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OneNOAA Science Seminars


[Seminar Partner's contacts]

[2007 Seminars]
[2009 Seminars]

Please join us for our upcoming "One NOAA" science discussion seminars. This is a joint effort to help share science across NOAA.

i-access to our seminar announcements:

1. Join our moderated seminar announcements e-mail list [nominally, one email per week sent on Mondays].
To join our email list contact Hernan Garcia or a seminar partner.

2. Online public access: http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/
Web page originally developed by Hajure Fontaine
; Maintained by Hernan Garcia

3. GoogleCalendar online public access: GoogleCalendar*
Maintained by Felix A. Martinez

Note: Hernan Garcia will be on AL from June 05-July 02, 2008. I may not have access to email during this time. If you would like to schedule a seminar during this period, please contact Hernan Garcia and Olga Baranova.

General notes about the OneNOAA science seminars:

  • The list of upcoming seminars is updated frequently. Please check for seminar changes (i.e., cancelations, etc.). [RSS available]
  • Constructive suggestions for improving the content of the seminar series are welcome.
  • All NOAA offices/divisions are welcome to participate and/or join as seminar partners (see seminar format).
  • Please share the seminar announcements with anyone interested.
  • Please notify us of any errors that you find so that we can correct them.
  • Remote access to seminars is available when indicated. When available, seminar presentations will be available for download.

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January

 

 

Title:

Biogeography of Marine Invasions: Current Status and Future Predictions

Date/Location:
Tuesday, 08 January 2008; 12:00 – 13:00 ETZ (SSMC-4, Room #8150, NOS seminar)
Speaker(s):
Gregory Ruiz (Smithsonian Environmental Research Center)
Abstract:
Biological invasions in coastal ecosystems have occurred throughout Earth’s history, but the scale and tempo has increased strongly in recent time due to global trade.  Available data suggest there is a strong latitudinal pattern in recent marine invasions, with more non-native species documented in temperate marine communities than polar or tropical systems.  Although this geographic pattern of invasion may reflect some historical biases in search effort and taxonomic knowledge, contemporary surveys suggest these patterns are robust across mid- and high-latitudes, when controlling for search effort.  For example, a standardized survey of sessile invertebrate assemblages in estuaries of western North America found a significant decrease in non-native species richness with increasing latitude (32 to 61 oN).  Several mechanisms may explain the observed invasion pattern across latitudes, operating alone or in combination, such as differences in (a) propagule supply, (b) biotic resistance to invasion, (c) environmental resistance to invasion, and (d) disturbance regime.  To date, the relative importance of these mechanisms across geographic regions has not been evaluated, but each may be expected to change over time.  Of particular interest and concern are the interactive effects of climate change and human activities on marine invasions, especially at high latitudes.  Current climate change models predict not only an increase in sea surface temperatures but also a rapid reduction in sea ice in the Artic. Combined with human responses, climate change is predicted to cause directional shifts in invasion biogeography, including increased invasion opportunity at high northern latitudes.
Notes:
Presentations are typically available via a combination of phone & webcast. With a reservation, they can also be available by video conferencing to those with appropriate equipment.  For phone: dial 866-541-1377, passcode 142625.  For webcast: 1) go to http://www.MyMeetings.com, enter the meeting number 449707376 and passcode NOS8150; 2) enter other required fields; 3) indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy; 4) click on Proceed.  You must also dial the phone number above so you can hear the presentation.  For videoconferencing: contact nos.video.conference@noaa.gov for information on setting up a reservation.  Please allow adequate time for testing of connections (at least 24 hours or more) if you do not regularly connect with NOS.

 


 

Title:

Global ocean heat content 1955-2006 in light of recently revealed instrumentation problems

Date/Location:
Thursday, 10 January 2008; 11:00 – 12:00 ETZ; 11:00 - 12:00 ETZ (SSMC-3, Room #4817, NODC Seminar)
Speaker(s):
John Antonov (NODC)
Abstract:
Recent instrumental biases and data recording problems have necessitated the reexamination of ocean heat content calculated from in situ observations.  Warm time-varying biases have been shown in XBT (and MBT) temperatures in comparison with bottle and CTD observations. Cool biases due to pressure offsets during data recording in a significant subset of profiling floats have also recently been discovered. Here we show that excluding floats with a cool bias and correcting for XBT and MBT biases does not significantly affect long term warming of the world ocean but reduces the decadal variability of ocean heat content. Other possible methods for dealing with the XBT warm bias will be also discussed.
Notes:
VideoTeleConferencing (VTC)/Webex access available upon request by contacting Cheryl.Ingram@noaa.gov (301-713-3284 x155) at least a day before the seminar. For general questions about this seminar, please contact Hernan Garcia (301-713-3290 x184). For Webcast access: 1) go to http://www.MyMeetings.com, enter the meeting number 442112424 and passcode NODC4817 (alternatively direct Participant Join URL: http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?i=442112424&p=NODC4817&t=c); 2) type in other required fields (i.e., your name, e-mail, organization); 3) indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy; 4) click on Proceed. Please contact your IT staff for questions about WebEx.

 


 

Title:

Sea Ice Change Around Alaska and Impacts on Human Activities

Date/Location:
Tuesday, 15 January 2008; 10:00-11:00am Alaska Daylight/Standard Time ( RISA/ACCAP seminar via teleconference only )
Speaker(s):
Hajo Eicken (University of Alaska)
Abstract:
The Arctic sea-ice cover is rapidly transforming, with sustained northward retreat of the summer ice edge and thinning of the pack ice. The seas around Alaska have experienced some of the largest changes anywhere in the Arctic. The talk will discuss some of the causes of such change and what this may mean for coastal communities, marine ecosystems and industrial activities.
Notes:
Pre-registration is not required but is strongly encouraged. For further information and to register please contact: Sarah Trainor, ACCAP Coordinator and Research Scientist, (907) 474-7878, fnsft@uaf.edu (see also http://www.uaf.edu/accap/teleconference.htm).

 


 

Title:

Vibrio spp. in the Mississippi Sound

Date/Location:
Thursday, 17 January 2008; 12:00 – 13:00 ETZ (SSMC-4, Room #8150, NOS seminar)
Speaker(s):
Crystal N. Johnson, Gulf Coast Research Laboratory, The University of Southern Mississippi
E-mail(s):
c.n.johnson@usm.edu, crystalj_at_uab@yahoo.com
Abstract:
There are several species of pathogenic vibrios that occur naturally in coastal waters worldwide, some of which cause disease outbreaks during certain environmental conditions. The most thoroughly described environmental factor is sea surface temperature; vibrio densities are highest when water temperatures are warm, and human illness is more frequent during warmer months. Temperature only accounts for approximately 50% of the variability in vibrio densities; thus the contribution of other environmental parameters must be considered. Three major species are pathogenic for humans, Vibrio parahaemolyticus, V. vulnificus, and V. cholerae. In the U.S., V. parahaemolyticus is the most commonly reported cause of human illness, although it is not the most abundant Vibrio spp. found in coastal areas. Although V. vulnificus typically does not cause outbreaks, it does have one of the highest case fatality rates among pathogenic bacteria, and infection can lead to amputation or death. V. parahaemolyticus illness most often results from consumption of raw or undercooked seafood, and V. vulnificus illness often results from wound infections. Densities of V. parahaemolyticus and V. vulnificus in waters, oysters, or sediment were measured in the Mississippi Sound during 2006-2007, along with sea surface temperature, salinity, turbidity, and chlorophyll levels and phytoplankton and zooplankton densities. V. parahaemolyticus containing genes associated with pathogenicity were collected and subjected to phylogenetic typing by PCR-based methods. In addition, a public outreach brochure was produced that has been distributed to formal and nonformal educators in MS and AL, legislators, local schools, and the MS Department of Marine Resources.
Notes:
Presentations are typically available via a combination of phone & webcast. With a reservation, they can also be available by video conferencing to those with appropriate equipment. For phone: dial 866-541-1377, passcode 142625. For webcast: 1) go to http://www.MyMeetings.com, enter the meeting number 449707376 and passcode NOS8150; 2) enter other required fields; 3) indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy; 4) click on Proceed. You must also dial the phone number above so you can hear the presentation. For videoconferencing: contact nos.video.conference@noaa.gov for information on setting up a reservation. Please allow adequate time for testing of connections (at least 24 hours or more) if you do not regularly connect with NOS.

 


 

Title:

Lessons Learned and Best Practices in the Management of Coral Reefs

Date/Location:
Wednesday, 23 January 2008; 12:00 – 13:00 ETZ (SSMC-4, Room #8150, NOS seminar)
Speaker(s):
Dr. Mark Tupper, Dr. Jamie Oliver; The WorldFish Center, Penang, Malaysia
E-mail(s):
m.tupper@cgiar.org
Abstract:
Since the 1990s, over $320 million of Global Environment Facility (GEF) funds were invested in projects at varying action and technical levels to improve the management of coral reef, seagrass and mangrove habitats, much of which was part of a broader portfolio of over $600 million invested in coastal-marine projects overall. The dissemination of best practices based on lessons learned is a strategic priority for the GEF. However, in the case of coral reef projects no comprehensive understanding of GEF successes and failures has ever been conducted. In recent reviews of GEF performance and activities, the need to utilize the results of previous project outcomes, experiences and lessons learned more comprehensively has been highlighted. The GEF supported project “Knowledgebase for Lessons Learned and Best Practices in the Management of Coral Reefs is intended to assist the GEF in fulfilling a major mandate to identify what has worked and what could be improved upon in supporting biodiversity conservation. Tools emanating from this effort, which will be demonstrated include:
  1. A WorldFish hosted online knowledgebase. The database can be accessed at www.reefbase.org/gefll, but is not yet fully functional.
  2. A online toolkit housed within ReefBase, linked to ReefGIS. This will be a “living document”, in which managers can edit or upload modules.
Notes:
Presentations are typically available via a combination of phone & webcast. With a reservation, they can also be available by video conferencing to those with appropriate equipment. For phone: dial 866-541-1377, passcode 142625. For webcast: 1) go to http://www.MyMeetings.com, enter the meeting number 449707376 and passcode NOS8150; 2) enter other required fields; 3) indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy; 4) click on Proceed. You must also dial the phone number above so you can hear the presentation. For videoconferencing: contact nos.video.conference@noaa.gov for information on setting up a reservation. Please allow adequate time for testing of connections (at least 24 hours or more) if you do not regularly connect with NOS.

