium-sized odontocetes in Hawaiian waters to examine movements in relation to stock structure, habitat use, and naval sonar use (in association with the 2008 Rim-of-the-Pacific naval exercise). Since 2006 satellite tags have been deployed on four Cuvier’s beaked whales, eight Blainville’s beaked whales, 12 false killer whales, 22 short-finned pilot whales, 12 melon-headed whales, and one pygmy killer whale. Re-sightings and photographs of previously tagged individuals indicate complete healing of the tag attachment sites and no disfigurements. Results on movements of false killer whales in association with long-line fishing effort and other species will be discussed.
Remote Access & Notes:
Webex access: https://wgmmume.nmfs.webexone.com/r.asp?a=4&id=131293&eaddr=3097. Meeting ID: 487851132. Phone access: 1-888-935-0561; Participants code: 624212. For Webex access questions for this seminar please contact Amy Sloan (Amy.Sloan@noaa.gov). For further information please contact Jaclyn Taylor (Jaclyn.Taylor@noaa.gov) and Helen Golde (helen.golde@noaa.gov).
Notes about the speaker(s):
http://www.cascadiaresearch.org/Robin/robin.htm
Web link to this OneNOAA science seminar announcement
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html#OneNOAASeminar_18Mar2009_Baird
OneNOAA Seminar Added:
OneNOAA Science Seminar added Wednesday, March 11, 2009 2:30 PM / Last edited: Thursday March 12, 2009 1:55 PM
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html



Utilizing High Resolution Satellite-derived SST Analysis Products to Develop a New Satellite Based Air-Sea Heat Flux Climatology

Date/Location:
Thursday, 19 March 2009; 11:00-12:00 ETZ (SSMC-3, 4th Floor, Room 4817, NODC Seminar)
Speaker(s):
Dr. Christopher Jeffery (NODC)
E-mail(s):
christopher.d.jeffery@noaa.gov
Abstract:
Ocean-atmosphere heat exchange occurs via a number of processes – solar and longwave radiation, conductive and convective transfer (sensible heat) and by evaporation (latent heat). The resulting net heat flux is a key variable for climate studies. Since direct observations are sparse, we rely on bulk parameterization of the air-sea fluxes as functions of surface meteorological variables. Whilst sources for these flux-related variables include marine surface weather reports from voluntary observing ships collected and atmospheric reanalyses from numerical weather predication (NWP) centers, comprehensive global coverage is only possible from an analysis incorporating satellite measurements. With advances being made in the retrieval of air temperature and humidity from space, it is now possible to produce fluxes using only satellite-derived parameters. We aim to produce global air-sea heat fluxes using multiple GHRSST L4 products and other satellite derived meteorological parameters. Intercomparison of this SST data and subsequently calculated fluxes will feed back into processing and development, and provide the opportunity to improve the current state of knowledge. This talk will outline future work and present preliminary results consisting of daily latent and sensible heat fluxes for 2006 – calculated using the COARE 3.0 bulk flux algorithm. In addition to SST, satellite derived: wind speed, air humidity and air temperature are used as inputs. Surface radiation fluxes from the international satellite cloud climatology project (ISCCP) are also combined to estimate net heat input into the ocean. So far two GHRSST L4 datasets have been processed and fluxes calculated: AVHRR_AMSR_OI (NCDC) and MW_IR_OI (REMSS). Differences of up to 15% in certain areas are observed in annual average latent and sensible heat flux as a result of discrepancies between the global SST analysis products.
Remote Access & Notes:
For Webcast access: 1) go to http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?i=741283869&p=nodc1315&t=c; 2) type in other required fields (i.e., your name, e-mail, organization; meeting number is 741283869; password is "nodc1315" -password is case sensitive- ); 3) indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy; 4) click on Proceed. For phone access: toll free dial 877-916-2513 using a touch-tone phone; when prompted enter participant code 5877174 followed by a "#". Please note that webcast & phone access is limited to 50 connections on a first-come-first served basis. Space in conference Room 4817 in SSMC-3 is limited to about 20-25 people. For general questions about this seminar, please contact Hernan Garcia (Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov)
Download Presentation(s):
Download presentation [PDF , ~2.7 MB]
Web link to this OneNOAA science seminar announcement
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html#OneNOAASeminar_19Mar2009_Jeffery
OneNOAA Seminar Added:
OneNOAA Science Seminar added Thursday, January 22, 2009 5:06 PM / Last updated Thursday, March 19, 2009 12:12 PM
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html



International Fisheries Trade Trends

Date/Location:
Thursday, 19 March 2009; 12:00-13:00 ETZ (SSMC-3, 2nd Floor, NOAA Central Library Silver Spring Seminar)
Speaker(s):
Stephane Vrignaud and Tom Asakawa (NOAA Fisheries Service)
Abstract:
Illegal, Unreported, Unregulated - How these fishing practices can affect the seafood you consume NOAA Fisheries Service international trade experts speak on this and other U.S. seafood fisheries management issues.
Remote Access & Notes:
For further information about this seminar please contact Mary Lou Cumberpatch (Mary.Lou.Cumberpatch@noaa.gov; 301-713-2600 Ext. 129) or Skip Theberge (Albert.E.Theberge.Jr@noaa.gov; 301-713-2600 Ext. 115).
Download Presentation(s):

Download: Exporting Seafood to the European Union Powerpoint slides [PPT]
Download: Us Exports to NE Asia Powerpoint slides [PPT]

Web link to this OneNOAA science seminar announcement
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html#OneNOAASeminar_19Mar2009_VrignaudAsakawa
OneNOAA Seminar Added:
OneNOAA Science Seminar added Wednesday, March 18, 2009 9:16 AM
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html



The Nature Conservancy's Coral Triangle Program: Conservation priorities and strategies in Southeast Asia and the Melanesia

Date/Location:
Monday, 23 March 2009; 11:30 – 12:30 ETZ (SSMC-4, Room #8150, NOS seminar)
Speaker(s):
Rili Djohani (Director, Coral Triangle Program, The Nature Conservancy)
E-mail(s):
rdjohani@tnc.org
Abstract:
The Nature Conservancy has been active in the Coral Triangle region since 1991, with well-established marine conservations program on the ground in Indonesia, Papua New Guinea and the Solomon Islands. The Conservancy more recently began to work with government and other partners in Timor-Leste. TNC’s Coral Triangle Program was launched in 2006, stimulated in large part by recognition that the region has been a global refuge for coral communities during periods of climate change. Please join Rili Djohani, TNC's Coral Triangle Program Director, to learn about the Conservancy's conservation efforts in the region, as well as strategies in place to achieve them.
Remote Access & Notes:
Presentations are available remotely via a combination of phone & webcast. Please be aware that remote access is limited to 50 connections on a first-come-first served basis, so we cannot guarantee participation. To participate remotely you must: 1) Dial 866-541-1377, and then wait for instructions. When prompted enter passcode 142625 followed by the # sign. Please use your phone’s mute button (or toggle *6) during the presentation until you are ready to ask questions. 2) Go to the webcast site at http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?i=746752585&p=&t=c 3) Enter meeting number 746752585 if needed. No passcode is required. 4) Enter other required fields. 5) Indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy and click Proceed. For questions: contact Felix Martinez (Felix.Martinez@noaa.gov).
Notes about the speaker(s):
For nearly 20 years, Rili has worked to improve the management and finance of marine protected areas and reduce the use of destructive fishing practices in Southeast Asia. She joined The Nature Conservation in 1995 to help establish the Conservancy’s coastal and marine program in Indonesia. Under Rili’s direction, TNC’s Coral Triangle Center in Bali was opened in 2000. The Center’s goals are to strengthen the network of marine protected areas in Indonesia in the Lesser Sundas (Nusa Penida, Komodo, Savu Sea), the Bird’s Head in West Papua (Raja Ampat Islands), Derawan and Wakatobi and the Coral Triangle through public and private partnerships and an integrated approach based on science & policy, outreach & training. Rili also leads an innovative financing and collaborative management initiative in Komodo National Park with the International Finance Corporation of the World Bank. Rili has been TNC’s Country Director for Indonesia for five years and worked closely with TNCs Advisory Board to align and position the program with the national government and TNCs global priorities and helped mobilize resources from private and public resources. In this period, the program scaled up significantly by working with partners including local communities, district government and the private sector on large scale protected area networks embedded in land use planning processes and ecosystem approaches to fisheries using the state of the art science. She focused on strengthening supporting functions of the program such as HR, Finance, Operations and Legal Services as well as the Communications, Policy/Government Relations and Partnerships for TNC in Indonesia. Rili and her team developed succession strategies across the programs and has recruited Indonesians in all senior executive positions. She initiated a five year staff leadership development plan and sparkplug program, chartered the Indonesian Leadership Team and implemented an organizational culture survey to increase program efficiencies. Rili is the chair for the Southeast Asian marine working group of the World Commission of Protected Areas under the auspices of the World Conservation Union and continues to support the Coral Triangle Initiative in Indonesia and the region. She holds a Master of Science degree in tropical marine ecology form the University of Leiden in the Netherlands and a Master of Science in tropical coastal zone management from the University of Newcastle Upon Tyne. She is currently enrolled in a PhD program (environmental policy and law) with the University of Leiden that builds upon her marine conservation work in Indonesia. Rili is a board member of the US-based Seacology Foundation.
Web link to this OneNOAA science seminar announcement
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html#OneNOAASeminar_23Mar2009_Djohani
OneNOAA Seminar Added:
OneNOAA Science Seminar added Wednesday March 11, 2009 7:46 AM
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html



Aquarius and Sea Surface Salinity

Date/Location:
Monday, 23 March 2009; 14:00-15:00 ETZ (World Weather Building, Room 707, Camp Springs, MD; JCSDA seminar)
Speaker(s):
Dr. Eric Lindstrom (Physical Oceanography Program, NASA Headquarters, Aquarius Program Scientist) and Dr. Gary Lagerloef (Earth and Space Research)
E-mail(s):
eric.j.lindstrom@nasa.gov & lager@esr.org
Abstract:
NASA’s Aquarius Mission is now planned to launch in mid-2010 to begin a 3 year (baseline) mission to measure sea surface salinity (SSS) monthly, over the open ocean, with an accuracy of 0.2 on the practical salinity scale (pss), and 150 km spatial resolution. It is the primary component of the international partnership satellite Aquarius/SAC-D, including Argentina, Italy, Canada, France and Brazil. The satellite will be placed in a sun-synchronous polar orbit that repeats every seven days, and will carry several complimentary scientific instruments. The primary sensor is an L-band microwave radiometer/radar system to measure the surface microwave brightness to retrieve SSS and the radar backscatter to correct for surface wind and sea state. This presentation will review the science background, SSS remote sensing and how it works, the Aquarius/SAC-D Mission design, calibration and data validation, algorithms and simulators, ground system, science teams and data access to NOAA and the broader science community.
Remote Access & Notes:
Phone Access: Toll free 1-866-715-2479 Passcode: 9457557 ; International: 1-517-345-5260. For questions please contact Christina Bacon (301-763-8154 x 188; Christina.Bacon@noaa.gov).
About the speaker(s):

Dr. Eric Lindstrom: http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/docs/09/OneNOAA_JCSDA_23Mar2009_Eric_Lindstrom_BIO.pdf
Dr. Gary Lagerloef: http://www.esr.org/mainfiles/staff/glagerloef.html

Download Presentation(s):
Download presentation [PDF ; ~3.6MB]
Web link to this OneNOAA science seminar announcement
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html#OneNOAASeminar_23Mar2009_Lindstrom
OneNOAA Seminar Added:
OneNOAA Science Seminar added Friday, January 2, 2009 11:16 AM / Last edited Friday, March 20, 2009 8:44 AM
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html



Into the Abyss: Submarine Exploration of the World’s Largest Undersea Canyon

Date/Location:
Tuesday, 24 March 2009; 12:00-13:00 ETZ (SSMC-3, 15th Floor, Room 15836, NMFS Seminar)
Speaker(s):
Dr. Michelle Ridgway (Alaskan Marine Ecologist and Chair of the Alaska Deep Sea Science Institute)
Abstract:
In the summer of 2007, an international team completed the first ever in-situ exploration of seafloor geological features and biological habitats in Zhemchug and neighboring Pribilof Canyon. Submarine pilot/marine ecologist, Michelle Ridgway, will present highlights of scientific findings and underwater video imagery from the depths of Alaska’s magnificent Beringian canyons. Carved into the North American continental margin by the Yukon River during past Ice Ages, Zhemchug Canyon is the largest undersea canyon in the world. One of several massive undersea chasms along the submerged southern edge of the Bering Sea Land Bridge, the canyons serve as conduits for nutrients upwelling from the deep Aleutian Basin and foraging corridors for species such as crab, halibut, rockfish seabirds and marine mammals. Highly productive currents from the canyons bathe waters surrounding the “Galapagos of the North”, the Pribilof Islands, and nourish their diverse species and extraordinary productivity.
Remote Access & Notes:
For general questions about this seminar, please contact Kate Naughten [(240) 687-9811; Kate.Naughten@noaa.gov]
Notes about the speaker(s):
A lifelong Alaskan, Michelle Ridgway has been exploring under Alaskan seas since 1982. Through over 2,000 scuba dives and piloting Remote Operated Vehicles and submarines, she has examined facets of our marine ecosystem from Chukchi Sea phytoplankton productivity and Aleutian nearshore foodwebs to Sitka Sound kelp beds and deep-sea phenomena of the Bering Sea shelf edge. She continues this work through the private sector, often in collaboration with state, federal, International and University colleagues. When not underwater, Ridgway sails the world’s oceans, serves on the North Pacific Fishery Management Council’s Advisory Panel and serves as Chair of the Alaska Deep Sea Science Institute.
Web link to this OneNOAA science seminar announcement
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html#OneNOAASeminar_24Mar2009_Ridgway
OneNOAA Seminar Added:
OneNOAA Science Seminar added Tuesday, March 17, 2009 10:47 AM / Last edited Tuesday, March 17, 2009 12:06 PM
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html



Institutional Legitimacy and Comanagement of Marine Protected Areas: The Case of Xcalak Reefs National Park, Mexico

Date/Location:
Wednesday, 25 March 2001; 12:00 – 13:00 ETZ (SSMC-4, Room #8150, NOS seminar)
Speaker(s):
Dr. David M. Hoffman (Department of Anthropology and Middle Eastern Cultures, Mississippi State University)
E-mail(s):
DHoffman@anthro.msstate.edu
Abstract:
This presentation will explore the relationships between a conservation intervention, the quest for local institutional legitimacy, and comanagement. More precisely, I will employ the case of Xcalak Reefs National Park, Mexico (PNAX) to illuminate the interaction between contextual and procedural elements of comanagement implementation, how these variables affect the production of legitimacy in the minds of local resource users, and how resultant attitudes can subvert both management devolution and resource conservation. The failure to produce comanagement will be related to the mismatch inherent in attempts to map comanagement onto a histories and institutions that do not align with the morality and practicalities necessary for its implementation. The case reiterates the necessity for conservation managers and practitioners to have an understanding of local history and context. Lastly, Xcalak demonstrates the dangers inherent in management processes that are inconsistent with built expectations. In so doing, I will highlight critical assumptions made in the real-world application of comanagement.
Remote Access & Notes:
Presentations are available remotely via a combination of phone & webcast. Please be aware that remote access is limited to 50 connections on a first-come-first served basis, so we cannot guarantee participation. To participate remotely you must: 1) Dial 866-541-1377, and then wait for instructions. When prompted enter passcode 142625 followed by the # sign. Please use your phone’s mute button (or toggle *6) during the presentation until you are ready to ask questions. 2) Go to the webcast site at http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?i=746752585&p=&t=c 3) Enter meeting number 746752585 if needed. No passcode is required. 4) Enter other required fields. 5) Indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy and click Proceed. For questions: contact Felix Martinez (Felix.Martinez@noaa.gov).
Web link to this OneNOAA science seminar announcement
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html#OneNOAASeminar_25Mar2009_Hoffman
OneNOAA Seminar Added:
OneNOAA Science Seminar added Thursday, March 19, 2009 9:03 AM
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html



The Hope for Integrated Management: Network governance in fisheries and watershed management.

Date/Location:
Thursday, 26 March 2009; 12:00-13:00 ETZ (SSMC-3, 2nd Floor, NOAA Central Library Silver Spring Seminar)
Speaker(s):
Dr. Troy W. Hartley (Virginia Sea Grant Director, Virginia Institute of Marine Science)
E-mail(s):
thartley@vims.edu
Abstract:
Increasingly, coastal and marine resource managers are asked to enhance communication, coordination and integration across ecological, jurisdictional, and sector boundaries. But was would such integrated, ecosystem-based management look like in operation? How do we implement integrated management across the watershed-estuary-ocean divide? This research employs communication network analysis methods to examine the governance networks underlying cases of collaborative watershed planning and Atlantic herring fisheries management. Specifically, the focus is on the extent of collaboration, roles of network leaders and managers, and the enhancement potential of the existing networks. Ramifications for integrated, ecosystem-based management are discussed.
Remote Access & Notes:
Remote access: Audio: 866-631-5469, passcode: 3958086. For further information about this seminar please contact Mary Lou Cumberpatch (Mary.Lou.Cumberpatch@noaa.gov; 301-713-2600 Ext. 129) or Skip Theberge (Albert.E.Theberge.Jr@noaa.gov; 301-713-2600 Ext. 115).
About the speaker(s):
Dr. Troy Hartley is a Research Associate Professor in coastal and marine policy and the Director of Virginia Sea Grant at the Virginia Institute of Marine Science (VIMS). Dr. Hartley's research interests are in coastal, marine and fisheries policy and management, specifically in the communication networks and stakeholder processes underlying integrated planning and management, adaptive management, collaborative management, ecosystem-based management, and other forms of governance networks.
  Download presentation [PDF ; PPT]
Web link to this OneNOAA science seminar announcement
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html#OneNOAASeminar_26Mar2009_Hartley
OneNOAA Seminar Added:
OneNOAA Science Seminar added Monday, February 2, 2009 8:53 AM / Last edited Tuesday March 24, 2009 9:51 AM
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html



Coupled Biophysical Modeling in the Northern California Current: GLOBEC Results and Future Directions

Date/Location:
Thursday, 26 March 2008; 12:00 – 13:00 ETZ (SSMC-4, Room #8150, NOS seminar)
Speaker(s):
Dr. Hal Batchelder (Oregon State University, COAS)
E-mail(s):
hbatchelder@coas.oregonstate.edu
Abstract:
More than a decade of US GLOBEC funding of model and field investigations has improved knowledge on atmospherically-forced patterns of circulation and hydrography in the Northern California Current, and how physical processes interact with ecology to structure continental shelf pelagic ecosystem dynamics and function. Results of coupled biophysical models are highly dependent on having realistic simulations of the ocean physics. This talk will summarize some of the results of GLOBEC's modeling investigations in the Northeast Pacific. How the physical and ecosystem models may be used to answer climate- and conservation-related societal needs will be addressed. Directions for future coupled biophysical models of the Oregon shelf region, including real-time forecasts of the production and fate of shelf primary production and its effects on dissolved oxygen concentration and incipient hypoxic conditions will be outlined.
Remote Access & Notes:
Presentations are available remotely via a combination of phone & webcast. Please be aware that remote access is limited to 50 connections on a first-come-first served basis, so we cannot guarantee participation. To participate remotely you must: 1) Dial 866-541-1377, and then wait for instructions. When prompted enter passcode 142625 followed by the # sign. Please use your phone’s mute button (or toggle *6) during the presentation until you are ready to ask questions. 2) Go to the webcast site at http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?i=746752585&p=&t=c 3) Enter meeting number 746752585 if needed. No passcode is required. 4) Enter other required fields. 5) Indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy and click Proceed. For questions: contact Felix Martinez (Felix.Martinez@noaa.gov).
Web link to this OneNOAA science seminar announcement
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html#OneNOAASeminar_26Mar2009_Btachelder
OneNOAA Seminar Added:
OneNOAA Science Seminar added Thursday March 12, 2009 1:42 PM
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html



Global Climate Variability and its Impacts on North Pacific Ecosystems

Date/Location:
Tuesday, 31 March 2009; 12:00 – 13:00 ETZ (SSMC-4, Room #8150, NOS seminar)
Speaker(s):
Frank Schwing (NOAA Fisheries Service/Southwest Fisheries Science Center)
E-mail(s):
franklin.schwing@noaa.gov
Abstract:
One on the important legacies of the US GLOBEC program is that it has advanced our view of climate-ecosystem linkages from a simplistic correlative relationship to one that recognizes and understands the mechanisms by which global climate variability drives changes in regional ecosystem productivity and structure. This talk will describe the multiple approaches to and results of recent work by GLOBEC scientists and colleagues to decipher the patterns in time and space that characterize environmental variability and climate change. Spatial variability from global down to sub-ecosystem scales is important in driving ecosystem processes. Temporal variability includes not only natural interannual to centennial cycles and an apparent anthropogenic global climate change trend, but shifts in seasonal cycles that are critical for the life histories of many managed and protected populations. These analyses have helped us to understand the relationships between past climate and ecosystem variability, and allowed scientists to develop indicators that summarize and assess ecosystem state. Many of these indicators are now being implemented.
Remote Access & Notes:
Presentations are available remotely via a combination of phone & webcast. Please be aware that remote access is limited to 50 connections on a first-come-first served basis, so we cannot guarantee participation. To participate remotely you must: 1) Dial 866-541-1377, and then wait for instructions. When prompted enter passcode 142625 followed by the # sign. Please use your phone’s mute button (or toggle *6) during the presentation until you are ready to ask questions. 2) Go to the webcast site at http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?i=746752585&p=&t=c 3) Enter meeting number 746752585 if needed. No passcode is required. 4) Enter other required fields. 5) Indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy and click Proceed. For questions: contact Felix Martinez (Felix.Martinez@noaa.gov).
Web link to this OneNOAA science seminar announcement
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html#OneNOAASeminar_31Mar2009_Schwing
OneNOAA Seminar Added:
OneNOAA Science Seminar added Tuesday, March 24, 2009 9:07 AM
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html

 


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April 2009

Mon
Tue
Wed
Thu
Fri
07
09
10
13
16
17
20
22
27
31

Other OneNOAA Science Seminars: Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec

(Total number of OneNOAA Science seminars in April 2009: 21)



NOAA Restoration Day: Bay Grass Growing Workshop *Silver Spring, MD only*

Thursday, 02 April 2009; 12:00 – 13:00 ETZ (SSMC-4, Room #1W611, NCBO workshop)
Allison Hammer and Peter Bergstrom (NOAA Chesapeake Bay Office)
Allison.Hammer@noaa.gov, Peter.Bersgtrom@noaa.gov
Alison Hammer, NOS Special Projects and Peter Bergstrom, NOAA Chesapeake Bay Office will explain the importance of underwater bay grasses in the Chesapeake Bay and distribute bay grass growing tanks for 22 NOAA offices. All 22 tanks have been assigned to offices for this year, but even if your office did not receive a tank you are welcome to come learn more about restoring underwater bay grasses. This informal presentation will include instructions on how to set-up the office tanks. After growing grasses in our offices for 2.5 months, the grasses will be planted during the* 2009 NOAA Restoration Day* event held on June 18 at Otter Point Creek, a component of the Chesapeake Bay MD National Estuarine Research Reserve (~1 hour from Silver Spring, MD).
Due to limited space, you *MUST RSVP* by Tuesday, March 31. If your office is receiving a tank, plan on bringing a cart to the workshop to pick up your supplies. To RSVP and for more information about the upcoming NOAA Restoration Day http://epsilon.nos.noaa.gov/welcome.html event on June 18 at the Otter Point Creek NERR, contact: Tonya.Kane@noaa.gov or Alison.Hammer@noaa.gov.
OneNOAA Science Seminar added Friday, March 27, 2009 12:20 PM
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html



Formation and Climate Impacts of Arctic Haze

Friday, 03 April 2009; 12:00-13:00 ETZ (SSMC-3, 2nd Floor, NOAA Central Library Silver Spring, NODC Seminar)
A NODC seminar as part of the "NOAA work in the high latitudes and the International Polar Year 2007-2008 seminar series"
For further information about the IPY seminars see: http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html#IPYSeminars

Dr. Yi Ming (NOAA GFDL)
Yi.Ming@noaa.gov
Arctic climate is changing at a pace faster than the global average in the recent decades. Arctic haze - an accumulation of long-range transported aerosols - exerts substantial surface warming in winter by interacting with clouds. The formation of Arctic haze and its influence on local climate are poorly understood. Here we find, with the help of a state-of-the-art global climate model, that the poleward transport of European air pollution is controlled strongly by the second climate mode of the North Atlantic - European region. This is supported by the strong correlation of measured surface aerosol concentrations and longwave downward radiative flux with the second mode. A shift of the mode from negative to positive phases doubles the abundance of Arctic haze. This finding is essential for understanding Arctic climate variability and change.
For Webcast access: 1) go to http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?i=741283869&p=nodc1315&t=c; 2) type in other required fields (i.e., your name, e-mail, organization; meeting number is 741283869; password is "nodc1315" -password is case sensitive- ); 3) indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy; 4) click on Proceed. For phone access: toll free dial 877-916-2513 using a touch-tone phone; when prompted enter participant code 5877174 followed by a "#" (Please mute your phone during the presentation). Please note that webcast & phone access is limited to 50 connections on a first-come-first served basis. Webcast & phone access will start approximately 5 min before the seminar. If possible, seminar audio will be available via podcast together with the seminar slides following the seminar. For general questions about this seminar, please contact Hernan Garcia (Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov), Mary Lou Cumberpatch (Mary.Lou.Cumberpatch@noaa.gov) or Skip Theberge (Albert.E.Theberge.Jr@noaa.gov).

Dr. Ming is a research scientist at NOAA GFDL with interests in Aerosol physics and chemistry, Aerosol-cloud-climate interactions, Anthropogenic and natural climate forcings, and Global and regional climate change. For further information please see http://www.gfdl.noaa.gov/yi-ming-homepage. A short CV: http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/docs/09/Yi_Ming_vitae_short.pdf

http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html#OneNOAASeminar_IPY_Yi_Ming
OneNOAA Science Seminar added Monday, March 2, 2009 1:26 PM / Last edited Tuesday, March 3, 2009 8:25 AM
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html



Strengthening Coral Reef Resilience to Climate Change Impacts

Monday, 06 April 2009; 14:00 – 15:00 ETZ (SSMC-4, Room 10153, NOS seminar)
Austin Bowden-Kerby (Project Scientist, Caribbean Community Climate Change Centre)
bowdenkerby@yahoo.com
Climate change is a significant threat to the survival of coral reefs. Warmer waters are implicated in extensive coral bleaching and coral disease, as well increased hurricane activity. These factors have caused significant coral mortality throughout the Caribbean region, resulting in lower coral cover than at any time in recent geological history. Ocean acidification is another serious problem directly related to rising atmospheric CO2 levels, reducing coral growth rates at a time when sea level rise threatens coastlines. The most vulnerable corals appear to be the Acroporids (saghorn and elkhorn corals), with an estimated 99% reduction in abundance in the Caribbean over the past 30 years. These two species became the first reef building corals to be listed as threatened with extinction in 2006, and their decline is directly related to climate change. However, even for the Acroporids, a few widely scattered coral genotypes continue to survive and even to thrive in spite of all of the adversities. It is these “genetic treasures” that the project focuses on, firstly to locate the temperature tolerant genotypes, and then to work to unlock the secrets to their success: growing fragments of these coral genotypes in in-situ coral nurseries, for further testing to discover their upper limits to project their fate into the future, and for out-planting of second-generation coral fragments to create climate change adapted coral reef patches. This is an entirely new approach to climate change adaptation, as the only currently recognized adaptation option for coral reefs is to work to increase coral reef health, hoping that healthy corals will survive better during warm water bleaching episodes. The pilot project, presently taking place in Belize, moves beyond this management option and seeks to actively identify and propagate corals that have survived previous bleaching episodes, disease epidemics, and hurricanes that are directly or indirectly related to increasing water temperatures.
Presentations are available remotely via a combination of phone & webcast. Please be aware that remote access is limited to 50 connections on a first-come-first served basis, so we cannot guarantee participation. To participate remotely you must: 1) Dial 866-541-1377, and then wait for instructions. When prompted enter passcode 142625 followed by the # sign. Please use your phone’s mute button (or toggle *6) during the presentation until you are ready to ask questions. 2) Go to the webcast site at http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?i=746752585&p=&t=c 3) Enter meeting number 746752585 if needed. No passcode is required. 4) Enter other required fields. 5) Indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy and click Proceed. For questions: contact Felix Martinez (Felix.Martinez@noaa.gov).
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html#OneNOAASeminar_06Apr2009_Bowden
OneNOAA Science Seminar added Wednesday, March 25, 2009 9:23 AM
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html



Population Dynamics of Pacific Salmon

Wednesday, 08 April 2009; 12:00 – 13:00 ETZ (SSMC-4, Room 8150, NOS seminar)
Louis W. Botsford (Department of Wildlife, Fish, and Population Dynamics, University of California, Davis)
lwbotsford@ucdavis.edu
The relative roles of the physical environment and fishing on fish populations is a question that has attracted scientific attention since the mid nineteenth century. Answering this question requires an understanding of the population dynamics of the species of interest. While we know that the direct effect of fishing is on mortality, the environment can affect growth and mortality rates at specific stages in their life history, and these points of action have different implications for expected population changes. In this talk I will trace our development of an understanding of salmon population dynamics from the beginning of the North East Pacific (NEP) GLOBEC program to the Pan Regional Synthesis beginning this year. In the NEP, coho salmon appeared to respond differently to the regime shift in the mid-1970s, offering the valuable opportunity for comparative research. Coho salmon catches showed a clear inverse relationship between Alaska and the California Current, while chinook salmon catches did not. The major population dynamic difference between species, a difference in spawning age distribution, was shown not to provide a clear explanation for this difference. More recent analysis of coho salmon survivals from coded wire tag data (1982-2004) showed a lack of inverse covariability between Alaska and the California Current, rather spatial covariability among survivals over 100 km scales, i.e., local regional scales rather than semi-basin scales. We are currently engaged in modeling studies showing how: (1) the life history point of action of environmental forcing (i.e., mortality or growth rate at age), (2) the variable observed (i.e., recruitment, abundance, catch), and (3) changes long-term survival (as caused by fishing or slow climate change) caused different population responses in Pacific salmon. The direct practical application of our work has been in: (1) assistance in debunking a publication that attempted to reduce the range of the ESA-listed southern coho salmon, and (2) reminding finger-pointing stakeholders in salmon disputes that it is the sum of all sources of mortality that cause declines, not a single cause (e.g., fishing, diversions, dams, etc.)
Presentations are available remotely via a combination of phone & webcast. Please be aware that remote access is limited to 50 connections on a first-come-first served basis, so we cannot guarantee participation. To participate remotely you must: 1) Dial 866-541-1377, and then wait for instructions. When prompted enter passcode 142625 followed by the # sign. Please use your phone’s mute button (or toggle *6) during the presentation until you are ready to ask questions. 2) Go to the webcast site at http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?i=746752585&p=&t=c 3) Enter meeting number 746752585 if needed. No passcode is required. 4) Enter other required fields. 5) Indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy and click Proceed. For questions: contact Felix Martinez (Felix.Martinez@noaa.gov).
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html#OneNOAASeminar_08Apr2009_Botsford
OneNOAA Science Seminar added Tuesday, April 7, 2009 6:58 AM
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html



The ABI (Advanced Baseline Imager) on the GOES-R series

Wednesday, 08 April 2009; 14:00-15:00 ETZ (SSMC-2, Room 2358, NWS Science and Technology Seminars)
Tim Schmit (NOAA/NESDIS ASPB)
The next generation geostationary satellite series will offer a continuation of current products and services and enable improved and new capabilities. The Advanced Baseline Imager (ABI) on the GOES-R series has been designed to meet user requirements covering a wide range of phenomena. This includes applications related to weather, oceanography, climate, and the environment. The ABI will improve upon the current GOES Imager with more spectral bands, faster imaging, higher spatial resolution, improved navigation and registration, and more accurate calibration. The ABI expands from five spectral bands on the current GOES imagers to a total of 16 spectral bands in the visible, near-infrared and infrared spectral regions. There will be an increase of the coverage rate leading to full disk scans at least every 15 minutes. ABI spatial resolution will be 2 km for the infrared bands and 0.5 km for the 0.64 micro-m visible band. ABI will improve every product from the current GOES Imager and will introduce a host of new products. The ABI will be used to generate “pseudo-soundings” to continue the sounder legacy products such as Total Precipitable Water and atmospheric stability parameters. To better prepare for the on-orbit ABI observations, simulations from a mix of synthetic (derived via advanced forward models) and actual satellite observations will be shown. This includes sample ABI images that are being used to develop a Weather Event Simulator (WES) case.
For questions about this seminar please contact Bob Glahn (301-713-1768; Harry.Glahn@noaa.gov)
Download presentation [PPT] (See http://www.weather.gov/mdl/seminar/)
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html#OneNOAASeminar_08Apr2009_Schmit
OneNOAA Science Seminar added Monday, March 16, 2009 10:55 AM / Last edited Friday, April 3, 2009 2:49 PM
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html



Climate Influence On Ice Breakup In Alaska

Tuesday, 14 April 2009; 10:00-11:00 am Alaska Local Time (RISA/ACCAP seminar via teleconference)
Larry A. Rundquist (NOAA National Weather Service)
larry.rundquist@noaa.gov
The National Weather Service Alaska-Pacific River Forecast Center has monitored river ice breakup on major rivers in Alaska for decades. The breakup process for large rivers in Interior Alaska can range from dynamic to thermal. The timing and severity of breakup is controlled by both weather and climate. Climate variability influences each of the elements of breakup, but weather patterns control the process. Join us to learn about trends in ice breakup conditions over the past decades, to hear expectations for breakup in 2009, and to discuss implications of variability in breakup conditions.
To Participate / Log-In to the Alaska Climate Teleconference: http://www.uaf.edu/accap/teleconference.htm. Teleconference: 1) Dial:1-800-893-8850; 2) When prompted, enter the PIN code: 7531823. To view the presentation during a teleconference: 1) Point your web browser to: http://www.shareitnow.com; 2) Click on the blue *Join a Meeting* button on the left side bar. 3) For Presenter ID enter: accap@uaf.edu. To join us in person: If you are in Fairbanks, join us in person on the UAF campus in the Duckering Building Room 535. Map: http://www.uaf.edu/campusmap/ (purple zone). For more information about the Alaska Climate Teleconferences and the Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy, please contact Brook Gamble, Outreach and Education Specialist, (907) 474-7812, accap@uaf.edu] or visit www.uaf.edu/accap.
Download presentation [PDF]
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html#OneNOAASeminar_14Apr2009_Rundquist
OneNOAA Science Seminar added Friday, February 27, 2009 7:28 AM /Last updated Tuesday, April 14, 2009 11:06 AM
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html



IPY and Indigenous People: Local Knowledge Contributes to the Study of Arctic Change

Wednesday, 15 April 2009; 12:00-13:00 ETZ (SSMC-3, 2nd Floor, NOAA Central Library Silver Spring, NODC Seminar)
A NODC seminar as part of the "NOAA work in the high latitudes and the International Polar Year 2007-2008 seminar series"
For further information about the IPY seminars see: http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html#IPYSeminars
Dr. Igor Krupnik (Curator, Arctic Studies Center, Smithsonian Institution)
krupniki@si.edu
All previous IPY/IGY initiatives were primarily geophysical programs; they were also exemplary products of the long-established paradigm of ‘polar science.’ Under that paradigm, any data to be used in scholarly analysis and academic publications were to be collected by professional scientists and/or by specially trained observers. Arctic indigenous residents had hardly any documented voice in the early IPY/IGY ventures, except by serving as ‘subjects’ for museum collecting or while working as dog-drivers, guides, and unskilled assistants to research expeditions. Natural scientists and anthropologists with strong interest in Native cultures were the first to break that pattern and to seek polar residents as a valuable source of expertise on the Arctic environment. This presentation explores the new model established by IPY 2007-2008 in reaching out to indigenous people and polar residents in a deliberate effort to document their observations and their knowledge of Arctic climate change. The paper uses the experience of one IPY project, /SIKU/ – Sea Ice Knowledge and Use (IPY #166) and of the resulting collaboration with local indigenous experts in Alaska, Canada, Arctic Russia, and Greenland.
For Webcast access: 1) go to http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?i=741283869&p=nodc1315&t=c; 2) type in other required fields (i.e., your name, e-mail, organization; meeting number is 741283869; password is "nodc1315" -password is case sensitive- ); 3) indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy; 4) click on Proceed. For phone access: toll free dial 877-916-2513 using a touch-tone phone; when prompted enter participant code 5877174 followed by a "#" (Please mute your phone during the presentation). Please note that webcast & phone access is limited to 50 connections on a first-come-first served basis. Webcast & phone access will start approximately 5 min before the seminar. If possible, seminar audio will be available via podcast together with the seminar slides following the seminar. For general questions about this seminar, please contact Hernan Garcia (Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov), Mary Lou Cumberpatch (Mary.Lou.Cumberpatch@noaa.gov) or Skip Theberge (Albert.E.Theberge.Jr@noaa.gov).
Dr. Igor Krupnik is the Curator, Arctic Studies Center at the Smithsonian Institution and member, Joint Committee for IPY 2007-2008. Dr. Igor Krupnik joined the ASC in September 1991, first as an 'international visiting scholar' under the SI Fellowship program (1991-94) and later as a staff Ethnologist/Research Anthropologist (since 1994). He was appointed Curator of the Arctic and Northern Ethnology collections in 2005, and he is currently in charge of some 30,000 ethnological objects at the NMNH coming from Alaska, Canada, Greenland, Siberia, and the southern portion of the NW Coast. Igor’s most recent contribution to Smithsonian science is his involvement in the International Polar Year (IPY) 2007–2008. He served on the U.S. National Planning Committee for IPY in 2003–2004, before being nominated to the main international steering body for IPY, the IPY Joint Committee, in 2004. On the Joint Committee, Igor serves as one of two social scientists representing the interests of social studies and Arctic residents. He was instrumental in bringing social/human research onto the IPY agenda for the first time in its history and he played a major role in developing a Smithsonian program for IPY, which culminated in a major international workshop, Smithsonian at the Poles: Contributions to IPY Sciences (May 2007) and the subsequent publication of its proceedings (Krupnik, Lang, and Miller, eds. 2009). Igor’s personal contribution to the IPY 2007–2008 science program is an international project called SIKU (Sea Ice Knowledge and Use in the North), on which he coordinates activities of several research teams from Canada, US, Russia, Greenland, and France working in some 20 Arctic communities from Bering Strait to Greenland.See http://www.mnh.si.edu/arctic/html/about_krupnik.html.
Download presentation [PDF] and (IPOD) audio [WMA]
Article "The Way We See It Coming”: Building the Legacy of Indigenous Observations in IPY 2007– 2008 [PDF]
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html#OneNOAASeminar_IPY_15Apr2009_Igor_Krupnik
OneNOAA Science Seminar added Friday February 6, 2009 12:56 PM / Last updated Friday, April 17, 2009 9:13 AM
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html



Doing Business in China

Wednesday, 15 April 2009; 12:00 – 13:00 ETZ (SSMC-4, Room #8150, NOS seminar)
LT Paul W. Kemp (Office of Response and Restoration, NOAA National Ocean Service)
Paul.W.Kemp@noaa.gov
In March, Paul Kemp participated in an MBA Study Trip to Beijing and Shanghai. This trip was a required component of University of Maryland University College's (UMUC) Executive MBA (http://www.umuc.edu/programs/grad/xmba/) curriculum. During this trip, Paul kept a journal capturing cultural observations and lectures given at Peking University, Kodak, Inc subsidiary, National Academy of Chinese Theatre Arts, United Hospital Services (UHS), and Volkswagen. In addition, Paul's Executive MBA cohort visited the Great Wall, Forbidden City, Summer Palace, 2008 Olympics "Bird's Nest" Coliseum, and many other sites. One of the most interesting observations gained from this study trip was the stark contrasts observed between traditional Beijing and progressive Shanghai.
Presentations are available remotely via a combination of phone & webcast. Please be aware that remote access is limited to 50 connections on a first-come-first served basis, so we cannot guarantee participation. To participate remotely you must: 1) Dial 866-541-1377, and then wait for instructions. When prompted enter passcode 142625 followed by the # sign. Please use your phone’s mute button (or toggle *6) during the presentation until you are ready to ask questions. 2) Go to the webcast site at http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?i=746752585&p=&t=c 3) Enter meeting number 746752585 if needed. No passcode is required. 4) Enter other required fields. 5) Indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy and click Proceed. For questions: contact Felix Martinez (Felix.Martinez@noaa.gov).
LT Paul Kemp is the Acting Coordinator of the Commerce & Transportation Goal Team's Emergency Response Program. In addition to these duties, Paul is a watch officer at the NOAA Desk of the Dept. of Homeland Security's National Operations Center (NOC) where Paul briefs DHS's secretary-level leadership on high-impact atmospheric events. Paul also represents the USDA in his capacity as a Emergency Support Function 11 (Natural Resources & Agriculture) watchstander at FEMA's National Response Coordination Center (NRCC). Paul represents DOC as a member of the National Response Team's Training Subcommittee. Paul is enrolled in University of Maryland University College's (UMUC) Executive MBA program, and is expected to graduate in June. In December, Paul will transfer to Honolulu, HI to assume the position of Executive Officer onboard NOAA Ship /Hi'ialakai/ (http://www.moc.noaa.gov/hi/).
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html#OneNOAASeminar_15Apr2009_Kemp
OneNOAA Science Seminar added Monday, March 23, 2009 1:25 PM / Last updated Tuesday, March 24, 2009 9:02 AM
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html