 


 

Title:

NOAA’s Data Holdings, New Energy Sectors, and a Changing Climate

Date/Location:
Thursday, 24 January 2008; 11:00 - 12:00 ETZ (SSMC-3, Room #4817, NODC Seminar)
Speaker(s):
Thomas Bigford (NMFS/Office of Habitat Conservation)
Abstract:
In this talk I remark on how NOAA might expect to provide data and information related to energy in the coming decades, with consideration for how others' expectations of NOAA might shift with the climate.
Notes:
VideoTeleConferencing (VTC)/Webex access available upon request by contacting Cheryl.Ingram@noaa.gov (301-713-3284 x155) at least a day before the seminar. For general questions about this seminar, please contact Hernan Garcia (301-713-3290 x184). Webcast access: 1) go to http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?i=442112424&p=NODC4817&t=c); 2) type in other required fields (i.e., your name, e-mail, organization); 3) indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy; 4) click on Proceed. Please contact your IT staff for questions about WebEx.
Presentation:
Download [PDF]
About The Speaker:
Bio [PDF]

 


 

Title:

Large scale variability of Atlantic derived waters within the St. Anna Trough region. More historical observed data - new peculiarities

Date/Location:
Friday, 25 January 2008; 11:00 - 12:00 ETZ (SSMC-3, Room #4817, NODC Seminar)
Speaker(s):
Dr. Sergey Pisarev (Head of the Polar Group with Shirshov' Institute of Oceanography, Russia)
Abstract:
Review/new perspectives.
Notes:
VideoTeleConferencing (VTC)/Webex access available upon request by contacting Cheryl Ingram (301-713-3284 x155) at least a day before the seminar. For general questions about this seminar, please contact Hernan Garcia (301-713-3290 x184). Webcast access: 1) go to www.MyMeetings.com, meeting number 442112424; passcode NODC4817; 2) type in other required fields (i.e., your name, e-mail, organization); 3) indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy; 4) click on Proceed. Please contact your IT staff for questions about WebEx.
Presentation:
Download [PDF]

 


 

Title:

Technologies Under Development Within The USGS Leetown Science Center With Emphasis On Ship Ballast Water Stabilization

Date/Location:
Thursday, 31 January 2008; 12:00 – 13:00 ETZ (SSMC-4, Room #8150, NOS seminar)
Speaker(s):
Dr. Barnaby Watten, Dr. Frank Panek, Dr. Philip Sibrell and Dr. Cliff Starliper ( USGS Leetown Science Center, Kearneysville, WV)
Abstract:
Current research within the Restoration Technologies Branch of the Leetown Science Center (LSC) will be reviewed including (1), the Pulsed Limestone Bed processes developed to restore acid impacted streams and rivers (2), the Ferroxysorb process developed to control P discharges into receiving waters from fish and other animal husbandry operations and (3), control processes developed to combat aquatic invasive species present in water supply systems and ship ballast. The latter includes hydroxide stabilization of ballast residuals followed by a dilution and/or recarbonation step. Supporting bioassay tests, conducted within the Fish Health Branch of LSC, have included analyses of the bactericidal effect of elevated pH (10, 11, and 12) on Gram-negative and Gram-positive species, including two primary fish pathogens (Aeromonas salmoncida and Yersinia ruckeri) as well as strains of Escherichia coli, Vibrio cholera, Enterococcus fecalis, Staphylococcus sp., and other aquatic bacteria. Hydroxide treatments to pH 12 provided a 100% bactericidal effect, relative to controls, for all bacteria tested to date. The duration at pH 12 required for 100 % killing was less than 48 h for most of the bacteria, and less than 72 h for all. Reagent requirements versus salinity level have been established and relative costs will be presented.
Notes:
Presentations are typically available via a combination of phone & webcast. With a reservation, they can also be available by video conferencing to those with appropriate equipment. For phone: dial 866-541-1377, passcode 142625. For webcast: 1) go to http://www.MyMeetings.com, enter the meeting number 449707376 and passcode NOS8150; 2) enter other required fields; 3) indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy; 4) click on Proceed. You must also dial the phone number above so you can hear the presentation. For videoconferencing: contact nos.video.conference@noaa.gov for information on setting up a reservation. Please allow adequate time for testing of connections (at least 24 hours or more) if you do not regularly connect with NOS.

 


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February

 

 

Title:

Shipwrecks on the Alaska Frontier: Kad’yak and Ha

Date/Location:
Friday, 01 February 2208; 12:00 – 13:00 ETZ (NOAA Science Center, 1301 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD)
Speaker(s):
Frank Cantelas (NOAA Office of Ocean Exploration) and John Jensen (Sea Education Association)
Abstract:
Come back in time to the early days of the Alaska frontier and learn about Alaska’s oldest shipwreck and a Coast Survey steamer that had a second life as a Klondike gold rush passenger ship before it mysteriously exploded and sank.
Notes:
Shipwrecks! The NOAA Heritage Week Lecture Series are free, open to the public, and sign language interpreted (public information 301-713-3066). For more information contact Lynne Mersfelder-Lewis (Lynne.Mersfelder@noaa.gov); see also http://www.preserveamerica.noaa.gov/heritageweek.html. No remote access.

 


 

Title:

The Hunt for the USS Alligator: The U.S. Navy’s First Sub

Date/Location:
Monday, 04 February 2008; 12:00 – 13:00 ETZ (NOAA Science Center, 1301 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD)
Speaker(s):
Jim Christley, Submarine History Enthusiast and Marine Artist
Abstract:
Join the search for the green, 140-year old Alligator. Last known location: off the North Carolina coast. Learn the exciting history of this mysterious vessel and the effort to find it.
Notes:
Shipwrecks! The NOAA Heritage Week Lecture Series are free, open to the public, and sign language interpreted (public information 301-713-3066). For more information contact Lynne Mersfelder-Lewis (Lynne.Mersfelder@noaa.gov); see also http://www.preserveamerica.noaa.gov/heritageweek.html. No remote access.

 


 

Title:

World War II Shipwrecks in the Deep Waters of the Gulf of Mexico

Date/Location:
Tuesday, 05 February 2008; 12:00 – 13:00 ETZ (NOAA Science Center, 1301 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD)
Speaker(s):
Robert Church, C&C Technology, Inc.
Abstract:
Dive into a recent effort by a diverse team of researchers to study the wrecks of six ships that were sunk by German U-boats in the deep waters of the Gulf of Mexico during World War II.
Notes:
Shipwrecks! The NOAA Heritage Week Lecture Series are free, open to the public, and sign language interpreted (public information 301-713-3066). For more information contact Lynne Mersfelder-Lewis (Lynne.Mersfelder@noaa.gov); see also http://www.preserveamerica.noaa.gov/heritageweek.html. No remote access.

 


 

Title:

Hot Sour Soup: Good for Colds, Bad for Corals

Date/Location:
Tuesday, 05 February 2008; 15:00 – 16:00 ETZ (SSMC-3, Room #4527, NOS seminar)
Speaker(s):
Mark Eakin, NOAA Center for Satellite Applications and Research, Satellite Oceanography & Climate Division (Coordinator of NOAA’s Coral Reef Watch)
Abstract:
Coral reefs live within a fairly narrow envelope of environmental conditions constrained by water temperatures, light, salinity, nutrients, bathymetry and the aragonite saturation state of seawater. As documented in numerous studies, the world’s coral reefs are “in crisis” as a result of human impacts on their environment. While local stresses currently dominate, coral reefs are increasingly confronted with global-scale changes due to rising greenhouse gas concentrations. These changes are rapidly modifying the environmental envelope of coral reefs through both increased thermal stress and ocean acidification. In the former case, there is a well-documented relationship between thermal stress and the response of corals that include coral bleaching, disease, and mortality. Clear tolerance thresholds exist beyond which high temperature and accumulated thermal stress have deleterious effects. However, the synergistic effects of increasing temperature and ocean acidification are not yet fully understood. At this time, there is mounting concern that decreasing pH and aragonite saturation state will cause net reef accretion to cease or become negative. The threshold at which this could occur is likely to be reached much sooner than the pH drop necessary to induce carbonate dissolution. Both the thermal and chemical limits that control coral survival and reef growth will likely be passed before 2100 assuming even conservative projections reported in the 4th Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. This talk, based in part on the review paper highlighted with the cover of Science on 14 December, will discuss these thresholds and their ramifications for ecosystems and resource management.
Notes:
Presentations are typically available via a combination of phone & webcast. With a reservation, they can also be available by video conferencing to those with appropriate equipment.  For phone: dial 866-541-1377, passcode 142625. For webcast: 1) go to http://www.MyMeetings.com, enter the meeting number 449707376 and passcode NOS8150; 2) enter other required fields; 3) indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy; 4) click on Proceed.  You must also dial the phone number above so you can hear the presentation. For videoconferencing: contact nos.video.conference@noaa.gov for information on setting up a reservation.  Please allow adequate time for testing of connections (at least 24 hours or more) if you do not regularly connect with NOS.

 


 

Title:

50th Anniversary World Data Centers (1957-2007): World Data Center of Oceanography, Silver Spring

Date/Location:
Wednesday 06 February 2008; 11:00 – 12:00 ETZ; (SSMC-3, Room #4817, NODC Seminar)
Speaker(s):
Charlotte Sazama, Robert Gelfeld, Godfrey Trammell (NODC)
Abstract:
Originally established during the International Geophysical Year of 1957-58, the World Data Center System functions under the guidance of the International Council of Scientific Unions (ICSU). World Data Center for Oceanography, Silver Spring, is collocated with, and operated by, the U.S. National Oceanographic Data Center (NODC). For additional information, please contact Sydney Levitus (Director, World Data Center for Oceanography, Silver Spring).
Notes:
For VideoTeleConferencing (VTC) access: contact Cheryl.Ingram@noaa.gov (301-713-3284 x155) at least a day before the seminar. For Webcast access: 1) go to http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?i=442112424&p=NODC4817&t=c); 2) type in other required fields (i.e., your name, e-mail, organization); 3) indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy; 4) click on Proceed. For phone access: toll free dial 866-743-9902 using a touch-tone phone; when prompted enter participant code 4689608 followed by a "#". For general questions about this seminar, please contact Hernan Garcia (301-713-3290 x184).
Presentation:
Download [PDF]


 

Title:

RMS Titanic: Exploring and Preserving a Maritime Icon

Date/Location:
Wednesday, 06 February 2008; 12:00 – 13:00 ETZ (NOAA Science Center, 1301 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD)
Speaker(s):
Craig McLean (Deputy Assistant Administrator, NOAA Research) and Ole Varmer (NOAA Attorney-Advisor)
Abstract:
Get a first-hand account of NOAA’s 20-plus year involvement in one of the most famous shipwrecks in history. This exciting talk will highlight the exploration and history of the vessel and the laws related to the wreck.
Notes:
Shipwrecks! The NOAA Heritage Week Lecture Series are free, open to the public, and sign language interpreted (public information 301-713-3066). For more information contact Lynne Mersfelder-Lewis (Lynne.Mersfelder@noaa.gov); see also http://www.preserveamerica.noaa.gov/heritageweek.html. No remote access.

 


 

Title:

The Wreck of the Henrietta Marie: A Dive into a Slave Ship’s Past

Date/Location:
Thursday, 07 February 2008; 10:00 – 11:00 ETZ (NOAA Science Center, 1301 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD)
Speaker(s):
Michael H. Cottman (Senior Writer, BlackAmerica.com)
Abstract:
Join Pulitzer Prize-winning author Michael Cottman as he describes his underwater odyssey to a sunken 17th century slave ship. Learn about the ship’s role in his ancestors’ history, their story, and the African-American scuba divers who helped explore the wreck. Presented in association with NOAA Chapter Blacks in Government.
Notes:
Shipwrecks! The NOAA Heritage Week Lecture Series are free, open to the public, and sign language interpreted (public information 301-713-3066). For more information contact Lynne Mersfelder-Lewis (Lynne.Mersfelder@noaa.gov); see also http://www.preserveamerica.noaa.gov/heritageweek.html. No remote access.

 


 

Title:

Explorations of the Airship USS Macon

Date/Location:
Friday, 08 February 2008; 12:00 – 13:00 ETZ (NOAA Science Center, 1301 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD)
Speaker(s):
Chris Grech (Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute) and Bruce Terrell (NOAA National Marine Sanctuary Program)
Abstract:
Go deep off the California coast with researchers as they explore the wreck of one the largest flying objects ever built.
Notes:
Shipwrecks! The NOAA Heritage Week Lecture Series are free, open to the public, and sign language interpreted (public information 301-713-3066). For more information contact Lynne Mersfelder-Lewis (Lynne.Mersfelder@noaa.gov); see also http://www.preserveamerica.noaa.gov/heritageweek.html. No remote access.

 


Title:

Evaluation of Satellite Data Assimilation in the Advanced Research Weather Research and Forecasting (ARWRF) Mesoscale Model System

Date/Location:
Friday, 08 February 8 10:00 - 11:00 ETZ (World Weather Building, Conference Room 707; 5200 Auth Road, Camp Springs, JCSDA seminar)
Speaker(s):
JianJun Xu (JCSDA / University Corporation for Atmospheric Research / Air Force Weather Authority)
Abstract:
Based on both the National Center for Atmospheric Research Advanced Research Weather Research and Forecasting (ARWRF)- Variational and Joint Center for Satellite Data Assimilation Global Statistical Interpolation data assimilation systems, Advanced TIROS Operational Vertical Sounder and Special Sensor Microwave Imager Sounder radiance data were assimilated into the ARWRF mesoscale forecasting system. A series of experiments were designed to access the model forecast accuracy over North America, and Southwest and East Asia. The statistical results show that the satellite data assimilation improves the initial conditions and reduces the model errors somewhat. Based on both the National Center for Atmospheric Research Advanced Research Weather Research and Forecasting (ARWRF)- Variational and Joint Center for Satellite Data Assimilation Global Statistical Interpolation data assimilation systems, Advanced TIROS Operational Vertical Sounder and Special Sensor Microwave Imager Sounder radiance data were assimilated into the ARWRF mesoscale forecasting system. A series of experiments were designed to access the model forecast accuracy over North America, and Southwest and East Asia. The statistical results show that the satellite data assimilation improves the initial conditions and reduces the model errors somewhat.
Notes:
Dial-in: Information 1-888-322-7905; Int'l. toll # +1-210-839-8501, Passcode: #44852. Unless noted otherwise, all seminars take place at World Weather Building Science Center, 5200 Auth Road, Camp Springs, MD 20746. For questions please contact Ada Armstrong (301-763-8172 x188) and George Ohring (301-763-8154 x352).

 


 

Title:

High Resolution Landscape Mosaics for Coral Reef Monitoring

Date/Location:
Friday, 08 February; 14:00 – 15:00 ETZ (SSMC-4, Room #10153, NOS seminar)
Speaker(s):
Pamela Reid, Diego Lirman, Nuno Gracias, Brooke Gintert, Art Gleason (Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science, University of Miami)
Abstract:
Significant declines in abundance and distribution of corals in the recent past have prompted the innovation of new tools to assess and monitor coral reef condition. One such tool is the development of landscape video mosaics of reef plots. Spatially accurate mosaics on the order of 20 m x 20 m with mm resolution can be constructed. These 2D mosaics have several advantages over 1D strip mosaics made from video transects. The georeferenced and spatially accurate landscape mosaics allow analysis of the distribution of benthic communities. Coral sizes, impossible to acquire from strip mosaics, can also be accurately measured. In addition, landscape mosaics allow assessment of large features, such as vessel grounding scars, and repeated surveys can be used for change detection. In the past two years, four major enhancements to the basic methodology have been developed: (1) removal of "sunflickering" artifacts based on motion compensated temporal filtering; (2) improved mosaic blending to effectively erase seams between images; (3) integration of a still camera for improved taxonomic resolution; and (4) addition of a heading sensor to allow mosaic construction in areas of high topographic relief. With these added capabilities, landscape mosaics are an outstanding tool for coral reef monitoring, enabling measurements on a plot scale that complement regional scale measurements from satellites and buoy networks and colony scale measurements by divers.
Notes:
This seminar will only be available remotely through teleconference. For phone: dial 888-677-5721, passcode 65858 (please dial *6 once on the line to mute your phone, press *6 again to unmute your phone at the conclusion of the seminar if you wish to ask questions). A copy of the PowerPoint presentation will be made available on the morning of the day of the seminar through the following FTP site: ftp://spo.nos.noaa.gov/Public/CSCORCoral/. For more information on this seminar contact Lauren Chhay (301-713-3155x120, lauren.chhay@noaa.gov).

 


 

Title:

Ecological forecasting and spatially explicit assessments of Chesapeake Bay: The role of EcoCheck (NOAA-UMCES Partnership) in engaging the Chesapeake Bay management community

Date/Location:
Monday, 11 February 2008; 12:00 – 13:00 ETZ (SSMC-3, Room #15836, NMFS Office of Habitat Conservation seminar)
Speaker(s):
Dr. Bill Dennison (Vice President for Science Application, University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science, Cambridge, MD.)
Abstract:
EcoCheck and the Chesapeake Bay Program Bay program have established a novel approach at supporting management through an annual cycle of ecological forecasting and integrated assessment is presented. The cycle consists of: (i) forecasting Chesapeake Bay summer ecological conditions in spring; (ii) tracking summer ecological conditions and assessing the accuracy of the forecast until fall; and, (iii) completing the cycle in early spring by assessing overall Bay health and producing a geographically detailed ecosystem health report card. The ecological forecasts are largely based on the relationship between river flow/nutrient loads and the forecast metric. The ecosystem health report card is based on a spatially derived index of compliance to established thresholds. Index scores are converted to report card grades (A to F) for 15 regions of the Bay. In 2007, the highest scoring region was the Upper Bay (C+) and the lowest scoring region was the Patapsco and Back Rivers (F). Overall, the annual cycle engages management and broader community, forcing constant assessment and communication of information, and ensuring awareness of recent and developing conditions. Finally, the annual cycle raises the profile and legitimacy of the restoration and protection program and in some instances, such as the report card, leads to locally effective management action.
Notes:
For webcast: 1. Click on https://premconf.webex.com/meet/2569761; 2. Enter Meeting Number: 745 450 778; 3. Enter your Name (First and Last) and Email address; 4. Click the Join Now button and you will be joined to the conference. For audio access: Dial-In Number: (877) 239-6423; Participant Code: 341333. For more information please contact Julie Nygard (301-713-0174 x192).