PSU Applied Research Laboratory Assimilation Projects

Wednesday, 15 April 2009; 12:00-13:00 P.M. (World Weather Building, Science Center, Room 707, Camp Springs, MD; NESDIS-STAR seminar)
Dr. Sue Ellen Hauptthis (Pennsylvania State University, Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Physics Computational Mechanics Division / Applied Research Lab and Associate Professor of Meteorology).
seh19@psu.edu
This talk will provide an overview of some current assimilation projects being accomplished in the Atmospheric and Oceanic Physics Department of the Applied Research Laboratory and the Meteorology Department of The Pennsylvania State University. In addition to using various standard assimilation techniques, including Newtonian relaxation, Extended Kalman Filter, Ensemble Kalman Filter, and 4DVAR, the group has developed a new GAVAR method that sets up an optimization problem and solves it using the robust Genetic Algorithm. Most of the research has been accomplished in the context of atmospheric transport and dispersion, emphasizing obtaining wind field variables given observations of pollutant concentrations. In spite of the one-way coupling, we have been able to consistently infer winds from concentration observation. Applications of this technique include back-calculating unknown source parameters and meteorological parameters. A current project is expanding the technique to larger scales by characterizing volcano emissions using satellite observations, modeling, and assimilation techniques. The team is also using assimilation techniques for downscaling. In addition, field studies are characterizing the variability in smoke plumes.
Phone access: U.S. participants: 866-832-9297; International participants: 203-566-7610; Passcode: 6070416. Seminar takes place at: Center for Satellite Applications & Research (STAR), World Weather Building, Science Center, Room 707, 5200 Auth Road, Camp Springs, MD 20746. For further information please conatct Bruce Ramsay (301-405-9205; Bruce.H.Ramsay@noaa.gov).
http://www.met.psu.edu/dept/faculty/Haupt.htm
Download presentation [PDF]
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html#OneNOAASeminar_15Apr2009_Hauptthis
OneNOAA Science Seminar added Wednesday, April 8, 2009 12:49 PM / Last updated Wednesday, April 15, 2009 1:37 PM
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html



Challenges in Using Advanced Infrared Sounders to Derive Useful Climate Products

Wednesday, 15 April 2009; 13:30-14:30 P.M. (SSMC-3, 3rd Floor, Room 3404, ARL Seminar)
Dr. Christopher Barnet (Physical Scientist, Integrated Observing System Science and Product Development Team, NOAA NESDIS STAR)
Chris.Barnet@noaa.gov
Hyper-spectral infrared sounders measure the thermal radiance at the top of Earth's atmosphere and are capable of deriving high accuracy temperature, moisture and trace gas products such as ozone, carbon monoxide, and methane, and carbon dioxide. The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) was launched on NASA's Aqua satellite in 2002 along with the Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU). Similar instruments were launched by the European organization for exploitation of Meteorological Satellites (EUMETSAT) in Oct. 2007 and will be launched in the near future by both EUMETSAT and the USA National Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellite System (NPOESS). Together the existing and planned advanced infrared and microwave sounders will span over 20 years of global measurements. The AIRS sounding algorithm was designed to be a "1st principles" approach that maximized information coming from the 2378 infrared spectral channels and 15 microwave channels to derive geophysical products in cloudy scenes. At NOAA/NESDIS we have migrated the AIRS science team approach for use in operational products from the EUMETSAT and NPOESS instruments and are investigating the utility of these satellites to provide climate-quality products. This presentation will summarize the AIRS science team algorithm and discuss some of the challenges in using passive thermal instruments to derive useful climate products. Also, the potential use of these advanced instruments as a "transfer standard" between in situ sensors (such as radiosondes) and/or ground stations will be discussed.
For further information please contact Betty Wells (Betty.Wells@noaa.gov)
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html#OneNOAASeminar_15Apr2009_Barnet
OneNOAA Science Seminar added Wednesday, April 1, 2009 7:03 AM
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html




Non-Gaussian Data Assimilation Methodologies

Tuesday, 21 April 2009; 10:00-11:00 ETZ (World Weather Building, Room 707, Camp Springs, MD; JCSDA seminar)
Dr. Steven J. Fletcher (Cooperative Institute for Research in the Atmosphere, Colorado State University)
Fletcher@cira.colostate.edu
In the current versions of both variational and ensemble data assimilation a very important assumption is made about how the errors are distributed. This assumption is that the errors are Gaussian (normally) distributed. However, this assumption is using the implicit property of the Gaussian distribution that the difference between two Gaussian random variables is also a Gaussian random variable. Therefore, this is implying that the state variables and the observations are also Gaussian distributed. This is not possible for the positive definite variables which can not go negative. There are some techniques to deal with variables which are lognormally distributed through using another property of the Gaussian distribution rather than assuming a Gaussian fit. This property, or rather its inverse, is that the logarithm of a lognormal random variable is a Gaussian distributed random variable. This approach introduces a bias into the analysis solution as we will demonstrate. In this paper we shall present the outline of the derivations for non-Gaussian data assimilation with respect to lognormal random variables. We shall present a 3D and 4D variational approach, and demonstrate these techniques with the Lorenz’63 model, which can assimilate Gaussian and lognormal random variables, both background errors and observations errors, simultaneously.
Phone Access: Toll free 1-866-715-2479 Passcode: 9457557 ; International: 1-517-345-5260. For questions please contact Christina Bacon (301-763-8154 x 188; Christina.Bacon@noaa.gov).
http://www.cira.colostate.edu/people/view.php?id=129
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html#OneNOAASeminar_21Apr2009_Fletcher
Download presentation [PDF]
OneNOAA Science Seminar added Friday, January 2, 2009 11:16 AM / Last edited Tuesday, April 21, 2009 9:47 AM
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html



Improving Stream Temperature Predictions for River Water Decision Support Systems

Tuesday, 21 April 2009; 12:00-13:00 (SSMC-3, Room 15836, OHC Seminar)
Eric M. Danner, Ph.D. (Southwest Fisheries Science Center, NOAA National Marine Fisheries Service)
eric.danner@noaa.gov

When making decisions about water allocations, state and federal water project managers must consider the short-term and long-term needs of agriculture, urban users, hydroelectric production, and flood control. They are also required by the Endangered Species Act (ESA) to make sure their decisions do not jeopardize the continued existence of any endangered or threatened species. The National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) evaluates water project impacts on threatened and endangered salmonids and provides a decision on these impacts by issuing a Biological Opinion (BiOp). For water projects across the United Sates the NMFS BiOps (or similar processes by other federal agencies) are the decision support systems (DSS) for water allocation decisions with respect to endangered species. The most recent BiOp for the Central Valley Project (CVP) in California was rejected by reviewers due to inadequate stream temperature and fish mortality models. These models are the current decisions support tools (DSTs) used in water allocation decisions, but are based on a monthly time step, which cannot take into account the fine scale temperature patterns that can be critical to salmonid survival. Thus NMFS is required to use models with finer spatiotemporal scales. Generating stream temperature estimates in near real time, at fine spatiotemporal scales, and over large geographic areas is problematic using existing modeling approaches. In a collaborative project with NASA, we are using high quality meteorological data coupled with ecosystem and statistical models to produce improved DTSs for stream temperature and fish mortality in the western U.S. The system will include nowcasting and forecasting capabilities that will provide stream temperature and fish mortality estimates for every 1km of stream reach at 15-minute intervals. These improvements to the existing DSS will allow for substantially improved water allocation decisions by fisheries managers and water project managers.

For Webcast access: goto https://www1.gotomeeting.com/register/579135849. For phone access: 1-877-909-6204; Participant code: 551159. For questions about this seminar please contact Lani Watson (Lani.Watson@noaa.gov; 301-713-2325 x158).
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html#OneNOAASeminar_21Apr2009_Danner
OneNOAA Science Seminar added Friday April 3, 2009 2:21 PM / Last updated Wednesday, April 15, 2009 1:42 PM
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html



Virtual Alaska

Tuesday, 21 April 2009; 12:00-13:00 ETZ (SSMC-3, 2nd Floor, NOAA Central Library Silver Spring Seminar)
Eric Hackathorn (Virtual Program Manager, NOAA OAR/ESRL)
eric.j.hackathorn@noaa.gov
Fish for Alaska King Crab, climb to the top of Mt. McKinley, traverse a glacier, survive a winter Bering Sea storm - all of these are possibilities in the coming world of Virtual Alaska. Eric Hackathorn will discuss plans for Virtual Alaska, experiences that could be incorporated into such a site, how to enter this virtual world, and even how to create and build the landscape. Virtual Alaska and other virtual adventures such as flying through a hurricane on the wing of an aircraft and exploring underwater caves and reefs are attracting large numbers of "avatars" or virtual selves to one of the first government-sponsored Earth-science islands" in the rapidly growing online world of Second Life. To join in requires installing free software on your computer available at http://www.secondlife.com. For further information see: http://www.scilands.org/virtual_alaska_brown_bag.pdf and http://www.sled-ak.ning.com
Phone access: dial 866-631-5469; passcode: 3958086. See abstract for additional instructions. For further information about this seminar please contact Mary Lou Cumberpatch (Mary.Lou.Cumberpatch@noaa.gov; 301-713-2600 Ext. 129) or Skip Theberge (Albert.E.Theberge.Jr@noaa.gov; 301-713-2600 Ext. 115).
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html#OneNOAASeminar_21Apr2009_Hackathorn
OneNOAA Science Seminar added Monday, April 20, 2009 6:49 AM / last edited Monday, April 20, 2009 2:07 PM
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html



Analysis of the Upper Ocean Response to Hurricanes in the Gulf of Mexico Using Satellite Observations and Model Simulations

Thursday, 23 April 2009; 10:00-11:00 ETZ (SSMC-3, 4th Floor, Room 4817, NODC Seminar)
Dr. Michelle M. Gierach (Marine Science Program, University of South Carolina, Columbia, South Carolina)
Biophysical responses of the upper ocean to hurricanes in the Gulf of Mexico were examined using satellite observations and model simulations. It was important that both satellite observations and model simulations were used, since satellite sensors were sensitive to cloud interference, heavy rainfall, and only provided measurements near the ocean surface during hurricane periods. This study utilized 1/25° nested HYCOM simulations, 1/20° biophysical model simulations, and various satellite observations including QuikSCAT scatterometer winds, SeaWiFS and MODIS chlorophyll-a concentrations, and AVHRR and TMI sea surface temperatures. Such data were used to (1) assess the ocean surface response to Hurricanes Katrina, Rita, and Wilma of 2005 in the Gulf of Mexico, (2) examine the evolving three-dimensional (surface and subsurface) ocean response to Hurricane Katrina, and (3) analyze ecosystem dynamics, plankton biomass, and plankton distribution during Hurricane Katrina. Satellite observations of biophysical responses associated with Hurricanes Katrina, Rita, and Wilma of 2005 illustrated sea surface temperature changes of 6-7°C, 4-5°C, and 5-6°C, and chlorophyll-a enhancement of 3 mg m-3, 2 mg m-3, and 4 mg m-3. The degree and orientation of the responses exhibited were greatly affected by the oceanic processes that occurred within the Gulf of Mexico, as well as the translation speed of each hurricane. Satellite-detected surface responses associated with Hurricane Katrina occurred within a region from 23.5°-25.5°N and 85°-83°W. Analysis of model surface and subsurface dynamics in this region revealed strong upwelling/downwelling, wind-driven currents dominating the surface circulation, and near-inertial oscillations following Hurricane Katrina. The storm generated sea surface temperature cooling of 3-4°C and salinity freshening of 0.1-0.2. Analysis of heat-budget terms in the mixed layer indicated that wind-driven mixing dominated net upper-ocean cooling during hurricane passage, whereas at the mixed layer base temperature changes were largely due to vertical advection. Biophysical model simulations revealed that large phytoplankton were most responsive to hurricane-induced turbulent mixing and nutrient injection, with increases in biomass along the hurricane track. Small phytoplankton, microzooplankton, and mesozooplankton biomass primarily shifted in location and increased in spatial extent as a result of Hurricane Katrina. Hurricane passage disrupted the distribution of plankton biomass associated with mesoscale eddies.
For Webcast access: 1) go to http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?i=741283869&p=nodc1315&t=c; 2) type in other required fields (i.e., your name, e-mail, organization; meeting number is 741283869; password is "nodc1315" -password is case sensitive- ); 3) indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy; 4) click on Proceed. For phone access: toll free dial 877-916-2513 using a touch-tone phone; when prompted enter participant code 5877174 followed by a "#" (Please mute your phone during the presentation). Please note that webcast & phone access is limited to 50 connections on a first-come-first served basis. Webcast & phone access will start approximately 5 min before the seminar. For questions about this seminar please contact Ken Casey (Kenneth.Casey@noaa.gov).
Dr. Michelle Gierach recently earned her PhD from the University of South Carolina, working with Subrahmanyam Bulusu and specializing in Physical/Satellite Oceanography. Her dissertation research focused on understanding hurricane-induced biophysical responses in the Gulf of Mexico through satellite observations and model simulations. Prior to her work in South Carolina, she earned B.S. and M.S. degrees in Meteorology from Florida State University. During the Masters program at Florida State University, she worked with Drs. James O’Brien and Mark Bourassa, and focused on developing a vorticity-based detection technique of tropical cyclogenesis.
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html#OneNOAASeminar_23Apr2009_Gierach
OneNOAA Science Seminar added Friday, April 3, 2009 2:36 PM / Last updated Tuesday, April 21, 2009 9:15 AM
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html



The Vertical Structure of Arctic Warming

Thursday, 23 April 2009, 10:00-11:00 ETZ (World Weather Building, Room 209, Camp Springs, MD; JCSDA seminar)
Erland Källén (Department of Meteorology, Stockholm University)
The Arctic area has undergone a significant surface warming over the last 30-40 years and simultaneously the sea ice cover has decreased significantly. The Arctic warming is about twice as large as the average global surface warming for the same time period. It is commonly conjectured that the retreat of the summer Arctic sea ice cover and the positive ice-albedo feedback is the main reason for the enhanced Arctic warming. We have analyzed the vertical structure of the Arctic warming over the past 30 years using re-analysis data. We find that the warming maximum is not at the surface but rather at about 3 km height. This leads us to look for other possible physical mechanisms responsible for the warming. We find that the warming maximum is linked to an increased baroclinic heat transport into the Arctic region. How this increased heat transport may be coupled to global warming remains an open question. We also discuss limitations of using re-analysis data to determine climate trends.
Phone access details: U.S. participants: 1.866.715.2479, International : 1.517.345.5260; Passcode : 9457557. For questions please contact Christina Bacon (301-763-8154 x 188; Christina.Bacon@noaa.gov)
Download presentation [PDF]
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html#OneNOAASeminar_23Apr2009_Kallen
OneNOAA Science Seminar added Wednesday, April 15, 2009 1:25 PM / Last updated Friday, April 24, 2009 7:01 AM
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html



Changes In The Bering Strait - Pacific Gateway To The Arctic

Friday, 24 April 2009; 10:30-11:30 Seatle, Washington Local Time (13:30-14:30 Maryland Local Time) [Presentation available by teleconference from Seatle, WA in SSMC-3 Room 4817, NODC Seminar)
A NODC seminar as part of the "NOAA work in the high latitudes and the International Polar Year 2007-2008 seminar series"
For further information about the IPY seminars see: http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html#IPYSeminars

Dr. Rebecca A. Woodgate (Applied Physics Laboratory, University of Washington)
woodgate@apl.washington.edu
The Bering Strait is the only gateway between the Pacific Ocean and the Arctic Ocean. The flow through this strait is an important source of nutrients, heat and freshwater for the Arctic, and is believed to have influence as far away the Atlantic. There have been challenges to gather the now nearly 2 decades of year-round measurements in the strait, but this record is now allowing us to quantify the changing influence of the Pacific waters on the Arctic system.

This seminar is available by VideoTeleConferencing (VTC), webcast, and phone from Seatle, WA. If you are in Silver Spring (SSMC), you can watch this presentation via VideoTeleConferencing (VTC) in SSMC-3, 4th Floor, Room 4817 (NODC). Other remote users can access this seminar via a combination of webcast and phone. For Webcast access: 1) go to http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?i=741283869&p=nodc1315&t=c; 2) type in other required fields (i.e., your name, e-mail, organization; meeting number is 741283869; password is "nodc1315" -password is case sensitive- ); 3) indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy; 4) click on Proceed. For phone access: toll free dial (877) 916-2513 using a touch-tone phone; when prompted enter participant code 5877174 followed by a "#" (Please mute your phone during the presentation). Please note that webcast & phone access is limited to 50 connections on a first-come-first served basis. Webcast & phone access will start approximately 5 min before the seminar. If possible, seminar audio will be recorded and made available via podcast together with the seminar slides following the seminar. For general questions about this seminar, please contact Hernan Garcia (Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov). For questions about VideoTeleConferencing please contact Cheryl Ingram (Cheryl.Ingram@noaa.gov ; 301-713-3284 Ext. 155) and Dian L. Gay (dian@apl.washington.edu).

Dr Woodgate is a physical oceanographer, specialising in polar research, with special focus on the circulation of the Arctic Ocean, interactions between sea-ice and the ocean, and and the role of the polar oceans in climate. Her research (see High Latitude Dynamics website) concentrates on the collection and analysis of in-situ oceanographic data. She has worked for many years in the deployment and recovery of moored oceanographic instrumentation in ice-covered waters, and the analysis of both mooring and hydrographic data. She is involved in undergraduate teaching and graduate education. She has worked on British, German, Norwegian and American research vessels and led expeditions to Bering Strait and the Arctic Ocean. Her first degree is in Physics from the University of Cambridge and her PhD (University of Oxford) is in Data Assimilation in Ocean models. Her postdoc work was done at the Alfred-Wegener Institute in Germany. Her goal is to understand the physical processes in both Arctic and Antarctic regions, and to use her background to bridge the gap between theory, modelling and real observations of the oceans (See http://psc.apl.washington.edu/pscweb2002/Staff/woodgate/woodgate.html).
Download podcast audio [WMA]
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html#OneNOAASeminar_IPY_24Apr2009_Rebecca_Woodgate
OneNOAA Science Seminar added Thursday February 12, 2009 6:25 AM / Last edited Tuesday, April 28, 2009 10:28 AM
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html



Using Social Network Analysis to Address Coastal Management Issues

Friday, 24 April 2009; 12:00 – 13:00 ETZ (SSMC-3, Room #12836, NMFS/NOS seminar)
Chris Ellis (NOS Coastal Services Center)
Chris.Ellis@noaa.gov
Social Network Analysis (SNA) is a multidisciplinary research method that is increasingly being used to uncover relationships among individuals and groups in both personal and professional contexts. Understanding existing professional and social relationships and structures is vital to maximize communication, nurture supportive relationships, and build efficiencies in the workforce. This presentation will provide a general overview on the theory and practice of SNA, and it will highlight a number of SNA research projects that illustrate its practical use and application of data. Limitations of SNA will also be discussed.
This presentation will not be available via Webcast. For more information contact Susan Abbott-Jamieson (NMFS) at Susan.Abbott-Jamieson@noaa.gov or Theresa Goedeke (NOS) at Theresa.Goedeke@noaa.gov.
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html#OneNOAASeminar_24Apr2009_Ellis
OneNOAA Science Seminar added Tuesday, April 7, 2009 7:04 AM
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html



Ozone Depletion, Greenhouse Gases, and the Special Case of Antarctic Climate Change

Tuesday, 28 April 2009; 13:00-14:00 ETZ (SSMC-3, 4th Floor Large Conference Room #4527, NODC Seminar)
A NODC seminar as part of the "NOAA work in the high latitudes and the International Polar Year 2007-2008 seminar series"
For further information about the IPY seminars see: http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html#IPYSeminars
Dr. Susan Solomon (NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory)
A description of variability in ozone Depletion, greenhouse gases, and the special Case of Antarctic climate change.
Because of technical difficulties, there is nowebcast access. For phone access: toll free dial 877-916-2513 using a touch-tone phone; when prompted enter participant code 5877174 followed by a "#" (Please mute your phone during the presentation). Please note that webcast & phone access is limited to 50 connections on a first-come-first served basis. Webcast & phone access will start approximately 5 min before the seminar. For general questions about this seminar, please contact Hernan Garcia (Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov).

Dr. Susan Solomon is Co-Chair, Climate Science Group of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (2007) and Senior Scientist, NOAA/ERL, Chemical Sciences Division. See http://cires.colorado.edu/people/solomon/.

Download presentation [PDF ~16 MB] and audio podcast [WMA ~30.5 MB].
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html#OneNOAASeminar_IPY_28Apr2009_Susan_Solomon

OneNOAA Science Seminar added Thursday, February 5, 2009 6:31 AM / Last updated Wednesday, April 29, 2009 6:58 AM
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html




Project FishSmart: A stakeholder-centered approach to improve fisheries conservation and management

Tuesday, 28 April 2009; 12:00-13:00 ETZ (SSMC-3, 2nd Floor, NOAA Central Library Silver Spring Seminar)
Dr. Tom Miller and Dr. Mike Wilberg (Center for Environmental Science, University of Maryland)
Despite increasing dissatisfaction among many stakeholder groups, fisheries management often does not allow for a meaningful exchange of information and ideas between stakeholders and managers. Stakeholders in several prominent U.S. fisheries have been frustrated by a perceived lack of inclusion of their views in fishery management decisions, which has led to distrust of management and the potential for problems with compliance. Our objective was to develop a process that allowed stakeholders to develop recommendations to 1) improve the fishery through voluntary measures and 2) provide management recommendations that they supported. We developed a “stakeholder-centered” process that allowed stakeholders to evaluate how well alternative options could achieve their goals using a decision analysis model. The first application of this collaborative process was to the king mackerel (Scomberomorus cavalla) fishery off the southeastern Atlantic coast of the U.S. The stakeholder workgroup developed objectives for the fishery, performance measures to guage whether objectives were reached, and options that could be used to reach the objectives. Objectives included traditional and non-traditional goals such as maintaining high and stable catches and retaining the ability to catch large fish, and options included both voluntary changes in fishing practices (e.g., adoption of techniques that reduce catch and release mortality) and mandatory regulations (e.g., size limits or bag limits). Through an iterative process, stakeholders assisted in developing a model to allow them to compare how well their options met their vision for a quality fishery. The workgroup developed a consensus suite of recommendations, including more conservative length and bag limits than those recommended by the Council’s Scientific and Statistical Committee, based on the results of the decision analysis. The immersion of stakeholders in the available science and model development and evaluation eventually led to recognition that more conservative management was necessary to achieve their objectives. This project demonstrated that stakeholders can be included in a meaningful participatory process that can improve fisheries management, but inclusion requires increased time and an effort to provide science without jargon or condescension.
For general questions about this seminar, please contact Mary Lou Cumberpatch (Mary.Lou.Cumberpatch@noaa.gov) or Skip Theberge (Albert.E.Theberge.Jr@noaa.gov).
Tom Miller is a Professor of fisheries science at the Chesapeake Biological Laboratory, University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science. Dr. Miller's research focuses on a range of fisheries topics including fisheries ecology with emphasis on early life history, population dynamics and stock assessment, and quantitative methods in ecology with emphasis on modeling, and experimental design and statistics. Mike Wilberg is a Professor of fisheries science at the Chesapeake Biological Laboratory, University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science. Dr. Wilberg's research focuses on fisheries management, development and evaluation of stock assessment methods, fisheries population dynamics, decision analysis, survey design, and statistical estimation and modeling in ecology.
Download presentation [PPT]
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html#OneNOAASeminar_28Apr2009_Miller
OneNOAA Science Seminar added Friday, April 3, 2009 3:53 PM \ Last updated Tuesday, April 28, 2009 11:23 AM
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html



Synthesis of Southern Ocean Food Webs

Wednesday, 29 April 2009; 12:00 – 13:00 ETZ (SSMC-4, Room 8150, NOS seminar)
Dr. Eileen Hofmann (Old Dominion University)
hofmann@ccpo.odu.edu
Some of the strongest regional expressions of global climate change have occurred in the Southern Ocean. Changes to the environment, including modifications in sea ice extent and concentration, have been associated with variations in ecosystems and biogeochemical processes. The region is characterized by unique food webs, is an important component of the global carbon cycle, and supports commercially harvested species. Understanding climate-induced changes and their consequences for food webs and biogeochemical cycling is integral to predicting the impacts and feedbacks of the Southern Ocean as part of the Earth System, and to developing sustainable management for the region. Fundamental to predicting how ecosystems respond to change is an understanding of food web structure and function. This requires synthesis of current knowledge of Southern Ocean food webs and modeling approaches. This presentation will review the status of Southern Ocean food web models and explore issues associated with developing these to the circumpolar scale. The gaps in knowledge that limit current food web models will be highlighted with particular emphasis on the importance of considering regional and trophic complexities. Multidisciplinary modeling approaches that bring together different scales and processes will be discussed with a particular focus on the development of end-to-end food web models for the Southern Ocean.
Presentations are available remotely via a combination of phone & webcast. Please be aware that remote access is limited to 50 connections on a first-come-first served basis, so we cannot guarantee participation. To participate remotely you must: 1) Dial 866-541-1377, and then wait for instructions. When prompted enter passcode 142625 followed by the # sign. Please use your phone’s mute button (or toggle *6) during the presentation until you are ready to ask questions. 2) Go to the webcast site at http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?i=746752585&p=&t=c 3) Enter meeting number 746752585 if needed. No passcode is required. 4) Enter other required fields. 5) Indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy and click Proceed. For questions: contact Felix Martinez (Felix.Martinez@noaa.gov).
Eileen Hofmann has been involved with the Global Ocean Ecosystem Dynamics (GLOBEC) Program since the late 1980s and became Chair of the Southern Ocean GLOBEC program in the mid-1990s. She was involved in the US Southern Ocean GLOBEC field program, which took place along the western Antarctic Peninsula continental shelf in 2001 and 2002. Her other research interests are in the areas of physical-biological interactions in marine food webs, shellfish population dynamics and disease ecology, and data assimilation for marine ecosystem models.
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html#OneNOAASeminar_29Apr2009_Hofman
OneNOAA Science Seminar added Monday, April 20, 2009 6:40 AM / Last edited Monday, April 27, 2009 10:24 AM
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html



The Antarctic Integrated System Science on the Antarctic Peninsula

Thursday, 30 April 2009; 12:00-13:00 ETZ (SSMC-3, 2nd Floor, NOAA Central Library Silver Spring, NODC Seminar)
A NODC seminar as part of the "NOAA work in the high latitudes and the International Polar Year 2007-2008 seminar series"
For further information about the IPY seminars see: http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html#IPYSeminars
Dr. Kelly K. Falkner (Program Director, Antarctic Integrated System Science, Office of Polar Programs, National Science Foundation)
kfalkner@nsf.gov

The discoveries of disciplinary science increasingly highlight the need for integrative approaches to forge new understanding of the complex interactions that govern Antarctica and its past, present and future roles in the earth system. To respond to this need and foster progress on some of societies’ most pressing issues on a planet subject to potentially accelerated change, the Antarctic Integrated System Science (AISS) program was established in 2007. An initial vision for the AISS program is outlined in the executive committee synthesis of a June 2007 community-based workshop that is available at: http://cresp.tamu.edu/AISSWorkshop. The synthesis includes examples of cross-cutting integrated system science questions that are not meant to be exhaustive. Initial activities funded under the IPY call can be found on the IPY award list (http://www.nsf.gov/od/opp/ipy/ipy_awards_list.jsp). In general terms, the AISS program administers projects that transcend disciplinary boundaries, are highly integrated and address questions broader in scope than those typically supported by the disciplinary programs described above. AISS projects must have compelling intellectual merit, broad impact and expand the frontiers of our knowledge. AISS does not fund programs that recast disciplinary questions into a form requiring minimal expertise from other disciplines when progress is possible within a discipline. Projects must not be so broad in scope that tractable research strategies are not practical. It is recognized that integrated system proposals can be challenging to review. At this juncture in accordance with existing NSF guidelines, proposers may choose to submit single collaborative proposals or multiple related proposals that share some common text. Proposals will be reviewed by both ad-hoc mail reviews and a combination of panelists from the disciplinary panels as appropriate. Those considering submission to AISS are encouraged to contact the program director in advance. See http://www.nsf.gov/funding/pgm_summ.jsp?pims_id=503240&org=NSF&from_org=NSF

For Webcast access: 1) go to http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?i=741283869&p=nodc1315&t=c; 2) type in other required fields (i.e., your name, e-mail, organization; meeting number is 741283869; password is "nodc1315" -password is case sensitive- ); 3) indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy; 4) click on Proceed. For phone access: toll free dial 877-916-2513 using a touch-tone phone; when prompted enter participant code 5877174 followed by a "#" (Please mute your phone during the presentation or toggle *6 otherwise it produces a sound feedback). Please note that webcast & phone access is limited to 50 connections on a first-come-first served basis. Webcast & phone access will start approximately 5 min before the seminar. If possible, seminar audio will be available via podcast together with the seminar slides following the seminar. For general questions about this seminar, please contact Hernan Garcia (Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov), Mary Lou Cumberpatch (Mary.Lou.Cumberpatch@noaa.gov) or Skip Theberge (Albert.E.Theberge.Jr@noaa.gov).
Download presentation [PDF]
http://chemoc.coas.oregonstate.edu:16080/~kkfalkner/
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html#OneNOAASeminar_IPY_30Apr2009_Kelly_Falkner
OneNOAA Science Seminar added Wednesday, January 21, 2009 11:20 AM / Last edited Monday, May 4, 2009 7:06 AM
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html

 




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May 2009

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Other OneNOAA Science Seminars: Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec

(Dates with scheduled OneNOAA Seminars in bold)
(Total number of OneNOAA Science seminars in May 2009: 24)



How Reducing Toxic Chemicals in Consumer Products Can Protect the Health of Cats, Kids, and Killer Whales

Monday, 04 May 2009; 12:00-13:00 ETZ (SSMC-3, 2nd Floor, NOAA Central Library Silver Spring Seminar)
Dr. Arlene Blum (Green Science Policy Institute)

This seminar will discuss how toxic chemicals from consumer products can enter the terrestrial and marine environments and strategies for reducing their use to protect the health of marine mammals as well as humans and pets.If time permits, Arlene Blum will share also dramatic images and stories from her historic mountaineering expeditions and will relate how her climbing career led to her current work in environmental health and public policy.

Audio conferencing: Telephone: 866-631-5469; Passcode: 3958086. For further information please contact Mary Lou Cumberpatch (Mary.Lou.Cumberpatch@noaa.gov; 301-713-2600 Ext. 129) or Skip Theberge (Albert.E.Theberge.Jr@noaa.gov; 301-713-2600 Ext. 115).
Download power point presentation [PPT]
Arlene Blum is a Visiting Scholar in Chemistry at UC Berkeley and executive director of the Green Science Policy Institute (GSP). GSP coordinates scientific research and policy to reduce toxic chemicals in consumer products and help industries become more sustainable in their materials and processes for a healthier safer environment. Blum holds a doctorate in biophysical chemistry and has taught at Stanford University, Wellesley College, and UC Berkeley. Her research and policy have contributed to the regulation of a variety of toxic chemicals since the 1970's (See also http://www.arleneblum.com/about.html).
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html#OneNOAASeminar_04May2009_Blum
OneNOAA Science Seminar added Friday, April 24, 2009 12:42 PM / Last edited Thursday, April 30, 2009 8:45 AM
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html



High-resolution bathymetric mapping with the new broad-bandwidth, split-beam, scientific, multibeam sonar installed on the new NOAA FSVs

Tuesday, 05 May 2009; 12:00-13:00 ETZ (SSMC-3, 2nd Floor, NOAA Central Library Silver Spring Seminar)
George R. Cutter (NOAA's Southwest Fisheries Science Center) and David A. Demer (IFREMER, France)
The Simrad ME70 is a new multibeam-echosounder system that was designed for quantitative fisheries research and is installed on each of the new, acoustically-quiet, NOAA Fisheries survey vessels (FSVs). The ME70 has configurable beams and transmits in the range of 70-120 kHz to provide calibrated, acoustic backscattering data throughout the detection range (Fisheries Mode). With hardware and software add-ons, the ME70 can also collect soundings that are expected to meet IHO S-44 Order 1 standards (Bathymetric Mode). Furthermore, with custom algorithms and software, bathymetric data can be obtained from the ME70 operating in Fisheries Mode, and volume backscatter can be sampled from the ME70 operating in Bathymetric Mode. This flexibility may allow data to be concurrently and efficiently collected on fish and their seabed habitat. Here, we describe a method to process the echo amplitude and phase data from multiple split-beams formed in Fisheries Mode to estimate seabed range, slope, roughness, and normalized surface scattering strength (a hardness metric). We compare the resulting bathymetry to that collected with the ME70 operating in Bathymetric Mode in the same area of the Bay of Biscay.
Audio-Phone number: 866-631-5469; Passcode: 3958086. For further information please contact Mary Lou Cumberpatch (Mary.Lou.Cumberpatch@noaa.gov; 301-713-2600 Ext. 129) or Skip Theberge (Albert.E.Theberge.Jr@noaa.gov; 301-713-2600 Ext. 115).
Download presentation [PPSM]
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html#OneNOAASeminar_05May2009_Cutter
OneNOAA Science Seminar added Friday, April 24, 2009 12:42 PM / Last updated Tuesday, May 5, 2009
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html



Barents Sea Warming

Wednesday, 06 May 2009; 12:00-13:00 ETZ (SSMC-3, 2nd Floor, NOAA Central Library Silver Spring, NODC Seminar)
A NODC seminar as part of the "NOAA work in the high latitudes and the International Polar Year 2007-2008 seminar series"
For further information about the IPY seminars see: http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html#IPYSeminars

Dr. Dan Seidov and Dr. Igor Smolyar (NOAA NODC)
Dan.Seidov@noaa.gov & Igor.Smolyar@noaa.gov
We present the results of a study of long-term thermohaline history of the Barents Sea (BS) using the World Ocean Database at NOAA NODC/Ocean Climate Laboratory. The database includes over 230,000 stations for the BS, with the time series beginning as early as 1900. The focus is on thermohaline regime shifts in the BS that may be instrumental for better understanding and prediction of possible future climate change in the Arctic Ocean. Area-averaged time series of temperature at various depth levels of the BS for the years 1900 through 2006 is discussed. The center of attention is on the half-century climate history of the BS since 1956. The ascertained ocean climate trends in the BS align closely with spectacular surface air temperature increase over the entire Arctic and/or with the rapid summer sea ice retreat since the end of the 1990s. Our analysis shows dramatic shifts of climate regimes in the BS since late sixties and strong warming in the subsurface layers since late eighties.
For Webcast access: 1) go to http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?i=741283869&p=nodc1315&t=c; 2) type in other required fields (i.e., your name, e-mail, organization; meeting number is 741283869; password is "nodc1315" -password is case sensitive- ); 3) indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy; 4) click on Proceed. For phone access: toll free dial 877-916-2513 using a touch-tone phone; when prompted enter participant code 5877174 followed by a "#" (Please mute your phone during the presentation or toggle *6 otherwise it produces a sound feedback). Please note that webcast & phone access is limited to 50 connections on a first-come-first served basis. Webcast & phone access will start approximately 5 min before the seminar. If possible, seminar audio will be available via podcast together with the seminar slides following the seminar. For general questions about this seminar, please contact Hernan Garcia (Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov), Mary Lou Cumberpatch (Mary.Lou.Cumberpatch@noaa.gov) or Skip Theberge (Albert.E.Theberge.Jr@noaa.gov).
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html#OneNOAASeminar_IPY_06May2009_Seidov_Smolyar
OneNOAA Science Seminar added Tuesday, February 10, 2009 11:10 AM / Last edited Friday, April 24, 2009 12:35 PM
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html



Using Heat as a Tracer to Characterize Tidal Inundation of Wetlands in Delaware's Murderkill Estuary

Wednesday, 06 May 2009; 12:00 – 13:00 ETZ (SSMC-4, Room #8150, NOS seminar)
Thomas E. McKenna (Delaware Geological Survey & Department of Geological Sciences/University of Delaware)
mckennat@UDel.Edu
A coupled hydrodynamic and water-quality model is currently being developed to investigate causes of low dissolved oxygen in the Murderkill River. A key component of the effort by the Murderkill Study Group is to incorporate the interaction of the river with an extensive fringing salt marsh into the model. However, it is rare to explicitly simulate wetland inundation and biogeochemical reactions in estuarine-scale models as it is computationally intensive and requires many input variables that are difficult to quantify. Therefore, a parameterization of river-marsh interaction is being developed including this characterization of tidal inundation. In general, the dynamic inundation of a salt marsh by tidal water is a simple concept, but the process remains poorly understood. This is partly due to the sampling requirements to fully describe a shallow flow system on a low relief surface having high temporal and spatial variability. This study integrates data from LiDAR elevation surveys and in-situ sensors (water level, salinity, temperature) to estimate the area and frequency of salt marsh inundation by tidal water. Given the low relief on the marsh platform, small changes in tide elevation (centimeters) result in large changes in inundated area, therefore it is critical to ensure that survey errors and/or bias are minimized and all elevation data are reduced to a common geodetic datum (NAVD88). Initial estimates of the frequency, duration, and potential depth of inundation are based on LiDAR elevations and tidal elevations from tide gages in the Murderkill River. In the initial estimate, inundation is based only on elevation with no explicit hydrodynamic component. Subsequent estimates incorporate information from tide gages in small tidal channels cutting through the salt marsh and tidal channel geometry. Aerial and ground-based thermal imaging is used along with data from in-situ temperature loggers on the marsh platform to test the accuracy of the estimates. Forward progress in understanding the complex hydrology of tidal wetlands requires collection of water level, salinity, and temperature at higher frequency than the major stressor on the system (tide). In-situ sensors and data loggers are essential; ground-based, time-lapse remote sensing may also be a viable option in some situations.
Presentations are available remotely via a combination of phone & webcast. Please be aware that remote access is limited to 50 connections on a first-come-first served basis, so we cannot guarantee participation. To participate remotely you must: 1) Dial 866-541-1377, and then wait for instructions. When prompted enter passcode 142625 followed by the # sign. Please use your phone’s mute button (or toggle *6) during the presentation until you are ready to ask questions. 2) Go to the webcast site at http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?i=746752585&p=&t=c 3) Enter meeting number 746752585 if needed. No passcode is required. 4) Enter other required fields. 5) Indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy and click Proceed. For questions: contact Felix Martinez (Felix.Martinez@noaa.gov).
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html#OneNOAASeminar_06May2009_McKenna
OneNOAA Science Seminar added Friday, May 1, 2009 9:43 AM
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html



Coral Reef Conservation and Management in an Era of Global Climate Change

Wednesday, 06 May 2009; 14:30 – 15:30 ETZ (SSMC-4, Room #8150, NOS seminar)
Dr. William F. Precht (NOAA Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary)
Bill.Precht@noaa.gov
Recent scientific papers have admonished the US Government for not doing enough to protect the valuable resources of the Florida reef tract. This implied lack of management is based on the hypothesis that the main causes of reef degradation are local, man-induced, and reversible. While there is consensus that these reefs are threatened, we argue that understanding the main causes of their decline (and recovery) are of paramount importance in devising science-based management and restoration strategies. The generally accepted model of coral reef decline is that the shift from a more desirable, coral-dominated state to a less desirable, macroalgae-dominated state was a consequence of overfishing and coastal eutrophication, making them more susceptible to other recent disturbances. While it is easy to take this view, evidence linking these causes remains elusive. Unfortunately, politicians, NGO’s, the media, and the public are receptive to such arguments because they have strong emotional appeal. In fact, many of the management strategies employed to date have been based on these models. However, the catastrophic decline in coral cover started in the late 1970s and was empirically observed to be driven proximally by pandemic disease outbreaks, and more recently by episodes of temperature-induced coral bleaching. Corals throughout the Caribbean (including Florida) have suffered the decline of essentially the same suite of species and at the same rates. Accordingly, we must combine local science-based management strategies with regional inter-governmental policies and ultimately global stewardship if we are to make progress in the fight to rescue Florida’s reefs.
Presentations are available remotely via a combination of phone & webcast. Please be aware that remote access is limited to 50 connections on a first-come-first served basis, so we cannot guarantee participation. To participate remotely you must: 1) Dial 866-541-1377, and then wait for instructions. When prompted enter passcode 142625 followed by the # sign. Please use your phone’s mute button (or toggle *6) during the presentation until you are ready to ask questions. 2) Go to the webcast site at http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?i=746752585&p=&t=c 3) Enter meeting number 746752585 if needed. No passcode is required. 4) Enter other required fields. 5) Indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy and click Proceed. For questions: contact Felix Martinez (Felix.Martinez@noaa.gov).
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html#OneNOAASeminar_06May2009_Precht
OneNOAA Science Seminar added Friday, April 24, 2009 12:33 PM / Last updated Monday, April 27, 2009 2:50 PM
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html



NOAA’s Role in the Science and Management of Arctic Fish and Marine Mammals

Thursday, 07 May 2009; 12:00-13:00 ETZ (SSMC-3, 2nd Floor, NOAA Central Library Silver Spring, NODC Seminar)
A NODC seminar as part of the "NOAA work in the high latitudes and the International Polar Year 2007-2008 seminar series"
For further information about the IPY seminars see: http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html#IPYSeminars

Jon Kurland (Acting Deputy Regional Administrator, NOAA Fisheries, Alaska Region) and Mike Sigler (Program Leader, Habitat and Ecological Processes Research Program NOAA Fisheries, Alaska Fisheries Science Center)
Jon.Kurland@noaa.gov ; Mike.Sigler@noaa.gov
NOAA’s National Marine Fisheries Service is actively involved in a variety of research and management activities related to the conservation of Arctic fish and marine mammal populations. NOAA Fisheries’ Alaska Regional Office and Alaska Fisheries Science Center have been involved in Arctic projects for many years, but the scope and breadth of our work in the Arctic has expanded substantially in the past few years and will continue to grow with climate change. This presentation will provide an overview of NOAA Fisheries’ current science and management activities in the Arctic as we begin addressing the consequences of climate change and the associated loss of sea ice, and as we prepare for the resource management challenges that lie ahead. The topics discussed will include:

• Development of a new Arctic Fishery Management Plan with precautionary fishery closures;
• Development of new habitat conservation measures for Bering Sea groundfish fisheries, including area closures and fishing gear modifications;
• Ice seal research and completion of status reviews for four species of ice seals to consider listing under the Endangered Species Act;
• Participation in the interagency North Slope Science Initiative to coordinate research and monitoring activities amongst federal, state, local, and private entities;
• Participation in the interagency Alaska Marine Ecosystem Forum to coordinate management activities amongst federal and state agencies that have jurisdiction over activities affecting the marine environment;
• Support for the U.S. delegation to the International Whaling Commission to ensure continued subsistence use of whales by Native Alaskan communities;
• Consultations on oil and gas development activities and related infrastructure to minimize adverse effects to fish, marine mammals, and their habitats;
• Completion of a Beaufort Sea offshore fish survey and planning for a similar survey in the Chukchi Sea;
• Continuation of nearshore fish habitat surveys near Point Barrow;
• Monitoring of fish, shellfish, and marine mammal species in the northern Bering Sea where northward expansion is expected; and
• Development of a research plan for the new Northern Bering Sea Research Area.

The presentation will also highlight the biggest needs for promoting the conservation and sustainable use of Arctic living marine resources as sea ice recedes and human activities continue to increase.

[Link to abstract in PDF format http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/docs/09/OneNOAA_IPY_Kurland_Sigler_NMFS_Arctic_Abstract_2-09.pdf]
For Webcast access: 1) go to http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?i=741283869&p=nodc1315&t=c; 2) type in other required fields (i.e., your name, e-mail, organization; meeting number is 741283869; password is "nodc1315" -note that the password is case sensitive- ); 3) indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy; 4) click on Proceed. For phone access: toll free dial 877-916-2513 using a touch-tone phone; when prompted enter participant code 5877174 followed by a "#" (Please mute your phone during the presentation or toggle *6 otherwise it produces a sound feedback). Please note that webcast & phone access is limited to 50 connections on a first-come-first served basis. Webcast & phone access will start approximately 5 min before the seminar. If possible, seminar audio will be available via podcast together with the seminar slides following the seminar. For general questions about this seminar, please contact Hernan Garcia (Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov), Mary Lou Cumberpatch (Mary.Lou.Cumberpatch@noaa.gov) or Skip Theberge (Albert.E.Theberge.Jr@noaa.gov).

Download presentation [PDF ~7.9 MB] ; Audio ipod to be added after some editing.
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/docs/09/OneNOAASeminar_IPY_07May2009_Kurland_Sigler.pdf

Jon Kurland is the Acting Deputy Regional Administrator for NOAA Fisheries Alaska Region, based in Juneau. He has been filling that role for the past year. His real job is Assistant Regional Administrator for Habitat Conservation. In that capacity he oversees the Alaska Region’s Habitat Conservation Division, which carries out the agency’s legal mandates to conserve habitats that support commercially harvested fish and marine mammals. Before moving to Alaska in 2002 Jon was the national Essential Fish Habitat Coordinator for NOAA Fisheries here in Silver Spring. Previously he worked for nine years in the NOAA Fisheries Northeast Region in Gloucester, Massachusetts.
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html#OneNOAASeminar_IPY_Kurland_Sigler
OneNOAA Science Seminar added Thursday, February 12, 2009 7:42 AM / Last edited Thursday, May 7, 2009 1:23 PM
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html



Mesophotic Coral Ecosystems of the Au‘au Channel, Hawai‘i

Thursday, 07 May 09; 12:00 – 13:00 ETZ (SSMC-4, Room #11153, NOS seminar)
John Rooney (NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center)
John.Rooney@noaa.gov
Efforts to map coral reef ecosystems in the Hawaiian and Mariana Archipelagos and islands of American Samoa and Pacific Remote Island Area have revealed the presence of hitherto unknown scleractinian zoothanthellate coral reefs at depths of 30 – 150+ m in each of these island groups. Such coral reefs and their associated communities have been recently defined as mesophotic coral ecosystems (MCEs). In more than 700 linear km of seafloor videos collected at mesophotic depths from 48 islands and banks in these island groups, by far the most extensive complex of mesophotic reefs found to date is located in the Au‘au Channel between the islands of Maui and Lāna‘i. The seafloor here is composed of highly karstified fossil reef that was sub aerially exposed during late Quaternary period glacial lowstands of sea level. Elevated ridges, solution rims, and pinnacles that are relatively free of sediment are generally heavily colonized by often luxuriant expanses of predominantly Leptoseris hawaiiensis corals, although others are present as well. Results from an ongoing NCCOS-funded project, including three research cruises and 11 submersible dives to the area over the past year and a half, will be discussed.
Presentations are available remotely via a combination of phone & webcast. Please be aware that remote access is limited to 50 connections on a first-come-first served basis, so we cannot guarantee participation. To participate remotely you must: 1) Dial 866-541-1377, and then wait for instructions. When prompted enter passcode 142625 followed by the # sign. Please use your phone’s mute button (or toggle *6) during the presentation until you are ready to ask questions. 2) Go to the webcast site at http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?i=746752585&p=&t=c 3) Enter meeting number 746752585 if needed. No passcode is required. 4) Enter other required fields. 5) Indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy and click Proceed. For questions: contact Felix Martinez (Felix.Martinez@noaa.gov).
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html#OneNOAASeminar_07May2009_Rooney
OneNOAA Science Seminar added Monday, April 27, 2009 6:57 AM
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html



Climate change, marine food webs and survival of juvenile salmon during the first summer at sea in the northern California Current

Wednesday, 13 May 2009; 12:00 – 13:00 ETZ (SSMC-4, Room #8150, NOS seminar)
Dr. Bill T. Peterson (NOAA Fisheries, Northwest Fisheries Science Center)
bill.peterson@noaa.gov
Long-term sampling of hydrography and zooplankton at biweekly intervals in the coastal upwelling zone off Oregon for the past 13 years has shown that variations in copepod biodiversity, species richness and community structure are highly-correlated with the PDO. When the PDO is in negative phase (as in 1999-2002), waters from the Gulf of Alaska feed the northern California Current (NCC) and transport large, lipid-rich copepods to the shelf waters of the NCC; when the PDO is positive (as in 2003-2006), waters from offshore and south feed the NCC and transport small, oceanic lipid-poor copepods to the coast. Thus the forces that drive the PDO, basin scale variations in wind, result in local food chains with vastly different bio-energetic content. These signals may be transmitted up the food chain to salmon since interannual variations in salmon returns are highly-correlated with biomass of “northern” lipid-rich zooplankton species. Thus, knowledge of source waters which feed the NCC is critical for understanding ecosystem dynamics in the shelf waters of the NCC. A comparison of hydrographic and zooplankton data from the 1960s and 1970s with recent data, shows that the Northern California Current ecosystem is becoming more subtropical in nature, likely due to climate change.
Presentations are available remotely via a combination of phone & webcast. Please be aware that remote access is limited to 50 connections on a first-come-first served basis, so we cannot guarantee participation. To participate remotely you must: 1) Dial 866-541-1377, and then wait for instructions. When prompted enter passcode 142625 followed by the # sign. Please use your phone’s mute button (or toggle *6) during the presentation until you are ready to ask questions. 2) Go to the webcast site at http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?i=746752585&p=&t=c 3) Enter meeting number 746752585 if needed. No passcode is required. 4) Enter other required fields. 5) Indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy and click Proceed. For questions: contact Felix Martinez (Felix.Martinez@noaa.gov).
See http://www.nwfsc.noaa.gov/research/staff/display_staffprofile.cfm?staffid=657
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html#OneNOAASeminar_13May2009_Peterson
OneNOAA Science Seminar added Friday, March 27, 2009 6:48 AM / Last updated Wednesday, May 6, 2009 7:08 AM
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html



Examination of Depth/Temperature Bias in the Arabian Sea and Bay of Bengal: Implications for Climate Studies

Wednesday,13 May 2009; 10:30-11:30 ETZ (SSMC-3, 4th Floor, Room 4817, NODC Seminar)
Tim Boyer (NODC) and Vissa V. Gopalakrishna (National Institute of Oceanography, India)
Tim.Boyer@noaa.gov
Recently, it has been shown that XBTs (Expendable Bathythermographs) have a warm bias compared with other instrumentation used for measuring subsurface ocean temperatures. This bias is variable over depth and time and may be geographically variable as well. 3 recent cruises, 2 in the Arabian Sea, 1 in the Bay of Bengal dropped XBTs at the same time as CTDs (Conductivity-temperature-depth probes) to explore this bias. Results from these tests will be presented along with implications for studies of the oceans heat content, which is an important component in the Earth's heat balance.
For Webcast access: 1) go to http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?i=741283869&p=nodc1315&t=c; 2) type in other required fields (i.e., your name, e-mail, organization; meeting number is 741283869; password is "nodc1315" -password is case sensitive- ); 3) indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy; 4) click on Proceed. For phone access: toll free dial 877-916-2513 using a touch-tone phone; when prompted enter participant code 5877174 followed by a "#" (Please mute your phone during the presentation or toggle *6 otherwise it produces a sound feedback). Please note that webcast & phone access is limited to 50 connections on a first-come-first served basis. Webcast & phone access will start approximately 5 min before the seminar. If possible, seminar audio will be available via podcast together with the seminar slides following the seminar. For general questions about this seminar, please contact Hernan Garcia (Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov).
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html#OneNOAASeminar_13May2009_Boyer
OneNOAA Science Seminar added Friday, April 24, 2009 12:29 PM / Last edited Monday, May 4, 2009 1:48 PM
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html



Recent Arctic climate change: Observations and model simulations

Thursday, 14 May 2009; 12:00-13:00 ETZ (SSMC-3, 2nd Floor, NOAA Central Library Silver Spring, NODC Seminar)
A NODC seminar as part of the "NOAA work in the high latitudes and the International Polar Year 2007-2008 seminar series"
For further information about the IPY seminars see: http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html#IPYSeminars

Dr. John E. Walsh (International Arctic Research Center, University of Alaska, Fairbanks)
jwalsh@iarc.uaf.edu
Observations of different parts of the Arctic system present a coherent picture of change over the past half century. The climate models used to project future changes capture the past variations to varying degrees Here we survey the performance of global climate models in simulating Arctic climate, with particular attention to simulations of the seasonal cycle, natural variations and greenhouse-driven changes. The role of low-frequency variations in confounding future projections will be given special attention, as will the impacts of deficiencies in model simulations of sea ice and the Arctic terrestrial surface. We will then address the downscaling of Arctic climate simulations by presenting the results of initial attempts to produce high-resolution scenarios of climate change for Alaska.
For Webcast access: 1) go to http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?i=741283869&p=nodc1315&t=c; 2) type in other required fields (i.e., your name, e-mail, organization; meeting number is 741283869; password is "nodc1315" -password is case sensitive- ); 3) indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy; 4) click on Proceed. For phone access: toll free dial 877-916-2513 using a touch-tone phone; when prompted enter participant code 5877174 followed by a "#" (Please mute your phone during the presentation or toggle *6 otherwise it produces a sound feedback). Please note that webcast & phone access is limited to 50 connections on a first-come-first served basis. Webcast & phone access will start approximately 5 min before the seminar. If possible, seminar audio will be available via podcast together with the seminar slides following the seminar. For general questions about this seminar, please contact Hernan Garcia (Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov), Mary Lou Cumberpatch (Mary.Lou.Cumberpatch@noaa.gov) or Skip Theberge (Albert.E.Theberge.Jr@noaa.gov).

Dr. Walsh is Professor of Climate Change & Chief Scientist, International Arctic Research Center. See http://www.iarc.uaf.edu/people/indiv/iarc_all_staff.php?photo=jwalsh

Download presentation [PDF ;~9.3 MB]
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html#OneNOAASeminar_IPY_14May2009_John_Walsh
OneNOAA Science Seminar added Wednesday, January 21, 2009 10:57 AM / Last edited Thursday, May 14, 2009 1:51 PM
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html



Multispecies Tradeoffs Near Marine Reserves

Monday, 18 May 2009; 11:30 – 12:30 ETZ (SSMC-4, Room #8150, NOS seminar)
Julie B. Kellner (Dept. of Environmental Science and Policy, UC Davis)
jbkellner@ucdavis.edu
No-take marine reserves are a rising trend in fisheries management and have been proposed as an alternative or complementary tool to conventional management which may help counteract multiple fishing impacts. Marine reserves typically lead to population abundances that are much more spatially heterogeneous relative to the patterns produced by conventional forms of fisheries regulations such as catch quotas, size limits, and gear regulations. High abundances inside marine reserves may sustain regional populations through spillover of larvae and adults, but this management-induced heterogeneity in fishing effort and population levels may also have unexpected consequences at the community level. Using a suite of ecological models, I will illustrate the types of multispecies tradeoffs that may arise due to marine reserve implementation. Three questions will be addressed: (1) Can marine reserves be effective tools in warding off invasion by exotics, (2)How will targeted fishing at reserve boundaries ("fishing the line") influence the distribution of fish populations inside and outside reserves, and (3) When do we expect to see trophic cascade effects inside reserves due to the recovery of higher trophic levels? This presentation will highlight the pressing need to transition from single-species analyses to examining community responses to fisheries management across broader biological and spatial scales, and consequently demonstrate the challenges involved in implementing ecosystem-based management.
Presentations are available remotely via a combination of phone & webcast. Please be aware that remote access is limited to 50 connections on a first-come-first served basis, so we cannot guarantee participation. To participate remotely you must: 1) Dial 866-541-1377, and then wait for instructions. When prompted enter passcode 142625 followed by the # sign. Please use your phone’s mute button (or toggle *6) during the presentation until you are ready to ask questions. 2) Go to the webcast site at http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?i=746752585&p=&t=c 3) Enter meeting number 746752585 if needed. No passcode is required. 4) Enter other required fields. 5) Indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy and click Proceed. For questions: contact Felix Martinez (Felix.Martinez@noaa.gov).
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html#OneNOAASeminar_18may2009_Kellner
OneNOAA Science Seminar added Thursday, March 19, 2009 10:31 AM
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html



Experimental Forecast of Area Burned For Interior Alaska

Tuesday, 19 May 2009; 10:00-11:00am Alaska Local Time (RISA/ACCAP seminar via teleconference)
Paul Duffy (Neptune Inc.)
2004 and 2005 were the largest fires years on record in Alaska. Climate change is expected to bring warmer temperatures and therefore greater drying and and more frequent extreme fire years in the future. The Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy is testing a new pilot website to forecast area burned for Interior Alaska, based on a gradient boosting model that takes advantage of strong linkages between teleconnection indices, weather, and fire in Alaska. Join us as we showcase this web-tool to learn more about how the forecasts are created and how you can stay up to date this summer on the fire forecast in Alaska.
How to Participate / Log-In to the Alaska Climate Teleconference: 1) With a regular telephone dial: 1-800-893-8850. 2) When prompted, enter the PIN code: 7531823 . PLEASE MUTE YOUR PHONE DURING THE PRESENTATION. The audio is very sensitive and your external conversations and typing can be heard by other participants. Thank You. To view the presentation during a teleconference: 1) Point your web browser to: http://www.shareitnow.com. 2) Click on the blue Join a Meeting button on the left side bar. 3) For Presenter ID enter: accap@uaf.edu . If you do not see anything on your screen, click on the refresh button on the top bar. For more information about the Alaska Climate Teleconferences and the Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy, please contact Brook Gamble, Outreach and Education Specialist, (907) 474-7812, accap@uaf.edu] or visit www.uaf.edu/accap.
Download presentation [PDF]
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html#OneNOAASeminar_19May2009_Duffy
OneNOAA Science Seminar added Tuesday, April 14, 2009 11:08 AM / Last edited Wednesday, May 20, 2009 7:57 AM
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html



Measuring the Effects of Coastal Restoration on Coastal Uses

Tuesday 19 May 2009; 12:00-13:00 ETZ (SSMC-3, 2nd Floor, NOAA Central Library, NOAA Fisheries/Office of Habitat Conservation seminar)
Drs. Linwood Pendleton (Senior Fellow, The Ocean Foundation and Director of the Coastal Ocean Values Center ) and David K. Loomis (University of Massachusetts Amherst, Director of the Human Dimensions of Marine and Coastal Ecosystem Program)
Many studies have used valuation techniques to predict the potential effect of coastal restoration on human uses, but few provide empirical evidence that restoration indeed affects the way people use and perceive the coast. We take two approaches to examining how coastal restoration affects uses and perception.
For general questions about this seminar, please contact Mary Lou Cumberpatch (Mary.Lou.Cumberpatch@noaa.gov) or Skip Theberge (Albert.E.Theberge.Jr@noaa.gov).
Download power point presentation (David K. Loomis) [PPT]
Download power point presentation (Linwood Pendleton) [PPT]:
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html#OneNOAASeminar_19May2009_Pendleton
OneNOAA Science Seminar added Wednesday, April 22, 2009 12:26 PM
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html



Impacts of High-Resolution Land and Ocean Surface Initialization on Local Model Predictions of Convection

Wednesday, 20 May 2009, 14:00-15:00 ETZ (World Weather Building, Room 707, Camp Springs, MD; JCSDA seminar)
Jonathan L. Case (ENSCO, Inc./Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) Center)
One of the most challenging weather forecast problems in the Southeastern U.S. is daily summertime pulse-type convection. During the summer, atmospheric forcing is usually weak in this region; thus, convection typically initiates in response to local forcing along sea/lake breezes, and other discontinuities often related to horizontal gradients in surface heating rates. For this study, it is hypothesized that high-resolution, consistent representations of surface properties such as soil moisture and sea surface temperature (SST) are necessary to better simulate the interactions between the surface and atmosphere, and ultimately improve predictions of local circulations and summertime pulse convection.

This evaluation focuses on a case study period from June–August 2008 using the Advanced Research dynamical core of the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. The primary goal is to improve simulations of pulse-type convection using the NASA Land Information System (LIS) and SPoRT’s high-resolution Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer sea surface temperature composites to initialize the land and sea-surface variables, respectively. The Developmental Testbed Center’s Meteorological Evaluation Tools (MET) package is employed to produce verification statistics, including neighborhood precipitation verification and output from the Method for Object-Based Diagnostic Evaluation tool. The WRF model configuration, LIS spin-up run, and MET verification results will be presented in this seminar.
Phone Access: Toll free 1-866-715-2479 Passcode: 9457557 ; International: 1-517-345-5260. For questions please contact Christina Bacon (301-763-8154 x 188; Christina.Bacon@noaa.gov).
Download presentation [PDF]
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html#OneNOAASeminar_20May2009_Case
OneNOAA Science Seminar added Thursday, May 7, 2009 7:32 AM / Last edited Wednesday, May 20, 2009 11:07 AM
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html



Ocean Resources Management and Marine Spatial Planning for Wave Energy and Marine Reserves in Oregon

Wednesday, 20 May 2009, 12:00-13:00 (SSMC-3, NOAA Central Library Silver Spring, NOAA Office of Coastal and Resource Management, Coastal Programs Divisions seminar)
Bob Bailey (Oregon Coastal Program Manager)
Although the state of Oregon has had an ocean resources management program for more than 20 years, recent events have converged to drive new program activities and create synergies to solve ocean management problems that are expanding the state's ocean management capacity and reach. Bob Bailey, Oregon Coastal Program Manager, will discuss current ocean planning work on marine reserve designations, ocean wave energy development proposals, the West Coast Governors Agreement on Ocean Health, and initiatives with coastal fishermen, local governments, NGOs, universities, and state and federal agencies to apply science, marine spatial databases, and GIS capacity to problems of ocean management. Along the way he will discuss the key roles of various NOAA programs ...as well as blind luck and good timing(!)...in moving these issues forward.
Call-in information: 866-631-5469; passcode: 3958086. For general questions about this seminar please contact Mary Lou Cumberpatch (Mary.Lou.Cumberpatch@noaa.gov; 301-713-2600 Ext. 129) or Skip Theberge (Albert.E.Theberge.Jr@noaa.gov; 301-713-2600 Ext. 115).
Download presentation [PDF]
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html#OneNOAASeminar_20May2009_Bailey
OneNOAA Science Seminar added Monday, May 11, 2009 7:10 AM / Last edited Monday, June 1, 2009 3:13 PM
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html



Safeguarding Fish, Wildlife, and Natural Systems in the Face of Climate Change: A New Era for Conservation

Thursday, 21 May 2009; 10:00 – 11:00 ETZ [SSMC-5 ( NOAA Science Center/Auditorium), NWS OHD seminar]
Larry Schweiger (President & Chief Executive Officer, National Wildlife Federation) and Dr. Amanda Staudt (Climate Scientist, National Wildlife Federation)
The unprecedented challenge that climate change poses to fish, wildlife, and natural systems has led to an ongoing transformation of the conservation agenda. This seminar will provide an overview of efforts within the conservation community to reorient their mission, show some practical examples of how natural resources adaptation to climate change is taking place on the ground, and share an update on relevant federal legislation. In addition, opportunities for NOAA and other federal agencies to partner with non-governmental organizations will be discussed, highlighting in particular how NGOs can help make connections with grassroot constituencies and governments at the state and local levels.
Web access: Webinar Registration https://www1.gotomeeting.com/register/227048073. Phone access Dial: 1-888-790-2029; Access Code: 60987. For questions: contact Pedro Restrepo (Pedro.Restrepo@noaa.gov) or Ken Pavelle (ken.pavelle@noaa.gov).
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html#OneNOAASeminar_21May2009_Schweiger
OneNOAA Science Seminar added Monday, May 18, 2009 6:58 AM / Last edited Wednesday, May 20, 2009 6:38 AM
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html



Seeing into The Sea: How the Seafloor Was Discovered

Thursday, 21 May 2009; 12:00-13:00 ETZ (SSMC-3, 2nd Floor, NOAA Central Library Silver Spring, NODC Seminar)
Albert E Theberge Jr (NOAA Central Library Silver Spring)
Albert.E.Theberge.Jr@noaa.gov
Up until about 160 years ago, the surface of the 70% of our planet covered by water was totally unknown except for small areas bordering the fringes of most continents. Since that time there has been an explosion of knowledge concerning our view of the seafloor. Many individuals and organizations were responsible for this. This presentation will introduce some of the significant individuals and their accomplishments in the history of seafloor mapping. It will also track the evolution of seafloor mapping technologies and how they influenced our view of planet Earth.
Download power point presentation [PPT]
Call-in information: 866-631-5469; passcode: 3958086. For general questions about this seminar please contact Mary Lou Cumberpatch (Mary.Lou.Cumberpatch@noaa.gov; 301-713-2600 Ext. 129) or Skip Theberge (Albert.E.Theberge.Jr@noaa.gov; 301-713-2600 Ext. 115).
http://www.photolib.noaa.gov/meet_skip.html
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html#OneNOAASeminar_21May2009_Theberge
OneNOAA Science Seminar added Monday, May 11, 2009 8:11 AM / Last edited Friday, May 22, 2009 7:50 AM
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html



Back to the Future: Bridging Modern Science to Traditional Governance and Management Practices to Save Coral Reefs in the Pacific Islands

Thursday, 21 May 2009; 12:00 – 13:00 ETZ (SSMC-4, Room #1W611, NOS seminar)
Bob Richmond (Kewalo Marine Laboratory, University of Hawaii; Noah Idechong, Speaker of the House, Palau National Congress)
richmond@hawaii.edu
Coral reefs worldwide are being degraded by human-induced disturbances, resulting in ecological, economic and cultural losses. Runoff and sedimentation are among the greatest threats to coastal reefs surrounding high islands and adjacent to continental landmasses. Scientific data exist that identify key stressors, synergisms, and outcomes at the coral reef ecosystem, community and population levels. These data demonstrate that marine protected areas alone may be insufficient for coral reef protection and that integrated watershed management practices are also needed. Gaps in the effectiveness of environmental policy, legislation and regulatory enforcement have resulted in the continued degradation of U.S reefs. Several Pacific Islands, with intact resource stewardship and traditional leadership systems, have been able to apply research findings to coral reef management policies relatively quickly. Three regional case histories in Micronesia provide insight on how biophysical data can be applied to manage human behaviors responsible for coral reef destruction, through a community driven process.
Presentations are available remotely via a combination of phone & webcast. Please be aware that remote access is limited to 50 connections on a first-come-first served basis, so we cannot guarantee participation. To participate remotely you must: 1) Dial 866-541-1377, and then wait for instructions. When prompted enter passcode 142625 followed by the # sign. Please use your phone’s mute button (or toggle *6) during the presentation until you are ready to ask questions. 2) Go to the webcast site at http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?i=746752585&p=&t=c 3) Enter meeting number 746752585 if needed. No passcode is required. 4) Enter other required fields. 5) Indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy and click Proceed. For questions: contact Felix Martinez (Felix.Martinez@noaa.gov).
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html#OneNOAASeminar_21May2009_Richmond
OneNOAA Science Seminar added Monday, May 18, 2009 6:49 AM
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html



NOAA’s Potential to Support Renewable Energy

Friday, 22 May 2009, 10:00-11:00 ETZ (World Weather Building, Room 209, Camp Springs, MD; JCSDA seminar)
Melinda Marquis (NOAA ESRL)
NOAA's role in energy is multi-faceted. To plan the energy systems of the future, the industry needs NOAA to provide information about the potential environmental impacts of these systems, and the pertinent observations and weather forecasts that are necessary before renewable energy (RE) can be integrated into the grid in large amounts. Further, current numerical weather prediction models have not been optimized to address the needs of the RE industry. In addition, increased understanding of the complex relationship between climate and renewable energy resources is required to support efficient and intelligent development of a carbon-free energy system. This seminar will present the needs of the RE industry that NOAA could address, as well as plans for the One-NOAA Energy Initiative for FY2012- 16.
Phone Access: Toll free 1-866-715-2479 Passcode: 9457557 ; International: 1-517-345-5260. For questions please contact Christina Bacon (301-763-8154 x 188; Christina.Bacon@noaa.gov).
Download presentation [PDF ~3 MB] and animation, atmospheric turbulence [GIF ~750KB]
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html#OneNOAASeminar_22May2009_Marquis
OneNOAA Science Seminar added Thursday, May 7, 2009 7:40 AM / Last updated Friday, May 22, 2009 10:54 AM
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html



Novel Partnerships and Recent Progress on Combating Marine Invasive Species

Friday, 22 May 2009; 12:00 – 13:00 ETZ (SSMC-4, Room 8150, NOS seminar)
Lad Akins (Reef Environmental Education Foundation), James Morris (NOAA National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science), and Stephanie Green (Simon Fraser University)
Lad@reef.org, James.Morris@noaa.gov
Invasive species cost Americans well over 130 billion dollars annually and include wide ranging impacts. While often hidden from easy view, aquatic invasives can cause significant impacts to native ecosystems, commerce, and recreation. A recent, novel partnership between federal, state, university and NGO organizations is providing new inroads in early detection and rapid response for marine invasive species. Lad Akins, Director of Special Projects for the Reef Environmental Education Foundation (REEF), a Florida based non-profit organization will talk about the current status and groundbreaking successes of these partnerships and the impact they are having on addressing the unprecedented invasion of lionfish along the Southeast U.S. and Caribbean.
Presentations are available remotely via a combination of phone & webcast. Please be aware that remote access is limited to 50 connections on a first-come-first served basis, so we cannot guarantee participation. To participate remotely you must: 1) Dial 866-541-1377, and then wait for instructions. When prompted enter passcode 142625 followed by the # sign. Please use your phone’s mute button (or toggle *6) during the presentation until you are ready to ask questions. 2) Go to the webcast site at http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?i=746752585&p=&t=c 3) Enter meeting number 746752585 if needed. No passcode is required. 4) Enter other required fields. 5) Indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy and click Proceed. For questions: contact Felix Martinez (Felix.Martinez@noaa.gov).
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html#OneNOAASeminar_22May2009_Akins_etal
OneNOAA Science Seminar added Friday, May 15, 2009 1:05 PM
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html



International Arctic Systems for Observing the Atmosphere: Challenges for a NOAA Climate Service

Wednesday, 27 May 2009; 12:00-13:00 ETZ (SSMC-3, 2nd Floor, NOAA Central Library Silver Spring, NODC Seminar)
A NODC seminar as part of the "NOAA work in the high latitudes and the International Polar Year 2007-2008 seminar series"
For further information about the IPY seminars see: http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html#IPYSeminars
Dr. Taneil Uttal (NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory)
Taneil.Uttal@noaa.gov

The International Polar Year was a designated period of world wide collaboration on polar research that started in March 2007 and just ended in March 2009. A number of legacy projects have resulted from the IPY that are expected to continue into the foreseeable future. One of these projects originated within NOAA; the International Arctic Systems for Observing the Atmosphere (IASOA). The main mission of IASOA is coordination of atmospheric data collection at existing and newly established intensive Arctic atmospheric Observatories in the 7 Arctic countries with participation and support from additional non-Arctic countries. Data of interest to the IASOA consortium include measurements of standard meteorology, greenhouse gases, atmospheric radiation, clouds, pollutants, chemistry, aerosols, and surface energy balances that are collected continuously with instruments on the ground. These measurements support studies of Arctic climate change attribution (why things are changing), not just trends (how things are changing). IASOA is responsive to growing evidence that the earth system may be approaching environmentally critical thresholds within decadal time scales. The information from IASOA will not only enhance scientific understanding but will also support decisions by the global community regarding climate change mitigation and adaptation strategies.

IASOA is a potential building block for the atmospheric, Arctic component of a NOAA Climate Service and could potentially contribute significantly to the operations of all NOAA line offices and mission goals. However, there are significant challenges which can only be solved by NOAA acquiring the authorities and support protocols for operating with international partners in a timely manner. This talk will be specifically addressed to the NOAA staff offices including International Affairs, Acquisition and Grants, General Consul, Finance, Travel, Communications and Education and will address a shopping list of current “show stoppers and dampers” that hinder NOAA support of IASOA. Specific examples will be used for on-going activities in Canada, Russia and Finland.

For Webcast access: 1) go to http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?i=741283869&p=nodc1315&t=c; 2) type in other required fields (i.e., your name, e-mail, organization; meeting number is 741283869; password is "nodc1315" -password is case sensitive- ); 3) indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy; 4) click on Proceed. For phone access: toll free dial 877-916-2513 using a touch-tone phone; when prompted enter participant code 5877174 followed by a "#" (Please mute your phone during the presentation or toggle *6 otherwise it produces a sound feedback). Please note that webcast & phone access is limited to 50 connections on a first-come-first served basis. Webcast & phone access will start approximately 5 min before the seminar. If possible, seminar audio will be available via podcast together with the seminar slides following the seminar. For general questions about this seminar, please contact Hernan Garcia (Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov), Mary Lou Cumberpatch (Mary.Lou.Cumberpatch@noaa.gov) or Skip Theberge (Albert.E.Theberge.Jr@noaa.gov).
Download presentation [PDF, ~ 5.5 MB; PPT, ~ 12.8 MB); Audio podcast TBD (editing)
Current research involves investigation of Arctic clouds and aerosol characteristics using radar, radiometers, and lidar. Observed cloud properties include water contents, phase, vertical distribution and optical properties which are considered to be important in determining how clouds will impact atmospheric radiation budgets, and how energy will be exchanged between the surface and the atmosphere. A primary objective is to collect long-time records of clouds to directly measure how they change over different seasons, and from year to year. These data sets will be important in determining the processes and mechanisms force climate change so we can answer not only "how" but "why" our environment is changing. An important component of this activity is to compare these surface data sets to satellite observations of cloud properties and to develop improved representation of Arctic clouds in climate models (See http://www.etl.noaa.gov/~tuttal/).
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html#OneNOAASeminar_27May2009_Uttal
OneNOAA Science Seminar added Wednesday, April 22, 2009 11:15 AM / Last edited Wednesday, May 27, 2009 1:57 PM
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html



How NOAA got to High Latitudes in the First Place: George Davidson of the Coast Survey, and Koh-klux, and Alaska

Thursday, 28 May 2009; 12:00-13:00 ETZ (SSMC-3, 2nd Floor, NOAA Central Library Silver Spring, NODC Seminar)
A NODC seminar as part of the "NOAA work in the high latitudes and the International Polar Year 2007-2008 seminar series"
For further information about the IPY seminars see: http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html#IPYSeminars
Dr John Cloud (NOAA Central Library)
John.Cloud@noaa.gov
Through its legacy agencies, NOAA has participated in every one of the International Polar Years. But the real beginnings of high latitude research involve the US purchase of "Russian America" in 1867, and then a research expedition for a total solar eclipse in 1869. George Davidson, the head of the US Coast Survey on the Pacific coast, was at the center of both activities. During the eclipse expedition, Davidson met and befriended a major Tlingit chief, named Koh-klux. In response to the eclipse, and the complex politics of Alaska, Davidson and Koh-klux made an exchange of lasting significance. Davidson made a painting of the eclipse as seen through his telescope at totality; Koh-klux and 2 of his wives made a large and extremely detailed map of the series of routes and trails/portages between the Tlingit homelands in coastal Alaska along the Lynn Canal, across the Chilkhat Passes and down to the main stem of the Yukon River at Fort Selkirk. The areas and the routes were later thoroughly transformed by the discovery of gold in the Klondike region. The 19th century Koh-klux map, re-discovered in the late 20th century, is now seen as a major historical document in the cultural history of native descendants in three different language families in Alaska and the Yukon. IPY4 (2007-2008) was the first Polar Year effort to formally acknowledge indigenous culture and knowledge in polar and high latitudes research. But George Davidson had initiated that from the very beginnings of his work in Alaska.
For Webcast access: 1) go to http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?i=741283869&p=nodc1315&t=c; 2) type in other required fields (i.e., your name, e-mail, organization; meeting number is 741283869; password is "nodc1315" -password is case sensitive- ); 3) indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy; 4) click on Proceed. For phone access: toll free dial 877-916-2513 using a touch-tone phone; when prompted enter participant code 5877174 followed by a "#" (Please mute your phone during the presentation or toggle *6 otherwise it produces a sound feedback). Please note that webcast & phone access is limited to 50 connections on a first-come-first served basis. Webcast & phone access will start approximately 5 min before the seminar. If possible, seminar audio will be available via podcast together with the seminar slides following the seminar. For general questions about this seminar, please contact Hernan Garcia (Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov), Mary Lou Cumberpatch (Mary.Lou.Cumberpatch@noaa.gov) or Skip Theberge (Albert.E.Theberge.Jr@noaa.gov).
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html#OneNOAASeminar_IPY_John_Cloud
OneNOAA Science Seminar added Monday, March 2, 2009 1:06 PM / Last edited Monday, April 13, 2009 11:32 AM
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html



Satellite Ocean Color Remote Sensing for Ocean Coastal and Inland Waters

Friday, 29 May 2009, 11:00–12:00 ETZ (World Weather Building, Science Center, Room 707, Camp Springs, MD; NESDIS-STAR seminar)
Dr. Menghua Wang (NOAA / NESDIS / STAR)
menghua.wang@noaa.gov
In the remote retrieval of the ocean (and inland) water near- surface properties, it is important to accurately remove the atmospheric and water surface effects from satellite sensor- measured signals. This process, which corrects more than 90% of satellite sensor-measured signals, is termed as atmospheric correction. The NASA standard atmospheric correction algorithm for Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS) and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) uses two near- infrared (NIR) bands for retrieval of aerosol properties with assumption of the black water at the NIR wavelengths. SeaWiFS (1997-present) and MODIS-Aqua (2002-present) have been producing high quality ocean color products over global open oceans. For the turbid waters in the ocean coastal regions (and inland lakes), however, water could have significant contributions in the NIR bands, leading to significant errors in the satellite-derived water property products. Recently, an atmospheric correction algorithm using the shortwave infrared (SWIR) bands has been developed for producing improved water optical and biological properties over turbid waters. In this presentation, I provide overview of the SeaWiFS/MODIS atmospheric correction algorithm that is currently used for deriving the ocean color products. The new approach using the SWIR bands for atmospheric correction is then described. I will demonstrate advantages of the new approach by comparing water optical and biological property results derived from the SWIR atmospheric correction algorithm and from the standard (NIR) algorithm. Some specific applications for deriving ocean color products along the China east coastal regions, as well as for monitoring and assessment of Lake Taihu blue-green algae bloom during the spring of 2007, will be presented and discussed.
Phone Access: U.S. participants: 866-832-9297; International participants: 203-566-7610; Passcode: 6070416. World Weather Building, Science Center, 5200 Auth Road, Camp Springs, MD 20746. For question please contact Bruce Ramsay (bruce.ramsay@NOAA.gov, 301-405-9205).
See http://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/Wang_M.php
Download presentation [PDF , ~2.5 MB]
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html#OneNOAASeminar_29May2009_Wang
OneNOAA Science Seminar added Wednesday, May 27, 2009 7:06 AM / Last edited Thursday, May 28, 2009 7:43 AM
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html



"Hielo en el Mar" - The National Ice Center Activities During the International Polar Year

Friday, 29 May 2009; 12:00-13:00 ETZ (SSMC-3, 2nd Floor, NOAA Central Library Silver Spring, NODC Seminar)
A NODC seminar as part of the "NOAA work in the high latitudes and the International Polar Year 2007-2008 seminar series"
For further information see: http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html#IPYSeminars
Dr. Pablo Clemente-Colón (Chief Scientist, U.S. National Ice Center)
Pablo.Clemente-Colon@natice.noaa.gov
The U.S. National Ice Center (NIC), AKA Centro Nacional del Hielo, brings together Navy, NOAA, and U.S. Coast Guard (USCG) assets in support of coastal and marine sea ice operations and research. The NIC provides specialized strategic and tactical ice products to support operational needs of the U.S. government. In partnership with the Canadian Ice Service (CIS) and the International Ice Patrol (IIP), the NIC also participates in the North American Ice Service (NAIS) seeking to harmonize operations and conduct collaborative research in support of their combined requirements. As the only national operational ice service with global monitoring responsibilities, the NIC closely collaborates with many other ice and meteorological services offices throughout the world. The NIC utilizes multiple sources of satellite and in-situ observations in conjunction with as NWP and ocean-sea ice model output to produce sea ice analyses. Parameters of interest to the NIC include sea and lake ice extent, concentration, thickness and the calving/tracking of icebergs. Operational responsibility for the production of the NOAA Snow and Ice mapping system (IMS), which provide global snow cover for the NWP community, has been transferred to the NIC in 2008. Examples of NIC activities and observations during the International Polar Year that just ended as well as future plans to address increasing observational requirements in both Polar Regions will be presented.
For Webcast access: 1) go to http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?i=741283869&p=nodc1315&t=c; 2) type in other required fields (i.e., your name, e-mail, organization; meeting number is 741283869; password is "nodc1315" -password is case sensitive- ); 3) indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy; 4) click on Proceed. For phone access: toll free dial 877-916-2513 using a touch-tone phone; when prompted enter participant code 5877174 followed by a "#" (Please mute your phone during the presentation or toggle *6 otherwise it produces a sound feedback). Please note that webcast & phone access is limited to 50 connections on a first-come-first served basis. Webcast & phone access will start approximately 5 min before the seminar. If possible, seminar audio will be available via podcast together with the seminar slides following the seminar. For general questions about this seminar, please contact Hernan Garcia (Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov), Mary Lou Cumberpatch (Mary.Lou.Cumberpatch@noaa.gov) or Skip Theberge (Albert.E.Theberge.Jr@noaa.gov).
Dr. Clemente-Colón is an Oceanographer with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) National Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Service (NESDIS) Center for Satellite Research and Applications (STAR). He presently serves as Chief Scientist of the National Ice Center (NIC) where he is the Senior Scientific Advisor responsible for providing research and science policy guidance to the NIC Director and Deputy Director and oversees the Science and Applied Technology Department research to operations activities. As part of the NIC and U.S. Naval Academy (USNA) collaborative activities, Dr. Clemente-Colón was recently appointed adjunct Assistant Professor at the USNA Department of Oceanography responsible for the instruction and development of Polar Oceanography and Polar Science classes. He received the Department of the Navy Meritorious Public Service Award with Medal from the U.S. Fleet Forces Command in April 2008. As an expert in ocean remote sensing applications including the use of synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data, Dr. Clemente-Colón has contributed to many publications including serving in the editorial board of the Synthetic Aperture Radar Marine User’s Manual published by NOAA in September 2004. He received a U.S. Dept. of Commerce Bronze Medal in 1999 for his work as Co-Leader of the Alaska SAR Demonstration. Dr. Clemente-Colón received a B.S in physics from the University of Puerto Rico at Mayagüez in 1977, an M.S. in oceanography from Texas A&M University in 1980, and a Ph.D. degree in marine studies from the University of Delaware in 2002. He is presently organizing the 3rd Symposium on the Impacts of an Ice-Diminishing Arctic on Naval and Maritime Operations to take place at the USNA Alumni Hall in Annapolis on 9-11 June 2009.
Download presentation [PDF, ~17.4 MB]
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html#OneNOAASeminar_29May2009_Clemente
OneNOAA Science Seminar added Wednesday February 18, 2009 3:28 PM \ Last edited Wednesday, May 27, 2009 7:46 AM
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html

 

 


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June 2009

Scheduled Seminars

Mon
Tue
Wed
Thu
Fri
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11
12
15
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Other OneNOAA Science Seminars: Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec

(Dates with scheduled OneNOAA Seminars in bold)
(Total number of OneNOAA Science seminars in June 2009: 19)



Towards a Global Climatology of Planetary Boundary Layer Height: Preliminary Results from Radiosonde Observations

Thursday, 04 June 2009; 11:30-12:30 ETZ (SSMC-3, 3rd Floor, Room 3404, ARL Seminar)
Dr. Dian Seidel (NOAA/ARL)
Dian.Seidel@noaa.gov
Planetary Boundary Layer (PBL) processes control exchanges of energy, water, and trace substances between the surface and free troposphere. Therefore, realistic simulation or parameterization of the PBL in climate, weather, and air quality models is critical to accurately represent these exchanges. Another potential use of global climatological PBL information is to provide more complete understanding of differential surface and free-tropospheric temperature trends (a still not-fully-resolved issue in climate change science), as unstable or stable PBLs can effectively couple or de-couple the surface and free atmosphere. But, although PBL characteristics have been studied in detail in field campaigns on local scales and for limited periods of time, no long-term global PBL height climatology exists for evaluation of model representations of the PBL.