 


 

Title:

Government & Academic Scientists: Bridging the Gap with AAAS Fellows

Date/Location:
Tuesday 12 February 2008; 12:00 – 13:00 ETZ; (SSMC-3, Room #4817, NODC Seminar)
Speaker(s):
KiKi Jenkins (1), Eric Toman (2), Daniel Poux (3)
1. AAAS Energy, Environment, Agriculture and Natural Resources Fellow, NOAA, National Marine Fisheries Service
2. AAAS Energy, Environment, Agriculture and Natural Resources Fellow, NOAA, Climate Program Office
3. Associate Director, Science & Technology Policy Fellowships, AAAS
Abstract:
The work of government and academic scientists are often complementary, but the application of this work to policy can sometimes be a controversial and divisive force between the two communities. One means of increasing understanding and cooperation in science policy is via the AAAS Science & Technology Policy Fellowship Program. This prestigious program brings accomplished scientists and engineers into 15 federal agencies to work at the intersections of science and policy. For the first time NOAA is hosting AAAS Fellows: Drs. Eric Toman and Kiki Jenkins. In this seminar they will present their perspectives on how the AAAS fellowship provides an opportunity to bridge the gap between academic and government scientists and address today's increasingly complex science and management challenges. They will be joined by Dan Poux, Associate Director of the Science & Technology Policy Fellowships at AAAS who will provide a brief overview of the fellowship program as well as by former fellows currently employed at NOAA. For more information on the fellowship program see: http://fellowships.aaas.org/.
Presentation:
Download [PDF]
Notes:
For VideoTeleConferencing (VTC) access: contact Cheryl.Ingram@noaa.gov (301-713-3284 x155) at least a day before the seminar. For Webcast access: 1) go to http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?i=442112424&p=NODC4817&t=c); 2) type in other required fields (i.e., your name, e-mail, organization); 3) indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy; 4) click on Proceed. For phone access: toll free dial 866-743-9902 using a touch-tone phone; when prompted enter participant code 4689608 followed by a "#". For general questions about this seminar, please contact Hernan Garcia (301-713-3290 x184).
About the speaker(s):
Bios (PDF)

 


 

Title:

RACE TO THE REEF: Tracking reef fish from open ocean to nursery habitats to coral reefs and back again

Date/Location:
Thursday, 14 February 2008; 12:00 – 13:00 ETZ (SSMC-4, Room #8150, NOS seminar)
Speaker(s):
Samantha Whitcraft, UM-Cooperative Institute for Marine & Atmospheric Science and FIU Biological Sciences Department (Ph.D. Student); and Dr. John Lamkin, NOAA-Fisheries
Abstract:
We are a multi-disciplinary team of scientists dedicated to excellence in early life history research to support applied fisheries management and habitat conservation in the Southeast Atlantic, Gulf of Mexico, and Caribbean ecosystems. To that end we study the dynamics of how specific fish species use a variety of habitats during their life-cycle.  For example, adult gray snappers (Lutjanus griseus) tend to spawn in deeper coastal waters, usually in association with coral reefs or hard-bottom substrate while coastal mangroves provide the intermediate juvenile habitat for gray snappers that recruit to seagrass beds. To study spawning and larval transport in pelagic waters we conduct large-scale survey cruises that sample, quantify, map, and model the distribution of specific fisheries species. To study smaller-scale estuarine and inshore habitat use and movements of snappers we use acoustic tagging and tracking to determine site fidelity and habitat requirements. Understanding this dynamic ecosystem connectivity is vital to determining essential fish habitat, conservation planning, and fisheries management.
Notes:
Presentations are typically available via a combination of phone & webcast. With a reservation, they can also be available by video conferencing to those with appropriate equipment.  For phone: dial 866-541-1377, passcode 142625. For webcast: 1) go to http://www.MyMeetings.com, enter the meeting number 449707376 and passcode NOS8150; 2) enter other required fields; 3) indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy; 4) click on Proceed.  You must also dial the phone number above so you can hear the presentation. For videoconferencing: contact nos.video.conference@noaa.gov for information on setting up a reservation.  Please allow adequate time for testing of connections (at least 24 hours or more) if you do not regularly connect with NOS.

 


 

Title:

Remote Sensing at the Cooperative Institute for Oceanographic Satellite Studies: CIOSS Research – On the Edge(s)

Date/Location:
Thursday, 14 February 2008; 12:00 - 13:00 ETZ (World Weather Building, Room 707, Camp Springs, MD; NESDIS-STAR seminar)
Speaker(s):
Dr. Ted Strub (Director, CIOSS, Oregon State University)
Abstract:
CIOSS research is “on the edge” in a number of ways. First, by definition, all research occurs on the edge of knowledge. Next, considering spatial dimensions, remote sensing of the ocean occurs at the very top edge of the ocean, due to the strong absorption of electromagnetic radiation (EMR) by water. This is a major difference between oceanographic and atmospheric remote sensing. At CIOSS, we also have a focus on the horizontal edge of the ocean – the coastal environment. Several efforts are underway to push microwave (active and passive) remote sensing closer to the coast, where contamination of EMR signals is caused by reflection and emision from the land into the antenna side-lobes. Finally, some of our ocean color group work is with hyperspectral data, pushing at the edges of spectral and spatial resolution. Examples will be presented of ongoing research at CIOSS in all of these, with a special emphasis on retrieving altimeter data closer to the coast.
Notes:
The seminar can be dialed in at 1-888-730-9134 with passcode 55392. For further information please contact Ralph Ferraro (301-405-0893). World Weather Building Science Center, 5200 Auth Road, Camp Springs, MD 20746.

 


 

Title:

Arctic Oceanography Timeline and Data Recovery Since 1860

Date/Location:
Thursday, 21 February 2008; 11:00 – 12:00 ETZ; (SSMC-3, Room #4817, NODC Seminar)
Speaker(s):
Igor Smolyar (NODC)
Abstract:
I will talk about the current status and outlook of the database of the Eastern Arctic Seas and new data products for the International Polar Year 2007-08.
Notes:
For VideoTeleConferencing (VTC) access: contact Cheryl.Ingram@noaa.gov (301-713-3284 x155) at least a day before the seminar. For Webcast access: 1) go to http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?i=442112424&p=NODC4817&t=c); 2) type in other required fields (i.e., your name, e-mail, organization); 3) indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy; 4) click on Proceed. For phone access: toll free dial 866-743-9902 using a touch-tone phone; when prompted enter participant code 4689608 followed by a "#". For general questions about this seminar, please contact Hernan Garcia (301-713-3290 x184).
Presentation
Download [PDF]

 


 

Title:

Observations and Modeling of Sea Surface Temperature Influence on Surface Winds and the Troposphere

Date/Location:
Monday, 25 February, 2008; 10:00 - 11:00 am (World Weather Building, Room 707, Camp Springs, NESDIS-STAR seminar)
Speaker(s):
Dr. Dudley Chelton (Distinguished Professor of CIOSS, Oregon State University)
Abstract:
A strong and positive coupling between sea surface temperature (SST) and surface wind speed on scales shorter than about 1000 km is well established from satellite measurements of surface winds by the QuikSCAT scatterometer and SST by the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer (AMSR). This ocean-atmosphere interaction is clearly evident in the ECMWF global forecast model, although it is underestimated by about a factor of two. The SST influence on surface winds is barely detectable in the NCEP global forecast model. Simulations with the Weather Research & Forecasting (WRF) mesoscale model suggest that this is due to a combination of inadequate resolution of the SST boundary condition used for the NCEP model and underestimation of vertical mixing in the marine atmospheric boundary layer.
Notes:
The seminar can be dialed in at 1-888-730-9134 with passcode 55392. For further information please contact Xiwu Zhan (301-763-8042 x 14) or Ken Pryor (301-763-8204 x173). World Weather Building Science Center, 5200 Auth Road, Camp Springs, MD 20746.

 


 

Title:

Verification of Weather Forecasts

Date/Location:
Wednesday, 27 February 2008, 14:00 - 15:00 ETZ (World Weather Building, Room 707, Camp Springs; JCSDA seminar)
Speaker(s):
Keith Brill (Hydrometeorological Prediction Center, National Centers for Environmental Prediction, National Weather Service, NOAA)
Abstract:
This presentation introduces the audience to some basic concepts, terminology, and practices related to the verification of weather forecasts. To convey the broad scope of the topic, objective verification of both deterministic and probabilistic forecasts is discussed. Anomaly correlations and phase errors are computed for verifying the Hydrometeorological Prediction Center's (HPC) deterministic forecasts of mean sea level pressure. HPC quantitative precipitation forecast verification exemplifies the use of 2 X 2 contingency tables applied to deterministic forecasts. Finally, verification of HPC's probabilistic heat index forecasts demonstrates use of the Brier score and the attribute diagram.
Notes:
Toll Free Domestic #888-322-7905; International #1-210-795-2680, passcode #29036. For questions please contact Ada Armstrong (301-763-8172 x188) and George Ohring (301-763-8154 x352) World Weather Building Science Center, 5200 Auth Road, Camp Springs, MD 20746.