Several options exist for developing a climatology of the global PBL. Traditional methods for determining the height of the PBL are based on in situ meteorological (e.g., radiosonde temperature and moisture) soundings, but new methods, based on GPS/RO (Global Positioning System/Radio Occultation) refractivity data and on remotely-sensed aerosol concentrations, are emerging. Comprehensive comparisons of these methods have not yet been performed.

This seminar will present preliminary findings of PBL height climatologies from a global network of radiosonde stations. We will compare results based on temperature, humidity, stability and refractivity profiles. Seasonal and (to the extent possible) diurnal structures will be elucidated, and the implications of these findings for use of GPS/RO data for determining PBL height will be presented. Feedback on the relevance of this work for model evaluation and development is welcome.

For further questions please contact Betty M. Wells (Betty.Wells@noaa.gov)
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html#OneNOAASeminar_04Jun2009_Seidel
OneNOAA Science Seminar added Wednesday, May 20, 2009 6:41 AM
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html



The Distributed Hydrological Model "Hydrograph": The Methodology of Universal Approach

Friday, 05 June 2009, 13:00pm - 14:00pm ETZ (SSMC-2, Room 8246, NWS OHD seminar)
Dr. Olga Seminova (State Hydrological Institute, St. Petersburg, Russia)
A brief information about the distributed hydrological model “Hydrograph” developed in the State Hydrological Institute (St. Petersburg, Russia) will be presented. The model has universal character: it can be applied in mountainous and flat terrain, and in basins of different natural zones regardless of their size. The main feature of the developed system is its independence of the scaling problem. The seminar will contain the description of approaches used in development of the model and the results of the model application for the basins with areas ranging from a few km2 to 2.5 millions km2.
GotoMeeting: https://www1.gotomeeting.com/join/707357409. Conference call: 866-713-2373, passcode 9960047. For further information please contact Pedro.Restrepo@noaa.gov or ken.pavelle@noaa.gov.
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html#OneNOAASeminar_05Jun2009_Seminova
OneNOAA Science Seminar added Tuesday, June 2, 2009 11:26 AM
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html



The End of the Blue Frontier: Managing Places in the Sea

Monday, 08 June 2009; 12:00-13:00 ETZ (SSMC-3, 2nd Floor, NOAA Central Library, NOAA OAR Office of Communications seminar)
Dr. Elliott Norse (President and Founder of Marine Conservation Biology Institute)
elliott@mcbi.org
Preceding his presentation, Dr. Norse will be presented the NOAA Nancy Foster Award for Habitat Conservation. Dr. Norse is being honored for decades of dedication to research, public policy, and education related to marine conservation issues. Among Dr. Norse's accomplishments are several books on conservation biology, a leading voice on marine habitat issues, visionary leadership on ocean programs, and infectious energy.
Dr. Norse received his Ph.D. in marine ecology, and since 1978 he’s focused on environmental policy at the US Environmental Protection Agency, White House Council on Environmental Quality, Ecological Society of America, The Wilderness Society, and Ocean Conservancy. Marine Conservation Biology Institute (MCBI) is a conservation advocacy organization focusing on ecosystem-based management including marine reserves, destructive fishing methods and ocean zoning as ways to protect, recover and sustainably use places in the sea. Elliott’s 140+ publications include Global Marine Biological Diversity: A Strategy for Building Conservation into Decision Making (1993), Marine Conservation Biology: The Science of Maintaining the Sea’s Biodiversity (2005), "Resolving mismatches in U.S. ocean governance" in Science (2006) and "Essential ecological insights for marine ecosystem-based management and marine spatial planning" in Marine Policy (2008). He’s a Pew Fellow in Marine Conservation and recipient of NOAA’s Nancy Foster Award for Habitat Conservation.
Call-in information: 866-631-5469; Passcode: 3958086. For further information please contact Mary Lou Cumberpatch (Mary.Lou.Cumberpatch@noaa.gov; 301-713-2600 Ext. 129) or Skip Theberge (Albert.E.Theberge.Jr@noaa.gov; 301-713-2600 Ext. 115).
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html#OneNOAASeminar_08Jun2009_Norse
OneNOAA Science Seminar added Thursday, June 4, 2009 1:59 PM / Last edited Friday, June 5, 2009 9:23 AM
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html



From Phytoplankton to Fish: Global Patterns in the Energy Flow through the Marine Food Web

Tuesday, 09 June 2009 12:00-13:00 ETZ (SSMC-3, 2nd Floor, NOAA Central Library Silver Spring Seminar)
Charles Stock (NOAA Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory)
Predicting the impact of climate change on higher trophic levels in marine ecosystems (e.g., fisheries) is hampered by uncertainties in the factors controlling the propagation of primary production through the marine food web. A marine ecosystem model and two compilations of observed and derived phytoplankton and mesozooplankton productivity estimates are thus used to diagnose the factors controlling global patterns in the ratio of mesozooplankton productivity to primary productivity (referred to as the z-ratio). Results suggest a modest yet significant (/r/ = 0.4) increasing trend in /z/-ratios with productivity, from values of ~0.01-0.04 in the oligotrophic sub-tropical gyres to >0.1 in highly productive upwelling regions. Two mechanisms were responsible: 1) zooplankton gross growth efficiencies increased as ingestion rates far exceeded basal metabolic costs in productive regions; and 2) the increasing dominance of large phytoplankton in such systems shortened the trophic distance between primary producers and mesozooplankton. Results suggest that climate-driven changes in primary production may be amplified at higher trophic levels.
Call-in information: 866-631-5469; passcode: 3958086. For further information please contact Mary Lou Cumberpatch (Mary.Lou.Cumberpatch@noaa.gov; 301-713-2600 Ext. 129) or Skip Theberge (Albert.E.Theberge.Jr@noaa.gov; 301-713-2600 Ext. 115).
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html#OneNOAASeminar_09Jun2009_Stock
OneNOAA Science Seminar added Monday, June 1, 2009 7:48 AM / last edited Thursday, June 4, 2009 2:00 PM
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html



Capacity Building and Partnerships in West Africa

Wednesday, 10 June 2009; 12:00-13:00 ETZ (SSMC-3, 2nd Floor, NOAA Central Library Silver Spring Seminar)
Teresa Turk (NOAA Fisheries, Office of Science and Technology, Office of International Affairs)
teresa.turk@noaa.gov
The 2007 Magnuson-Stevens Act calls on the United States to promote improved monitoring, control, and surveillance for high seas and Regional Fisheries Management Organization (RFMO) fisheries; improve the effectiveness of RFMOs through adoption of IUU vessel lists, stronger port state controls, and market-related measures; and build capacity in other countries to ensure sustainable fisheries and regulatory enforcement. To further NOAA Fisheries Service efforts in Africa, we have been collaborating with the U.S. Navy’s African Partnership Station (APS) to improve maritime safety, security, and resource stewardship. We participated in an on-board, fisheries-focused reception in Senegal in 2007, including a speech by a representative of the Senegalese Ministry of Fisheries on the importance of fisheries to maritime security in the region. In early April 2008, NOAA Fisheries coordinated a 10 day observer training workshop on board APS vessel, HSV2 Swift, in Tema, Ghana. We worked with the Ghanaian Ministry of Fisheries to offer a training program for up to 35 fishery observers. The program trained observers to improve the ways they collect data for scientific research and monitoring of fish stocks and bycatch within domestic and international fisheries. NOAA Fisheries also provided Ghana with safety and scientific equipment for use by observers while performing their duties. In February 2009, NOAA Fisheries in coordination with the Ministry of Fisheries Senegal and through the US Navy’s APS, USS Nashville, provided a second observer training to 40 Senegalese observers and several interested NGO’s and university students. The presentation will discuss these ongoing activities and future plans for a coordinated engagement working with a variety of partners dedicated to improving fisheries management and combating IUU fishing in West Africa.
Teresa Turk is a fisheries biologist with NOAA Fisheries, Office of International Affairs and serves as the coordinator for international observer programs and capacity building projects in W. Africa. She also works for the Office of Science and Technology, National Observer Program and serves as the National Coordinator for the development of the Fisheries Scientific Computing System (FSCS). She received her B.S. in Zoology and M.A. in Anthropology from the University of Arkansas and her M.S. in Fisheries Science from the University of Washington. She has been working toward improving observer programs for the past 20 years. Most recently, she has been actively engaged in assisting the International Commission for the Conservation of Atlantic Tunas (ICCAT) efforts to develop and implement a regional observer program for transshipment vessels in the Atlantic Ocean and coordinating the development of international observer training for West Africa.
Call-in information: 866-631-5469; passcode: 3958086. For further information please contact Mary Lou Cumberpatch (Mary.Lou.Cumberpatch@noaa.gov; 301-713-2600 Ext. 129) or Skip Theberge (Albert.E.Theberge.Jr@noaa.gov; 301-713-2600 Ext. 115).
Download presentation [PDF]
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html#OneNOAASeminar_10Jun2009_Turk
OneNOAA Science Seminar added Friday, May 22, 2009 7:52 AM / Last edited Tuesday, June 16, 2009 7:58 AM
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html



NOAA Enterprise GIS Seminar Series: NWS RIDGE 2 Radar Demonstration

Wednesday 10 June 2009; 14:00-15:00 ETZX (SSMC-2, Room 12246, Enterprise GIS Technical Seminar Series)
Keith Stellman (NWS Shreveport) and Corey Pieper (NWS Southern Region HQ)
The National Weather Service is close to releasing its next-generation interactive radar display - RIDGE 2. (See beta version here: http://radar.srh.noaa.gov/) The RIDGE 2 radar display, which utilizes Google Maps, gives users the ability to toggle elements aside from just the radar. Warnings, watches, and advisories along with the radar can be overlaid on the Google Maps interface, which provides map, terrain, and satellite background options. Another improvement of the RIDGE 2 is the ability to display radar reflectivity data in mosaic form from Terminal Doppler Weather Radar sites. The presenters will also discuss some of the technical aspects of development such as the use of the OpenLayers application programming interface, tiling, caching, and web mapping services.
Remote Access: Webex: http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?i=745983570&p=NOAAGIS&t=c ; Webex Meeting Number: 745983570 ; Webex Meeting Passcode: NOAAGIS. Conference Call Number: 866-909-6773; Conference Call Pass code: 819016. For questions please contact Kim.Jenkins@noaa.gov and Randy.Warren@noaa.gov.
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html#OneNOAASeminar_10June2009_Stellman
OneNOAA Science Seminar added Monday, June 8, 2009 6:41 AM
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html



Ecosystem Status and Trends on Continental Shelves and Slope Regions in the Pacific Arctic Sector

Wednesday, 17 June 2009 12:00-13:00 ETZ (SSMC-3, 2nd Floor, NOAA Central Library Silver Spring, NODC Seminar)
A NODC seminar as part of the "NOAA work in the high latitudes and the International Polar Year 2007-2008 seminar series"
For further information see: http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html#IPYSeminars
Dr. Jackie M. Grebmeier (Research Professor, Chesapeake Biological Laboratory)
jgrebmei@cbl.umces.edu
Benthic systems in the Pacific Arctic sector can be rich and diverse habitats for marine life in spite of the extreme cold-water environment. Benthic carbon cycling and biological community structure are directly influenced by changing sea ice extent, seawater hydrography (nutrients, salinity, temperature, currents), and both sea ice and water column production. Variability in the sea ice melt period and timing of the retreat in the Bering and Chukchi seas is already having an impact on the biological system which includes changes in overlying primary production, carbon transformation, pelagic-benthic coupling, and benthic production and community structure that can have cascading effects to higher trophic levels. Time-series observation sites in the northern Bering Sea indicate a change and decline in the dominant bivalve populations coincident with diving seaducks over the last few decades. In addition, a decline in benthic amphipod populations in the Chirikov Basin south of Bering Strait has likely influenced the movement of migrating gray whales that have now expanded their range north of Bering Strait to as far as Barrow, Alaska. Time-series sites indicate that the dominant bivalve, polychaete and amphipod community structure in this region varies depending upon water mass structure and sediment type, but that the observed decline in benthic biomass likely results from changes in the timing of ice retreat and its impact on spring ice algal phytoplankton production. The changing benthic prey fields directly impact top benthic predators in this system, such as diving sea ducks, walrus and gray whales. Long-term biological measurements and modeling studies of key trophic organisms and biological processes are needed to track the status and change of the rapidly change ecosystem in the Pacific Arctic sector.
For Webcast access: 1) go to http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?i=741283869&p=nodc1315&t=c; 2) type in other required fields (i.e., your name, e-mail, organization; meeting number is 741283869; password is "nodc1315" -password is case sensitive- ); 3) indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy; 4) click on Proceed. For phone access: toll free dial 877-916-2513 using a touch-tone phone; when prompted enter participant code 5877174 followed by a "#" (Please mute your phone during the presentation or toggle *6 otherwise it produces a sound feedback). Please note that webcast & phone access is limited to 50 connections on a first-come-first served basis. Webcast & phone access will start approximately 5 min before the seminar. If possible, seminar audio will be available via podcast together with the seminar slides following the seminar. For general questions about this seminar, please contact Hernan Garcia (Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov), Mary Lou Cumberpatch (Mary.Lou.Cumberpatch@noaa.gov) or Skip Theberge (Albert.E.Theberge.Jr@noaa.gov).
Dr. Jackie M. Grebmeier (University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science, Chesapeake Biological Laboratory, PO Box 38, Solomons, MD 20688). Dr. Grebmeier is a research professor at the Chesapeake Biological Laboratory. Her research interests are related to pelagic-benthic coupling, benthic carbon cycling, and benthic faunal population structure in the marine environment. Over the last 20 years, her field research program in both the Arctic and Antarctic has focused on such topics as understanding how water column processes influence biological productivity in Arctic waters and sediments, how materials are exchanged between the sea bed and overlying waters, and documenting longer-term trends in ecosystem health of Arctic continental shelves (See http://arctic.cbl.umces.edu/web-content/Jacqueline_Grebmeier/index.html).
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html#OneNOAASeminar_17Jun2009_Grebmeier
OneNOAA Science Seminar added Wednesday February 18, 2009 3:28 PM / Last edited Tuesday, June 16, 2009 7:13 AM
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html



High-resolution MODIS / AMSR-E Composite SST for Diagnostic and Regional Weather Prediction Studies

Wednesday, 17 June 2009 14:00-15:00 ETZ (World Weather Building, Room 707, Camp Springs, MD; JCSDA seminar)
Gary Jedlovik (NASA / MSFC / SPoRT)
gary.jedlovec@nasa.gov
Accurate high resolution specification of sea surface temperature (SST) is important for regional weather forecasting studies and coastal ocean applications. Chelton et al. (2007) and Lacasse et al. (2008) showed that the use of coarse resolution SST products such as from the real-time global (RTG) SST analysis (Thiebaux et al. 2003) in regional weather forecast models do not properly portray the fluxes of heat and moisture from the ocean that drive the formation of low level clouds and precipitation over the ocean. High resolution SSTs may also be important for hurricane track and intensity forecasts and useful to verification of ocean circulation models. Previous work developed a polar orbiting data compositing technique which provides spatially continuous, accurate, high-resolution SST fields using data from the Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS) on NASA’s Terra and Aqua satellites was developed (Haines et al. 2007). Case et al. (2008) presented a detail analysis of the impact of the composite SST product in coast regions. However, the approach was limited during periods of long-term cloud cover where latency of past data reduced the accuracy of the data presented in the composites. Recently, an enhanced compositing technique was developed to circumvent shortcomings of the Haines et al. (2007) approach by including AMSR-E SST data in the compositing process. The enhanced scheme also incorporates a more sophisticated temporal weighting scheme which considers bias, observational errors and spatial resolution along with the latency of the SST data in the generation of the high resolution composites. The enhanced SST composite product is produced four times a day in near real-time over the ocean regions surrounding the continental U.S. The product is being integrated into NASA’s Short Term Prediction and Research Transition (SPoRT) project (Jedlovec et al. 2006) and distributed to the NWS, other government agencies, and the public for use in regional weather forecast applications. Prospective users and also get this product from the Physical Oceanography DAAC in standard L3P format later this year. The presentation will describe this work and present examples of the impact of the product on short-term weather forecasts.
Phone Access: Toll free 1-866-715-2479; International: 1-517-345-5260; Passcode: 9457557. For questions please contact Christina Bacon (301-763-8154 x 188; Christina.Bacon@noaa.gov) or George.Ohring@noaa.gov.
Gary Jedlovec received his B.S. and M.S. degrees in meteorology in 1979 and 1981 from Saint Louis University, Saint Louis, MO. He was awarded the Ph.D. in meteorology with a minor in remote sensing from the University of Wisconsin - Madison in 1987. From 1981-1985 he was employed as a research associate with the Universities Space Research Association (USRA). In 1985, he joined NASA where he is still employed as an atmospheric scientist. Dr. Jedlovec also holds an adjunct professor position with the University of Alabama in Huntsville, where he teaches and mentors graduate students in atmospheric sciences. Dr. Jedlovec has spent most of the last 25 years developing and evaluating algorithms to retrieve geophysical parameters from remotely sensed aircraft and satellite measurements for regional climate studies and weather forecasting applications. For the last few years, Dr. Jedlovec has lead an effort to transition the use of unique NASA EOS satellite data into NWS forecast offices as part of the Short-term Prediction and Research Transition (SPoRT) program at NASA. See http://weather.msfc.nasa.gov/sport/staff/gjj.html.
Download presentation [PDF; http://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/jcsda/documents/seminardocs/Jedlovec_20090617.pdf]
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html#OneNOAASeminar_17Jun2009_Jedlovik
OneNOAA Science Seminar added Wednesday, January 21, 2009 12:29 PM / Last edited Wednesday, June 17, 2009 7:56 AM
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html



The Co-Operative Observational (COOP) Network Explained – Avoiding the Obstacles and Providing A Way Forward

Wednesday, 17 June 2009; 14:00-15:00 ETZ ( SSMC-2, Room 2358, NWS Science and Technology Seminars)
Joel Cline (NOAA NWS/OCWWS)
Officially started in 1890 the COOP program remains around 10000 observational sites nationwide. Both a weather and climate observational network, COOP provides critical information to numerous stakeholder groups. Confusion exists today with various other climate monitoring networks such as the U.S. Climate Reference Network (USCRN), Historical Climate Network (HCN), and HCN-Modernization (HCN-M). These networks will be explained both spatially and through their mission, in order to show how each relates to the other. COOP has experienced numerous difficulties in continuous observations in order to preserve the climate record for the United States. We will explore the programs deficiencies in detail and provide a plan of solutions for the program to remain viable and move forward in the future.
For more information contact Bob Glahn at (301-713-1768 ; Harry.Glahn@noaa.gov).
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html#OneNOAASeminar_17June2009_Cline
OneNOAA Science Seminar added Monday, June 15, 2009 7:12 AM
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html



Is Swarm Sensing in the Ocean An Idea Whose Time Has Come?

Thursday, 18 June 2009; 12:00 – 13:00 ETZ (SSMC-4, Room #8150, NOS seminar)
Jules Jaffe (Marine Physical Laboratory, Scripps Institution of Oceanography)
jjaffe@ucsd.edu
The understanding of oceanic processes has always been hindered by the difficulty in measuring them. Almost all types of propagating waves are either rapidly attenuated or suffer little and non-specific interaction with the ocean’s interior. The latest generation of ships, moorings, gliders all offer advantages, however, still suffer from significant aliasing. Via the revolution in micro processing technology, power storage and the continuing advancement of low cost sensors the opportunity to launch swarms of small, autonomous, self contained, and communicating vehicles now exists. Such vehicle swarms could sample oceanic processes on space-time scales that were heretofore unobtainable while being transported at lower Reynolds numbers. This permits the measurement of ocean currents while at the same time providing a view from the point of view of small animals that cannot swim faster than these currents. Among the many interesting processes that can be investigated using these ideas are coastal larval transport, the measurement of various features of sub mesoscale eddies, and the evolution of thin oceanic layers of phytoplankton. This talk will describe the speaker’s experiences in developing autonomous platforms for ocean sensing, his vision of the evolution of these systems, and the role that they can play in helping to achieve a better understanding of the dynamics of the ocean’s interior and the processes that occur within.
Presentations are available remotely via a combination of phone & webcast. Please be aware that remote access is limited to 50 connections on a first-come-first served basis, so we cannot guarantee participation. To participate remotely you must: 1) Dial 866-541-1377, and then wait for instructions. When prompted enter passcode 142625 followed by the # sign. Please use your phone’s mute button (or toggle *6) during the presentation until you are ready to ask questions. 2) Go to the webcast site at http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?i=746752585&p=&t=c 3) Enter meeting number 746752585 if needed. No passcode is required. 4) Enter other required fields. 5) Indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy and click Proceed. For questions: contact Felix Martinez (Felix.Martinez@noaa.gov).
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html#OneNOAASeminar_18Jun2009_Jaffe
OneNOAA Science Seminar added Monday, June 1, 2009 7:36 AM
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html



The Role of Water Cycle Observations and Science in the Global Earth Observation System of Systems (GEOSS) : An Opportunity for NOAA

Thursday, 18 June 2009, 09:30-11:00 ETZ (SSMC-2, Room 8246, NWS OHD seminar)
Rick Lawford (University of Maryland, Baltimore County and University of Manitoba)
The Global Earth Observation System of Systems (GEOSS) is being developed in the 2006-2015 timeframe to bring together the observational capabilities of the nations to effectively address the information needs of many communities. The area of Water Management is one of nine Societal Benefit Areas (SBAs) being directly addressed by the Group of Earth Observations (GEO). The focus on Water Management is very timely given the uncertainty that is expected in water supplies as a result of climate change. GEO initiatives related to water include those that deal with the monitoring and prediction of floods and droughts, the development of integrated data sets for measuring and reporting precipitation, soil moisture, runoff, and water quality, as well as projects that support capacity building in the developing world. NOAA continues to play a critical role in the development of the Water SBA. This presentation will provide a brief summary of the structure of GEO and review some of the activities related to Water that are currently underway. It will also lead to discussions of ways in which NOAA could contribute to these activities through its programs and its ongoing and emerging services in weather, water and climate.
Rick Lawford is the former Director of the International GEWEX Project Office who now divides his time between the University of Manitoba in Winnipeg where he works as the Network Manager for the Canadian Drought Research Initiative, and the University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC), where he works as a GEO Consultant. Before working for UMBC/GEWEX he worked in NOAA as the program manager for the GEWEX Americas Prediction Project (GAPP) and the GEWEX Continental-scale International Project (GCIP). He also occupied a number of positions in the Canadian government, primarily with Environment Canada in program management and research in the fields of hydrology, hydrometeorology and meteorology.
GotoMeeting: https://www1.gotomeeting.com/join/280005584. Conference call: 866-713-2373, passcode 9960047. For further information please contact Pedro.Restrepo@noaa.gov or ken.pavelle@noaa.gov.
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html#OneNOAASeminar_18Jun2009_Lawford
OneNOAA Science Seminar added Tuesday, June 2, 2009 11:26 AM
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html



NY Sea Grant's Proactive Research and Extension Responses to Viral Hemorrhagic Septicemia (VHS)

Thursday, 18 June 2009; 12:00-13:00 ETZ (SSMC-3, 2nd Floor, NOAA Central Library Silver Spring Seminar)
David B. MacNeill (Fisheries Specialist, New York Sea Grant, SUNY College at Oswego, Oswego, New York) and Paul R. Bowser (Professor of Aquatic Animal Medicine, Aquatic Animal Health Program, Department of Microbiology and Immunology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York)
Historically, Viral Hemorrhagic Septicemia (VHS) has been described as one of the most devastating fish diseases on a worldwide basis and has decimated fresh-water reared rainbow trout in the European continent for many years. Disease events known as early as the 1930's were thought to have a viral cause (a viral etiology), but it was not until the early 1960's when the techniques of fish cell culture became available, that the virus was cultured and proven as the cause of Viral Hemorrhagic Septicemia. A major event in the history of VHS occurred in 1988 and 1989 when VHSV was isolated from apparently normal returning sea-run chinook and coho salmon in the Puget Sound area of Washington State in the Pacific Northwest of the United States. Discovery of VHSV in marine fish made the fish health community think of VHSV as a pathogen of marine fish that somehow moved into the freshwater trout culture facilities of Europe in the 1930's. The emergence of VHSV in the Great Lakes Basin of North America in 2005 marked another major milestone in the history of this virus and the disease it causes. Of additional concern is the fact that VHSV has also been isolated from Atlantic herring, Striped bass and mummichog in the Northwest Atlantic (Gulf of Maine, Bay of Fundy). These isolations revealed the presence of a virus that was genetically most closely related to the Pacific Northwest genotype. This discovery presents a potential a risk to Atlantic species, in that the no one knows the relative susceptibility of these species to infection and possible losses due to disease from VHSV. As a pathogen that is listed by the OIE (World Organization for Animal Health) as reportable, the finding of VHSV in these new locations has significant trade implications on a national and international level and has already demonstrated economic impacts to bait dealers, and commercial fish processors in the Great Lakes and St. Lawrence River. In response to the discovery of a freshwater form of VHSV in the Great Lakes and a Pacific genotype in Northwest Atlantic, New York Sea Grant proactively and effectively responded to the issue through sponsored research integrated with extension outreach on a statewide, regional and national scale. These efforts include pioneering research on VHS diagnostics, technical/policy discussions with legislative offices, an information workshop for marine Sea Grant colleagues, facilitated meetings between regulatory authorities and affected businesses, partnerships with regulatory agencies and fish health experts to develop a national outreach plan and applied research with prominent fish health experts.
For further information please contact Mary Lou Cumberpatch (Mary.Lou.Cumberpatch@noaa.gov; 301-713-2600 Ext. 129) or Skip Theberge (Albert.E.Theberge.Jr@noaa.gov; 301-713-2600 Ext. 115). Remote Access: 866-631-5469; passcode 3958086.
Download presentation [PDF]
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html#OneNOAASeminar_18June2009_MacNeill
OneNOAA Science Seminar added Monday, June 15, 2009 7:20 AM / last updated Thursday, June 18, 2009 1:43 PM
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html



Evolution and interannual variability of thermal inversions in the Southeastern Arabian Sea

Wednesday, 24 June 2009; 12:00-13:00 ETZ (SSMC-3, 4th Floor, Room 4817, NODC Seminar)
Dr. Vissa V. Gopalakrishna (National Institute of Oceanography, Dona Paula, Goa, India)
gopal@nio.org
Repeat XBT transects made at fortnightly intervals in the Southeastern Arabian Sea (SEAS) are examined to describe the observed year-to-year variability in the near-surface thermal inversions during the winter seasons of 2002–2008. Despite the existence of a large low-salinity water intrusion into the SEAS, unusually very few thermal inversions are noticed during the winter 2005-06 compared to the other winters. These inversions have occurred at relatively shallower depths (~10m) and have shown larger layer thickness (~35m) compared to those occurred in other winters. Analysis of sea surface salinity and the ARGO vertical salinity profile data has also revealed unusual freshening in the surface layer in the SEAS during winter2005/06. The possible causative mechanisms are examined to explain the anomalous nature of the observed thermal inversions and the associated excessive surface freshening. During the summer monsoon of 2005 and the following winter season, unusually heavy rainfall has occurred over the southwestern Bay of Bengal and the SEAS compared to any other year under study. Accordingly, during winter2005/06, unusually larger quantities of low salinity waters from the Bay of Bengal intruded into the SEAS by the coastal currents where relatively cooler near-surface thermal regime persisted owing to extended upwelling until November, 2005. In addition, the local surface wind field was also relatively stronger and the net heat gain to the ocean was relatively weaker over the SEAS during the post-monsoon season of 2005. Thus during winter 2005/06, the combination of extended upwelling and relatively stronger surface wind field resulting in anomalous heat loss have caused weaker secondary warming of the near-surface waters in the SEAS. This has led to a weaker horizontal SST gradient between SEAS and the intruding Bay of Bengal waters leading to the formation of fewer thermal inversions compared to the other winters despite stronger vertical haline stratification.
Download presentation [PDF; ~5.3 MB]
For Webcast access: 1) go to http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?i=741283869&p=nodc1315&t=c; 2) type in other required fields (i.e., your name, e-mail, organization; meeting number is 741283869; password is "nodc1315" -password is case sensitive- ); 3) indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy; 4) click on Proceed. For phone access: toll free dial 877-916-2513 using a touch-tone phone; when prompted enter participant code 5877174 followed by a "#" (Please mute your phone during the presentation or toggle *6 otherwise it produces a sound feedback). Please note that webcast & phone access is limited to 50 connections on a first-come-first served basis. Webcast & phone access will start approximately 5 min before the seminar. If possible, seminar audio will be available via podcast together with the seminar slides following the seminar. For general questions about this seminar, please contact Hernan Garcia (Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov).
Dr. V. V. Gopalakrishna is a research scientist in the Physical Oceanography Division, National Institute Of Oceanography, Dona Paula, Goa, India. He is currently a visiting scientist at the U.S. National Oceanographic Data Center.
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html#OneNOAASeminar_24Jun2009_Gopalakrishna
OneNOAA Science Seminar added Thursday April 9, 2009 9:28 AM / Last edited Wednesday, June 24, 2009 6:58 AM
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html



Development of the Fishing Ecosystem Analysis Tool (FEAT)

Wednesday, 24 June 2009; 12:00-13:00 ETZ (SSMC-3, 2nd Floor, NOAA Central Library Silver Spring Seminar)
Matt Austin (NOS Office of Coast Survey Cartographic and Geospatial Technologies Program)
The Fishing Ecosystem Analysis Tool (FEAT) is a system for analyzing and spatially displaying commercial and recreational catch data in combination with the place-based approach to defining and measuring fishing communities envisioned by National Standard 8 of the Magnuson-Stevens Act. Fishing communities in Hawaii are currently defined at the island level, which is overly broad for conducting social impact analysis. A suitable scale for many analyses is Zip Code Tabulation Area, which the U.S. Bureau of the Census developed by aggregating census blocks. We refer to these areas as Socioeconomic Zones because they can be characterized using Census socioeconomic variables such household income, poverty level, education, ethnicity and many others. Socioeconomic zones can be linked to commercial marine license catch data and recreational catch data using anglers’ zip codes. This allows for spatial analysis and reporting of catch variables such as species, pounds landed, port of landing, gear used, and fishing area location. We can then associate any of these variables with socioeconomic zones and characteristics. Data from 10 years of commercial marine license catch reports and 7 years of recreational catch data currently are entered into the database. We will provide a number of examples of possible analyses that can be conducted with FEAT, which has the capability to tie in with other Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) data systems and to be used for many purposes other than analysis of human dimensions data.
For further information please contact Mary Lou Cumberpatch (Mary.Lou.Cumberpatch@noaa.gov; 301-713-2600 Ext. 129) or Skip Theberge (Albert.E.Theberge.Jr@noaa.gov; 301-713-2600 Ext. 115).
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html#OneNOAASeminar_24May2009_Austin
OneNOAA Science Seminar added Tuesday, April 28, 2009 11:26 AM
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html



Outcomes of The Arctic Council's Arctic Marine Shipping Assesment.

Wednesday, 24 June 2009; 10:00-11:00 am Alaska Daylight/Standard Time ( RISA/ACCAP seminar via teleconference only )
Lawson Brigham (Distinguished Professor of Geography & Arctic Policy, UAF and Chair, Arctic Marine Shipping Assessment of the Arctic Council)
In response to unprecedented changes occurring in the circumpolar Arctic, in 2004 the Arctic Council called for the Council’s Protection of the Arctic Marine Environment (PAME) working group to conduct a comprehensive assessment of Arctic marine shipping. The Arctic Marine Shipping Assessment (AMSA) 2009 Final Report represents the results of this four year study. Findings and recommendations were negotiated and approved by the Ministers of the Arctic States on April 29, 2009 and take into consideration Arctic marine geography, changes in sea ice and climate, history of marine transport, governance of Arctic marine shipping, current marine use in the Arctic, Arctic marine infrastructure, human and environmental considerations and impacts, and Arctic marine shipping futures scenarios to 2020. Join us for an overview of the AMSA findings, presented by Dr. Lawson Brigham.

To Participate / Log-In to the Alaska Climate Teleconference: http://www.uaf.edu/accap/teleconference.htm. Teleconference: 1) Dial:1-800-893-8850; 2) When prompted, enter the PIN code: 7531823. To view the presentation during a teleconference: 1) Point your web browser to: http://www.shareitnow.com; 2) Click on the blue *Join a Meeting* button on the left side bar. 3) For Presenter ID enter: accap@uaf.edu. To join us in person: If you are in Fairbanks, join us in person on the UAF campus in the Duckering Building Room 535. Map: http://www.uaf.edu/campusmap/ (purple zone). For more information about the Alaska Climate Teleconferences and the Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy, please contact Brook Gamble (907-474-7812; accap@uaf.edu) or Sarah Trainor (907-474-7878; accap@uaf.edu ) or visit our website: www.uaf.edu/accap.

Download presentation [PDF ;~ 1.9 MB]
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html#OneNOAASeminar_24Jun2009_Brighman
OneNOAA Science Seminar added Wednesday, June 10, 2009 7:10 AM / Last edited Thursday, June 25, 2009 8:33 AM
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html



Web-based Tools for Accessing, Analyzing and Developing Environmental Data Products

Wednesday, 24 June 2009; 10:30-11:30 ETZ (SSMC-3, 4th Floor, Room 4817, NODC Seminar)
Dr. Franklin Schwing (NOAA Fisheries Service, Chief of Staff, Office of Science & Technology)
Franklin.Schwing@noaa.gov
A description of several web-based tools available for scientific data access and analysis.
Download presentation [PDF ;~ 7.6 MB]
For Webcast access: 1) go to http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?i=741283869&p=nodc1315&t=c; 2) type in other required fields (i.e., your name, e-mail, organization; meeting number is 741283869; password is "nodc1315" -password is case sensitive- ); 3) indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy; 4) click on Proceed. For phone access: toll free dial 877-916-2513 using a touch-tone phone; when prompted enter participant code 5877174 followed by a "#" (Please mute your phone during the presentation or toggle *6 otherwise it produces a sound feedback). Please note that webcast & phone access is limited to 50 connections on a first-come-first served basis. Webcast & phone access will start approximately 5 min before the seminar. If possible, seminar audio will be available via podcast together with the seminar slides following the seminar. For general questions about this seminar, please contact Hernan Garcia (Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov).
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html#OneNOAASeminar_24Jun2009_Schwing
OneNOAA Science Seminar added Tuesday, June 23, 2009 6:55 AM
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html



Google Earth: A new display tool for hydrological data sets

Wednesday, 24 June 2009, 14:00-15:00 ETZ (SSMC-2, Room 8246, NWS OHD seminar)
Brian Cosgrove (NWS OHD)
Google Earth is seeing growing use in the National Weather Service, and has proven to be a valuable tool in visualizing hydrologic data sets. One common challenge is converting the data into a format which is compatible with Google Earth. This presentation will provide an overview of the recently developed "xmrgtokml" utility which can be used to convert XMRG data on the HRAP grid to a KML (Google Earth) formatted file. Example HRAP images will be shown, as will other examples of hydrologic data visualization within Google Earth.
GotoMeeting: https://www1.gotomeeting.com/join/933838856. Conference call: (866) 713-2373, passcode 9960047. For further information please contact Pedro.Restrepo@noaa.gov or ken.pavelle@noaa.gov.
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html#OneNOAASeminar_24Jun2009_Cosgrove
OneNOAA Science Seminar added Wednesday, June 17, 2009 10:47 AM
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html



Instream Temperature Predictions and Forecasting Using the Two-Zone Solute and Temperature Model

Thursday, 25 June 2009, 13:00-14:30 ETZ (SSMC-2, Room 8246, NWS OHD seminar)
Dr. Bethany Neilson (Assistant Professor, Civil and Environmental Engineering, Utah Water Research Laboratory, Utah State University)
Quantifying the influences of changing weather and climate patterns on instream temperatures is becoming more important due to its effects on other instream processes and aquatic species. Along these lines, the Alaska-Pacific River Forecast Center is investigating the expansion of their services to include the forecasting of instream temperatures. Initial efforts have begun in the Ninilchik River in cooperation with the Cook Inlet Keeper organization by implementing the Two-Zone Solute and Temperature (TZTS) model developed at Utah State University. This research model includes options to account for a variety of heat fluxes including surface fluxes, bed conduction, hyporheic fluxes, dead zone fluxes, and shortwave solar radiation attenuation in the water column and bed substrate. This presentation will include a summary of the TZTS model structure, minimal data requirements for simplified applications (i.e., accounting for surface fluxes only), and how necessary data will be assembled for instream temperature forecasting in Alaska. Additionally, research approaches for more inclusive TZTS applications and the associated data collection and calibration will be covered.
GotoMeeting: https://www1.gotomeeting.com/join/324792289. Conference call: 866-713-2373, passcode 9960047. For further information please contact Pedro.Restrepo@noaa.gov or ken.pavelle@noaa.gov.
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html#OneNOAASeminar_25Jun2009_Neilson
OneNOAA Science Seminar added Tuesday, June 2, 2009 11:26 AM / Last edited Wednesday, June 17, 2009 10:50 AM
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html



Venting of Liquid Carbon Dioxide on a Mariana Arc Submarine Volcano: A natural laboratory for studying effects of ocean acidification

Tuesday, 30 June 2009; 12:00-13:00 ETZ (SSMC-3, 2nd Floor, NOAA Central Library Silver Spring Seminar)
Dr. John Lupton (NOAA Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory)
The NOAA Vents Program has recently been studying activity on submarine volcanoes along volcanic arcs. These studies have revealed that several of these submarine arc volcanoes are venting fluids highly concentrated in carbon dioxide. One in particular, NW Eifuku volcano in the northern Mariana Arc, is releasing droplets of pure liquid CO2 into the ocean at about 1600 m depth, about one mile under the ocean surface. The high CO2 concentrations at this vent site, which is appropriately named Champagne, locally produce acidic or low pH conditions that affect the mussels and other organisms that inhabit the volcano. Five other volcanoes on the Mariana and Tonga-Kermadec Arcs have also been found to be venting CO2 as a pure gas phase. These sites represent valuable natural laboratories for studying the effects of acidic CO2-rich environments on marine ecosytems.
For further information please contact Mary Lou Cumberpatch (Mary.Lou.Cumberpatch@noaa.gov; 301-713-2600 Ext. 129) or Skip Theberge (Albert.E.Theberge.Jr@noaa.gov; 301-713-2600 Ext. 115).
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html#OneNOAASeminar_30June2009_Lupton
OneNOAA Science Seminar added Monday, June 15, 2009 7:29 AM / Last edited Wednesday, June 24, 2009 2:27 PM
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html

 

 


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July 2009

Scheduled Seminars

Mon
Tue
Wed
Thu
Fri
02
03
06
07
10
13
14
15
16
17
20
21
23
24
27
30
31

Other OneNOAA Science Seminars: Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec

(Dates with scheduled OneNOAA Seminars in bold)
(Total number of OneNOAA Science seminars in July 2009: 7)



Polar Resources in the NOAA Central Library Network

Wednesday, 01 July 2009; 12:00-13:00 ETZ (SSMC-3, 2nd Floor, NOAA Central Library Silver Spring, NODC Seminar)
A NODC seminar as part of the "NOAA work in the high latitudes and the International Polar Year 2007-2008 seminar series"
For further information about the IPY seminars see: http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html#IPYSeminars
Anna Fiolek (NOAA Central Library)
Anna.Fiolek@noaa.gov

Located in Silver Spring, Maryland, the NOAA Central Library (NCL) networks over thirty NOAA libraries nationwide. NCL is considered the most comprehensive multidisciplinary and historically richest scientific collection in hydrographic surveying, oceanography, ocean engineering, atmospheric sciences (climatology and meteorology), meteorological satellite applications, living marine resources, geophysics, cartography, and mathematics in the United States. It incorporates holdings of NOAA’s predecessor agencies, including the Coast and Geodetic Survey, National Weather Service, and the Bureau of Fisheries. The collections reflect the history of these organizations, their scientific research, observations and data from 1820 to the present. The NOAA Library Network collections are unique; over 40% of the items in NOAALINC (the online catalog) and their manual catalogs are not found anywhere else. Unique polar research includes historic and current reports from the various polar expeditions, and research and observations from both the Arctic and Antarctic regions. The presence of these unique and historical resources in NOAA impelled the Library to participate in the 4th International Polar Year (IPY) 2007-2008 activities. Many unique and historically valuable NOAA polar research documents and scientific data, in the forms of digital videos, still images, and datasets, have been entered into the NOAALINC, the National Oceanographic Data Center Ocean Archive System (OAC), and other oceanographic information catalogs and databases. This was possible thanks to the Library’s collaboration with several NOAA projects and programs, including the Video Data Management System (VDMS), Climate Data Modernization Program (CDMP), and NODC Cruise Report Program. Over two hundred thirty of these unique and historically valuable documents were selected, cataloged, imaged and entered into NOAALINC to assure online, open access to their full-text files. A comprehensive bibliography has been prepared to provide an additional access point to the polar related resources via the Library’s home page. This online bibliography also serves as an Internet locator for printed and remote resources in polar research. It is located at: http://docs.lib.noaa.gov/rescue/Bibliographies/IPY2007.pdf. During the 4th IPY, the NOAA Library Network collections serve as an important resource for polar data and research. The Library’s IPY home page and the Polar Poster developed in NCL serve as an additional access point to the library’s polar resources. The library's IPY home page and Polar Poster are located at: http://www.lib.noaa.gov/collections/ipy.html ; http://docs.lib.noaa.gov/rescue/Bibliographies/IPY2007_poster.pdf.