 


 

Title:

Communication Goes Two Ways: Keeping the Information Flowing Between Scientists and Policy and Communications Staffs

Date/Location:
Friday, 29 February 2008; 12:00 – 13:00 ETZ (SSMC-4, Room #8150, NOS seminar)
Speaker(s):
Hanna Goss (NOAA Coastal Services Center)
Abstract:
Before scientific research can influence public policy and opinion, scientists typically must first work with policy and communications staff members. Deadlines, along with differing agendas, expectations, and educational backgrounds, are among the many hurdles that must be overcome for these staff members to effectively communicate with one another. Goss will provide some tips, secrets, and shortcuts to keep the information flowing.
Notes:
Presentations are typically available via a combination of phone & webcast. With a reservation, they can also be available by video conferencing to those with appropriate equipment. For phone: dial 866-541-1377, passcode 142625. For webcast: 1) go to http://www.MyMeetings.com, enter the meeting number 449707376 and passcode NOS8150; 2) enter other required fields; 3) indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy; 4) click on Proceed. You must also dial the phone number above so you can hear the presentation. For videoconferencing: contact nos.video.conference@noaa.gov for information on setting up a reservation. Please allow adequate time for testing of connections (at least 24 hours or more) if you do not regularly connect with NOS. For questions: contact Felix Martinez (Felix.Martinez@noaa.gov).
About the speaker(s):
Hanna Goss is writer and editor of Coastal Services, a national trade journal for coastal resource managers published by the NOAA Coastal Services Center. Goss has more than 20 years of professional writing and communications experience. Her background includes 5 years as a reporter for a daily newspaper, and public relations and marketing positions at educational institutions. Since Goss joined NOAA 9 years ago, Coastal Services has received more than 30 state, regional, national, and international awards.

 


 

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March

 

 

Title:

Hydrologic Tools and Products for Advancing Operational Forecast Systems

Date/Location:
Monday, 03 March 2008; 13:00-14:00 ETZ (SSMC-2, Room #8246, OHD Seminar)
Speaker(s):
Terri S. Hogue (1) and Kristie J. Franz (2)
(1) Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of California, Los Angeles
(2) Department of Geological and Atmospheric Sciences, Iowa State University
Abstract:
The hydrologic research community has invested extensive resources into the development and application of increasingly complex models and related configurations (optimization, data assimilation, etc). The key to integration of research advances is an understanding of operational systems and needs, as well as close collaboration with users and system developers. Previous work conducted by the authors, in consultation with NWS personnel, has led to incremental advances in model calibration and forecast verification approaches. Dr. Hogue has developed and integrated automated optimization routines into both the SAC-SMA and SNOW17 operational forecast models. This work evolved from extensive collaborations with several River Forecasting Centers (RFCs) and resulted in a step-wise calibration system (MACS) designed to assist operational calibration efforts. Research by Dr. Franz has included development and application of forecast verification methods for NWS ensemble streamflow predictions (ESP). The current presentation will overview recent work that has been explicitly tied to NWS hydrologic models and the development of methods and products aimed at improving operational river forecasts. Dr. Hogue has developed a remotely-sensed potential evaporation (PE) product designed to be an alternative to the traditional PE inputs used in the SAC-SMA. The product allows for high resolution (daily) spatial estimates which incorporate current land-cover and climate conditions. Dr. Franz undertook an extensive comparison of the SNOW17 and an energy balance snow model, both off-line and coupled to the SAC-SMA model. While the more complex energy balance model did not show a marked improvement over the simpler snow model currently used in operational streamflow prediction, hindcast analysis revealed that, on average, the two models have similar ensemble forecast skill. Follow-on research includes the development of a combined model that contains both SNOW17 and energy balance routines for multi-model ensemble prediction and support of remotely sensed data applications. Additional work by the authors involves development of parsimonious methods for regionalization of SAC-SMA parameters for operational forecast basins in the southeastern United States. The authors will also overview a recently funded project which focuses on coupling data assimilation algorithms with the SAC-SMA and SNOW-17 models for assimilation of both remotely-sensed and ground-based observations.
Notes:
For those of you attending via Goto Meeting, this is the information: https://www1.gotomeeting.com/join/734401399; Conference Call: Telecon: 1-877-774-5038; Passcode: 925335#; Meeting ID: 734-401-399. Notice for the remote callers: We have a new wireless lapel microphone that connects directly to the speakerphone system. Expect a considerable improvement in the sound quality. For questions please contact Pedro.Restrepo@noaa.gov.

 


 

Title:

Implications of Aquaculture for Wild Fisheries: The Case of Alaska Wild Salmon

Date/Location:
Wednesday, 05 March 2008; 12:00-13:00 ETZ (SSMC-3, 2nd Floor, NOAA Central Library / NOAA Aquaculture Program Seminar)
Speaker(s):
Dr. Gunnar Knapp (Professor of Economics, Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska - Anchorage, Alaska)
Abstract:
Worldwide aquaculture production is growing rapidly. The experience of Alaska wild salmon suggests that aquaculture may have significant and wide-ranging potential implications for wild fisheries. Salmon farming exposed wild salmon’s natural monopoly to competition, expanding supply and driving down prices. Wild salmon has faced both inherent as well as self-inflicted challenges in competing with farmed salmon. The economic pressures caused by competition from farmed salmon have been painful and difficult for the wild salmon industry, fishermen and communities. However, these pressures have contributed to changes which have helped make the salmon industry more economically viable. Farmed salmon has greatly expanded the market and created new market opportunities for wild salmon. Farmed salmon has benefited consumers by lowering prices, expanding supply, developing new products, and improving quality of both farmed and wild salmon. Salmon farming has had no apparent direct effects on Alaska wild salmon resources, but could have indirect effects on wild salmon resources which might be positive or negative. The experience of Alaska wild salmon suggests that anyone interested in wild fisheries should pay close attention to what is happening in aquaculture. No wild fishery market—especially for higher valued species—should be taken for granted.
Notes:
For more information contact Mary Lou Cumberpatch or Albert E. Theberge (301-713-2600). Teleconference available for NOAA staff only.

 


 

Title:

WSR-88D Super-Resolution

Date/Location:
Wednesday, 05 March 2008; 14:00-15:00 ETZ (SSMC-2, Room 2358; NWS - Office of Science & Technology Seminar)
Speaker(s):
Mike Istok (Systems Engineering Center, Office of Science and Technology)
Abstract:
Super-Resolution WSR-88D will provide data with a sample size of ¼ km by ½ degree, and increase the range of Doppler data to 300 km from the current 230 km. National Severe Storms Laboratory has quantified the potential benefits for tornado detection: 1) 50% greater range of detection of tornado signatures, and 2) 15% to 20% stronger rotational shear measurements. Super Resolution is implemented with WSR-88D Build 10 RDA and RPG software which begins beta testing on March 4, 2008 at Paducah, KY and with AWIPS OB8.2 which began deploying in January 2008. The functional enhancement consists of new super-resolution base products for reflectivity, velocity, and spectrum width for the lowest elevation angles. This seminar will describe the super-resolution data generation process, show examples of super-resolution products, and identify impacts to systems which process WSR-88D Level 2 Data and Level 3 products.
Notes:
For further information please contact Bob Glahn (310-713-1768)

 


 

Title:

Why The Weather

Date/Location:
Thursday, 06 March 2008; 11:00 – 12:00 ETZ; (SSMC-3, Room #4817, NODC Seminar)
Speaker(s):
Doria Grimes (Chief, Contract Operations Branch, NOAA Central Library)
Abstract:
Charles Franklin Brooks, the founder and first Secretary of the American Meteorological Society, composed daily public service announcements for the Science Service beginning in May 1923. These daily “blogs” were also authored by Charles Fitzhugh Talman and A. H. Thiessen, and were read on the radio. The announcements were designed to present meteorology to the general public through clear and simple explanations of weather facts and phenomena. “Beware of weather proverbs”, wrote Brooks on May 28, 1923, “or better still, pick the true ones and throw aside those which have not been proved….” “Evening red and morning gray, help the traveller on his way…” The "sun does not draw water”. "Thunder does not sour milk!" This presentation is an analysis and, at times, a humorous summary of weather facts and proverbs as broadcast during this era. The NOAA Central Library is honored to be a custodian of a copy of these radio transcripts which have been recently imaged and are on a prototype web site. The online subject index provides quick navigation through 16+ years of public service announcements. Why The Weather is a joint project of LISD and ISMD of NODC.
Notes:
For VideoTeleConferencing (VTC) access: contact Cheryl.Ingram@noaa.gov (301-713-3284 x155) at least a day before the seminar. For Webcast access: 1) go to http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?i=442112424&p=NODC4817&t=c); 2) type in other required fields (i.e., your name, e-mail, organization); 3) indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy; 4) click on Proceed. For phone access: toll free dial 866-743-9902 using a touch-tone phone; when prompted enter participant code 4689608 followed by a "#". For general questions about this seminar, please contact Hernan Garcia (301-713-3290 x184).
Presentation
Download [PDF]

 


 

Title:

NOAA's Climate Services

Date/Location:
Friday, 07 March 2008; 13:00 – 14:00 ETZ; (SSMC-3, Room #4527 -Large Conference Room-, NODC Seminar)
Speaker(s):
Dr. Chester Koblinsky (Director, Climate Program Office, Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research, NOAA)
Abstract:
I will discuss how NOAA’s strategy to address the demand for climate services is evolving. Topics of discussion will include the history and evolution of NOAA’s strategy, the emphasis on better integrating research and climate services, and the important role that the regions will play in this effort.
Notes:
For Webcast access: 1) go to http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?i=442112424&p=NODC4817&t=c); 2) type in required fields (i.e., your name, e-mail, organization); 3) indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy; 4) click on Proceed. For phone access: toll free dial 866-743-9902 using a touch-tone phone; when prompted enter participant code 4689608 followed by a "#". For general questions about this seminar, please contact Hernan Garcia (301-713-3290 x184). No VideoTeleConferencing (VTC) access.
About the speaker(s):
As Director of NOAA’s Climate Program Office and leader of NOAA’s climate mission, Dr. Koblinsky oversees the development of NOAA’s climate activities and manages the execution of its competitive research programs. NOAA’s climate mission is to /“Understand climate variability and change to enhance society’s ability to plan and respond. Dr. Koblinsky joined NOAA in 2003 after a 25-year career as a research scientist and manager at NASA and the Scripps Institution of Oceanography. He has published over 90 scientific papers and lead the development of research satellite missions. He is a recipient of NASA’s Medal for Exceptional Scientific Achievement. Dr. Koblinsky received a Ph.D. in oceanography from Oregon State University.
Presentation
Download [PDF]

 


 

Title:

Emerging Infectious Diseases: Evolutionary Accidents Waiting to Happen

Date/Location:
Tuesday, 11 March 2008; 12:00 - 13:00 ETZ (SSMC-3, 2nd Floor NOAA Library, NOAA Restoration Center seminar)
Speaker(s):
Dr. Daniel R. Brooks (Professor, Department of Zoology, University of Toronto and Fellow, Royal Society of Canada)
Abstract:
Today’s bio-diversity crisis is not just one of lost habitats and extinct species. It is also a crisis of emerging infectious diseases (EID’s), such as HIV in humans, Ebola in humans and gorillas, West Nile virus and Avian Influenza in humans and birds, chytrid fungi in amphibians, and distemper in sea lions. There is every reason to take these events seriously, because EID’s appear to have a long evolutionary history. Geographical restriction and specialized transmission mean that in most time periods, most pathogens occur in a small number of host species, often only one, but retain the ability to infect more. However, climate change alters everything. Species move out of their areas of origin and ecosystems change. Pathogens come into contact with susceptible hosts that they have never before encountered, and that never had the opportunity to evolve resistance. As a result, EID’s are not just possible; they are inevitable. Indeed, every episode of climate change has produced them. If EID’s were rare, management through crisis response might be cost-effective. But EID’s are not rare at all. Rather, they are a common outcome of geographic dispersal associated with large-scale environmental changes. We face a potential crisis, however, that stems from our fundamental ignorance about the biosphere, for it is impossible to be proactive about species of pathogens whose existence has not been documented. This makes many pathogens “evolutionary land mines” awaiting us as we relocate to novel habitats, move species around, and alter existing ecosystems. Nevertheless, most resources are still being allocated for responses to known EID’s rather than to assessing the risk of potential EID’s. Simply put, we must complete the global inventory of pathogenic species. Now. The question is whether we find them before they find us.
Notes:
For more information contact Mary.Lou.Cumberpatch@noaa.gov or Albert.E.Theberge.Jr@noaa.gov; 301-713-2600. Teleconference available for NOAA staff only (dial 866-631-5469, participant code 3958086).
About the speaker(s):
Professor Daniel R. Brooks is a parasitologist of world renown and teaches in the Department of Zoology at the University of Toronto, Ontario, CANADA. He was conferred the honor of Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada in 2004 and has received numerous awards and honors for his research contributions from organizations and institutions of higher learning in Canada, the U.S., and other countries. He has conducted research in Canada, the U.S., Colombia, Venezuela, Mexico, Brazil, Costa Rica, Uruguay, and Ecuador. In addition to his teaching and mentoring duties at U.T., he is coordinator of the Inventory of Eukaryotic Parasites of Vertebrates in the Area de Conservación Guanacaste, Costa Rica, a World Heritage Site. He studies parasites in many countries and is interested in the dynamics of emerging infectious diseases around the world. He is currently amassing a database of parasites which will contain all published phylogenetic trees for parasitic helminths (worms) of vertebrates (including DNA information), in an effort to recognize, predict, and prevent parasitic infestations in humans in the future. He views unknown parasites and pathogens as, “…. “evolutionary land mines” awaiting us as we relocate to novel habitats, move species around, and alter existing ecosystems”.

 


 

Title:

Nanotechnology and NOAA: Potential Roles in and Contributions to the National Nanotechnology Initiative

Date/Location:
Tuesday, 11 March 2008; 12:00 – 13:00 ETZ (SSMC-4, Room #8150, NOS seminar)
Speaker(s):
Dr. John V. Stone, Michigan State University
Abstract:
Nanotechnology is the understanding and control of matter at dimensions of roughly 1 to 100 nanometers, where unique phenomena enable novel applications. Encompassing nanoscale science, engineering and technology, nanotechnology involves imaging, measuring, modeling, and manipulating matter at this length scale. Given nanotechnology’s potential to transcend traditional disciplinary and sectoral boundaries, the U.S. Congress enacted the ‘21st Century Nanotechnology Research and Development Act’ (108 P.L. 153, 2003), to coordinate multiagency efforts in these areas. Twenty-seven federal agencies and departments presently participate in the NNI (including the Department of Commerce), eleven of which have research and development (R&D) budgets for nanotechnology. Other federal organizations contribute studies of the applications from those agencies performing R&D, as well as other collaborations. Nanotechnologies have been characterized as both holding ‘promise’ and posing ‘peril.’ For example, in agriculture, nano-engineered fertilizers and pesticides may drastically reduce reliance on and thus non-point source pollution from their more conventional cousins; and yet, they may also pose new environmental and human health & safety – as well as socio-economic – risks and impacts. Similarly, nanotechnologies are being developed for water quality and coastal monitoring and management; yet, as in the agrifood sector, these very applications may present new uncertainties for aquatic environments and resources, as well as for the agencies charged with managing them. This presentation considers potential NOAA roles in and contributions to the NNI, particularly those related to the NNI’s interests in public engagement as a mechanism for addressing the ethical, legal, and social issues (ELSI) associated with various nanotechnology applications. The presentation is inspired, in part, by NOAA’s Draft Human Dimensions Strategic Plan for 2008-13, which briefly discusses a “nanotechnology example;” it is intended to spur dialogue in this area between NOAA and the NNI. Drawing on NSF-funded research on adapting Cooperative Extension as a model for public engagement in agrifood nanotechnology, this presentation argues that Sea Grant Extension is a strong NOAA resource with great potential to fulfill the NNI’s public engagement and ELSI interests in the aquatic resource applications and implications of nanotechnology. This presentation will outline the key components of the adapted Extension model, wherein Extension Educators receive training on potential nanotechnology applications in a given sector (e.g. ‘agrifood,’ ‘marine resources,’ etc.) and work at a grass-roots level to link public perceptions of risk and opportunity to nanotechnology policy-makers and other stakeholder groups, with the overall goal of advancing socially responsive nanotechnology policies across all NNI member agencies.
Notes:
Presentations are typically available via a combination of phone & webcast. With a reservation, they can also be available by video conferencing to those with appropriate equipment. For phone: dial 866-541-1377, passcode 142625. For webcast: 1) go to http://www.MyMeetings.com, enter the meeting number 449707376 and passcode NOS8150; 2) enter other required fields; 3) indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy; 4) click on Proceed. You must also dial the phone number above so you can hear the presentation. For videoconferencing: contact nos.video.conference@noaa.gov for information on setting up a reservation. Please allow adequate time for testing of connections (at least 24 hours or more) if you do not regularly connect with NOS. For questions: contact Felix Martinez.
About the speaker(s):
Dr. Stone is an Applied Anthropologist and Senior Research Scientist at the Institute for Food and Agricultural Standards of the Michigan State University. He is currently involved in the Project on Social and Ethical Dimensions of Agrifood Nanotechnology.

 


 

Title:

The Orbiting Carbon Observatory (OCO): Measuring CO2 from Space

Date/Location:
Wednesday, 19 March 2008, (World Weather Building, Room 707, Camp Springs, MD; JCSDA seminar)
Speaker(s):
David Crisp ( NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory )
Abstract:
The Orbiting Carbon Observatory (OCO) is currently under development by the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory to identify and characterize natural CO2 sinks. This Earth System Science Pathfinder mission is scheduled for launch in December 2008. During its nominal two-year operational lifetime, OCO will make space-based measurements of CO2 and molecular oxygen (O2) over the sunlit hemisphere of the Earth. These data will be analyzed with remote sensing algorithms to retrieve estimates of the column- averaged CO2 dry air mole fraction, XCO2 with the accuracy and sampling resolution needed to characterize surface sources and sinks of CO2 on regional scales over the entire globe. The observatory consists of a dedicated spacecraft bus that carries and points a single instrument. This instrument incorporates 3 high-resolution grating spectrometers that make coincident measurements of reflected sunlight in near-infrared CO2 and molecular oxygen (O2) bands. The pre-flight qualification and calibration testing of the OCO instrument has just been completed. These tests describe the instrument's radiometric, spectral, and spatial performance. The end-to-end instrument performance was verified by recording atmospheric solar spectra with the flight instrument and comparing these results to spectra recorded simultaneously from a collocated ground-based high-resolution Fourier transform spectrometer. This comparison indicates that the instrument meets or exceeds its design objectives and will provide excellent data for XCO2 retrievals.
Notes:
For questions please contact Ada Armstrong (301-763-8172 x188) and George Ohring (301-763-8154 x352). World Weather Building Science Center, 5200 Auth Road, Camp Springs, MD 20746.

 


 

Title:

How Climate Change Places Ice-Dependent Beringian Mammals At Risk

Date/Location:
Thursday, 20 March 2008; 11:30 - 13:00 ETZ (SSMC-3, 2nd Floor, NOAA Central Library Seminar)
Speaker(s):
G. Carlton Ray (Professor, University of Virginia)
Abstract:
TBD
Notes:
For more information contact Mary Lou Cumberpatch or Albert E Theberge; 301-713-2600.
About the speaker(s):
Professor Ray has years of experience monitoring Arctic populations of marine mammals and their habitats.

 


 

Title:

Hot Sour Soup: Good for Colds, Bad for Corals

Date/Location:
Thursday, March 20, 2008, 12:00-13:00 ETZ (World Weather Building, Room 707, Camp Springs, NESDIS-STAR seminar)
Speaker(s):
Mark Eakin (oceanographer, STAR / SOCD / MEB and Coordinator, NOAA's Coral Reef Watch )
Abstract:
Coral reefs live within a fairly narrow envelope of environmental conditions constrained by water temperatures, light, salinity, nutrients, bathymetry and the aragonite saturation state of seawater. As documented in numerous studies, the world’s coral reefs are "in crisis" as a result of human impacts on their environment. While local stresses currently dominate, coral reefs are increasingly confronted with global-scale changes due to rising greenhouse gas concentrations. These changes are rapidly modifying the environmental envelope of coral reefs through both increased thermal stress and ocean acidification. In the former case, there is a well-documented relationship between thermal stress and the response of corals that include coral bleaching, disease, and mortality. Clear tolerance thresholds exist beyond which high temperature and accumulated thermal stress have deleterious effects. However, the synergistic effects of increasing temperature and ocean acidification are not yet fully understood. At this time, there is mounting concern that decreasing pH and aragonite saturation state will cause net reef accretion to cease or become negative. The threshold at which this could occur is likely to be reached much sooner than the pH drop necessary to induce carbonate dissolution. Both the thermal and chemical limits that control coral survival and reef growth will likely be passed before 2100 assuming even conservative projections reported in the 4th Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. This talk, based in part on the review paper highlighted with the cover of Science on 14 December, will discuss these thresholds and their ramifications for ecosystems and resource management.
Notes:
Dial-in Information 866-541-9958; Passcode: 2531766. Contact Ralph Ferraro ( 301-405-0893). See http://www.orbit.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/seminars.php for presentations 24 hours before the talk.
About the speaker(s):
See http://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/Eakin_M.php

 


 

Title:

Behavioral Response Study (BRS) of Deep-Diving Cetaceans in Tongue of the Ocean, Bahamas

Date/Location:
Friday, 21 March 2008; 12:00 - 13:00 ETZ (SSMC-3, 2nd Floor, NOAA Central Library Seminar)
Speaker(s):
Dr. Brandon Southall (Director, NOAA Ocean Acoustics Program)
Abstract:
Initial results are reported from a study designed to provide science-based approaches for mitigating risk of sonar to beaked and other whales. The study on beaked and other whale behavioral responses to mid-frequency sonar and other sounds was conducted at the AUTEC range near Andros Island, Bahamas, where Blainvilles beaked whales (/Mesoplodon densirostris/) can regularly be detected using passive acoustic monitoring of their echolocation clicks. Tags recorded sound at the whale and behavior of the whale. Data were collected from 10 tags; 6 on Blainvilles beaked whales, 4 on pilot whales. 109 hours of data were collected from tags; 74h from beaked whales; 34h from pilot whales. Playbacks of mid-frequency sonar and killer whale sounds were performed on 1 tagged beaked whale and 2 tagged pilot whales.The tagged beaked whale responded to both sonar and killer whale sounds by premature cessation of clicking during foraging dives (RL = ~117 dB re 1 µPa for the killer whale sound, ~145 dB for the sonar), with unusually slow and long ascents. Following the two exposures, the beaked whale exhibited sustained and directed avoidance of the area for at least 10 hours.
Notes:
For Teleconference and further information please contact Mary.Lou.Cumberpatch@noaa.gov
About the speaker:
Dr. Southall is a fisheries biologist and director of NOAA's Ocean Acoustics Program within the NOAA Fisheries Office of Science and Technology. Brandon completed graduate studies (M.S. in Marine Science in 1998 and a Ph.D. in Ocean Sciences in 2002) on hearing in seals and sea lions as well as effects of noise on their hearing, including: auditory masking, temporary threshold shifts, and age-related hearing loss. He also conducted and continues fieldwork on northern elephant seal acoustic communication, measuring vocalization source levels, natural ambient noise conditions, assessing context-specificity of vocal parameters, and signal directionality. Dr. Southall joined the NOAA Fisheries Acoustics program in 2003 and has been involved in all aspects of this program, including: the development of acoustic exposure criteria for marine mammals, organizing and serving as the meeting chair for two international symposiums on shipping noise and marine mammals, and organizing an ongoing series of educational lectures at nearly 20 locations across the nation on marine noise issues. He is also the principal investigator of the behavioral response study being conducted in the Bahamas with several dozen partners from academia, conservation, and government scientists from eight countries. He has three adorable children with whom he enjoys fishing and playing baseball.

 


 

Title:

Linking land use, fisheries and economics - examples from the Patuxent River Synthesis project

Date/Location:
Wednesday, 26 March 2008; 12:00 – 13:00 ETZ (SSMC-4, Room #8150, NOS seminar)
Speaker(s):
Denise Breitburg (Smithsonian Environmental Research Center)
Abstract:
Land use, economics, food webs and fisheries are inextricably linked. Although understanding the linkages and incorporating them in a predictive framework can be challenging, these are critical steps towards ecosystem based management of our coastal systems and their fisheries. The COASTES and Synthesis projects have focused on the Patuxent River, a subestuary of Chesapeake Bay, to consider how multiple stressors influenced by both the terrestrial landscape and economic drivers affect the estuarine food web, including economically and ecologically important fish and shellfish species. I will focus on a series of management-relevant models and analyses developed as part of the Synthesis project including (1) a new Universal Soils Loss equation, (2) a linked Land Use-Water Quality-Fish Survival-Economic Benefit modeling study that considers how the spatial scale of nutrient management affects the ecological and economic benefits, (3) water quality models that incorporate contaminants such as arsenic and copper, (4) food web models that examine how nutrient enrichment and oyster restoration might ultimately affect forage fish production in Chesapeake Bay, and (5) analyses of how principals of enforcement economics can inform environmental management.
Notes:
Presentations are typically available via a combination of phone & webcast. With a reservation, they can also be available by video conferencing to those with appropriate equipment. For phone: dial 866-541-1377, passcode 142625. For webcast: 1) go to http://www.MyMeetings.com, enter the meeting number 449707376 and passcode NOS8150; 2) enter other required fields; 3) indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy; 4) click on Proceed. You must also dial the phone number above so you can hear the presentation. For videoconferencing: contact nos.video.conference@noaa.gov for information on setting up a reservation. Please allow adequate time for testing of connections (at least 24 hours or more) if you do not regularly connect with NOS. For questions: contact Felix Martinez (Felix.Martinez@noaa.gov).
About the speaker:
Dr. Breitburg received her MS (1982) and PhD (1984) in marine ecology from the University of California at Santa Barbara. She was a curator at the Academy of Natural Sciences Estuarine Research Center from 1984-2003, and have been a Senior Scientist at the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center since 2004. She is interested in how natural and human influences on individual animals are translated to community and ecosystem-level effects and spatial patterns in the environment. Her research has included work on fish, oysters and gelatinous zooplankton. She has served on the Chesapeake Bay Program Scientific and Technical Advisory Panel, NRC panels (most recently reviewing the Ocean Research Priorities Plan), and the governing boards of the Coastal and Estuarine

 


 

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April

 

 

Title:

Real-time assimilation of streamflow, precipitation and potential evaporation data into lumped SAC via 2DVAR and estimation and local optimization of lumped model parameters via AB_OPT – A progress report and plans

Date/Location:
Wednesday 03 April 2008; 13:00 - 14:30 ETZ (SSMC-2, Room 8246; OHD Hydrologic Ensemble Prediction (HEP) Seminar)
Speaker(s):

D.J. Seo (1,2), Victor Koren (1), Lee Cajina (1), Bob Corby (3), Tracy Howieson (3), Chip Gobs (1), Vadim Kuzmin (4).