For Webcast access: 1) go to http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?i=741283869&p=nodc1315&t=c; 2) type in other required fields (i.e., your name, e-mail, organization; meeting number is 741283869; password is "nodc1315" -password is case sensitive- ); 3) indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy; 4) click on Proceed. For phone access: toll free dial 877-916-2513 using a touch-tone phone; when prompted enter participant code 5877174 followed by a "#" (Please mute your phone during the presentation or toggle *6 otherwise it produces a sound feedback). Please note that webcast & phone access is limited to 50 connections on a first-come-first served basis. Webcast & phone access will start approximately 5 min before the seminar. If possible, seminar audio will be available via podcast together with the seminar slides following the seminar. For general questions about this seminar, please contact Hernan Garcia (Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov), Mary Lou Cumberpatch (Mary.Lou.Cumberpatch@noaa.gov) or Skip Theberge (Albert.E.Theberge.Jr@noaa.gov).
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html#OneNOAASeminar_01Jul2009_Fiolek
OneNOAA Science Seminar added Wednesday, June 3, 2009 6:43 AM / Last edited Monday, June 15, 2009 9:48 AM
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html



The GOES-R Proving Ground 2009 Spring Experiment at NOAA's Hazardous Weather Testbed

Wednesday, 01 July 2009; 14:00-15:00 ETZ (SSMC-2, Room 2358, NWS Science and Technology Seminars)
Chris Siewert (University of Oklahoma - CIMMS)
The GOES-R Proving Ground's 2009 Spring Experiment at NOAA's Hazardous Weather Testbed in the Storm Prediction Center in Norman, OK provided a unique opportunity to interact with and study new products available on the next generation GOES-R satellite in an operational framework, with an overall goal to provide forecasters with the knowledge and experience needed to effectively use the products in day to day operations once they are available. Products focusing on detecting and forecasting convective initiation, total lightning and severe hail were studied this year in a broad range of forecasting strategies, from short term convective outlooks to real-time nowcasting exercises. The GOES-R Proving Ground's activities at the SPC, preliminary findings from this year's events, forecaster interactions and goals for the GOES-R Proving Ground's direction in years to come will be discussed.
For questions about this seminar please contact Bob Glahn (301-713-1768; Harry.Glahn@noaa.gov) or Carl Mccalla (Carl.Mccalla@noaa.gov)
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html#OneNOAASeminar_01Jul2009_Siewert
OneNOAA Science Seminar added Wednesday, June 24, 2009 8:41 AM
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html



NCAR Societal Impacts Program (SIP) Research Integrating Social Science and Meteorology

Wednesday, 08 July 2009; 10:30-11:30 ETZ (SSMC-2, Room 2358, NWS Science and Technology Seminars)
Jeffrey K. Lazo, Rebecca E. Morss, and Julie L. Demuth (National Center for Atmospheric Research)
The NCAR Societal Impacts Program (www.sip.ucar.edu) was created in 2004 and is funded by NCAR and NOAA‘s U.S. Weather Research Program. The goal of SIP is to improve the societal gains from weather forecasting by infusing social science and economic research, methods, and capabilities into the planning, execution, and analysis of weather information, applications, and research directions. We will begin with a brief overview of SIP and results from a few recent and current research efforts with emphasis on those of direct relevance to the National Weather Service. This overview will include projects on the public’s sources, perceptions, uses, and values for weather forecast information; the public’s and broadcast meteorologists’ interpretations of, use of, and preferences for weather forecast uncertainty information; estimates of weather-related damage in Storm Data; and support for NWS Service Assessments, including the Super Tuesday tornado outbreak. We will then present two research efforts in greater depth. First, we will discuss a survey of Miami households’ uses, perceptions, and values for current and improved hurricane forecasts. This will include a discussion of non-market approaches for estimating values for hurricane forecasts and ongoing research related to the Hurricane Forecast Improvement Project. Second, we will discuss ongoing NSF- and NOAA-funded research to improve weather warning systems, with a focus on flash floods and hurricanes. This work employs a multi-method approach to (1) study how weather warning information is created, interpreted and used by forecasters, public officials, media organizations, and the public; (2) explore the mental models that underlie people’s behavior with respect to weather warnings; and (3) apply the findings to improve development, communication, and use of weather warnings. The presentation will close with ideas for future work integrating social science into meteorology to help meet NOAA and NWS needs.
For questions about this seminar please contact Bob Glahn (301-713-1768; Harry.Glahn@noaa.gov) or Carl Mccalla (Carl.Mccalla@noaa.gov)
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html#OneNOAASeminar_08Jul2009_Lazo_etal
OneNOAA Science Seminar added Wednesday, June 24, 2009 8:51 AM
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html



Reducing Threats of Land-based Sources of Pollution to Human and Ecosystem Health: A case study for the Island of Dominica

* Seminar canceled * Thursday, 09 July 2009; 12:00-13:00 ETZ (SSMC-3, 2nd Floor, NOAA Central Library Silver Spring Seminar) * Seminar canceled *
Ed Kruse (International Affairs Specialist, NOS International Program Office)
Dominica is the northern most windward island in the Caribbean Sea. It’s economy is mainly supported by agriculture however the importance of tourism and specifically eco-tourism is a growing economic sector. A preliminary assessment of the vulnerability of the Springfield catchment area to impacts from anthropogenic pollutants was conducted to identify potential threats to the watershed and the drinking water supply. The Springfield catchment area serves as the drinking water source for the City of Roseau and the surrounding environs. Data were collected on water flow, land use, and basic physical/chemical parameters (DO, pH, nitrogen, dissolved solids) to establish an initial baseline. A preliminary inventory of point and nonpoint sources of pollution was obtained and the data were geocoded for analysis by the geographic information system. Data on landuse, soils, vegetation and topography were also collected and brought into ArcGis. Analysis of the data collected revealed several potential anthropogenic sources of contamination which could pose detrimental impacts to the catchments water quality. Important threats identified by this study included: (1) heavy erosion and sedimentation during high rainfall periods, (2) migration of pesticide and fertilizer residues into raw drinking water; (3) unregulated trash disposal within the catchment area, (4) potential high levels of disinfection by products (trihalomethanes and haloaetic acid) from chlorination of the drinking water., and runoff from road surfaces (oil,grease). Anthropogenic effects observed in the field or documented in the data review ranged from pesticide and fertilizer residues from farming practices, sedimentation, disinfection by products resulting from chlorination of organic rich water, and poorly planned human development development in the headwaters of the catchment area. The catchment is traversed by a major road connecting Roseau with the primary airport at Melville Hall. All drainage form the road drains directly into the catchment basin through a series of culverts and through direct runoff from the road surface. It is recommended that a source water protection plan be developed and implemented in combination with additional monitoring of water quality for disinfection byproducts, herbicides/pesticides, and microbiological contaminants particularily parasites that are resistant to disinfection by chlorination.
For further information please contact Mary Lou Cumberpatch (Mary.Lou.Cumberpatch@noaa.gov; 301-713-2600 Ext. 129) or Skip Theberge (Albert.E.Theberge.Jr@noaa.gov; 301-713-2600 Ext. 115). This seminar was originally scheduled for hursday, 25 June 2009; 12:00-13:00 ETZ. It has been re-scheduled for 09 July 2009.
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html#OneNOAASeminar_09Jul2009_Kruse
OneNOAA Science Seminar added Monday, May 4, 2009 7:05 AM / Last edited Wednesday, July 8, 2009 12:12 PM
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html




Climatology and scenarios of Texas hurricanes from planning perspective and other current activities at ECSC

Wednesday, 22 July 2009; 12:00 – 13:00 ETZ (SSMC-4, Room #8150, NOS seminar)
Dr. Tanveer Islam (Integrated Assessment Research Associate, NOAA Environmental Cooperative Science Center)
tanveerul.islam@famu.edu
The lack of public attention to preparedness for hurricanes and other potentially catastrophic disasters is a persistent phenomenon in American society. Most of the published materials on hurricanes are too demanding of time or technical expertise to meet the requirements of being "usable science" that might inform public planning or private investment in coastal counties and cities. This study provides a place-based approach to the organization and analysis of historic hurricane information in the context of informing decision-making in urban planning, disaster management and mitigation, and natural resource stewardship on the Texas coast. The metrics used here for "usable science" include visual representations of hurricane histories based on state-of the-art data and robust basic statistics, combined with a relatively brief explanatory text that can be understood by a broad range of interested citizens. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) hurricane track information for storms hitting Texas between 1851 and 2006 has been analyzed according to origin, intensity, speed of approach to the coast, and date. This analysis shows a significant percentage (54%) of the storms formed in the Gulf of Mexico with an even higher percentage for storms that hit the upper Texas coast. Although the overall temporal distribution generally shows the well known pattern of storm activity in August and September, Texas storms that form in the Gulf of Mexico have a significantly different temporal landfall pattern. The study also focuses on historic hurricanes that pose special challenges to emergency managers because of their rapid formation and landfall on the Texas coastline. All too often, hurricane planning is primarily informed by the most recent serious event, or by generic scenarios that do not reflect important regional hurricane characteristics that are "knowable" from historic records. By reconstructing scenarios of historic hurricanes that formed and made landfall rapidly on the Texas coastline, the study suggests that these storms are especially challenging for emergency planners, citizens, and public officials.
Presentations are available remotely via a combination of phone & webcast. Please be aware that remote access is limited to 50 connections on a first-come-first served basis, so we cannot guarantee participation. To participate remotely you must: 1) Dial 866-873-0221, and then wait for instructions. When prompted enter passcode 5574872 followed by the # sign. Please use your phone’s mute button (or toggle *6) during the presentation until you are ready to ask questions. 2) Go to the webcast site at http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?i=746752585&p=&t=c 3) Enter meeting number 746752585 if needed. No passcode is required. 4) Enter other required fields. 5) Indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy and click Proceed. For questions: contact Felix Martinez (Felix.Martinez@noaa.gov).
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html#OneNOAASeminar_22July2009_Islam
OneNOAA Science Seminar added Monday, May 11, 2009 10:36 AM
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html



Concept for a U.S. Space-Based Wind Lidar: Status and Current Activities

Tuesday, July 28, 2009, 12:00-13:00h ETZ (World Weather Building, Room 707, Camp Springs, MD; JCSDA-NCEP/EMC seminar)
Wayman Baker (Joint Center for Satellite Data Assimilation)
The measurement of global wind profiles is widely recognized as the most important unmet observational requirement for improving numerical weather forecasts. The wind field has a unique dynamical role in forcing the mass field to adjust to it at small scales in the extratropics and at all scales in the tropics. Inferring the wind field through the measurement of other quantities, as is currently done, leaves much room for improvement in the analyses for numerical forecasts and for climate monitoring. Doppler lidar technology can provide the direct measurement of wind profiles from space, with the first space-based demonstration, the European Space Agency’s Atmospheric Dynamics Mission (ADM), scheduled for launch in Spring 2011. ADM will measure line-of-sight winds via a single perspective view of the target atmospheric volume. In the U.S., a wind lidar concept has been developed which will measure the horizontal vector wind for the first time from two perspectives of the target volume. The U.S. concept also combines two different technologies, referred to as the “hybrid” approach, to obtain wind profiles from near the surface to the lower stratosphere. The U.S. wind lidar space-based concept will be discussed as well as some recent forecast impact results obtained with wind lidar data collected by aircraft during the THORPEX Pacific Area Regional Campaign (T-PARC) in Fall 2008.
Phone access: Domestic : (866) 715-2479, International: (517) 345-5260, Passcode : 9457557. For questions please contact Christina Bacon (301-763-8154 x 188; Christina.Bacon@noaa.gov) or Michiko Masutani (Michiko.Masutani@noaa.gov; 301-763-8000 ext. 7551).
Download presentation [PDF, ~1.7 MB]
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html#OneNOAASeminar_28Jul2009_Wayman
OneNOAA Science Seminar added Thursday, July 9, 2009 6:53 AM / Last updated Friday, July 24, 2009 7:01 AM
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html



Sea Grant 101: Have you ever wondered how the National Sea Grant College Program works - research, extension, and education?

Wednesday, 29 July 2009; 12:00 – 13:00 ETZ (SSMC-4, Room #8150, NOS seminar)
Dr. Nikola Garber (Assistant Director for Administration, NOAA Sea Grant)
Nikola.Garber@noaa.gov
For more than 40 years, the National Sea Grant College program has worked to create and maintain a healthy coastal environment and economy. A partnership between universities and the federal government’s National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration NOAA), Sea Grant directs federal resources to pressing problems in local communities. By drawing on the experience of more than 3,000 scientists, engineers, public outreach experts, educators and students from more than 300 institutions, Sea Grant is able to make an impact at local and state levels, and serve as a powerful national force for change. Come learn more about us!
Presentations are available remotely via a combination of phone & webcast. Please be aware that remote access is limited to 50 connections on a first-come-first served basis, so we cannot guarantee participation. To participate remotely you must: 1) Dial 866-873-0221, and then wait for instructions. When prompted enter passcode 5574872 followed by the # sign. Please use your phone’s mute button (or toggle *6) during the presentation until you are ready to ask questions. 2) Go to the webcast site at http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?i=746752585&p=&t=c 3) Enter meeting number 746752585 if needed. No passcode is required. 4) Enter other required fields. 5) Indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy and click Proceed. For questions: contact Felix Martinez (Felix.Martinez@noaa.gov).
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html#OneNOAASeminar_28Jul2009_Garber
OneNOAA Science Seminar added Friday, June 5, 2009 6:55 AM
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html

 


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August 2009 (scheduled OneNOAA Science Seminars in Bold)

Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri
03
05
07
10
13
14
18
20
24
25
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28

ther OneNOAA Science Seminars: Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
(Total number of OneNOAA Science seminars in August 2009: 11)



Land-related data and products from USGS and the Land Processes Distributed Active Archive Center (LP DAAC)

Tuesday, 04 August 2009, 10:00-11:00h ETZ (World Weather Building, Room 707, Camp Springs, MD; NESDIS/STAR seminar)
Kevin Gallo (NOAA / NESDIS / STAR at USGS Earth Resources Observation and Science (EROS))
Kevin.P.Gallo@noaa.gov
This seminar will include a review of the land-related data and products available from the USGS Center for Earth Resources Observation and Science (EROS) facility and the USGS/NASA Land Processes Distributed Active Archive Center (LP DAAC) that may be applicable for STAR research activities. Data sets and products reviewed will primarily include those available from the Landsat, MODIS and ASTER sensors. These sensors have spatial resolutions that range from 15m to 1000m and temporal resolutions from 1 to 16 days. An update on the activities of the CEOS Land Surface Imaging Constellation will also be discussed.
Phone access: U.S. participants: 866-832-9297; International participants: 203-566-7610; Passcode: 6070416. For questions please contact Ivan Csiszar (ivan.csiszar@noaa.gov; 301-763-8053 x114) or Xiwu Zhan (xiwu.zhan@noaa.gov, 301-763-8042 x148)
Dowload presentation [PDF, ~14 MB]
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html#OneNOAASeminar_04Aug2009_Gallo
See http://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/Gallo_K.php
OneNOAA Science Seminar added Wednesday, July 29, 2009 6:51 AM / Last updated Monday, August 3, 2009 1:48 PM
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html



Marine Spatial Planning and Ecosystem Based Management --The Rhode Island Example

Thursday, 06 August 2009; 12:00-13:00 ETZ (SSMC-3, 2nd Floor, NOAA Central Library Silver Spring Seminar)
Grover Fugate (Executive Director Coastal Resources Management Council, Oliver Stedman Government Center, Wakefield, Rhode Island)
The Rhode Island Ocean SAMP, or Ocean Special Area Management Plan, will define use zones for Rhode Island’s offshore waters through a research and planning process that integrates the best available science with open public input and involvement. From 2008 to 2010, through a public policy process that includes scientific research and stakeholder involvement, the Ocean SAMP will make Rhode Island the first state in the nation to zone its offshore waters for diverse activities including renewable energy development. This process will also protect current uses and habitats through zones for commercial fishing; critical habitats for fish, marine animals, and birds; marine transport; and more. Leading this project is the R.I. Coastal Resources Management Council (CRMC), the state’s coastal management agency. Among other responsibilities, CRMC is charged with managing the state’s submerged lands. CRMC has already zoned Rhode Island’s near-shore waters for a variety of uses, from industrial ports to conservation areas. CRMC is leading the SAMP effort with the support of the University of Rhode Island (URI). Federal agencies such as the Minerals Management Service and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, which have authority in federal waters, will participate, as will state agencies including the R.I. Department of Environmental Management. Research projects undertaken by URI scientists will provide the essential scientific basis for Ocean SAMP policy development. These projects assess wind speeds, appropriate technologies, marine life, geology, meteorology, and more. Information about each project is available on the Ocean SAMP web site.
For further information please contact Mary Lou Cumberpatch (Mary.Lou.Cumberpatch@noaa.gov; 301-713-2600 Ext. 129) or Skip Theberge (Albert.E.Theberge.Jr@noaa.gov; 301-713-2600 Ext. 115).
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html#OneNOAASeminar_06Aug2009_Fugate
Grover Fugate graduated from the University of Connecticut in 1976, with a degree in Natural Resource Management. After graduation Mr. Fugate worked in Canada in a series of positions including Forester, Land Use Planner, with the Department of Agriculture, Regional Resource Planner, with the Crown Lands Branch, and Director of Shore Zone Management. In 1984, Mr. Fugate completed his MBA from Memorial with a program specialization in resource policy analysis. In 1986, Mr. Fugate moved to Rhode Island to assume the duties of the Executive Director of the Coastal Resources Management Council. The council is an independent state agency, set up to be the principle planning and management agency for the state’s coastal areas. Mr. Fugate's current duties include, the day to day administration of the Rhode Island Coastal Resource Management Program for the State of Rhode Island. As part of his duties Mr. Fugate is the council’s and states representative to a number of boards, commissions, task forces, and other coastal related organizations. Mr. Fugate also holds an adjunct faculty position in the Marine Affairs Program at the University of Rhode Island and is a guest lecturer at Brown University and Roger Williams University Law School. He is also a trainer at the Coastal Resources Center for Integrated Coastal Management. He is the recipient of many citations from the Governor and the Legislature for his work in Coastal Management and Community Service. He is also the recipient of the 2008 Sea Grant Lifetime Achievement Award for Coastal Zone Management. Mr. Fugate has published articles on various issues in coastal and natural resource management.
OneNOAA Science Seminar added Monday, July 27, 2009 8:12 AM
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html



Tutorial: Using Web-based and Google Earth Maps of Projected Climate Change in Alaska

Tuesday 11 August 2009, 10:00-11:00h Alaska Daylight/Standard Time ( RISA/ACCAP seminar via teleconference only )
Nancy Fresco (Network Coordinator for Scenarios Network for Alaska Planning) and Katie Kennedy (Education and Outreach Coordinator for the University of Alaska Geography Program)
The University of Alaska, Scenarios Network for Alaska Planning (SNAP) provides quick and easy access to a wide range of climate projections for the state of Alaska at a 2km resolution. Data and maps are available for download in web-based and Google Earth formats. These maps show projected changes in temperature, precipitation, growing season length, freeze-up date and thaw date, and include documentation of uncertainties. Join this tutorial to learn how to view, interpret and download available data and maps and discuss upcoming SNAP products. Participants will need to download Google Earth onto their computer before the teleconference tutorial (see http://www.snap.uaf.edu/google-earth-maps). For assistance contact Brook Gamble, 907-474-7812, brook.gamble@alaska.edu.
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html#OneNOAASeminar_11Aug2009_Fresco_Kennedy

To Participate / Log-In to the Alaska Climate Teleconference: To view the presentation: 1) Point your web browser to: http://www.shareitnow.com, 2) Click on the blue ‘Join a Meeting’ button on the left side bar, 3) For Presenter ID enter: accap@uaf.edu. Teleconference: 1) Dial:1-800-893-8850, 2) When prompted, enter the PIN code: 7531823. To join us in person: If you are in Fairbanks, join us in person on the UAF campus in the Duckering Building Room 535. Map: http://www.uaf.edu/campusmap/ (purple zone). For more information about the Alaska Climate Teleconferences and the Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy, please contact Brook Gamble, Outreach and Education Specialist, (907) 474-7812, accap@uaf.edu ) or visit our website: www.uaf.edu/accap.

OneNOAA Science Seminar added Tuesday, August 4, 2009 6:40 AM
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html



Massachusetts Ocean Management Planning

Tuesday 11 Auguust 2009; 10:30-11:30 ETZ (SSMC-3, 2nd Floor, NOAA Central Library Silver Spring, NOS Seminar) * Note seminar time *
Bruce Carlisle (Deputy Director, Massachusetts Office of Coastal Zone Management)
On May 28, 2008 Governor Deval Patrick signed the Oceans Act of 2008. The Oceans Act requires the Secretary of Energy and Environmental Affairs to develop a comprehensive ocean management plan, following a scientific and stakeholder process that leads to a draft plan by summer of 2009, and the final promulgation of the plan by December 31, 2009. The plan will use comprehensive science-based planning to assure long-term protection and sustainable use of ocean resources and to accommodate the siting of appropriate scale offshore renewable energy facilities. The draft plan was released for public comment on June 30, 2009. Mr. Carlisle will talk about the process for developing the plan and the information it contains. More information on the Ocean Management Plan can be found on the Massachusetts CZM Program web site: http://www.mass.gov/czm/czm.htm. Sponsored by the NOAA NOS Office of Coastal and Resource Management, Atlantic Coastal Management Programs and Planning/Budgeting.
Bruce Carlisle is the Assistant Director of the Massachusetts Coastal Zone Management Program in the Executive Office of Environmental Affairs. Mr. Carlisle has been with CZM since 1993, serving in several positions, including coordinator of the Coastal Nonpoint Pollution Control Program and manager of the Wetlands Restoration Program, before being promoted to Assistant Director in 2005. Mr. Carlisle has a masters in Environmental Policy from Tufts University.

Remote access: 1. Join the meeting: http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?sigKey=mymeetings&i=742656968&p=FPGIRX9C&t=c, 2. Enter the required fields, 3. Indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy, 4. Click on Proceed. Audio is separate call-in: 866-631-5469, Passcode: 3958086. For further information please contact Mary Lou Cumberpatch (Mary.Lou.Cumberpatch@noaa.gov; 301-713-2600 Ext. 129) or Skip Theberge (Albert.E.Theberge.Jr@noaa.gov; 301-713-2600 Ext. 115).

http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html#OneNOAASeminar_11Aug2009_Carlisle
OneNOAA Science Seminar added Monday, August 10, 2009 7:00 AM / last updated Monday, August 10, 2009 1:27 PM
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html



Investigation of the Hurricane Katrina Case in New Orleans: National Weather Service Environmental Risk Communications Across Cultures

Wednesday, 12 August 2009; 12:00-13:00 ETZ (SSMC-3, 2nd Floor, NOAA Central Library Silver Spring Seminar)
Curtis D. Cary (Director of Communications and Executive Affairs for NOAA's NWS) and Vankita Brown (doctoral student in Mass Communications and Media Studies at Howard University in Washington, DC.)
Today, the National Weather Service has some of the most thorough products and precise lead times for predicting weather events; yet, with all its definitive data some people, because of adverse risk behavior, still succumb unnecessarily to weather incidents. This paradox has caused NWS to consider employing methods, thought to be unconventional in an empirical scientific environment that will examine this challenge. NOAA and the National Weather Service representatives recognize the importance of social science research and integrate disciplines such as, anthropology, psychology, sociology, economics, and communications to meet their goals and mission. This interdisciplinary approach will provide an opportunity to enhance and improve the ability of the NWS to protect life and property. As a part of this initiative, NWS has undertaken the task of investigating the impacts of culture on weather related risk communication on diverse and vulnerable populations. NWS Communications Director, Curtis Carey, Ph.D. and NOAA Graduate Scientist, Vankita Brown, are working together to discover ways in which culture influences risk perception and behavior during times of severe weather events and natural disasters. In June, Brown traveled to New Orleans for two weeks to talk with emergency management personnel, academic professionals, and residents for phase one of her ongoing research project on communicating risk across cultures. She will present her initial findings in this brown bag luncheon. Her study will serve as a framework or model to assist forecasters in developing more effective protocols and mechanisms for communicating risks to diverse and vulnerable publics.
For further information please contact Mary Lou Cumberpatch (Mary.Lou.Cumberpatch@noaa.gov; 301-713-2600 Ext. 129) or Skip Theberge (Albert.E.Theberge.Jr@noaa.gov; 301-713-2600 Ext. 115).
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html#OneNOAASeminar_12Aug2009_Cary
Curtis D. Carey, Ph.D., has a unique combination of international and domestic communications experience, serving in a variety of commercial broadcasting, government, military, and academic positions. He is currently the director of Communications and Executive Affairs for National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) National Weather Service. He has served as a national press officer for NOAA and the Department of The Interior, managing media relations on issues ranging from domestic energy policy to environmental sciences. Dr. Carey has a B.A. (cum laude) in Asian Studies with a minor in Communication from the University of the State of New York; a Graduate Certificate in Integrated Marketing Communication from the University of Denver; a M.A. in Communication from the University of Oklahoma; and a Ph.D. in Communication and Culture from Howard University in Washington, D.C.

Vankita Brown is a doctoral student in Mass Communications and Media Studies at Howard University in Washington, DC. She was granted the prestigious NOAA Graduate Scientist Fellowship in 2007 and is assigned to the National Weather Service. Her current research involves understanding how culture affects decision making and behavior in the threat of natural disasters.Prior to pursuing her Ph.D., Brown worked for various non-profit agencies in public relations. She is a member of Community Service Public Relations Council and CORO Women in Leadership. Brown is a recent recipient of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication’s Inez Kaiser Graduate Student of Color Award. She has a M.A. in Media Communications Management from Webster University in St. Louis, Missouri and a B.A. in Mass Communications from Southern Illinois University at Edwardsville.

OneNOAA Science Seminar added Tuesday, July 21, 2009 7:05 AM
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html



Propagation of Antarctic Bottom Water through abyssal channels in the Atlantic Ocean

Monday, 17 August 2009; 11:00-12:00 ETZ (SSMC-3, 4th Floor, Room 4817, NODC Seminar)
Dr. Eugene Morozov (Shirshov's Institute of Oceanology, Moscow, Russia)
A description of deep oceanic flows across fracturs in the Mid-Atlantic Ridge system.
For Webcast access: 1) go to http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?i=741283869&p=nodc1315&t=c; 2) type in other required fields (i.e., your name, e-mail, organization; meeting number is 741283869; password is "nodc1315" -password is case sensitive- ); 3) indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy; 4) click on Proceed. For phone access: toll free dial 877-916-2513 using a touch-tone phone; when prompted enter participant code 5877174 followed by a "#" (Please mute your phone during the presentation or toggle *6 otherwise it produces a sound feedback). Please note that webcast & phone access is limited to 50 connections on a first-come-first served basis. Webcast & phone access will start approximately 5 min before the seminar. If possible, seminar audio will be available via podcast together with the seminar slides following the seminar. For general questions about this seminar, please contact Hernan Garcia (Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov). For further information about the speaker, please contact Dan.Seidov@noaa.gov.
Dr. Eugene Morozov, is the director of Laboratory of Internal Waves at the Shirshov Institute of Oceanology, Russian Academy of Sciences, Russia. He is also Vice-President of the International Association for the Physical Sciences of the Oceans (IAPSO).
Download presentation [PDF]
Prof. Eugene Morozov graduated from Moscow Physical Technical Institute in 1970, defended PhD in 1975, dDefended Doctoral dissertation in 1989. He is the Head of Laboratory at the Shirshov Institute of Oceanology . He has over 150 publications, 38 expeditions to different regions of the ocean, last in May 2009 . His research background: (1) Field observations, data processing, and interpretation and (2) Physical oceanography: Internal waves, mesoscale eddies, coastal dynamics, general circulation. His research instrests are in flows in deep channels (Seven expeditions to the South Atlantic). He is the vice President of the IAPSO (International Association for the Physical Sciences in the Ocean).
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html#OneNOAASeminar_17Aug2009_Morozov
OneNOAA Science Seminar added Wednesday, February 11, 2009 7:14 AM \ Last edited Monday, August 17, 2009 10:47 AM
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html



Coastal margin 'collaboratories': oceanography, re-visited

Wednesday, 19 August 2009; 12:00 – 13:00 ETZ (SSMC-4, Room #8150, NOS seminar)
Antonio Baptista
baptista@stccmop.org
The Center for Coastal Margin Observation and Prediction (CMOP), one of 17 NSF Science and Technology Centers and one of only two STCs dedicated to the study of the ocean, is built on the premise that 'collaboratories' are transformative agents for coastal margin understanding, management and operation. We define 'collaboratories' as networked integrations of sensors, platforms, models, data, analyses and collaboration & social processes. CMOP has created and maintains SATURN, a novel inter-disciplinary collaboratory for the Columbia River coastal margin. Besides a description of the SATURN components and their integration, the talk will address the evolving impact of the collaboratory on the scientific and practical understanding of the Columbia River ecosystem, its contemporary variability, and its historical and anticipated changes under continuing development and evolving large-scale stresses. Using SATURN as foundation, and OOI and IOOS as umbrella context, the talk will also examine opportunities for broadly collaborative, anticipatory, gene-to-climate thinking on the impact of climate and human activities on coastal margins.
Presentations are available remotely via a combination of phone & webcast. Please be aware that remote access is limited to 50 connections on a first-come-first served basis, so we cannot guarantee participation. To participate remotely you must: 1) Dial 866-873-0221, and then wait for instructions. When prompted enter passcode 5574872 followed by the # sign. Please use your phone’s mute button (or toggle *6) during the presentation until you are ready to ask questions. 2) Go to the webcast site at http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?i=746752585&p=&t=c 3) Enter meeting number 746752585 if needed. No passcode is required. 4) Enter other required fields. 5) Indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy and click Proceed. For questions: contact Felix Martinez (Felix.Martinez@noaa.gov).
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html#OneNOAASeminar_19Aug2009_Baptista
OneNOAA Science Seminar added Friday, July 31, 2009 1:45 PM
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html



GPS-RO and the Next Generation Occultation System

Wednesday, 19 August 2009, 14:00-15:00h ETZ (World Weather Building, Room 209, Camp Springs, MD; JCSDA seminar)
Dr. Robert Kursinski (Department of Atmospheric Sciences, University of Arizona)
This talk will summarize research by our group at the University of Arizona related to GPS radio occultation (RO) and a next generation RO system called the Active Temperature, Ozone and Moisture Microwave Spectrometer (ATOMMS). GPS RO is receiving more attention with time as the weather and climate communities become aware of its features such as ~200 m vertical resolution, high precision, self calibration and high accuracy and retrievals in both clear and cloudy conditions. Under the assumption of spherical symmetry, the refractivity profiles derived from bending angle profiles are unique (except sometimes in the low latitude boundary layer). The instruments are small and inexpensive such that a constellation of these receivers like the 6 satellite COSMIC mission can provide full diurnal coverage. These features are well suited for weather prediction and climate. We will summarize our results studying the low latitude water cycle using the wealth of information from the CHAMP and COSMIC GPSRO missions about vertical water distribution between 2.5 and 8.5 km. We have developed a new method to grid the GPS RO data, identified a preliminary free tropospheric water vapor-based ENSO index and found new predictive skill for ENSO. We have also uncovered indications of a substantial negative feedback between the 2007 El Nino and 2008 La Nina that may be related to why 2008 was a relatively cold year. We have been working to increase the NWP impact of GPSRO data in the lower troposphere by improving the error covariance and correcting the cause of a negative refractivity bias in the lower troposphere due to a combination of receiver signal tracking problems (which improved greatly with the open loop receivers on COSMIC) and super-refraction, a ducting effect that often occurs at the top of the marine boundary layer that has limited the use of GPSRO data in the lower troposphere. We are working to implement an algorithm we developed that accounts and corrects for super-refraction. While quite powerful, GPSRO is limited by GPS frequencies chosen to minimize interaction with the atmosphere. We will present an overview of a new RO system that we are developing at the University of Arizona for climate that probes the atmosphere at frequencies near absorption lines of key atmospheric species. ATOMMS combines many of the best features of GPSRO and the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS). An ATOMMS instrument prototype is near completion in preparation for an aircraft-to-aircraft occultation demonstration in 2010.
See http://www.atmo.arizona.edu/~kursinsk/kursinski.html
Phone Access: Toll free 1-866-715-2479 Passcode: 9457557 ; International: 1-517-345-5260. For questions please contact Christina Bacon (301-763-8154 x 188; Christina.Bacon@noaa.gov).
Download presentation [PDF; 2 MB]
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html#OneNOAASeminar_19Aug2009_Kursinski
OneNOAA Science Seminar added Monday, August 10, 2009 6:49 AM / Last edited Wednesday, August 19, 2009 8:11 AM
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html



Diagnostic Monitoring of Rip Currents on Southern California Beaches

Wednesday, 19 August 2009; 14:00-15:00 ETZ (SSMC-2, Room 2358, NWS Science and Technology Seminars)
Stephan B. Smith and Chung-Sheng Wu (Meteorological Development Laboratory, Office of Science and Technology, National Weather Service)
A pilot project was conducted to train lifeguards to provide surf and rip current observations on Moonlight Beach in Encinitas, California. The observations were used to study the rip current phenomenon in Southern California and to validate different derivations of rip current monitoring indices. The manual observations are used to populate a database that began in 2007 and that now contains more than 400 days worth of rip current observations. Analysis indicates that during the late spring and summer, rip currents are most often produced by swells originating from the south-southwesterly quadrant and by waves of 2-5 ft heights. During the winter, northwesterly sea swells produce very strong rip currents. During the seasonal transition period, rips are less common. Using the lifeguard observations, we validated different indices for diagnosing the conditions conducive to rip currents, particularly, moderate-strong rips. We compared the quality of lifeguard observations with data derived from a coastal wave model initialized with off-shore buoy data. Our interaction with the Southern California lifeguard community has led us to examine rip currents within the context of beach safety. In particular, we consider how rip current danger is dependent not only the wave and surf conditions, but on the behavior of common beachgoers as well.
For questions about this seminar please contact Bob Glahn (301-713-1768; Harry.Glahn@noaa.gov)
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html#OneNOAASeminar_19Aug2009_Smith_Wu
OneNOAA Science Seminar added Thursday August 13, 2009 2:15 PM
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html



Chart the Future: NOAA's Next Generation Strategic Plan

Friday 21 August 2009; 12:00-13:00 ETZ (SSMC-3, 2nd Floor, NOAA Central Library Silver Spring Seminar)
Paul Doremus (Deputy Assistant Administrator & Director of Strategic Planning, NOAA Program, Planning and Integration)
It’s time to *Chart the Future* to better prepare for the external developments and challenges we face while continuing to serve as the nation’s most trusted source on environmental leadership. Join us in our commitment to reassess and renew the mission, vision, and goals of NOAA as part of the Next Generation Strategic Plan. The objective of the Next Generation Strategic Plan is to inform and respond to the priorities of the new administration; to engage and respond to stakeholders; to respond to the long-term external challenges facing the agency; and to meet the GPRA and related requirements. This initiative aims to support our role in helping understand and predict changes in Earth's environment and conserve and manage coastal and marine resources to meet our Nation's economic, social, and environmental needs.
Remote access via webinar: 1. Join the meeting: http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?sigKey=mymeetings&i=742656968&p=FPGIRX9C&t=c; 2. Enter the required fields; 3. Indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy; 4. Click on Proceed. Audio is separate call-in: 866-631-5469; Passcode: 3958086. For further information please contact Mary Lou Cumberpatch (Mary.Lou.Cumberpatch@noaa.gov; 301-713-2600 Ext. 129) or Skip Theberge (Albert.E.Theberge.Jr@noaa.gov; 301-713-2600 Ext. 115).
Download presentation [PPT]
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html#OneNOAASeminar_21Aug2009_Doremus
OneNOAA Science Seminar added Friday, August 14, 2009 10:49 AM / Last updated Monday, August 24, 2009 9:21 AM
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html



Surf Research in Hawaii: Using Historical Records to Improve Surf and Surf-related Coastal Flood Forecasts

Thursday, 27 August 2009, 12:00-13:00h ETZ (SSMC-3, 4th Floor, Room 4817, NODC Seminar)
Patrick Caldwell [NOAA Data Center Hawaii Liaison (NESDIS/NODC/NCDDC)]
Patrick.Caldwell@noaa.gov
It all started with an Internet-based, NODC-sponsored, un-official, recreational surf forecast for Oahu, Hawaii in 1997 by the NODC Pacific Islands liaison based at the University of Hawaii. In 2002, to keep a single voice to the public from NOAA, a collaborative Oahu surf forecast was initiated with the National Weather Service (NWS), Honolulu Forecast Office (HFO). At this time, the HFO had recently changed from a colloquial method for sizing surf heights, referred to as the Hawaii scale, to an oceanographic standard of trough to crest, referred to as face. But breakers are dynamic-- definitions were needed to clarify face heights spatially and temporally. Another issue was how to convert deep water swell characteristics to breaker face heights. These questions were investigated using daily observations of surf and the regional buoy network. Historical records were made in Hawaii scale, which were translated to face height using photographic evidence. An empirical formula, which matched buoy measurements to the surf observations, was created to estimate breaker heights based on deep water swell. This formula is now operational at the HFO. Hourly buoy and tide data back to 1981 were used to develop a scheme to forecast extreme wave run-up during coinciding high surf and tide events. This scheme offers the HFO a guidance product for triggering extreme surf warnings, which are issued when there are potentially destructive impacts to shoreline infrastructure such as homes, highways, and harbors. Surf studies by the NODC liaison have been published in three articles by the Journal of Coastal Research.
For Webcast access: 1) go to http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?i=741283869&p=nodc1315&t=c; 2) type in other required fields (i.e., your name, e-mail, organization; meeting number is 741283869; password is "nodc1315" -password is case sensitive- ); 3) indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy; 4) click on Proceed. For phone access: toll free dial 877-916-2513 using a touch-tone phone; when prompted enter participant code 5877174 followed by a "#" (Please mute your phone during the presentation or toggle *6 otherwise it produces a sound feedback). Please note that webcast & phone access is limited to 50 connections on a first-come-first served basis. Webcast & phone access will start approximately 5 min before the seminar. If possible, seminar audio will be available via podcast together with the seminar slides following the seminar. For general questions about this seminar, please contact Hernan Garcia (Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov).
Mr. Patrick Caldwell is the NOAA Data Center Hawaii Liaison (NESDIS/NODC/NCDDC) .
Download power point presentation [PPT]
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html#OneNOAASeminar_27Aug2009_Caldwell
OneNOAA Science Seminar added Monday, June 29, 2009 3:05 PM / Last updated Monday, August 24, 2009 3:31 PM
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html



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September 2009 (scheduled OneNOAA Science Seminars in Bold)

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Other OneNOAA Science Seminars: Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
(Total number of OneNOAA Science seminars in September 2009: 12)

 



Identifying key climate change information for marine and coastal ecological research

Wednesday, 09 September 2009; 12:00 – 13:00 ETZ (SSMC-4, Room 8150, NOS seminar)
Karsten Shein (NOAA National Climatic Data Center)
Karsten.Shein@noaa.gov
A growing awareness of the potentially significant adverse effects that a variable climate may have on marine and coastal ecosystems has prompted “climate change” to be widely labeled as one of the foremost threats to those ecosystems. However, although a growing body of research is focused on the perceived impacts of climate change on marine and coastal ecosystems, and the environmental tolerance envelopes of many species are well documented through geographic analysis and laboratory studies, establishing correlations between climate variables and species health addresses just one aspect of the full impacts a variation in the overlying climate may have on a particular ecosystem. Arguably as important as establishing which climatic conditions may play a role in exacerbating ecosystem stress is to understand how those conditions behave in space and time, and which ones may present the most dominant influence on species health. Unfortunately, information on these details of climate change is often not readily available or can easily be misinterpreted. Time-series observations from sparse networks, satellite imagery, and regionalized averages of climate variables may provide some information, but coarse resolutions and limited spatial coherence can hinder interpretation at the local scale. This discussion addresses some of the ways in which appropriate climate change information can be developed and presented to support marine and coastal research and decision making, discusses some of the climate information products and services of the NOAA National Climatic Data Center, and details the scope and limitations of relevant climatological data.
Presentations are available remotely via a combination of phone & webcast. Please be aware that remote access is limited to 50 connections on a first-come-first served basis, so we cannot guarantee participation. To participate remotely you must: 1) Dial 1-866-816-8440, and then wait for instructions. When prompted enter passcode 3770077 followed by the # sign. Please use your phone’s mute button (or toggle *6) during the presentation until you are ready to ask questions. 2) Go to the webcast site at http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?i=746752585&p=&t=c 3) Enter meeting number 746752585 if needed. No passcode is required. 4) Enter other required fields. 5) Indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy and click Proceed. For questions: contact Felix Martinez (Felix.Martinez@noaa.gov). Note new phone/passcode acces codes.
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html#OneNOAASeminar_09Sep2009_Shein
OneNOAA Science Seminar added Tuesday, July 21, 2009 6:43 AM / Last updated Tuesday, September 8, 2009 11:00 AM
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html



The 7th Framework Program for Research of the European Commission - Transatlantic opportunities for research cooperation

Thursday, 10 September 2009; 12:00-13:00 ETZ (SSMC-3, 2nd Floor, NOAA Central Library Silver Spring Seminar)
Dr.Astrid-Christina Koch (Science Counselor, Science, Technology and Education, Delegation of the European Commission)
The European Commission would like to increase the knowledge within NOAA about our 7th Framework Programme and lay the foundation for developing ways to collaborate on research and policy topics (Examples, but not limited to: space weather, earth observation, data management, modelling, ocean management, climate change impacts). The European Commission launched new calls for research proposals in a variety of areas -- all open to partnerships with countries from outside the European Research Area, including the United States. U.S. research institutions, universities and industry are invited to join research proposals under the Cooperation, Capacities and People Programme of the Seventh Framework Programme for Research and Development (FP7).
Remote access: Audio: 866-631-5469 (passcode 3958086). For further information please contact Mary Lou Cumberpatch (Mary.Lou.Cumberpatch@noaa.gov; 301-713-2600 Ext. 129) or Skip Theberge (Albert.E.Theberge.Jr@noaa.gov; 301-713-2600 Ext. 115).
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html#OneNOAASeminar_10Sep2009_Koch
OneNOAA Science Seminar added Tuesday, September 8, 2009 12:45 PM
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html



(1) Outcomes of BoM FEWS Pilot – Stage 1
(2) The Flood Warning Data Collection and Enviromon (ALERT) Event Reporting System with a live demo of Enviromon

Thursday, 10 September 2009; 10:00 -- 12:00 ETZ (SSMC-2, Room 8246, NWS OHD Seminar)
Robert Thompson (Australia Bureau of Meteorology)
TBD
GotoMeeting: https://www1.gotomeeting.com/join/606041313; Teleconference: 866-713-2373, Passcode 9960047. For further information please contact ken.pavelle@noaa.gov.
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html#OneNOAASeminar_10Sep2009_Thompson
OneNOAA Science Seminar added Thursday, September 10, 2009 6:17 AM
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html



Seminar Title:

Detecting Change in Arctic Sea Ice Using Satellite Altimetry

Date/Location:
Friday, 11 September 2009; 12:00 - 13:00 ETZ (World Weather Building, Science Center, Room 707, Camp Springs, MD; NESDIS-STAR seminar)
Speaker(s):
Dr. Sinéad Louise Farrell (University of Maryland), Dr. Laurence Connor (NOAA/NESDIS/STAR Laboratory for Satellite Altimetry), and Dr. David McAdoo (NOAA/NESDIS/STAR Laboratory for Satellite Altimetry).
E-mail(s):
Sinead.Farrell@noaa.gov, Laurence.Connor@noaa.gov, Dave.McAdoo@noaa.gov
Abstract:

Sea ice is an important indicator of climate change, and a key component of the polar climate system. Ongoing loss of Arctic sea ice has serious implications for climate change, ocean circulation, the Arctic ecosystem, and economic development in the region. Areal shrinkage of Arctic sea ice has been observed over the last three decades, and its decline is now proceeding faster than forecasted. A record minimum ice extent was reached in September 2007. The latest satellite observations of sea ice freeboard also reveal a decline in ice thickness, in line with the observed changes in ice extent and the loss of multiyear ice. An extensive monitoring of Arctic-wide sea ice thinning using satellite altimeters is now necessary to determine whether such observations are part of a sustained negative trend in Arctic ice thickness or a reflection of the natural, interannual variability. It is key to first validate satellite altimeter data over sea ice. We achieve this by making comparisons with "ground-truth" observations gathered from low altitude aircraft under-flights and in-situ measurements collected on the sea ice itself. We will discuss recent validation experiments which we have conducted in the Arctic, with particular emphasis on the Canada Basin Sea Ice Thickness (CBSIT) experiment completed earlier this year.

Remote Access & Notes:
Dial-In Information: U.S. participants: 866-832-9297, International participants: 203-566-7610, Passcode: 6070416. Seminar takes place at: Center for Satellite Applications & Research (STAR), World Weather Building, Science Center, Room 707, 5200 Auth Road, Camp Springs, MD 20746. For further information please conatct Bruce Ramsay (301-405-9205; Bruce.H.Ramsay@noaa.gov) or Juanita Coller (301-763-8282 Ext 100; juanita.coller@noaa.gov).
Download presentation
Download presentation [PDF]
Notes about the speaker(s):
Dr. Sinéad Louise Farrell (see http://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/Farrell_S.php)
Dr. David McAdoo (see http://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/McAdoo_D.php).
Web link to this OneNOAA science seminar announcement
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html#OneNOAASeminar_11Sep2009_Farrell_etal
OneNOAA Science Seminar Added:
OneNOAA Science Seminar added Friday, September 4, 2009 11:38 AM / Last updated Friday, September 11, 2009 12:02 PM
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html



Seminar Title:

Climate Change Impacts on Water Availability in Alaska

Date/Location:
Tuesday, 15 September 2009; 10:00-11:00 am Alaska Local Time (RISA/ACCAP seminar via teleconference)
Speaker(s):
Brendan J. O’Brien (Climate Change Analyst, The Wilderness Society)
Abstract:
This webinar reports results of research using data from the Scenarios Network for Alaska Planning (SNAP) to downscale and map projected changes in surface water availability state-wide. Future estimates of potential evapotranspiration have been calculated from averaged monthly climate data from 5 global circulation models, previously evaluated as best-fit for Alaska. Future projections are compared with a historical baseline to determine the magnitude of change over time. With significantly more water leaving the landscape, growing season water availability is likely to drop below historic levels by mid-century, leading to more severe water deficits across the landscape. Such a dramatic decrease in water availability will likely have strong impacts on the wildlife, vegetation, and human communities that depend on water resources. Join us to learn more about projected changes in water availability state-wide. With this information, Alaskans will be better prepared to identify species, landscapes and communities that are vulnerable to change. For the full text of the report, go to: http://www.snap.uaf.edu/downloads/climate-change-impacts-water-availability-alaska.
Remote Access & Notes:
To Participate / Log-In to the Alaska Climate Teleconference: http://www.uaf.edu/accap/teleconference.htm. Teleconference: 1) Dial:1-800-893-8850; 2) When prompted, enter the PIN code: 7531823. To view the presentation during a teleconference: 1) Point your web browser to: http://www.shareitnow.com; 2) Click on the blue *Join a Meeting* button on the left side bar. 3) For Presenter ID enter: accap@uaf.edu. To join us in person: If you are in Fairbanks, join us in person on the UAF campus in the Duckering Building Room 535. Map: http://www.uaf.edu/campusmap/ (purple zone). For more information about the Alaska Climate Teleconferences and the Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy, please contact Brook Gamble, Outreach and Education Specialist, (907) 474-7812, accap@uaf.edu] or visit www.uaf.edu/accap.
Web link to this OneNOAA science seminar announcement
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html#OneNOAASeminar_15Sep2009_OBrien
OneNOAA Seminar Added:
OneNOAA Science Seminar added Wednesday, September 2, 2009 7:47 AM
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html



Seminar Title:

Communicating NOAA's Science Through Social Media Tools

Date/Location:
Wednesday, 16 September 2009; 12:00-13:00 ETZ (SSMC-3, 2nd Floor, NOAA Central Library Seminar)
Speaker(s):
Bradley Akamine (NOAA Director of Online Communications), Ron Jones (NWS Internet Projects Specialist and Chair, DoC Social Media Working Group), Pat Erdenberger (NOAA Records Officer), Kate Naughten (NOAA Fisheries), and Emily Crum (NOAA National Ocean Service)
Abstract:
Panel Discussion on best practices, policies, and innovative use of social media tools within NOAA and Department of Commerce. Join Bradley Akamine, NOAA Director of Online Communications, Ron Jones, NWS Internet Projects Specialist and Chair, DoC Social Media Working Group, Pat Erdenberger, NOAA Records Officer, Kate Naughten, NOAA Fisheries, and Emily Crum, NOAA National Ocean Service. Lively discussion promised on using these new technology and communications tools to make NOAA data and science more useful, more efficient and more transparent to the public.
Remote Access & Notes:
For further information please contact Mary Lou Cumberpatch (Mary.Lou.Cumberpatch@noaa.gov; 301-713-2600 Ext. 129) or Skip Theberge (Albert.E.Theberge.Jr@noaa.gov; 301-713-2600 Ext. 115).
Download presentation
Download presentation [PDF]
Web link to this OneNOAA science seminar announcement
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html#OneNOAASeminar_16Sep2009_Akamine_etal
OneNOAA Seminar Aded:
OneNOAA Science Seminar added Friday, August 7, 2009 11:44 AM / Last updated Monday, September 21, 2009 10:13 AM
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html




Seminar Title:

Cyber-enabled Real Time Rain Gauge Quality Control and Radar Bias Adjustment

Date/Location:
Wednesday, 16 September 2009; 14:00 PM - 15:00 ETZ (SSMC-2, Room 10246, NWS OHD Seminar)
Speaker(s):
David J. Hill (Rutgers University in Piscataway, NJ)
Abstract:
Radar-rainfall data are being used in an increasing number of real-time applications because of their wide spatial and temporal coverage. Because of uncertainties in radar measurements and the relationship between radar measurements and rainfall on the ground, radar-rainfall data are often combined with rain gauge data to improve their accuracy. However, while rain gauges can provide accurate estimates of rainfall, their data are sometimes corrupted with errors caused by the environment in which the gauges are deployed. This study develops methods for real-time combination of weather radar and rain gauge data that accounts for possible failures of the rain gauges. These methods employ Dynamic Bayesian Networks (DBNs) to assimilate data from multiple rain gauges and a weather radar into an uncertain model of the current rainfall. Filtering (e.g. Kalman filtering) can then be used to infer the likelihood that a particular gauge measurement is anomalous. Measurements with a high likelihood of being anomalous are classified as such. Because of the uncertainty in the relationship between the radar and rainfall measurements, the methods use a machine learning method (expectation maximization) to determine the best parameters for this relationship given a moving window of previous measurements. The performance of the anomaly detector developed in this study is demonstrated using a precipitation sensor network composed of a WSR-88D weather radar and several near-real-time telemetered rain gauges deployed by the USGS in Chicago. The results indicate that the method performs well at identifying anomalous data caused by a real sensor failure.
Remote Access & Notes:
GotoMeeting: https://www1.gotomeeting.com/join/941896345. Teleconference: 888-282-0413; Passcode 50627. For further information please contact ken.pavelle@noaa.gov.
Notes about the speaker(s):
David J. Hill is an assistant professor at Rutgers University in Piscataway, NJ. He received a B.S. degree in Civil and Environmental Engineering from Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, and a M.S. and Ph.D. from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Prior to joining the Rutgers faculty he was a postdoctoral research associate at the National Center for Supercomputing Applications. His research interests include real-time modeling of large scale water resources systems, real-time sensing of environmental systems, fusion of multi-scale measurements from remote and embedded sensor networks, and assimilation of sensor data into predictive models.
Web link to this OneNOAA science seminar announcement
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html#OneNOAASeminar_16Sep2009_Hill
OneNOAA Science Seminar Added:
OneNOAA Science Seminar added Monday, September 14, 2009 1:43 PM
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html



Seminar Title:

Real-Time Optimization of Combined Sewer Overflows Using Blue Dolphin, an Advanced Information System for Real-Time Decision Making

Date/Location:
Wednesday, 16 September 2009; 15:00 PM - 16:00 ETZ (SSMC-2, Room 10246, NWS OHD Seminar)
Speaker(s):
Barbara Minsker (University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign)
Abstract:
This talk will present ongoing efforts to create a real-time optimization system to improvement management of sewer overflows. Despite careful planning and infrastructure design, sewer overflows still occur frequently in association with precipitation events. From the 9,348 regulated combined sewer overflow (CSO) outfalls in the United States, the EPA estimates that about 850 billion gallons of untreated wastewater and stormwater are released as CSOs each year, while an estimated three to ten billion gallons of untreated wastewater are released into waterways each year through sanitary sewer overflows (SSOs) (EPA, 2004). In 1993, heavy spring rains and snowmelt carried sewage containing cryptosporidium parvum oocysts into Lake Michigan, causing the largest waterborne disease outbreak in documented U.S. history, an event that sickened over 400,000 people in Milwaukee, WI (Corso et al., 2003; MacKensie et al., 1994). This research is currently focusing on a case study in Chicago, where over 300 combined sewer outfall points exist within the service area of the Metropolitan Water Reclamation District of Greater Chicago (MWRDGC). MWRDGC’s Tunnel and Reservoir Plan (TARP) was designed to prevent CSOs by directing potential overflows into a deep tunnel system; the gravity-driven tunnels and reservoirs are controlled by pumping stations which direct flows to treatment plants. Many overflow connections to the tunnels include sluice gates that allow control of TARP inflows. Operator decisions to open or close gates at certain outfalls are currently correlated to predefined threshold tunnel levels. This research seeks to minimize the number of CSOs into Chicago waterways by providing tunnel operators with a near-real-time likelihood of overflows during storm events, as well as the optimal sequence of management decisions (consisting of pumping rates, treatment plant inflows, and sluice gate closure levels) at multiple time steps throughout each storm. Efforts to date have focused primarily on identifying hydrologic and infrastructure characteristics that correlate with sewer overflows and creating a simplified large-scale hydrologic/hydraulic model of the system. In parallel, we are creating real-time rainfall estimates from NEXRAD radar and rain gage data that will serve as inputs to the model. A genetic algorithm (GA) for real-time optimization is also being created that will minimize the cumulative volume of combined sewer outflows. Initial work is using off-line historical data sources in hindcasting mode to test and verify approaches. Early results for a hypothetical case study based on Chicago show a 70% reduction in overflows from optimization. Current research is extending the models to a portion of the Chicago River. Future plans include real-time decision updates that incorporate dynamic, measured system state variables such as combined sewer and river water levels.
Remote Access & Notes:
GotoMeeting: https://www1.gotomeeting.com/join/941896345. Teleconference: 888-282-0413; Passcode 50627. For further information please contact ken.pavelle@noaa.gov.
Notes about the speaker(s):
Barbara Minsker is Professor of Environmental and Water Resources Systems Engineering in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Director of the Environmental Engineering, Science, and Hydrology Group at the National Center for Supercomputing Applications, and Associate Provost Fellow in the Office of the Provost at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign. She earned her PhD in Environmental Systems Engineering from Cornell University in 1995 and has been at the University of Illinois since 1996. Her research interests are in creating improved methods for modeling complex environmental systems so that informed management-level decisions can be made under conditions of uncertainty.
Web link to this OneNOAA science seminar announcement
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html#OneNOAASeminar_16Sep2009_Misker
OneNOAA Science Seminar Added:
OneNOAA Science Seminar added Monday, September 14, 2009 1:45 PM
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html



Seminar Title:

Building Partnerships to Improve Climate and Drought Monitoring on the Southern Colorado Plateau

Date/Location:
Thursday, 17 September 2009 ; 12:00-13:00 ETZ (SSMC-3, 2nd Floor, NOAA Central Library, seminar sponsored by NOAA Climate Program Office)
Speaker(s):
Daniel Ferguson (Program Manager, CLIMAS, University of Arizona), Mike Crimmins (Climate Science Extension Specialist, University of Arizona), Arnold Taylor (Hopi Department of Natural Resources)
Abstract:
Over the last several years, the Climate Assessment for the Southwest (CLIMAS) program, based at the University of Arizona, has worked with a wide variety of stakeholders in the Southwest to increase their capacity to cope with ongoing drought conditions. In recent years, stakeholders have become increasingly concerned with understanding and planning for anticipated climate changes, including the possibility of prolonged drought conditions throughout the region. The warmer and drier conditions already experienced in the Southwest are resulting in significant cultural and socioeconomic impacts that are expected to worsen with increased warming. In Arizona and New Mexico, American Indian Nations are managing large areas of land and water resources, yet they often lack robust climate data and information to inform their decisions. This presentation will focus on emerging CLIMAS efforts to partner with the Hopi Nation and Navajo Nation to: 1) help develop a network of natural resource managers that ensures better access to drought and climate information and 2) improve climate and drought monitoring on the southern Colorado Plateau. This emergent work with Native Nations is part of ongoing CLIMAS efforts to build the long-term partnerships necessary to foster climate adaptation capacity throughout the Southwest.
Remote Access & Notes:
For further information please contact Mary Lou Cumberpatch (Mary.Lou.Cumberpatch@noaa.gov; 301-713-2600 Ext. 129) or Skip Theberge (Albert.E.Theberge.Jr@noaa.gov; 301-713-2600 Ext. 115).
Web link to this OneNOAA science seminar announcement
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html#OneNOAASeminar_17Sep2009_Ferguson_etal
OneNOAA Science Seminar Added:
OneNOAA Science Seminar added Tuesday, September 8, 2009 7:06 AM
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html



Seminar Title:

The Value of In-stream Water Temperature Forecasts: An Application to Salmonid Management in the Pacific Northwest

Date/Location:
Wednesday, 17 September 2009; 13:00 PM - 14:00 ETZ (SSMC-2, Room 8246, NWS OHD Seminar)
Speaker(s):
Richard M. Adams (Oregon State University)
Abstract:
Water temperature is an important factor affecting aquatic life within the stream environment. Cold water species, such as salmonids, are particularly susceptible to elevated water temperatures. For example, increased water temperatures are believed to have been the major cause of a large fish kill observed in the Klamath River in September 2002. This paper examines the economic value of short-term (7 to 10 days) water temperature forecasts for salmonid management. Forecasts may have value if they allow the water resource manager to make more cost-effective water allocation decisions. This study considers two applications. One is the case of adult Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) returning to the lower Klamath River in California. Water management in this setting involves the potential release of cooler water upstream from Lewiston Dam on the Trinity River, the major tributary to the Klamath River. Such water releases create opportunity costs because of foregone hydropower production and crop irrigation. The second application is to steelhead trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) in the North Fork of the John Day River. The water mangement decision here is to lease water from agriculture to prevent water temperature increases during critical late summer time periods. The opportunity cost is in the form of lower crop yields. This assessment incorporates bio-physical models and water temperature distribution data into a Bayesian framework to simulate changes in fish populations and the corresponding opportunity cost of water under different temperature forecast accuracies. Simulation results indicate that use of the forecasts results in increased fish production. The resultant marginal cost in the Klamath River declines from about $74 per fish when the forecast standard deviation is 6 (moderate accuracy) to about $34 when the forecast standard deviation is 0 (perfect forecast). In the John Day River the marginal cost per fish declines from $34 for a standard deviation of 6 to $29 for a perfect forecast. While these findings are conditioned on the accuracy of the numerous models and assumptions embedded in this assessment, a key result of the assessment is the pattern of declining marginal costs as forecast accuracy increases, suggesting that provision and use of such stream temperature forecasts would have potential value to society. To assess the overall efficacy of adding water temperature forecasts to the suite of NOAA weather products, these benefits need to be compared with the costs of providing such forecasts.
Remote Access & Notes:
GotoMeeting: https://www1.gotomeeting.com/join/909996456. Teleconference: 866-713-2373 Passcode 9960047#. For further information please contact ken.pavelle@noaa.gov.
Notes about the speaker(s):
Richard M. Adams is Professor Emeritus of Agricultural and Resource Economics at Oregon State University. He has served as editor of the American Journal of Agricultural Economics and associate editor for Water Resources Research and the Journal of Environmental Economics and Management. He is a member of various government committees dealing with climate change, air and water pollution and other environmental issues.
Web link to this OneNOAA science seminar announcement
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html#OneNOAASeminar_16Sep2009_Adams
OneNOAA Science Seminar Added:
OneNOAA Science Seminar added Monday, September 14, 2009 1:45 PM
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html



A Program Evaluation Network for NOAA

Date/Location:
Tuesday, 22 September 2009; 12:00-13:00 ETZ (SSMC-3, 2nd Floor, NOAA Central Library Seminar)
Speaker(s):
Cassandra Barnes (Policy, Planning, and Evaluation, OAR)
Abstract:
Program Evaluation is a tool used to describe why your program is seeing the results it is. Join me as I describe the tools and pointers I learned from a detail assignment at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Evaluation Support Division. The presentation will provide some ideals that NOAA can adapt to build capacity to conduct program evaluation. What other organizations in NOAA are interested in Program Evaluation? Please, sign-up for the new Program Evaluation Network during the presentation.
Remote Access & Notes:
Remote access via webinar: Meeting Number: 742656968, Meeting Passcode: brownbag. 1. Join the meeting now: http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?sigKey=mymeetings&i=742656968&=brownbag&t=c ; 2. Enter the required fields; 3. Indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy; 4. Click on Proceed; Audio: 866-833-7307; passcode 8986360. For further information please contact Mary Lou Cumberpatch (Mary.Lou.Cumberpatch@noaa.gov; 301-713-2600 Ext. 129) or Skip Theberge (Albert.E.Theberge.Jr@noaa.gov; 301-713-2600 Ext. 115).
Web link to this OneNOAA science seminar announcement
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html#OneNOAASeminar_22September_Barnes
OneNOAA Seminar Added:
OneNOAA Science Seminar added Monday, September 21, 2009 7:47 AM
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html




Ocean for Life: Enhancing Cultural Understanding Through Ocean Science

Date/Location:
Tuesday, 29 September 2009; 12:00-13:00 ETZ (SSMC-3, 2nd Floor, NOAA Central Library, seminar sponsored by Office of National Marine Sanctuaries and the National Marine Sanctuary Foundation)
Speaker(s):
Jonathan Shannon (OFL 2009 program director, ONMS Education Liaison), Michiko Martin (ONMS Communications and Outreach Division head), Letise LaFeir (NMSF Director of Education and Government Relations).
Abstract:
All life in the ocean is connected and in the same way our human cultures are all connected. Diversity is a strength in the ocean world. So too in ours. The goal of the Ocean for Life program is to bring better understanding of the diverse marine world and of the diverse peoples of the world. Our lives depend on close connections to the ocean -- and on the close connections that link us all. During two field studies, one to the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary (July 15-30) and the other to the Cordell Bank, Gulf of the Farallones, and Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuaries (July 29-Aug 9), high school students from Western and Middle Eastern countries worked together to learn more about marine science and each other's cultures. The students captured their experience by creating youth media projects based upon the three themes of Ocean for Life: a sense of place, interconnectedness, and ocean conservation and stewardship. These projects will be shared along with highlights from the two field studies. Upon returning to their home communities, the participants are encouraged to use their experience to become better stewards of their local environment, promote its connection to the ocean, and strengthen the links they have built to the communities and cultures of their fellow participants. We will also discuss how you can help this effort, through serving as a mentor and/or forum moderator on www.oceanforlife.org.
Remote Access & Notes:
Remote access via webinar: Meeting Number: 742656968, Meeting Passcode: brownbag. 1. Join the meeting now: http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?sigKey=mymeetings&i=742656968&=brownbag&t=c ; 2. Enter the required fields; 3. Indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy; 4. Click on Proceed; Audio: 866-833-7307; passcode 8986360. For further information please contact Mary Lou Cumberpatch (Mary.Lou.Cumberpatch@noaa.gov; 301-713-2600 Ext. 129) or Skip Theberge (Albert.E.Theberge.Jr@noaa.gov; 301-713-2600 Ext. 115).
Web link to this OneNOAA science seminar announcement
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html#OneNOAASeminar_29September_Shannon_etal
OneNOAA Seminar Added:
OneNOAA Science Seminar added Friday, August 14, 2009 2:45 PM / Last edited Monday, September 28, 2009 2:40 PM
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html

 


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October 2009 (scheduled OneNOAA Science Seminars in Bold)

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(Total number of OneNOAA Science seminars in October 2009: 13)



Operational Implementation of 4D-VAR Assimilation for the U.S. Navy

Date/Location:
Thursday, 01 October 2009; 10:00 - 11:00 ETZ (World Weather Building Camp Springs, Room 707, Camp Springs, MD; JCSDA seminar)
Speaker(s):
Liang Xu (Naval Research Laboratory, Monterey, CA)
E-mail(s):
xu@nrlmry.navy.mil
Abstract:
An observation-space global 4D-Var atmospheric data assimilation system, NAVDAS-AR (NRL Atmospheric Variational Data Assimilation System – Accelerated Representer), for the U.S. Navy has been successfully implemented and tested at Fleet Numerical Meteorology and Oceanography Center (FNMOC). NAVDAS-AR will replace NAVDAS (NRL Atmospheric Variational Data Assimilation System), the 3D-Var observation-space data assimilation system, to provide the analysis for the Navy Operational Global Atmospheric Prediction System (NOGAPS) in the near future. In this talk, we will give a brief background of the development and testing of the NAVDAS-AR. We will present the weak constraint variational formulism and the minimization algorithm used in the system. Some of the results obtained from a recent validation test report required for the NAVDAS-AR operational transition will be shown. We will also give a brief description of some of the NAVDAS-AR capabilities that were not included in the current operational implementation. Planned upgrades to the operational 4D-Var system will also be discussed. (L. Xu, N. Baker, B. Ruston, T. Hogan, P. Pauley, and S. Swadley, NRL, Monterey, CA; T. Rosmond and B. Chua, SAIC, Monterey, CA; R. Pauley, FNMOC, Monterey, CA).
Remote Access & Notes:
For phone access: USA participants: 1-866-715-2479, International: 1-517-345-5260, Passcode: 9457557. For questions please contact George Ohring (George.Ohring@noaa.gov).
Download Presentation(s):
Download Presentation (PDF, ~1.8MB)
Web link to this OneNOAA science seminar announcement
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html#OneNOAASeminar_01Oct2009_Xu
OneNOAA Science Seminar Added:
OneNOAA Science Seminar added Tuesday, September 8, 2009 1:01 PM / Last updated Friday, October 2, 2009 9:25 AM
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html



Climate Change and Alaska Fisheries

Date/Location:
Tuesday, 06 October 2009; 10:00-11:00 am Alaska Local Time (RISA/ACCAP seminar via teleconference)
Speaker(s):
Mike Sigler (Program Leader, Habitat and Ecological Processes Research Program NOAA Fisheries, Alaska Fisheries Science Center)
E-mail(s):
Mike.Sigler@noaa.gov
Abstract:
Fish harvests in the Arctic Ocean are small, yet the largest U.S. commercial fisheries lie immediately south in the Bering Sea. Some groundfish and crabs have moved northward. This trend is predicted to continue. A large ecosystem study of the Bering Sea aims to understand and forecast these changes. The Bering Sea project is funded by the North Pacific Research Board and the National Science Foundation (http://bsierp.nprb.org/). Join us to learn more about climate impacts on Alaska fisheries.
Remote Access & Notes:
TTo Participate / Log-In to the Alaska Climate Teleconference: http://www.uaf.edu/accap/teleconference.htm. Teleconference: 1) Dial:1-800-893-8850; 2) When prompted, enter the PIN code: 7531823. To view the presentation during a teleconference: 1) Point your web browser to: http://www.shareitnow.com; 2) Click on the blue *Join a Meeting* button on the left side bar. 3) For Presenter ID enter: accap@uaf.edu. To join us in person: If you are in Fairbanks, join us in person on the UAF campus in the Duckering Building Room 535. Map: http://www.uaf.edu/campusmap/ (purple zone). For more information about the Alaska Climate Teleconferences and the Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy, please contact Brook Gamble, Outreach and Education Specialist, (907) 474-7812, accap@uaf.edu] or visit www.uaf.edu/accap.
Web link to this OneNOAA science seminar announcement
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html#OneNOAASeminar_06Oct2009_Sigler
OneNOAA Seminar Added:
OneNOAA Science Seminar added Wednesday, September 2, 2009 7:59 AM / Last edited Monday, October 5, 2009 12:20 PM
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html



How Charts Have Played a Role in American History

Date/Location:
Tuesday, 06 October 2009; 12:00-13:00 ETZ (SSMC-3, 2nd Floor, NOAA Central Library seminar)
Speaker(s):
Steven Barnum and John Lowell (Office of Coast Survey) and Albert Theberge (NOAA Central Library)
Abstract:
NOAA is the nation's chartmaker. Since the early 1800s, cartographers developing nautical charts for NOAA predecessor organizations have played a vital -- but usually unrecognized -- role in major historical events. This presentation will provide a fascinating look at how charts and other Coast Survey graphical products were involved in American history, from 1807 to 1945, with highlights from the Civil War, the two World Wars, and an analysis of the 1927 Mississippi River flood. Coast Survey will briefly describe the "chart of the future." Note: Following the seminar, there will be a special presentation to show appreciation for the assistance provided by NOAA Library to Office of Coast Survey.
Remote Access & Notes:
Remote access via webinar: Meeting Number: 742656968, Meeting Passcode: brownbag. 1. Join the meeting now: http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?sigKey=mymeetings&i=742656968&=brownbag&t=c ; 2. Enter the required fields; 3. Indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy; 4. Click on Proceed; Audio: 866-833-7307; passcode 8986360.For further information please contact Mary Lou Cumberpatch (Mary.Lou.Cumberpatch@noaa.gov; 301-713-2600 Ext. 129) or Skip Theberge (Albert.E.Theberge.Jr@noaa.gov; 301-713-2600 Ext. 115).
Web link to this OneNOAA science seminar announcement
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html#OneNOAASeminar_06Oct2009_Barnum_etal
OneNOAA Seminar Added:
OneNOAA Science Seminar added Monday, September 28, 2009 2:44 PM
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html



Surface Water Freezing Experiments for the Red River of the North using SAC-HT

Date/Location:
Wednesday, 07 October 2009; 12:30 PM - 1:30 PM (SSMC-2, Room 8246; NWS OHD Seminar)
Speaker(s):
Victor Koren
Abstract:
Hypothetical simulations were performed for the March Red River 2009 flood using the SAC-HT model. The main goal was to investigate the potential for the effect of freezing surface water on the over-prediction of the second crest. Although the SAC-HT does not have the capability to account for the accumulation and thermal dynamics of water stored on the surface, it does have a 'buffer-above-surface" layer that can mimic surface water effects on the soil moisture freezing process. Experiments were performed with the use of hourly point air temperature and limited snow water equivalent data at Wahpeton. The SAC-HT was run with three levels of buffer-layer filling by water. Simulations suggest that at some levels of ponded water, the thermal conditions of the soil column can significantly increase the percolation rate and as a result reduce the potential for high floods. More recently, similar tests were performed with NCRFC-archived 6-hourly precipitation and air temperature data (MAP, MAT) for four headwater basins in the Wild Rice River basin. The SAC-HT was run in a lumped mode assuming all input/output data are uniform in space. Basin wide simulations with 6-hourly time step show only minor impacts of the ponded water effect. One potential cause of the big difference compared to the point -based analysis may be the simulation time step. At this time there were no hourly data for the head water basins used. The use of 6-hourly time interval at the Wahpeton site simulations shows minor effect of the surface water freezing on runoff.
Remote Access & Notes:
Teleconference: (866) 804-8182, passcode 9848619; GotoMeeting: https://www1.gotomeeting.com/join/732596121. For further information about this seminar please contact Ken Pavelle (ken.pavelle@noaa.gov).
Web link to this OneNOAA science seminar announcement
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html#OneNOAASeminar_07Oct2009_Koren
OneNOAA Science Seminar Added:
OneNOAA Science Seminar added Monday, October 5, 2009 1:11 PM / Last updated Wednesday, October 7, 2009 10:51 AM
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html



An Analytical Conserved Adjustment Scheme for Stabilization of Hydrographic Profiles

Date/Location:
Friday 09 October 2009; 11:00-12:00 ETZ (SSMC-3, 4th Room 4517, NODC Seminar)
Speaker(s):
Peter C Chu (Naval Postgraduate School, Monterey, California, USA)
E-mail(s):
pcchu@nps.edu
Abstract:
Hydrographic data, be it observational or averaged data, contain substantial regions having vertical density inversions. A new analytical conserved adjustment scheme has been developed on the base of conservation of heat, salt, and static stability for the whole water column with a predetermined (T, S) adjustment ratio. A set of well-posed combined linear and nonlinear algebraic equations has been established and is solved using the Newton's method. This new scheme can be used for ocean hydrographic data analysis and data assimilation.
Remote Access & Notes:
For Webcast access: 1) go to http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?i=741283869&p=nodc1315&t=c; 2) type in other required fields (i.e., your name, e-mail, organization; meeting number is 741283869; password is "nodc1315" -password is case sensitive- ); 3) indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy; 4) click on Proceed. For phone access: toll free dial 877-916-2513 using a touch-tone phone; when prompted enter participant code 5877174 followed by a "#" (Please mute your phone during the presentation or toggle *6 otherwise it produces a sound feedback). Please note that webcast & phone access is limited to 50 connections on a first-come-first served basis. Webcast & phone access will start approximately 5 min before the seminar. If possible, seminar audio will be available via podcast together with the seminar slides following the seminar. For general questions about this seminar, please contact Hernan Garcia (Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov).
About The Speaker:
http://research.nps.navy.mil/cgi-bin/vita.cgi?p=search_results&last=chu
Web link to this OneNOAA science seminar announcement
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html#OneNOAASeminar_09Oct2009_Chu
OneNOAA Science Seminar Added:
OneNOAA Science Seminar added Wednesday, October 7, 2009 8:55 AM
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html



The Australian Rip Current Problem: Research, outreach and politics

Date/Location:
Wednesday, 14 October 2009; 12:00-13:00 ETZ (SSMC-3, 2nd Floor, NOAA Central Library seminar)
Speaker(s):
Dr Rob Brander (School of Biological, Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia)
Abstract:
It is estimated that at any given time, approximately 18,000 rip currents operate on Australia’s 11,000 beaches. It is therefore not surprising that the vast majority of the 90 coastal drownings and 90% of the more than 15,000 rescues each year are related to rip currents. Unfortunately, the incidence of rip related drownings has not changed in the last decade suggesting that whatever rip education is in place is not working. For example, results from ongoing research has shown that 60% of Australian beachgoers cannot recognize a rip current. One of the fundamental limitations is that findings from scientific rip research have not translated successfully into beach safety programs and interventions. Furthermore, existing rip education in Australia is largely ad hoc, inconsistent and hindered by politics. This seminar describes Australian rip current systems and the challenges and limitations facing the improvement of rip current research, education and awareness.
Remote Access & Notes:
Remote access via webinar: Meeting Number: 742656968, Meeting Passcode: brownbag. 1. Join the meeting now: http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?sigKey=mymeetings&i=742656968&=brownbag&t=c ; 2. Enter the required fields; 3. Indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy; 4. Click on Proceed; Audio: 866-833-7307; passcode 8986360. For further information please contact Mary Lou Cumberpatch (Mary.Lou.Cumberpatch@noaa.gov; 301-713-2600 Ext. 129) or Skip Theberge (Albert.E.Theberge.Jr@noaa.gov; 301-713-2600 Ext. 115).
Web link to this OneNOAA science seminar announcement
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html#OneNOAASeminar_14Oct2009_Brander
OneNOAA Seminar Added:
OneNOAA Science Seminar added Monday, September 28, 2009 2:44 PM
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html



Climate Change Communication 2.0

Date/Location:
Friday, 16 October 2009; 11:00-12:00 ETZ (SSMC-3, 4th Room 4517, NODC Seminar)
Speaker(s):
Dr. Ed Maibach (Director of George Mason University’s Center for Climate Change Communication)
E-mail(s):
emaibach@gmu.edu
Abstract:
Increasing awareness and understanding of climate change is important if ultimately we are going to be able to change behaviors to tackle the problem. Dr. Maibach will share his thoughts about lessons learned from the first 20 years of climate change communication in America (starting with Jim Hansen’s clarion call to Congress in the late 1980s). He will also facilitate a discussion with session participants about the climate change communication challenges we will likely face over the next 20 years. Learn how you might effectively engage your friends and others to become part of the solution.
Download the Presentation
Download the presentation [PDF, ~3.5 MB]
Remote Access & Notes:
For Webcast access (no sound): 1) go to http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?i=741283869&p=nodc1315&t=c; 2) type in other required fields (i.e., your name, e-mail, organization; meeting number is 741283869; password is "nodc1315" -password is case sensitive- ); 3) indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy; 4) click on Proceed. For phone access (to hear the presentation): toll free dial 877-916-2513 using a touch-tone phone; when prompted enter participant code 5877174 followed by a "#" (Please mute your phone during the presentation or toggle *6 otherwise it produces a sound feedback). Please note that webcast & phone access is limited to 50 connections on a first-come-first served basis. Webcast & phone access will start approximately 5 min before the seminar. If possible, seminar audio will be available via podcast together with the seminar slides following the seminar. For general questions about this seminar, please contact Hernan Garcia (Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov).
Notes about the speaker(s):
See http://www.climatechangecommunication.org/edward_maibach.cfm.
Web link to this OneNOAA science seminar announcement
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html#OneNOAASeminar_16Oct2009_Maibach
OneNOAA Seminar Added:
OneNOAA Science Seminar added Tuesday, September 8, 2009 8:46 AM / Last edited Friday October 16, 2009 2:05 PM
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html


Promises and Challenges in Assimilating Aura/OMI Satellite Data to Study Global Air Quality

Date/Location:
Tuesday, 20 October 2009; 14:00 - 15:00 ETZ (World Weather Building Camp Springs, Room 707, Camp Springs, MD; JCSDA seminar)
Speaker(s):
Pawan K. Bhartia (Laboratory for Atmospheres, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center)
E-mail(s):
pawan.k.bhartia@nasa.gov
Abstract:
OMI is a Dutch-Finnish built instrument that was launched on the Aura satellite in July 2004. Its original purpose was to extend the long-term record of ozone created by TOMS and SBUV- series of instruments - a record that goes back to 1970. However, owing to its hyperspectral capability, high spatial resolution, and daily global coverage, OMI is producing many more products related to atmospheric chemistry and air quality with better accuracy and precision than its predecessor instruments. Despite its spectacular success, use of OMI data for scientific studies remains a challenge. Like most nadir-viewing passive remote sensing instruments OMI algorithms depend on a priori information for accurate retrieval. However, for most OMI products, with the exception of ozone, the quality of available a priori data is quite limited. In principle, this limitation can be overcome by assimilating OMI data with modern high-resolution chemical- transport models. However, so far there has been limited success in assimilating non-meteorological data into data assimilation systems. This is perhaps because the fundamental nature of the two problems is quite different. Progress in this area will require close coordination between the measurement and data assimilation community.
Remote Access & Notes:
Online streaming presentation access: 1. Click for Online Video Access, 2. Enter your name and e-mail address, 3. This meeting's password: JCSDAseminar2009, 4. Click "Join Now". 5. Follow the instructions that appear on your screen. For phone access: USA participants: 1-866-715-2479, International: 1-517-345-5260, Passcode: 9457557. For questions please contact George Ohring (George.Ohring@noaa.gov).
Download Presentation(s):
Download presentation [PDF; ~ 4.4 MB]
Web link to this OneNOAA science seminar announcement
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html#OneNOAASeminar_20Oct2009_Bhartia
OneNOAA Science Seminar Added:
OneNOAA Science Seminar added Tuesday, October 6, 2009 12:43 PM / Last edited Thursday, October 22, 2009 8:46 AM
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html



The Structure and Progress of the Integrated Ocean Observing System (IOOS)

Date/Location:
Tuesday, 20 October 2009; 12:00-13:00 ETZ (SSMC-3, 2nd Floor, NOAA Central Library seminar)
Speaker(s):
Jennie Lyons (IOOS Communications) and April Black (IOOS Legislative Affairs)
Abstract:
As "our eyes on the oceans, coasts, and Great Lakes", the Integrated Ocean Observing System (IOOS) is a tool for tracking, predicting, managing, and adapting to changes in our marine environment. IOOS delivers the data and information needed to increase our understanding of our waters, so decision makers can take action to improve safety, enhance the economy, and protect the environment. NOAA is proud to lead a national partnership of 17 federal agencies and 11 regions working together to link marine data in an easy-to-use standard format that will provide users with a composite picture of our nation's waters in an accurate and timely manner. This seminar will discuss some of the complexities of the national IOOS efforts, what NOAA and its partners are doing to integrate our ocean and coastal data, and IOOS benefits to data users, the general public, and the nation.
Remote Access & Notes:
Remote access via webinar: Meeting Number: 742656968, Meeting Passcode: brownbag. 1. Join the meeting now: http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?sigKey=mymeetings&i=742656968&=brownbag&t=c ; 2. Enter the required fields; 3. Indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy; 4. Click on Proceed; Audio: 866-833-7307; passcode 8986360. For further information please contact Mary Lou Cumberpatch (Mary.Lou.Cumberpatch@noaa.gov; 301-713-2600 Ext. 129) or Skip Theberge (Albert.E.Theberge.Jr@noaa.gov; 301-713-2600 Ext. 115).
Web link to this OneNOAA science seminar announcement
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html#OneNOAASeminar_20Oct2009_Lyons_and_Black
OneNOAA Seminar Added:
OneNOAA Science Seminar added Thursday, October 15, 2009 9:40 AM
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html



History, background, and activities at the Brazil National Oceanographic Data Center (BNDO)

Date/Location:
Thursday, 22 October 2009; 13:00-14:00 (SSMC-3, 4th Floor Room 4817, NODC Seminar)
Speaker(s):
Commander Nickolás de Andrade Roscher (NODC Brazil)
E-mail(s):
rosher@chm.mar.mil.br
Abstract:
Remote Access & Notes:
For Webcast access (no sound): 1) go to http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?i=741283869&p=nodc1315&t=c; 2) type in other required fields (i.e., your name, e-mail, organization; meeting number is 741283869; password is "nodc1315" -password is case sensitive- ); 3) indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy; 4) click on Proceed. For phone access (to hear the presentation): toll free dial 877-916-2513 using a touch-tone phone; when prompted enter participant code 5877174 followed by a "#" (Please mute your phone during the presentation or toggle *6 otherwise it produces a sound feedback). Please note that webcast & phone access is limited to 50 connections on a first-come-first served basis. Webcast & phone access will start approximately 5 min before the seminar. If possible, seminar audio will be available via podcast together with the seminar slides following the seminar. For general questions about this seminar, please contact Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov and Daphne.Johnson@noaa.gov.
Download presentation
Download presentation [PDF; ~0.3 MB]
Web link to this OneNOAA science seminar announcement
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html#OneNOAASeminar_22Oct20009_Roscher
OneNOAA Seminar Added:
OneNOAA Science Seminar added Thursday, October 15, 2009 12:45 PM / Last updated Thursday, October 22, 2009 8:31 AM
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html



Methods and measurements of relative sea level and monitoring its long-term trends and anomalies, with emphasis on the June-July 2009 East Coast event

Date/Location:
Thursday, 22 October 2009; 12:00-13:00 ETZ (SSMC-3, 2nd Floor, NOAA Central Library seminar)
Speaker(s):
Dr. William Sweet (NOAA NOS/CO-OPS)
Abstract:
NOAA’s Center for Operational Oceanographic Products and Services (CO-OPS) has been measuring sea level (SL) for over 150 years. Historically tasked with providing a reference for charting and marine boundaries, the national network tracks relative regional SL trends that are location-specific and vary by ±1 cm/yr nationwide. The network also detects variability about the mean seasonal SL cycle that CO-OPS derives and incorporates into its tidal predictions. An extreme in this variability occurred during June and July 2009 when SL was ~0.3 m higher than predicted along most of the U.S. East Coast. Near-peak levels in the latter half of June coincided with a perigean-spring tide that added to the observed SL anomaly and flooded many coastal areas in the absence of coastal storms normally causing these conditions. The June - July 2009 SL anomaly was the most extreme event to occur simultaneously over the entire East Coast during a summer period as far back as 1980
Remote Access & Notes:
Remote access via webinar: Meeting Number: 742656968, Meeting Passcode: brownbag. 1. Join the meeting now: http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?sigKey=mymeetings&i=742656968&=brownbag&t=c ; 2. Enter the required fields; 3. Indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy; 4. Click on Proceed; Audio: 866-833-7307; passcode 8986360. For further information please contact Mary Lou Cumberpatch (Mary.Lou.Cumberpatch@noaa.gov; 301-713-2600 Ext. 129) or Skip Theberge (Albert.E.Theberge.Jr@noaa.gov; 301-713-2600 Ext. 115).
Web link to this OneNOAA science seminar announcement
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html#OneNOAASeminar_22Oct2009_Sweet
OneNOAA Seminar Added:
OneNOAA Science Seminar added Wednesday, September 30, 2009 7:43 AM
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html



Marine Biodiversity Research in Canada: The Canadian Healthy Ocean Network (CHONe)

Date/Location:
Friday, 23 October 2009; 12:00-13:00 ETZ (SSMC-3, 2nd Floor, NOAA Central Library seminar)
Speaker(s):
Dr. Paul Snelgrove (Memorial University, Canada, and Program Director for the Canadian Healthy Ocean Network)
Abstract:
With about 15 academic institutions and over 100 PIs, Canadian Healthy Ocean Network (CHONe) is the largest Canadian research program focusing on marine biodiversity. The Network focuses particularly on geographical patterns in biodiversity, population connectivity and ecosystem functionality, and management support is an important element in the CHONe approach. Dr. Snelgrove will also discuss how activities within NOAA might be coordinated with those of CHONe.
Remote Access & Notes:
Remote access via webinar: Meeting Number: 742656968, Meeting Passcode: brownbag. 1. Join the meeting now: http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?sigKey=mymeetings&i=742656968&=brownbag&t=c ; 2. Enter the required fields; 3. Indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy; 4. Click on Proceed; Audio: 866-833-7307; passcode 8986360. For further information please contact Mary Lou Cumberpatch (Mary.Lou.Cumberpatch@noaa.gov; 301-713-2600 Ext. 129) or Skip Theberge (Albert.E.Theberge.Jr@noaa.gov; 301-713-2600 Ext. 115).
Web link to this OneNOAA science seminar announcement
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html#OneNOAASeminar_23Oct2009_Snelgrove
OneNOAA Seminar Added:
OneNOAA Science Seminar added Friday, October 16, 2009 7:23 AM
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html



What Can Science Tell Us That Fishermen Don’t Already Know?

Date/Location:
Monday, 26 October 2009; 12:00-13:00 ETZ (SSMC-3, 4th Floor Large Conference Room 4527, NODC Seminar)
Speaker(s):
Dr. Elizabeth W. North (Assistant Professor, University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science)
E-mail(s):
enorth@hpl.umces.edu
Abstract:
For millennia, fishermen have known that abundances of fish vary from year to year and that these variations could be associated with changes in weather. One hundred years ago, many scientists thought that man could not exhaust the sea’s bounty and that climate fluctuations were unpredictable and not related to human activities. Today, we see that fish populations may fluctuate due to fishing, natural weather and climate variability, and human-induced climate change. As our understanding of the earth’s system grows and our ability to predict (or at least forecast envelopes of future realities) expands with it, we need to ask, “What is the validity of the quantitative tools developed from this understanding, and how can we use these tools to better manage fish, fisheries, and ecosystems?” Although empirical relationships between oceanographic conditions and fish and shellfish recruitment are notoriously ephemeral, I will make the case that a process-level understanding of recruitment for individual species is an achievable and important goal for fisheries science. The state of the ecosystem (both physical and biological components) can have profound influences on early-life dynamics, which in turn feed back to the ecosystem via proliferation or collapse of year classes that can shift community structure as they pulse through a system. Understanding the influence of environmental variability on both the ecosystem and single species is necessary for projecting how fished populations will respond to climate change, for developing decision-support tools for ecosystem-based management, and for science to tell us something that fishermen don’t already know. Supporting insights and examples will be drawn from the Global Ecosystem Dynamics (GLOBEC) Program and from research on Chesapeake Bay and the Western Atlantic’s Middle Atlantic Bight. Perspectives on research needs and priorities will be offered.
Remote Access & Notes:
For Webcast access (no sound): 1) go to http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?i=741283869&p=nodc1315&t=c; 2) type in other required fields (i.e., your name, e-mail, organization; meeting number is 741283869; password is "nodc1315" -password is case sensitive- ); 3) indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy; 4) click on Proceed. For phone access (to hear the presentation): toll free dial 877-916-2513 using a touch-tone phone; when prompted enter participant code 5877174 followed by a "#" (Please mute your phone during the presentation or toggle *6 otherwise it produces a sound feedback). Please note that webcast & phone access is limited to 50 connections on a first-come-first served basis. Webcast & phone access will start approximately 5 min before the seminar. If possible, seminar audio will be available via podcast together with the seminar slides following the seminar. For general questions about this seminar, please contact Melissa Zweng (Melissa.Zweng@noaa.gov) and Hernan Garcia (Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov).
Notes about the speaker(s):
Elizabeth W. North is an Assistant Professor at the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science (UMCES). Located at Horn Point Laboratory, Dr. North works to advance basic principles of fisheries oceanography, support fisheries management, and enhance ecosystem restoration. Her research integrates field and numerical modeling approaches and focuses on physical-biological interactions during the early life of fish and shellfish. Dr. North received a B.A. from Swarthmore College in 1991, a M.S. in Interdisciplinary Science Studies from Johns Hopkins University in 1996, and a Ph.D. in Marine, Estuarine, and Environmental Science with specialization in Fisheries Science from University of Maryland in 2001. In 2007, she received the Cronin Award for Early Career Achievement from the Coastal and Estuarine Research Federation. Currently she serves on the ICES Working Group on Modelling Physical-Biological Interactions and the US GLOBEC Standing Committee for Synthesis, and she will co-chair the ICES workshop on Understanding and quantifying mortality in fish early life stages: experiments, observations and models (WKMOR) in 2010. See also http://hpl.umces.edu/faculty/enorth.html.
Web link to this OneNOAA science seminar announcement
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html#OneNOAASeminar_26Oct20009_North
OneNOAA Seminar Added:
OneNOAA Science Seminar added Friday, April 10, 2009 10:49 AM / Last edited Friday, October 16, 2009 2:08 PM
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html

 


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November 2009 (scheduled OneNOAA Science Seminars in Bold)

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OneNOAA Science Seminars 2009 : Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
(Total number of OneNOAA Science seminars in November 2009: TBD)



Use of In-Situ and Airborne Data to Assess Satellite Estimates of Directional Surface Reflectance and Albedo

Date/Location:
Tuesday, 03 November 2009; 0 9:30–10:30 ETZ (World Weather Building, Room 707, Camp Springs, MD; NESDIS-STAR seminar)
Speaker(s):
Dr. Miguel O. Román (Terrestrial Information Systems Branch (Code 614.5), NASA Goddard Space Flight Center)
E-mail(s):
miguel.o.roman@nasa.gov
Abstract:

Accurate representation of the regional characteristics of anisotropic light scattering by land surfaces under a wide range of sky conditions is required (1) for modeling atmospheric shortwave radiative fluxes; (2) for modeling the energy exchange between the earth and atmosphere; and (3) for determining the lower boundary conditions for atmospheric radiative transfer models. However, uncertainties arise when satellite retrievals of surface bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) are directly compared against in-situ observations. In particular, the spatial variability of ground-based estimates of the BRDF introduces errors within the footprint of satellite sensor retrievals that are very difficult to quantify and are oftentimes ignored. Empirical quality of BRDF data is rarely certain and knowledge of their uncertainties is essential to understand its effect on higher-level surface biophysical products (e.g. vegetation indexes, surface albedo, LAI/FPAR, burned area, land cover, and land cover change). This would enable robust accuracy assessments that include evaluations of measurement, scaling, and analytical (or model-driven) errors. Linking airborne angular reflectance measurements for a given surface location yields the underlying reflectance anisotropy (or BRDF shape) of that location. This talk will outline an algorithm suitable for such a task using airborne angular reflectance measurements available from NASA's Cloud Absorption Radiometer (CAR); a 14-channel airborne scanning radiometer with a spectral range from 0.331– 2.345µm. This information was used to quantify the differences in the directional reflectance data, and related measures of vegetation structure, at multiple spatial scales. A new set of gridding functions were also created to exploit the geometric efficiency of CAR observations. The routines allocate the airborne angular reflectance measurements acquired by the CAR into the most frequently sampled spatial intervals obtained for a given flight path. Under well-planned flight scenarios, this technique can be used to derive a combination of one-of-a-kind maps of the underlying reflectance anisotropy that are optimized to a specific spatial scale. This enables "datamatchups" with ancillary data sources (e.g., land use/cover maps), thereby improving the utility of the CAR retrievals in regional mapping and characterization of terrestrial ecosystems.

Remote Access & Notes:
World Weather Building (WWB), Science Center, 5200 Auth Road, Camp Springs, MD 20746, USA. For further information please contact Bob Yu (301-763-8053 x 140) or Xiwu Zhan (301-763-8042 x 148).
Notes about the speaker(s):
See http://neptune.gsfc.nasa.gov/tisb/personnel/index.php?id=376
Web link to download Presentation(s):
Visit http://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/seminars.php#Roman20091103 to download the slides on the day of the seminar
Web link to this OneNOAA science seminar announcement
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html#OneNOAASeminar_03Nov2009_Roman
OneNOAA Science Seminar Added:
OneNOAA Science Seminar added Saturday, October 31, 2009 10:49 AM
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html



Changes To Permafrost In Alaska: Observations and Modeling

Date/Location:
Tuesday, 03 November 2009; 10:00-11:00 am Alaska Local Time (RISA/ACCAP seminar via teleconference) Need to find your time zone? [U.S. Time clock]
Speaker(s):
Vladimir Romanovsky (University of Alaska Fairbanks)
Abstract:
Observed and predicted climatic changes will inevitably change the energy and mass fluxes at the land surface and, as a result, the near-surface and subsurface physical conditions in the Alaskan Arctic and Sub-Arctic. This will trigger changes in ecosystems and infrastructure because the stability of these systems in the north relies on the stability of ice that, so far, holds these systems together. If recent warming trends in the Arctic continue, it will take several centuries to millennia for permafrost to disappear completely in the areas where it is now actively warming and thawing. In losing permafrost, we are losing the stability of these systems. Negative consequences of this degradation will be pronounced from the very beginning because the highest ice content in permafrost is usually found in the upper few tens of meters. In this presentation we will discuss possible effects of degrading permafrost in the Alaskan Arctic and Sub-Arctic on hydrology, ecosystems, infrastructure, and the carbon cycle.
Remote Access & Notes:
To Participate / Log-In to the Alaska Climate Teleconference: http://www.uaf.edu/accap/teleconference.htm. Teleconference: 1) Dial:1-800-893-8850; 2) When prompted, enter the PIN code: 7531823. To view the presentation during a teleconference: 1) Point your web browser to: http://www.shareitnow.com; 2) Click on the blue *Join a Meeting* button on the left side bar. 3) For Presenter ID enter: accap@uaf.edu. Pre-registration is strongly encouraged. To register please fill out the web-form at: http://www.uaf.edu/accap/teleconference.htm#register, or contact: Brook Gamble, Outreach and Education Specialist, (907) 474-7812, accap@uaf.edu.
Web link to this OneNOAA science seminar announcement
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html#OneNOAASeminar_03Nov2009_Romanovsky
OneNOAA Seminar Added:
OneNOAA Science Seminar added Friday, October 2, 2009 9:31 AM / Last updated Thursday, October 22, 2009 8:04 AM
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html



NOAA’s Gulf of Mexico Marine Debris Project: Accomplishments and Lessons Learned

Date/Location:
Thursday, 05 November 2009; 12:00-13:00 ETZ (SSMC-3, 2nd Floor, NOAA Central Library seminar)
Speaker(s):
Nir Barnea (NOAA Office of Response and Restoration, Seattle)
E-mail(s):
nir.barnea@noaa.gov
Abstract:
During the 2005 hurricane season, Hurricanes Katrina and Rita inflicted severe damage on the Gulf of Mexico coastal region and deposited huge amounts of debris over large areas of the Gulf coastal waters. This submerged debris posed a persistent hazard to commercial navigation, fishing activities, recreational boating, and living marine resources. With Congressional funding, NOAA’s Office of Coast Survey (OCS) and Office of Response and Restoration (OR&R) launched a joint project to address marine debris impacts on the Gulf Coast. Collaborating with Federal, State, and local agencies, the project conducted side scan sonar surveys and mapping of nearshore waters, coordinated multi-agency review of marine debris to facilitate removal, and posted survey results and other information on the project website at http://gulfofmexico.marinedebris.noaa.gov/. Partnering with Sea Grant, the project conducted an extensive public outreach campaign to fishing communities and the general public. Since August, 2006, the project has surveyed 1580 square nautical mile, mapped 7,000 submerged items, developed a model to predict marine debris dispersion, and collaborated with its regional partners to generate a document containing lessons learned from the response to this large-scale marine debris dispersion, as well as recommendations and best practices to address future such event. Sponsored by NOAA Marine Debris program.
Remote Access & Notes:
For Remote access: Meeting Number: 742656968, Meeting Passcode: brownbag. 1. Join the meeting now: http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?sigKey=mymeetings&i=742656968&=brownbag&t=c ; 2. Enter the required fields; 3. Indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy; 4. Click on Proceed; Audio: 866-833-7307; passcode 8986360. For further information please contact Mary Lou Cumberpatch (Mary.Lou.Cumberpatch@noaa.gov; 301-713-2600 Ext. 129) or Skip Theberge (Albert.E.Theberge.Jr@noaa.gov; 301-713-2600 Ext. 115).
Web link to this OneNOAA science seminar announcement
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html#OneNOAASeminar_04Nov2009_Barnea
OneNOAA Science Seminar Added:
OneNOAA Science Seminar added Thursday, October 8, 2009 12:04 PM
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html



Advancing Solar Energy at NASA and NREL
1. Using NASA Satellite and Model Analysis for Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Applications (Paul Stackhouse, NASA)
2. Solar Resource for Renewable Energy: Current Status and Challenges (Manajit Sengupta, NREL)

Date/Location:
Thursday, 05 November 2009; 15:00 – 16:30 pm (Mountain Time [Boulder, CO]), followed by a panel discussion from 16:30-17:00h (ESRL David Skaggs Research Center (DSRC), 325 Broadway, in Boulder, Colorado; SEAS Seminars hosted by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory and NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory)
Speaker(s):
Paul Stackhouse (NASA) and Manajit Sengupta (NREL)
Abstract:
1. Using NASA Satellite and Model Analysis for Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Applications (Paul Stackhouse, NASA). Abstract: This presentation describes the successful tailoring of NASA research data sets to meet environmental information needs of the renewable energy sector. The NASA Earth Science Applied Science program has supported the development of the Surface meteorology and Solar Energy (SSE) web interface (http://eosweb.larc.nasa.gov/sse) through a project called the Prediction of Worldwide renewable Energy Resource (POWER, http://power.larc.nasa.gov/). The paths of modifying/preparing these data sets for energy applications for the SSE web site are described. These data help engineers, architects, and project analysts develop feasibility studies for renewable energy technology projects, make regional assessments or long-term energy market forecasts. Thus, this information helps from small scale projects to regional energy analysis. Examples of the usage of these data sets are shown to help describe the need and impact of this information. These examples come from the many collaborative partners in this work such as the DOE National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), and the Natural Resources Canada RETScreen project. The presentation also gives potential future data needs of these types of technologies and explains how NASA data could help contribute to meeting those needs. This is particularly pertinent to the growing needs to develop clean energy sources to achieve energy independence and climate change mitigation and adaptation.

2. Solar Resource for Renewable Energy: Current Status and Challenges (Manajit Sengupta, NREL). Abstract: Solar energy is fast becoming an important player in the nation's energy portfolio. To achieve the goal of high solar penetration accurate solar resource assessment and forecasting has rapidly gained in importance in the past few years. NREL has been involved in the US effort for a number of years and has developed tools and methods to address questions posed by the solar energy industry. Current capabilities include measurement, methods and data for various types of resource assessments and validation. They also include the study of resource variability and their potential impact on the grid. This presentation will cover what is currently available at NREL and what we see as current and near term needs. Also covered will be what we are doing to address those needs and areas that will need additional research to meet the challenges.

Remote Access & Notes:
Web access: webinar info will be posted at: http://www.esrl.noaa.gov/research/events/seas/. If you plan to attend and do not work at NOAA, please contact Holly Palm (Holly.Palm@noaa.gov) at least one day in advance, so that she can give your name to the security office to have badges made for you ahead of time and facilitate your entrance to the campus (see http://www.esrl.noaa.gov/about/visiting.html). For more information and slides from previous SEAS seminars see http://esrl.noaa.gov/research/events/seas/. For further information please contact Melinda.Marquis@noaa.gov.
Web link to download Presentation(s):
Webinar: Register at: https://www2.gotomeeting.com/register/144806835. See http://esrl.noaa.gov/research/events/seas/
Web link to this OneNOAA science seminar announcement
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html#OneNOAASeminar_05Nov2009_Stackhouse_Sengupta
OneNOAA Science Seminar Added:
OneNOAA Science Seminar added Thursday, October 22, 2009 7:11 AM / last edited Saturday, October 31, 2009 10:45 AM
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html



Climate Adaptation in Coastal Communities: A Network Approach to Outreach (2009 Sea Grant Climate Network Workshop)

Date/Location:
09-11 November 2009 (This workshop takes place in Charleston, SC. Sessions are available remotely)
Speaker(s):
Various speakers (see remote access notes below)
Abstract:

Through the use of WebEx remote meeting technologies, Wisconsin Sea Grant is making the plenary sessions of the conference available for remote attendees.

Remote Access & Notes:
You must pre-register to attend the Webcasts. Please register by Monday, November 3, 2009 *and select the sessions that you wish to attend at the following site:*: http://uwmadison.qualtrics.com/SE/?SID=SV_9vtPWwoImWkUeI4&SVID=Prod. You will receive an email invitation late in the week of November 1 that includes passcodes and instructions on how to log in. You may require assistance from your system administrator to install the third-party WebEx plug-in. Additional information on joining a WebEx meeting can found at their website: https://my.webex.com/join_meeting_tips.html. We look forward to a successful workshop in Charleston. If you cannot attend in person, or on WebEx, we will be posting videos of the sessions on the Web shortly after the workshop. For further information please contact Nikola.Garber@noaa.gov.
Web link to this OneNOAA science seminar announcement
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html#OneNOAASeminar_0911Nov_SeaGrantClimateNetworkWorkshop
OneNOAA Science Seminar Added:
OneNOAA Science Seminar added Saturday, October 31, 2009 12:15 PM
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html



Recent Developments in Forecasting Convective Downburst Potential Using GOES

Date/Location:
Monday, 09 November 2009; 09:30 – 11:00 ETZ (World Weather Building, NESDIS-STAR Seminar)
Speaker(s):
Ken Pryor (Meteorologist, NOAA / NESDIS / STAR)
Abstract:
A suite of products has been developed and evaluated to assess hazards presented by convective downbursts to aircraft in flight derived from the current generation of Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) (11-P). The existing suite of GOES microburst products employs the GOES sounder to calculate risk based on conceptual models of favorable environmental profiles for convective downburst generation. Recent testing and validation have found that the GOES microburst products are effective in the assessment and short-term forecasting of downburst potential and associated wind gust magnitude. Two products, the Microburst Windspeed Potential Index (MWPI) and a multispectral GOES imager product, have demonstrated capability in downburst potential assessment. Both the GOES sounder MWPI and imager microburst risk products are predictive linear models that consist of a set of predictor variables that generates output of expected microburst risk. This presentation compares and contrasts the sounder and imager microburst products and outlines the advantages of each product in the nowcasting process. An updated assessment of the sounder MWPI and imager microburst products, case studies demonstrating effective operational use of the microburst products, and validation results is presented.
Remote Access & Notes:

World Weather Building, 5200 Auth Road, Camp Springs, MD 20746, For questions please contact Bruce Ramsay (301-405-9205)

Web link to download Presentation(s):
Download presentation [PDF; ~1 MB]
Web link to this OneNOAA science seminar announcement
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html#OneNOAASeminar_09Nov2009_Pryor
OneNOAA Science Seminar Added:
OneNOAA Science Seminar added
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html



Climate Services for Poverty Reduction and Adaptation: the Example of Index Insurance in Ethiopia

Date/Location:
Thursday, 12 November 2009, 10:00-11:30 ETZ (SSMC-3, Room 11836; NOAA Climate Program Office seminar)
Speaker(s):
Daniel Osgood (International Research Institute for Climate and Society, Columbia University)
E-mail(s):
sarah.abdelrahim@noaa.gov
Abstract:
Climate risk prevents much of the world's population from escaping poverty and from being positioned to be able to adapt to climate change. Because most of the world's poor do not have access to basic risk management tools such as insurance, they are overwhelmed by the risks they face. Weather based index insurance is a recent innovation. Although pilot projects have led to optimism that index insurance may have an important role in reducing poverty and spurring adaptation, their applicability at large scales is limited by sparse or inadequate data availability. For example monitoring systems must be strengthened, remote sensing must be prudently calibrated, and climatologies and forecasts must be continually refined in close collaboration with developing country farmers, met services, and development agencies. The example of index insurance that triggers payouts to farmers in Ethiopia using the NOAA NCEP CPC ARC remote sensing product is presented to illustrate how advances in climate services, science, and technology are central to overcoming key constraints in index insurance to provide robust, validated, and responsible index insurance products at large scales.
Remote Access & Notes:
For web conferencing, go to (https://www2.gotomeeting.com/?Portal=gotomeeting.com); from here click the tab the says "join a meeting'. Webinar ID: 361074955. For phone access: toll free dial 866-710-6541 using a touch-tone phone; when prompted enter participant code 5841149 followed by a "#". Please use your phone’s mute button (or toggle *6) during the presentation until you are ready to ask questions. For further information please contact sarah.abdelrahim@noaa.gov
Web link to this OneNOAA science seminar announcement
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html#OneNOAASeminar_12Nov2009_Osggod
OneNOAA Science Seminar Added:
OneNOAA Science Seminar added
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html



Science for Marine Spatial Planning symposium (see http://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/news/msp_symposium.html)

Date/Location:
Monday, 16 November 2009, 09:00-16:30 ETZ (NOAA Science Center in Silver Spring, MD; symposium hosted by the NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries)
Speaker(s):
Various speakers (See program/speakers [PDF] and MSP Symposium flyer [PDF])
E-mail(s):
Questions or comments may be directed to Celeste.Leroux@noaa.gov
Abstract:

We invite you to come learn about the importance and value of the natural and social sciences in resolving spatial use conflicts in the ocean. Speakers will highlight past examples of marine spatial planning and discuss future needs and approaches. Presentations will feature scientists from NOAA, the Minerals Management Service, the Northwest Indian Fisheries Commission, non-governmental organizations, and academic institutions. Detailed information is available at http://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/news/msp_symposium.html. Please take a moment to consider your schedule and we hope you can join us for this valuable and timely event! See program/speakers [PDF] and MSP Symposium flyer [PDF].

Remote Access & Notes:
Register for the webinar at: https://www1.gotomeeting.com/register/211342304. To attend in person, please email RSVP.Sanctuaries@noaa.gov. Note that seating is extremely limited. Questions or comments may be directed to Celeste.Leroux@noaa.gov.
Web link to this OneNOAA science seminar announcement
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html#OneNOAASeminar_16Nov2009_NMFSymposium
OneNOAA Science Seminar Added:
OneNOAA Science Seminar added Monday, November 16, 2009 7:54 AM
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html



Technology Transfer from Inception to Implementation

Date/Location:
Wednesday, 16 Nov 2009; 12:00 – 13:00 ETZ (SSMC-4, Room #8150, NOS/ seminar)
Speaker(s):
Wayne Litaker
E-mail:
wayne.litaker@noaa.gov
Abstract:
This seminar will examine the complex and often underappreciated issues involved in producing products and services requested by costal mangers and other stakeholders. These include deciding on which requests to address, how much basic research is necessary to prove the efficacy of the product or service, who will pay for the training, who owns the intellectual property rights to the new product, and whether or not the production should be turned over to a private company and if so how? A specific case study involving the development of a domoic acid (DA) test kit by CCFHR scientists will be used to illustrate both the process of product development and concomitant issues which must be addressed. DA is of concern because it is a potent neurotoxin, produced by certain harmful algal bloom species, which can accumulate to high levels in crabs and shellfish along the US West Coast (including Alaska), the US Northeast coast, both coasts of Canada, and much of Europe. Tribal Nations located along the Pacific Northwest coast depend on subsistence harvests of shellfish and are at particularly vulnerable to DA exposure. Due to the remoteness of their location, tribal environmental managers are unable to get results back from the State Health Department Laboratory in less than 3 to 14 days, far too long to hold the shellfish prior to consumption. To address this problem, CCFHR scientists were requested to develop a rapid, accurate, affordable DA assay that could be run onsite. The kit was successfully developed, tested and commercialized with assistance from both the Quileute and Quinault Nations and Mercury Science, Inc. Subsequently, the assay was introduced to the wider management community and is now being used by managers, scientists, and NGOs along the US west coast, Florida, Canada and France. The DA test kit is currently undergoing certification processes required by the Interstate Shellfish Sanitation Commission and the basic technology is being adapted for use in novel remote sensing devices in a joint NOAA/IFREMER project. This entire process from request to a commercialized product in wide use required nine years.
Remote Access & Notes:

Presentations are available remotely via a combination of phone & webcast. Please be aware that remote access is limited to 50 connections on a first-come-first served basis, so we cannot guarantee participation. To participate remotely you must: 1) Dial 866-816-8440, and then wait for instructions. When prompted enter passcode 3770077 followed by the # sign. Please use your phone’s mute button (or toggle *6) during the presentation until you are ready to ask questions. 2) Go to the webcast site at http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?i=746752585&p=&t=c 3) Enter meeting number 746752585 if needed. No passcode is required. 4) Enter other required fields. 5) Indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy and click Proceed. For questions: contact Felix Martinez (Felix.Martinez@noaa.gov).

Web link to this OneNOAA science seminar announcement
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html#OneNOAASeminar_16Nov2009_Litaker
OneNOAA Science Seminar Added:
OneNOAA Science Seminar added Monday, November 16, 2009 8:11 AM
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html



Marine Protected Areas (MPA) Center Databases - Applications and Uses

Date/Location:
Tuesday 17 November 2009; 12:00-13:00 (SSMC-3, 2nd Floor, NOAA Central Library seminar)
Speaker(s):
Jordan Gass and Mimi D'Iorio (NOAA National Marine Protected Areas Center, Monterey, California)
Abstract:
The MPA Center maintains various databases on state, federal, territorial and tribal marine protected areas throughout the US. The MPAs are classified based on the types of protection, and coupled with the geospatial boundary data, these data can be used to support a number of NOAA programs and partners. This talk will describe the MPA Center databases including the types of data, and examples of applications and uses for the coastal, marine and Great Lakes environments of the US.
Remote Access & Notes:
Remote access via webinar: 1. http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?i=748618552&p=130511353&t=c; 2. Enter the required fields; 3. Indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy; 4. Click on Proceed. Audio: 866-833-7307; passcode 8986360. For further information please contact Mary Lou Cumberpatch (Mary.Lou.Cumberpatch@noaa.gov; 301-713-2600 Ext. 129) or Skip Theberge (Albert.E.Theberge.Jr@noaa.gov; 301-713-2600 Ext. 115).
Web link to this OneNOAA science seminar announcement
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html#OneNOAASeminar_17Nov2009_Gass
OneNOAA Science Seminar Added:
OneNOAA Science Seminar added Saturday, October 31, 2009 11:22 AM / Last edited Monday, November 16, 2009 11:57 AM
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html



EO-1/Hyperion Calibration and Contributions to the Operational Calibration of Radiometers in the Visible and Near-infrared

Date/Location:
Wednesday, 18 November 2009; 10:00 – 11:30 ETZ (Room 209, World Weather Building, NESDIS-STAR Seminar)
Speaker(s):
Dr. Stephen Ungar (NASA Emeritus of NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Former EO-1 Mission Scientist and Chair of CEOS Working Group on Calibration and Validation)
Abstract:
The Hyperion on NASA's EO-1 satellite launched in 2000 is among the few Earth-observing hyperspectral instruments in the 400- 2500nm spectral range with a 30 meter spatial resolution. In addition to its wide ranging applications in mining, geology, forestry, agriculture, and environmental management, Hyperion measurements are especially useful for characterizing vicarious calibration sites to resolve spectral related calibration issues. This seminar will introduce the calibration of the Hyperion instrument using both onboard devices and lunar observations, and the instrument performance since launch. Its applications to the vicarious site characterization such as the Dome C and Desert sites, as well as the benefits to NOAA operational instruments will be discussed.
Remote Access & Notes:

World Weather Building, 5200 Auth Road, Camp Springs, MD 20746, For questions please contact Changyong Cao (301-763-8316 Ext 196) or Xiwu Zhan (301-763-8042 Ext 148).

Web link to download Presentation(s):
Please go to http://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/seminars.php for slides the day of the talk.
Web link to this OneNOAA science seminar announcement
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html#OneNOAASeminar_18Nov2009_Ungar
OneNOAA Science Seminar Added:
OneNOAA Science Seminar added Monday, November 16, 2009 7:21 AM
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html



The Need for More Strategic Estuarine/Marine Restoration and Conservation: The Puget Sound Nearshore Ecosystem Restoration Project (PSNERP) Approach

Date/Location:
Wednesday, 18 November 2009; 12:00-13:00 (SSMC-3, 2nd Floor, NOAA Central Library, Seminar sponsored by NMFS Office of Habitat Conservation)
Speaker(s):
Charles ("Si") Simenstad (Research Professor and Coordinator, Wetland Ecosystem Team, School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences, University of Washington)
Abstract:
Most opportunistic restoration and conservation of estuarine/marine ecosystems are presumed to be universally beneficial to ecosystem functions, goods and services. However, limited resources and focused objectives (e.g., essential fish habitat) would dictate that we need to be more strategic in selecting what restoration/conservation actions and where and how we deploy them in the coastal landscapes. Lessons learned from many of the larger ecosystem restoration projects suggest that it is challenging to plan and implement a comprehensive ecosystem approach. The Puget Sound Nearshore Ecosystem Restoration Project (PSNERP) is designing restoration and conservation of nearshore beaches, estuaries and deltas around the entire ~4000 km of the Sound's shoreline. Our approach is based on: (1) documenting historic changes of geomorphic and ecological structure in shoreline landforms; (2) assessing to what extent these changes have resulted in the impairment of nearshore ecosystem processes and the implications of degraded ecosystem functions, goods and services; (3) developing spatially-explicit inventory of restoration/conservation needs; (4) designing strategies for optimal recovery and conservation of nearshore processes in specific nearshore "process units"; (5) evaluating the risk to these strategies of future population growth and development, and climate change, anticipated for the Puget Sound region; and, (6) assembling portfolios of restoration/conservation actions that would provide optimal ecosystem benefit, persistence and resilience. If and when implemented, rigorous monitoring and scientific assessment will be nested in an adaptive management framework that will allow us to test and refine the outcomes of such a strategic approach.
Remote Access & Notes:
The NOAA NMFS Office of Habitat Conservation will present the 2009 Nancy Foster Habitat Conservation Award Seminar, its annual award for career contributions in habitat conservation, to Charles ("Si") Simenstad, Research Professor and Coordinator, Wetland Ecosystem Team, School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences, University of Washington. Remote access via webinar: 1. http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?sigKey=mymeetings&i=742656968&=brownbag&t=c; 2. Enter the required fields; 3. Indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy; 4. Click on Proceed. Audio: 866-833-7307; passcode 8986360. For further information please contact Mary Lou Cumberpatch (Mary.Lou.Cumberpatch@noaa.gov; 301-713-2600 Ext. 129) or Skip Theberge (Albert.E.Theberge.Jr@noaa.gov; 301-713-2600 Ext. 115).
Web link to this OneNOAA science seminar announcement
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html#OneNOAASeminar_18Nov2009_Simenstad
OneNOAA Science Seminar Added:
OneNOAA Science Seminar added Saturday, October 31, 2009 11:22 AM
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html



Representation Error in Ocean Data Assimilation

Date/Location:
Wednesday, 18 November 2009; 14:00 – 15:00 ETZ (World Weather Building, Room 707, 5200 Auth Road, Camp Springs, MD 20746; JCSDA Seminar)
Speaker(s):
Robert Miller (Oregon State University, College of Oceanic and Atmospheric Sciences)
E-mail:
miller@coas.oregonstate.edu
Abstract:
The difference between observations and a model simulation can be decomposed into instrument error, model forecast error, and representation error. A major challenge for data assimilation is accurate characterization of these errors. We have developed a technique which identifies the information content of a model. We use a long simulation to formulate a basis for a reduced state space of the model as determined by our metric for the information content. The projection of a sequence of model-data misfits into the reduced model state space can be used to estimate the model forecast errors. The estimate, so obtained, is analogous to the estimate obtained by ensemble methods. The remainder of the misfits, which have no projection on the model state space, can be assigned to the model representation error and instrument error. Work has begun on construction of a system to test the consequences of incorporating our error estimates into the operational climate forecast system.
Remote Access & Notes:
Video: 1. Click on JCSDA Seminar. 2. Enter your name and email address. 3. Enter the meeting password: JCSDAseminar2009 4. Click "Join Now". 5. Follow the instructions that appear on your screen. Audio: USA participants: 1-866-715-2479, Passcode: 9457557; International: 1-517-345-5260. For questions contact George Ohring (George.Ohring@noaa.gov).
Download Presentation
Download Presentation [PDF]
Web link to this OneNOAA science seminar announcement
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html#OneNOAASeminar_18Nov2009_Miller
OneNOAA Science Seminar Added:
OneNOAA Science Seminar added Monday, November 16, 2009 8:08 AM
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html



Earth Science in the Spotlight: Engaging the Public

Date/Location:
Thursday, 19 November 2009; 11:00-12:00 ETZ (SSMC-3, 4th Room 4517, NODC Seminar)
Speaker(s):
Geoff Camphire (Education and Outreach, American Geological Institute)
E-mail(s):
gac@agiweb.org
Abstract:
The news media routinely sound alarms about natural disasters, climate change, and the energy crisis. But who helps the public make sense of these issues? More and more, scientists are stepping up to help ordinary people, from school children to policy makers, understand the earth science behind the headlines. Earth science, after all, encompasses virtually all the sciences, from biology to chemistry to physics. Learn how AGI, an association of 45 member societies across the geosciences, is tapping the expertise of professional geologists, oceanographers, meteorologists, and other scientists to improve education and promote public awareness on such timely topics. Join us for a brief discussion, exciting video and hands-on activities showing how you can play a vital part.
Remote Access & Notes:
For Webcast access: 1) go to http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?i=741283869&p=nodc1315&t=c; 2) type in other required fields (i.e., your name, e-mail, organization; meeting number is 741283869; password is "nodc1315" -password is case sensitive- ); 3) indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy; 4) click on Proceed. For phone access: toll free dial 877-916-2513 using a touch-tone phone; when prompted enter participant code 5877174 followed by a "#" (Please mute your phone during the presentation or toggle *6 otherwise it produces a sound feedback). Please note that webcast & phone access is limited to 50 connections on a first-come-first served basis. Webcast & phone access will start approximately 5 min before the seminar. If possible, seminar audio will be available via podcast together with the seminar slides following the seminar. For general questions about this seminar, please contact Hernan Garcia (Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov) and Melissa Zweng (Melissa.Zweng@noaa.gov).
Download presentation
Download presentation [PDF].
Web link to this OneNOAA science seminar announcement
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html#OneNOAASeminar_19Nov2009_Camphire
OneNOAA Science Seminar Added:
OneNOAA Science Seminar added Tuesday, October 6, 2009 11:49 AM / Last updated Tuesday, November 17, 2009 12:06 PM
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html



Coupling landscape ecology with digital terrain analysis to model and map fish and coral distributions across complex tropical seascapes

Date/Location:
Thursday, 19 Nov 2009; 12:00 – 13:00 ETZ (SSMC-4, Room #9415, NOS/NCCOS/CCMA seminar)
Speaker(s):
Simon J. Pittman
E-mail(s):
simon.pittman@noaa.gov
Abstract:
Spatial predictive modeling provides a cost-effective tool for filling critical data gaps, such as species distributions, that often limit effective decision making in ecosystem-based management and marine spatial planning. This study integrates tools and techniques applied by landscape ecologists together with surface morphometrics used in surface metrology and terrain analysis to quantify the spatial heterogeneity of coral reef ecosystems at multiple spatial scales. Novel machine learning algorithms were applied to determine which components of seafloor spatial heterogeneity best predicted fish and coral distributions and at which spatial scales. These modeling techniques can incorporate a large number of predictors, can model non-linear relationships including interactions between predictors and are robust to missing data. The multi-scale approach produced excellent predictions (AUC= >0.9) for a wide range of species across broad areas (10’s km2) of coral reef ecosystems in SW Puerto Rico using predictors developed only from publicly available remotely sensed data, benthic habitat maps and biological monitoring data. The techniques also show great promise for predicting deeper water coral distributions and for predicting the future distributions of fish under climate change scenarios.
Remote Access & Notes:
This is a Washington DC area only seminar. There will be no remote participation access. For questions: contact Sara Hile (Sarah.Hile@noaa.gov).
Web link to this OneNOAA science seminar announcement
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html#OneNOAASeminar_19Dec2009_Pittman
OneNOAA Science Seminar Added:
OneNOAA Science Seminar added Monday, November 16, 2009 6:57 AM
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html



Soil Moisture Active Passive Mission (SMAP)

Date/Location:
Monday 23 November 2009; 14:00-15:00 ETZ (World Weather Building, Room 707, 5200 Auth Road, Camp Springs, MD 20746; JCSDA Seminar)
Speaker(s):
Dara Entekhabi (Department of Civil & Environmental Engineering, MIT)
Abstract:
The SMAP mission is one of the first satellites being developed by NASA in response to the National Research Council’s Decadal Survey. SMAP will make global measurements of surface soil moisture its freeze/thaw state. The measurements should enable science and applications users to: 1) Understand processes that link the terrestrial water, energy and carbon cycles, 2) Estimate global water and energy fluxes at the land surface, 3) Quantify net carbon flux in boreal landscapes, 4) Enhance weather and climate forecast skill, 5) Develop improved flood prediction and drought monitoring capability. The SMAP mission concept would utilize L-band radar and radiometry. The SMAP project also includes model value-added data assimilation products on deeper profile soil moisture (rootzone) and net ecosystem exchange of carbon. In this presentation a description of the data assimilation product and a few representative soil moisture data- denial and control experiments with atmospheric models will be presented.
Remote Access & Notes:
Video: 1. Click on JCSDA Seminar. 2. Enter your name and email address. 3. Enter the meeting password: JCSDAseminar2009 4. Click "Join Now". 5. Follow the instructions that appear on your screen. Audio: USA participants: 1-866-715-2479, Passcode: 9457557; International: 1-517-345-5260. For questions contact George Ohring (George.Ohring@noaa.gov).
Download Presenatation:
See http://www.jcsda.noaa.gov/JCSDASeminars.php for the presentation on the day of the talk.
Web link to this OneNOAA science seminar announcement
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html#OneNOAASeminar_23Nov2009_Entekhabi
OneNOAA Science Seminar Added:
OneNOAA Science Seminar added Friday, November 20, 2009 7:46 AM
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html

 


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December 2009 (scheduled OneNOAA Science Seminars in Bold)

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OneNOAA Science Seminars 2009 : Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
(Total number of OneNOAA Science seminars in December 2009: TBD)



Seminar title to be determined. Seminar has been CANCELLED (seminar will be re-scheduled to a date TBD).

Date/Location:
Thursday, 03 December 2009; 12:00-13:00 ETZ (SSMC-3, 4th Floor Large Conference Room 4527, seminar hosted by the National Oceanographic Data Center and NOAA Central library)
Speaker(s):
Dr. Jane Lubchenco (Under Secretary of Commerce for Oceans and Atmosphere and NOAA Administrator)
E-mail(s):
Jane.Lubchenco@noaa.gov
Abstract:

To be determined

Remote Access & Notes:

Presentation will be available remotely using phone and webcast (public open access). For Webcast access: This will allow you to see the presentation slides remotely from your computer (IE or Firefox recommended). Instructions: (1) go to http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?i=741283869&p=nodc1315&t=c; (2) type in other required fields (e.g., your name, e-mail, organization; meeting number is 741283869; password is "nodc1315" -password is case sensitive- ); (3) indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy; 4) click on Proceed. For phone access: This will allow you to hear the presentation. Instructions: Toll free dial 877-916-2513 using a touch-tone phone; when prompted enter participant code 5877174 followed by a "#". For people accessing the seminar via phone: (1) please mute your phone during the presentation or toggle *6 otherwise it produces a sound feedback and we'll have to disconnect everyone on the phones to avoid further interuptions of the seminar and (2) please hold on questions until the end of the seminar. Please note that webcast & phone access is open to anyone but limited to 50 connections on a first-come-first served basis (limit of connections might be increased pending interest). Webcast & phone access will start approximately 5-10 min before the seminar.

Joining us in person: Please note that if NOAA staff only want to join us in person in Silver Spring, SSMC-3 Room 4527 has a seating limit for about 130 people on a first-come-first-served basis. In case of seating overflow in Room 4527, SSMC-3 Room 4817 will be available with seats for an additional 20 people.

Video and podcast: There will be no real time video webcast of the seminar. However, if possible, (1) video of the presentation as well as (2) seminar audio (podcast) together with the seminar slides will be available following the seminar.

For general questions about this OneNOAA Science Seminar: please contact Hernan E. Garcia (Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov). For questions to Dr. Jane Lubchenco please contact LCDR William Mowitt (William.Mowitt@noaa.gov).

Notes about the speaker(s):
Dr. Jane Lubchenco is the Under Secretary of Commerce for Oceans and Atmosphere and NOAA Administrator (see http://www.noaa.gov/lubchenco.html)
Web link to download Presentation(s):
To be determined
Web link to this OneNOAA science seminar announcement
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html#OneNOAASeminar_03Dec2009_Jane_Lubchenco
OneNOAA Science Seminar Added:
OneNOAA Science Seminar added Tuesday, August 18, 2009 8:18 AM / Last updated Monday, November 30, 2009 2:22 PM
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html



Connecting Alaska Landscapes Into The Future

Date/Location:
Tuesday, 08 December 2009; 10:00-11:00 Alaska Local Time ( ACCAP Alaska Climate Teleconferences, University of Alaska, Faibanks) Check [U.S. Time clock]
Speaker(s):
Nancy Fresco (Scenarios Network for Alaska Planning) and Karen Murphy (US Fish and Wildlife Service)
Abstract:
Understanding how climate change will affect biodiversity and traditional subsistence is a common challenge faced by Federal, State, Native, and private land managers. The Connecting Alaska Landscapes into the Future project (Connectivity Project) was a consensus-based effort that included the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and University of Alaska researchers as well as state and federal agency and non-profit partners. The project’s goal was to develop the methodology and thought processes to identify a network of lands that support ecosystem functions to ensure landscape-level connectivity within Alaska given climate change using data that are available today. In order to model projected changes in statewide biomes and in potential habitat for key species, we gathered data on existing conditions and linked these to models of future conditions, using climate projection data from SNAP, input from project participants, and complex statistical models. With feedback from participants, we refined these models and used them as basis for creating maps of potential future statewide connectivity. The proof-of-concept results presented in this report are preliminary and are not intended to be proscriptive, but rather to serve as a guide for planning and as a jumping-off point for synergy and further research.
Remote Access & Notes:
How to Participate / Log-In to the Alaska Climate Teleconference: 1) With a regular telephone dial: 1-800-893-8850. 2) When prompted, enter the PIN code: 7531823. PLEASE MUTE YOUR PHONE DURING THE PRESENTATION. The audio is very sensitive and your external conversations and typing can be heard by other participants. Thank You. To view the presentation during a teleconference: 1) Point your web browser to: http://www.shareitnow.com. 2) Click on the blue Join a Meeting button on the left side bar. 3) For Presenter ID enter: accap@uaf.edu. If you do not see anything on your screen, click on the refresh button on the top bar. For questions please contact Brook Gamble (jbgamble@alaska.edu; 907-474-7812). http://www.uaf.edu/accap.
Web link to this OneNOAA science seminar announcement
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html#OneNOAASeminar_08Dec2009_Fresco
OneNOAA Science Seminar Added:
OneNOAA Science Seminar added Monday, November 16, 2009 10:04 AM/ Last updated Wednesday, December 2, 2009 1:59 PM
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html




NOAA International Affairs [seminar postponed]

Date/Location:
Wednesday 09 December 2009; 12:00-13:00 (SSMC-3, 2nd Floor, NOAA Central Library seminar) New seminar date TBD
Speaker(s):
Dr. James Turner (Deputy Assistant Secretary for NOAA International Affairs)
James.Turner@noaa.gov
Abstract:
NOAA's Mission is driven by Science, Service, and Stewardship. Each of these drivers includes significant international aspects. We work collaboratively with other nations to make measurements and observations and share that data to develop, test, and evaluate our models. Our science and understanding are enriched through interactions with international peers. Besides providing information services to decision and policy makers domestically, NOAA also shares these services and others not only with our neighbors, but globally as well. Stewardship involves both conserving and preserving our domestic resources and protecting those resources from external threats. In the broader picture, stewardship extends to protecting resources in the world-wide ecosystem since national borders are not barriers to phenomena in the oceans and atmosphere. The relationship between the Office of International Affairs, the Line Offices, Goal Teams, and International Affairs Council will be described. What will be presented includes examples of international activities which significantly support NOAA's Mission and opportunities for enhancing international contributions.
Remote Access & Notes:
Remote access via webinar: 1. http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?sigKey=mymeetings&i=742656968&=brownbag&t=c; 2. Enter the required fields; 3. Indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy; 4. Click on Proceed. Audio: 866-833-7307; passcode 8986360. For further information please contact Mary Lou Cumberpatch (Mary.Lou.Cumberpatch@noaa.gov; 301-713-2600 Ext. 129) or Skip Theberge (Albert.E.Theberge.Jr@noaa.gov; 301-713-2600 Ext. 115).
About The Speaker:
Dr. James M. Turner leads NOAA's international scientific and environmental efforts associated with the global oceans, atmosphere, and space (See http://www.noaa.gov/turner.html).
Web link to this OneNOAA science seminar announcement
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html#OneNOAASeminar_09Dec2009_Turner
OneNOAA Science Seminar Added:
OneNOAA Science Seminar added Saturday, October 31, 2009 11:22 AM / Last updated Friday, December 4, 2009 1:01 PM
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html



Region-wide Reproductive Impairment and Gonadal Intersex in Atlantic Croaker Collected from the Northern Gulf of Mexico Dead Zone

Date/Location:
Wednesday, 09 Dec 2009; 12:00 - 13:00 ETZ (SSMC-4, Room 8150, NOS seminar)
Speaker(s):
Peter Thomas (University of Texas/Austin)
E-mail(s):
peter.thomas@mail.utexas.edu
Abstract:
The long term effects of the recent dramatic increase worldwide in the incidence of coastal hypoxia on marine ecosystems are unknown. Our previous field studies in two northern Gulf of Mexico (GOM) estuaries provided the first evidence that environmental hypoxia exposure causes marked endocrine and reproductive impairment in fish. Here we show a similar disruption of endocrine and reproductive functions in Atlantic croaker collected from the dead zone off the Louisiana coast, the second most extensive seasonal hypoxic region in the world, occupying 16-19,000 km2 of the northern GOM in the summer months. Gonadal development in Atlantic croaker collected in September 2007 and 2008 at six sites in the dead zone was compared to that in fish sampled from three reference sites east of the Mississippi Delta which do not experience persistent hypoxia. Croaker gonads collected from the dead zone were at an earlier stage of gametogenesis than those from the reference sites. Egg production (fecundity) and sperm production were <30% that of the control fish at the reference sites and was accompanied by marked decreases in gonadal growth. These alterations of gametogenesis were associated with changes in estrogen and androgen signaling, respectively. The decrease in gonadal steroidogenesis was accompanied with impairment of neuroendocrine function and gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) expression. Laboratory studies demonstrated that hypoxia down-regulates the hypothalamic serotonergic system controlling GnRH and gonadotropin secretion by inhibiting the activity of the serotonin biosynthetic enzyme, tryptophan hydroxylase. Interestingly, testicular tissue was present in 24 % of the ovaries of fish collected in the hypoxic regions, whereas none of the fish at the reference sites east of the Mississippi Delta showed any evidence of intersex. Gonadal intersex in females from the dead zone was associated with decreased brain and ovarian levels of aromatase, the enzyme that converts androgens to estrogens. A similar incidence of intersex was observed after chronic (10 weeks) exposure of croaker to low oxygen levels (1.7mg/dl) in a controlled laboratory study, which was also accompanied by declines in brain and gonadal aromatase activity. Finally a consistent males bias was observed in the sex ratio of fish collected from the hypoxic sites, but not the normoxic ones. The results suggest that severe reproductive impairment can occur over regional scales in croaker populations exposed to extensive seasonal hypoxia in the northern GOM dead zone, with potential long term impacts on croaker population abundance.
Remote Access & Notes:
Presentations are available remotely via a combination of phone & webcast. Please be aware that remote access is limited to 50 connections on a first-come-first served basis, so we cannot guarantee participation. To participate remotely you must: 1) Dial 866-816-8440, and then wait for instructions. When prompted enter passcode 3770077 followed by the # sign. Please use your phone’s mute button (or toggle *6) during the presentation until you are ready to ask questions. 2) Go to the webcast site at http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?i=746752585&p=&t=c 3) Enter meeting number 746752585 if needed. No passcode is required. 4) Enter other required fields. 5) Indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy and click Proceed. For questions: contact Felix Martinez (Felix.Martinez@noaa.gov).
Web link to this OneNOAA science seminar announcement
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html#OneNOAASeminar_09Dec2009_Thomas
OneNOAA Science Seminar Added:
OneNOAA Science Seminar added Monday, November 16, 2009 6:57 AM
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html



Jellyfish: Swimming, Eating, and Getting Eaten

Date/Location:
Thursday, 10 December 2009; 12:00-13:00 (SSMC-3, 2nd Floor, NOAA Central Library seminar)
Speaker(s):
Mike Ford (NMFS/OAA)
E-mail(s):
Michael.Ford@noaa.gov
Abstract:
This seminar will look at two research areas: i.) the functional morphology of gelatinous zooplankton and its relationship to swimming, feeding, and ecology, and ii.) trends in gelatinous zooplankton over the entire Northeast Shelf of the US. These two lines of research would ultimately intersect to better understand the size and type of impact gelatinous zooplankton has on this system. Morphology and kinematics of scyphomedusae and hydromedusae generate flow fields that entrain prey. Swimming resulted in a pulsed series of toroids which travel along the medusan oral arms and tentacles. Prey was entrained in this flow and the location of encounter was influenced by the phase of the pulsation cycle during which entrainment occurred. Flow-field velocities, measured by tracking particles adjacent to the bell margin during contraction, increased with bell diameter. Differences in body design produce differing flow patterns and capture strategies. These relationships can provide insight into prey selection. The number of ctenophores found in approximately 60,000 stomachs of the spiny dogfish (Squalus acanthias) over the last 30 years provided an estimate of the abundance of ctenophores across the Northeast Continental Shelf of the US. There have been a few such major increases in ctenophores in enclosed (e.g. Caspian Sea) and semi enclosed (e.g. Mediterranean Sea) ecosystems, with concomitant significant effects on those ecosystems and the productivity of their fishery resources.
Remote Access & Notes:
Remote access via webinar: 1. http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?sigKey=mymeetings&i=742656968&=brownbag&t=c; 2. Enter the required fields; 3. Indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy; 4. Click on Proceed. Audio: 866-833-7307; passcode 8986360. For further information please contact Mary Lou Cumberpatch (Mary.Lou.Cumberpatch@noaa.gov; 301-713-2600 Ext. 129) or Skip Theberge (Albert.E.Theberge.Jr@noaa.gov; 301-713-2600 Ext. 115).
Web link to this OneNOAA science seminar announcement
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html#OneNOAASeminar_10Dec2009_Ford
OneNOAA Science Seminar Added:
OneNOAA Science Seminar added Monday, November 23, 2009 7:26 AM / Last updated Friday, December 4, 2009 1:02 PM
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html



Subjective Probability Forecasts at the NWS Storm Prediction Center

Date/Location:
Thursday, 10 December 2009; 14:00 - 15:00 ETZ (SSMC-2, Room 10246, NWS Science and Technology Seminar)
Speaker(s):
Russell S. Schneider and Steven J. Weiss (Storm Prediction Center, National Weather Service)
E-mail(s):
russell.schneider@noaa.gov & Steven.Weiss@noaa.gov
Abstract:
Creation and communication of reliable and effective probabilistic forecast information allows NWS partners to make more informed decisions, and enables more effective communication with the public. Components of a successful program for probabilistic NWS forecasts include effective ensemble prediction systems, post-processed probabilistic guidance, problem-appropriate forecast tools, focused forecaster insight, and effective training and verification systems. In practice, the optimal mix of these forecast system components will vary by forecast problem. Modern research on subjective probability forecasts began with Sanders (1963). Murphy and his collaborators further developed these concepts from the mid 1970’s through the early 1990’s. The SPC worked with Murphy in the late 1970s and again in the 1980s on early probabilistic forecasting experiments. It was not until the late 1990s, however, that a more robust scientific foundation for probabilistic severe weather forecasting was in place. After several years of experimental probabilistic severe weather forecasts, the Storm Prediction Center began operational probabilistic severe weather forecasts in 2000. The explicit use of forecaster-created probabilities to quantify forecast uncertainty now extends through all convective outlooks, convective watches, and even convective mesoscale discussions. Concurrent with the expansion of subjective probabilistic forecasts, the SPC has championed expansion of ensemble forecast systems within the Hazardous Weather Testbed, developed statistically post-processed probabilistic forecast guidance to support its forecast mission, and invested in unique forecast verification approaches and tools. This presentation will focus on the current efforts in subjective probabilistic forecasting at the Storm Prediction Center, with the human forecast component treated not in isolation, but as a key part of an integrated forecast system.
Remote Access & Notes:
The GotoMeeting registration is at https://www1.gotomeeting.com/register/477858345 to follow on screen. The teleconference number is 1-866-628-9344, passcode: 9782594. For questions please contact Bob Glahn at (301-713-1768 ; Harry.Glahn@noaa.gov).
Web link to this OneNOAA science seminar announcement
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html#OneNOAASeminar_10Dec2009_Schneider_Weiss
OneNOAA Science Seminar Added:
OneNOAA Science Seminar added Monday, November 16, 2009 9:08 AM / Last updated Wednesday, December 9, 2009 3:33 PM
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html



Chesapeake Bay Inundation System (CIPS) forecasts for the November 11-13, 2009 Nor'easter

Date/Location:
Friday, 11 December 2009; 13:00 - 15:00 ETZ (SSMC-2, 2nd Floor Conference Room, NWS OHD Seminar)
Speaker(s):
TBD
Abstract:
The webinar will provide an overview of the Chesapeake Inundation Prediction System (CIPS) and it's performance in modeling inundation in the Hampton Roads area during the November 11-13, 2009 Nor'easter.
Remote Access & Notes:
Reserve your Webinar seat now at: https://www1.gotomeeting.com/register/194488857. Please register even if you plan to attend in person so we can make sure enough seats are available. For more information contact OHD.Presentation@noaa.gov & Pedro.Restrepo@noaa.gov
Web link to this OneNOAA science seminar announcement
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html#OneNOAASeminar_11Dec2009_OHD
OneNOAA Science Seminar Added:
OneNOAA Science Seminar added Wednesday, November 25, 2009 10:00 AM
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html



Cloud and Precipitation Retrievals from TRMM and GPM satellites – The Impact of A-priori Information

Date/Location:
Wednesday, December 16, 2009, 14:00 - 15:00 ETZ (World Weather Building, Room 707, Camp Springs, MD; JCSDA seminar)
Speaker(s):
Chris Kummerow (Professor, Colorado State University)
E-mail(s):
kummerow@atmos.colostate.edu
Abstract:
Satellite precipitation retrievals are fundamentally underconstrained. Regardless of whether retrievals use infrared, passive microwave, radar, or any combination of the above sensors, there are simply more free parameters associated with precipitation than can be retrieved from currently available satellites. A-priori information must be added in the inversion procedure. This can range from simple cloud caricatures to cloud profile databases derived from models or field observations to interactively derived structures as might be done in rainfall assimilation. This talk will focus on the a-priori cloud profile information being developed for current and future precipitation sensors and missions (e.g., SSMI, AMSR-E, TRMM and GPM). From these databases, both optimal estimation and Bayesian schemes are used to "retrieve" clouds and precipitation structures. These databases of observed cloud structures, however, can also be compared to output from ECMWF's forecast and analysis of precipitation. The talk will conclude by comparing retrieved cloud structures with ECMWF 'first guess' and 'analyzed' structures for an oceanic convective system observed by SSMI.
Remote Access & Notes:
Online streaming presentation access: 1. Click for Online Video Access, 2. Enter your name and e-mail address, 3. This meeting's password: JCSDAseminar2009, 4. Click "Join Now". 5. Follow the instructions that appear on your screen. For phone access: USA participants: 1-866-715-2479, International: 1-517-345-5260, Passcode: 9457557. For questions please contact George Ohring (George.Ohring@noaa.gov).
Web link to download Presentation(s):
See http://www.jcsda.noaa.gov/JCSDASeminars.php#Kummerow20091216 the day before the talk for seminar slides.
Web link to this OneNOAA science seminar announcement
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html#OneNOAASeminar_16Dec2009_Kummerow
OneNOAA Science Seminar Added:
OneNOAA Science Seminar added Thursday, December 10, 2009 10:12 AM
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html



Small Business Innovation Research Program [Seminar rescheduled to January 2010 TBD]

Date/Location:
[Seminar rescheduled] Friday, December 18, 2009, 10:00 - 11:00 ETZ (World Weather Building, Room 707, Camp Springs, MD; NESDIS STAR seminar)
Speaker(s):
Bruce H. Ramsay (Cooperative Research Programs (CoRP), Satellite Climate Studies Branch (SCSB), Center for Satellite Applications and Research (STAR), National Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Service)
E-mail(s):
bruce.h.ramsay@noaa.gov
Abstract:
The Small Business Innovation Research Program for FY 2010 is a NOAA Program for which a solicitation just opened on October 14, 2009 and closes on January 14, 2010. Program objectives include stimulating technological innovation in the private sector and strengthening the role of small business in meeting Federal research and development (R&D) needs. The SBIR Reauthorization Act of 2000 requires the DOC to establish a three-phase SBIR program by reserving a percentage of its extramural R&D budget to be awarded to small business concerns for innovation research. There are three SBIR phases: Phase I is the for Feasibility Research and the purpose is to determine the technical feasibility of the proposed research and the quality of performance of the small business concern receiving an award. Phase II is for Research and Development prototype development in which only firms that are awarded Phase I contracts under this solicitation will be given the opportunity to submit a Phase II proposal. Phase III is intended for commercialization and it's intended that non-SBIR capital be used by the small business to pursue commercial applications of Phase II. Consultative arrangements between firms and universities or other non-profit organizations are encouraged, with the small business serving as the prime contractor. CoRP/SCSB serves as the focal point for the NESDIS SBIR program. It is the purpose of this presentation to inform NESDIS scientists and managers about the SBIR program, how it can help move forward new and innovative ideas within the organization, and then discuss strategies to solicit more subtopics for the 2011 solicitation notice which is due in the spring of 2010.
Remote Access & Notes:
Phone access: US participants: 866-832-9297; International participants: 203-566-7610; Passcode: 6070416 (see http://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/seminars.php). For questions please contact Bruce Ramsay (bruce.h.ramsay@noaa.gov, 301-405-9205)
Web link to download Presentation(s):
See http://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/seminars.php
Web link to this OneNOAA science seminar announcement
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html#OneNOAASeminar_18Dec2009_Ramsay
OneNOAA Science Seminar Added:
OneNOAA Science Seminar added Monday, December 14, 2009 6:17 AM/ Last edited Wednesday, December 16, 2009 7:12 AM
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html


 



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Concept: The "OneNOAA" science seminar series are an opportunity to share and promote constructive discussion of the work conducted at NOAA, and elsewhere with colleagues and guests speakers in an informal setting.


OneNOAA Science Seminar Partner's contacts


NESDIS / National Oceanographic Data Center
(NODC) seminars:
Location: Unless otherwise indicated, NODC seminars are held in conference Room 4817 (SSMC-3, 4th Floor; 1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD 20910). NESDIS Seminars: Check locations. Information/questions? Please contact Hernan Garcia (Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov; 301-713-3290 Ext 184). Notes: For Webcast access: 1) go to http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?i=741283869&p=nodc1315&t=c; 2) type in other required fields (i.e., your name, e-mail, organization; meeting number is 741283869; password is "nodc1315" -password is case sensitive- ); 3) indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy; 4) click on Proceed. For phone access: toll free dial 877-916-2513 using a touch-tone phone; when prompted enter participant code 5877174 followed by a "#" (Please mute your phone during the presentation or toggle *6 otherwise it produces a sound feedback). Please note that webcast & phone access is limited to 50 connections on a first-come-first served basis. Webcast & phone access will start approximately 5 min before the seminar. If possible, seminar audio will be available via podcast together with the seminar slides following the seminar. For general questions about this seminar, please contact Hernan Garcia (Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov).

National Ocean Service (NOS) seminars:
Location:  Unless otherwise indicated, seminars are typically held in the NOS conference Room# 8150 (SSMC-4, 8th Floor)
Information/questions? Please contact Felix A. Martinez (Felix.Martinez@noaa.gov; 301-713-3338 x153) NOS/NCCOS/Center for Sponsored Coastal Ocean Research. Notes: Presentations are available remotely via a combination of phone & webcast. Presentations are available remotely via a combination of phone & webcast. Please be aware that remote access is limited to 50 connections on a first-come-first served basis, so we cannot guarantee participation. To participate remotely you must: 1) Dial 866-541-1377, and then wait for instructions. When prompted enter passcode 142625 followed by the # sign. Please use your phone’s mute button (or toggle *6) during the presentation until you are ready to ask questions. 2) Go to the webcast site at http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?i=746752585&p=&t=c 3) Enter meeting number 746752585 if needed. No passcode is required. 4) Enter other required fields. 5) Indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy and click Proceed. For questions: contact Felix Martinez (Felix.Martinez@noaa.gov).

National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) seminars:
Location:
  Check announcements
Information/questions? Please contact Gloria Thompson (301 713-2239)

Fisheries Service, Office of Habitat Conservation seminars:
Location: Check announcements
Information/questions? For more information or to suggest a speaker, contact Katherine Smith (Katherine.Smith@noaa.gov)

Air Resources Laboratory seminars:
Location: Check announcements
Information/questions? Please contact  Betty Wells (Betty.Wells@noaa.gov)

National Weather Service - Office of Hydrologic Development
Location:  Check announcements
Information/questions? For more information or to suggest a speaker, contact Pedro.Restrepo@noaa.gov

National Weather Service - Science and Technology Seminars
Location:  Check announcements
Information/questions? For more information or to suggest a speaker, contact Bob Glahn at (301-713-1768 ; Harry.Glahn@noaa.gov)

National Marine Fisheries Service Office of Policy Seminars
Location:  Check announcements
Information/questions? For more information or to suggest a speaker, please contact Anne.Isham@noaa.gov (301) 713-9070 ext 116).

NOAA Chesapeake Bay Office (NCBO): NCBO focuses multiple NOAA capabilities on Chesapeake Bay restoration through science, service, and stewardship of the Bay ecosystem.
Location:  Check announcements
Information/questions? For more information or to suggest a speaker, please contact Kim.Couranz@noaa.gov (410) 267-5673.

NOAA Central Library:
Location: All NOAA central library brown bag seminars (unless otherwise noted) are held from 1200-1300h ET in SSMC-3, 2nd Floor (main floor), 1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring. Information/Questions? Contact Mary Lou Cumberpatch (301-713-2600 Ext.129; Mary.Lou.Cumberpatch@noaa.gov) or Albert (Skip) Theberge (301-713-2600 Ext. 115; Albert.E.Theberge.Jr@noaa.gov). Subscribe to the RSS NOAA Central Library brown bag seminars.

NOAA NMFS Office of Protected Resources (OPR) seminars
Location:  Check announcements. Information/questions? For further information please contact Jaclyn Taylor [(301) 713-2322 ext 118] and Helen Golde (301-713-2332 x 108)

Office of Ocean Exploration (OE)
Location: Check announcements. Information/questions? For questions please contact: Reginald.Beach@noaa.gov and/or Nicolas.Alvarado@noaa.gov.

NOAA’s National Climatic Data Center
Location: Check announcements. Information/questions? For questions please contact Sharon LeDuc (828-271-4848)

Joint Center for Satellite Data Assimilation (JCSDA) Seminars:
The Joint Center for Satellite Data Assimilation was established by NOAA and NASA to accelerate the use of satellite data in NWP models; US Air Force and Navy subsequently joined as affiliated partners. The seminar series of the Joint Center for Satellite Data Assimilation includes presentations on satellite observing instruments, radiative transfer models for use in satellite data assimilation, algorithms for deriving information on the Earth's atmosphere, oceans, and land surface from satellite observations, advances in data assimilation techniques, preparations for assimilation of data from new satellite instruments, and impacts of satellite data on weather and climate predictions. The seminars are 1 hour in duration (including discussion period) and are held monthly, usually on the 3rd Wednesday of each month, at 2 PM at NOAA's World Weather Building, at 5200 Auth Road, in Camp Springs, MD, and are open to the public. The audience for the seminars generally consists of remote sensing researchers from NOAA/NESDIS, modelers from NOAA/NCEP and NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center Global Modeling and Assimilation Office, and students/faculty from U. Maryland. You can view a list of previous seminar speakers and their presentations at http://www.jcsda.noaa.gov/JCSDASeminars.php. Location: Unless noted otherwise, all seminars take place at World Weather Building Science Center, 5200 Auth Road, Camp Springs, MD 20746. Seminar web?: http://www.jcsda.noaa.gov/JCSDASeminars.php. Phone Access: Toll free 1.866.715.2479 Passcode: 9457557 ; International: 1-517-345-5260. Information/questions? For questions please contact

Center for Satellite Applications and Research (STAR) Seminars:
Location: Unless noted otherwise, all seminars take place at Center for Satellite Applications and Research, World Weather Building, Science Center, Room 707, 5200 Auth Road,
Camp Springs, MD 20746. Seminar web?: http://www.orbit.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/seminars.php. Information/questions? For questions please contact Lori K. Brown (301-361-0637).

National/Naval Ice Center (NATICE) Seminars
Location: Unless noted otherwise, all seminars take place at NOAA Satellite Operations Facility (NSOF), 4251 Suitland Road, Washington, D.C. 20395.
Information/questions? Please contact Pablo Clemente-Colón

Northern Gulf Institute (NGI) seminars: The Northern Gulf Institute (NGI), a National Oceanic & Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Cooperative Institute, develops, operates, and maintains an increasingly integrated research and transition program focused on filling priority gaps and reducing limitations in current Northern Gulf of Mexico awareness, understanding and decision support. Location: Check announcements. Information/questions? For questions please contact Sharon Hodge (shodge@ngi.msstate.edu) and Jay Ritchie (jritchie@ngi.msstate.edu).

NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory (ESRL): A monthly seminar series designed to enhance communication and collaboration among scientists at NREL, NOAA ESRL, and others in the community working on issues related to renewable energy. Key meteorological questions must be answered to accelerate the deployment of renewable energy in the U.S. This series brings together those who can combine their knowledge and expertise to solve the problems that have slowed the integration of renewable energy sources into the U.S. electric grid. Seminar web?: http://www.esrl.noaa.gov/research/events/seas/. Information/questions? For questions please contact Dr. Melinda Marquis (Melinda.Marquis@noaa.gov)


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Seminar Locations (unless otherwise indicated)

NOAA Silver Spring Campus

  • SSMC-1 (Silver Spring Metro Center, Building 1): 1335 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD, 20910, USA.
  • SSMC-2 (Silver Spring Metro Center, Building 2): 1325 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD, 20910, USA.
  • SSMC-3 (Silver Spring Metro Center, Building 3): 1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD, 20910, USA.
  • SSMC-4 (Silver Spring Metro Center, Building 4): 1305 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD, 20910, USA.
  • SSMC-5 (NOAA Science Center/Auditorium): 1301 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD, 20910, USA.

NOAA Camp Springs Campus

  • World Weather Building, Science Center, Room 707, 5200 Auth Road, Camp Springs, MD 20746, USA.

NOAA Satellite Operations Facility (NSOF)

  • NOAA Satellite Operations Facility (NSOF), 4251 Suitland Road, Washington, D.C. 20395.

 

 

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Pending for seminar date Seminars:




 


Canceled Seminars



Assessing Human Health Impacts of Environmental Contamination in the U.S. Arctic (seminar canceled)

Date/Location:
(Seminar canceled) Originally scheduled for Thursday, 11 June 2009 12:00-13:00 ETZ (SSMC-3, 2nd Floor, NOAA Central Library Silver Spring, NODC Seminar).
A NODC seminar as part of the "NOAA work in the high latitudes and the International Polar Year 2007-2008 seminar series"
For further information see: http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html#IPYSeminars
Speaker(s):
Dr. Jawed Hameedi (NOAA NCCOS)
E-mail(s):
Jawed.Hameedi@noaa.gov
Abstract:
TBD
Remote Access & Notes:
For Webcast access: 1) go to http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?i=741283869&p=nodc1315&t=c; 2) type in other required fields (i.e., your name, e-mail, organization; meeting number is 741283869; password is "nodc1315" -password is case sensitive- ); 3) indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy; 4) click on Proceed. For phone access: toll free dial 877-916-2513 using a touch-tone phone; when prompted enter participant code 5877174 followed by a "#" (Please mute your phone during the presentation or toggle *6 otherwise it produces a sound feedback). Please note that webcast & phone access is limited to 50 connections on a first-come-first served basis. Webcast & phone access will start approximately 5 min before the seminar. If possible, seminar audio will be available via podcast together with the seminar slides following the seminar. For general questions about this seminar, please contact Hernan Garcia (Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov), Mary Lou Cumberpatch (Mary.Lou.Cumberpatch@noaa.gov) or Skip Theberge (Albert.E.Theberge.Jr@noaa.gov).
Web link to this OneNOAA science seminar announcement
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html#OneNOAASeminar_11Jun2009_Hameedi
OneNOAA Seminar Added:
OneNOAA Science Seminar added Monday, March 23, 2009 12:39 PM / last edited Monday, May 18, 2009 12:02 PM
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html



Understanding Lightning and Lightning Safety

Date/Location:
* Canceled * Wednesday, 17 June 2009; 12:00-13:00 ETZ (SSMC-3, 2nd Floor, NOAA Central Library Silver Spring Seminar) * Canceled *
Speaker(s):
John Jens (NWS Warning Coordination Meteorologist)
Abstract:
TBD
Remote Access & Notes:
For further information about this seminar please contact Mary Lou Cumberpatch (Mary.Lou.Cumberpatch@noaa.gov; 301-713-2600 Ext. 129) or Skip Theberge (Albert.E.Theberge.Jr@noaa.gov; 301-713-2600 Ext. 115).
Notes about the speaker(s):
John Jens has always had a keen interest in lightning and lightning safety. In 2000, he proposed the first "National" Lightning Safety Awareness Week which was conducted in 2001. This lightning safety effort has continued to grow since its inception. John has developed a considerable amount of educational material and has worked with numerous organizations such as Little League Baseball to promote lightning safety among their participants. John serves as a NOAA spokesperson on lightning safety and, in addition to numerous non-technical talks, interviews, and television and radio shows concerning lightning and lightning safety, John has made live appearances on network shows such as the Today Show and the CBS Early Show. For his work in lightning safety education, John was awarded the National Weather Association’s 2005 Public Education Award. In 2006, in recognition of John’s efforts to initiate NOAA’s lightning safety efforts and for his contributions to that effort, John was awarded a Department of Commerce Silver Medal, the Departments second highest honor.
Web link to this OneNOAA science seminar announcement
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html#OneNOAASeminar_17June2009_Jens
OneNOAA Seminar Added:
OneNOAA Science Seminar added Friday, March 13, 2009 7:17 AM / Last updated Monday, March 30, 2009 1:51 PM
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html



NOAA Ancestors In The Polar Regions 1860-1970 (seminar postponed)

Date/Location:
Thursday, 21 May 2009; 12:00-13:00 ETZ (SSMC-3, 2nd Floor, NOAA Central Library Silver Spring, NODC Seminar)
A NODC seminar as part of the "NOAA work in the high latitudes and the International Polar Year 2007-2008 seminar series"
For further information about the IPY seminars see: http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html#IPYSeminars
Speaker(s):
Albert E Theberge Jr (NOAA Central Library)
E-mail(s):
Albert.E.Theberge.Jr@noaa.gov
Abstract:
TBD
Remote Access & Notes:
For Webcast access: 1) go to http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?i=741283869&p=nodc1315&t=c; 2) type in other required fields (i.e., your name, e-mail, organization; meeting number is 741283869; password is "nodc1315" -password is case sensitive- ); 3) indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy; 4) click on Proceed. For phone access: toll free dial 877-916-2513 using a touch-tone phone; when prompted enter participant code 5877174 followed by a "#" (Please mute your phone during the presentation or toggle *6 otherwise it produces a sound feedback). Please note that webcast & phone access is limited to 50 connections on a first-come-first served basis. Webcast & phone access will start approximately 5 min before the seminar. If possible, seminar audio will be available via podcast together with the seminar slides following the seminar. For general questions about this seminar, please contact Hernan Garcia (Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov), Mary Lou Cumberpatch (Mary.Lou.Cumberpatch@noaa.gov) or Skip Theberge (Albert.E.Theberge.Jr@noaa.gov).
Notes about the speaker(s):
http://www.photolib.noaa.gov/meet_skip.html
Web link to this OneNOAA science seminar announcement
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html#OneNOAASeminar_IPY_Albert_Theberge
OneNOAA Seminar Added:
OneNOAA Science Seminar added Monday, March 2, 2009 1:06 PM / Last updated Wednesday, May 6, 2009 9:46 AM
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html

 


Sample Seminar Format

 


Date/Location:
 
Speaker(s):
 
E-mail(s):
 
Abstract:
 
Remote Access & Notes:
 
Notes about the speaker(s):
 
Web link to download Presentation(s):
 
Web link to this OneNOAA science seminar announcement
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html#OneNOAASeminar_
OneNOAA Science Seminar Added:
OneNOAA Science Seminar added
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html

 

 

 

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Please check for seminar changes and cancelations. Remote access to seminars is available when indicated via a combination of web/phone access. When available, seminar presentations will be available for download (see Notes for each seminar).

A PDF version of this OneNOAA scioence seminar announcement is available:
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/docs/09/OneNOAASeminars_DDMMMYYYY.pdf

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