(1) NOAA/NWS/Office of Hydrologic Development; (2) University Corporation for Atmospheric Research; (3) NOAA/NWS/West Gulf River Forecast Center; (4) University of Melbourne, Australia

Abstract:
In this presentation, we summarize the progress of the “VAR” project to date, specific outcomes of and from the project and plans for the next steps for discussion. A collaboration between OHD and WGRFC, the project began in 2001 with the immediate goal of “implementing a prototype at a forecast office”. Since then, we developed (Seo et al. 2003a) and implemented (Seo et al. 2003b) a prototype at WGRFC for experimental operation, and have continued enhancement based on operational experience and objective and rigorous performance evaluation (Seo et al. 2008). The latest version has been/is being implemented in the Site-Specific Hydrologic Prediction (SSHP) System for OB9 release. The potency and efficacy of data assimilation (DA) hinges on the quality of the models (SAC, UHG). The more accurate the models (i.e. the smaller the structural and parametric errors) are, the larger the improvement from DA is. To support 2DVAR and 1-hr lumped modeling of SAC and UHG in general, we also developed in 2003 a parameter estimation and local optimization tool, AB_OPT, which underwent a number of enhancements since then to the current form (Kuzmin et al. 2008). A stand-alone tool, AB_OPT performs estimation of long-term biases in MAPX and MAPE, estimation of empirical UHG and local/limited optimization of the SAC parameters. A salient shortcoming of the “variational assimilation” methodology is that it does not, in its original form, provide uncertainty estimates. For planned infusion into Phase 2 of the eXperimental Ensemble Forecast System (XEFS), we have started development of an ensemble filter, a variant of Maximum Likelihood Ensemble Filter (MLEF, Zupanski 2005), that combines the strengths of variational assimilation and ensemble Kalman filter methodologies. We will share some examples that illustrate potential and science issues. In order to meet the AHPS goal of providing uncertainty information to most forecast points, ensemble DA extend to downstream locations. Time-permitting, we will describe an exploratory effort toward development of a real-time updating capability for hydrologic routing through examples from WGRFC.
Notes:
OHD Hydrologic Ensemble Prediction (HEP) Seminar. For further information about this seminar please contact Ken Pavelle. Conference Call: (866) 713-2373 Code: 9960047; GotoMeeting: https://www1.gotomeeting.com/join/171404181; Meeting ID: 171-404-181.

 


 

Title:

Status of Blue Whales off California and Background on the Ship Strikes that Occurred in 2007

Date/Location:
Tuesday 08 April 2008; 12:00 - 13:00 ETZ (SSMC-3, Room 13836; NMFS Office of Protected Resources seminar)
Speaker(s):
John Calambokidis (Senior Research Biologist, Cascadia Research, Olympia, WA)
Abstract:
TBD
Notes:
For Webex access, please contact Jaclyn Taylor [(301) 713-2322 ext 118] at least a day before the seminar.

 


 

Title:

Climate Change Impacts on Water Resources in Northern Alaska

Date/Location:
Tuesday, 08 April 2008; 10:00 – 11:00 Alaska Time Zone (Duckering Building Room 535, University of Alaska/Fairbanks, ACCAP/Alaska Climate Teleconference seminar)
Speaker(s):
Dan White (University of Alaska/Fairbanks)
Abstract:
Water is critical in Northern Alaska for drinking and residential use in villages, for the construction of ice roads and pads in oil and gas exploration and drilling, and as habitat for migratory birds and water fowl. Join us to find out more about how climate change has and will continue to impact availability of water in Northern Alaska.
Notes:
To Participate / Log-In to the Alaska Climate Teleconference: 1) Dial: 1-800-893-8850. 2) When prompted, enter the PIN code: 7531823. PLEASE MUTE YOUR PHONE DURING THE PRESENTATION. The audio is very sensitive and your external conversations and typing can be heard by other participants and disrupt the presentation. Thank You. To view the presentation during a teleconference: 1) Point your web browser to: http://www.shareitnow.com. http://www.shareitnow.com/ 2) Click on the blue *Join a Meeting* button on the left side bar. 3) For Presenter ID enter: accap@uaf.edu. If you do not see anything on your screen, click on the refresh button on the top bar. For optimal viewing, we suggest selecting 'Always resize to fit window (max 100%)' under 'View.' For Macintosh computer users: A copy of the presentation will also be available on the ACCAP website: www.uaf.edu/accap. See the right-hand column under "Highlights." To join us in person: If you are in Fairbanks, you are welcome to join us in person on the UAF campus, Duckering Building Room 535. Map: http://www.uaf.edu/campusmap/(purple zone). Registration: Pre-registration is not required but is strongly encouraged as it helps us to moderate the discussion. To register please contact: Sarah Trainor, ACCAP Coordinator and Research Scientist, (907) 474-7878, accap@uaf.edu, fnsft@uaf.edu, or fill out the web-form at: http://www.uaf.edu/accap/teleconference.htm#register. For more information about the Alaska Climate Teleconferences and the Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy, please contact Sarah Trainor (telephone and email above) or visit our website: http://www.uaf.edu/accap/.

 


 

Title:

Exploration of Hudson Submarine Canyon Region Offshore New York and New Jersey

Date/Location:
Thursday, 10 April 2008; 11:30 - 12:30 ETZ (SSMC-3, 2nd Floor, NOAA Central Library Seminar)
Speaker(s):
Peter A. Rona, Ph.D. (Professor of Marine Geology and Geophysics, Institute of Marine and Coastal Sciences, Rutgers University)
Abstract:
Dr. Rona will report on an area of approximately 23,000 square kilometers of the continental slope and continental rise, centered on Hudson Canyon. He will describe the geomorphology (the shape of the terrain), sea floor environments, and the inferred processes of their formation. The interpretations are based on integration of multibeam bathymetry and backscatter intensity imagery with widely-spaced sub-bottom seismic profiles. Dr. Rona is a well-know ocean explorer who was the first to discover hydrothermal venting in the Atlantic Ocean prior to retirement from NOAA.
Notes:
For Teleconference and further information please contact Mary Lou Cumberpatch (301-713-2600 Ext.129)

 


 

Title:

Stellwagen Bank National Marine Sanctuary as a Case Study for Characterizing and Managing Regional Underwater Noise Budgets

Date/Location:
Thursday, 10 April 2008; 12:45 - 13:45 ETZ (SSMC-3, 2nd Floor, NOAA Central Library Seminar)
Speaker(s):
Leila Hatch, PhD (Regional Marine Bioacoustic Coordinator, NOAA Stellwagen Bank National Marine Sanctuary)
Abstract:
Stellwagen Bank National Marine Sanctuary (SBNMS) is home to many vocally-active marine species that are protected and/or managed under multiple US statutes. Placed right in the middle of Massachusetts Bay, this urban Sanctuary is also a busy place for human commerce and recreation, both of which contribute noise to the underwater environment of the sanctuary. Meeting protection and management objectives in the SBNMS thus necessitates identifying contributors to the sanctuary’s total noise budget and evaluating their possible effects on marine animal behavior. This talk will introduce the partnerships, technologies, and methodologies being utilized in the SBNMS to meet NOAA’s mandates. Low frequency acoustic data, collected and analyzed by researchers from SBNMS, NOAA’s Northeast Fisheries Science Center and Cornell University, are being used to address multiple questions regarding the locations, behaviors, and potentials for hearing loss and masking among vocally-active species in the sanctuary. Ship tracking data are being used to characterize patterns of large commercial traffic in the sanctuary and, when integrated with acoustic data, to assess shipping noise contributions to sanctuary waters. Further collaborations integrate empirical noise data and ship tracks with data from acoustic propagation models and tagged whales to examine whale behaviors in their acoustic context.
Notes:
For Teleconference and further information please contact Mary Lou Cumberpatch (301-713-2600 Ext.129)

 


 

Title:

The Geostationary Lightning Mapper for GOES-R and Beyond

Date/Location:
Friday, 11 April 2008, 12:00-13:00 ETZ (World Weather Building, Room 707, Camp Springs, MD; NESDIS-STAR seminar)
Speaker(s):
Dr. Steve Goodman (Deputy Director, NESDIS / STAR)
Abstract:
The Geostationary Lightning Mapper (GLM) is a single channel, near-IR imager/optical transient event detector, used to detect, locate and measure total lightning activity over the full-disk as part of a 3-axis stabilized, geostationary weather satellite system. The next generation NOAA Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES-R) series with a planned launch in 2014 will carry a GLM that will provide continuous day and night observations of lightning from the west coast of Africa (GOES-E) to New Zealand (GOES-W) when the constellation is fully operational. The mission objectives for the GLM are to 1) provide continuous, full-disk lightning measurements for storm warning and nowcasting, 2) provide early warning of tornadic activity, and 3) accumulate a long-term database to track decadal changes of lightning. The GLM owes its heritage to the NASA Lightning Imaging Sensor (1997-Present) and the Optical Transient Detector (1995- 2000), which were developed for the Earth Observing System and have produced a combined 13 year data record of global lightning activity. In parallel with the instrument development, a GOES-R Risk Reduction Team and Algorithm Working Group Lightning Applications Team have begun to develop the Level 2 algorithms and applications. Proxy total lightning data from the NASA Lightning Imaging Sensor on the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite and regional test beds (e.g., Lightning Mapping Arrays in North Alabama and the Washington DC Metropolitan area) are being used to develop the pre-launch algorithms and applications, and also improve our knowledge of thunderstorm initiation and evolution. Real time lightning mapping data are being provided in an experimental mode to selected National Weather Service (NWS) forecast offices in Southern and Eastern Region. This effort is designed to help improve our understanding of the application of these data in operational settings.
Notes:
Dial-in Information 866-541-9958; Passcode: 2531766. For further information please contact Ralph Ferraro (301-405-0893).
About the speaker:
Link to Presentation:
Presentation file posted at http://www.orbit.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/seminars.php by 4/10/2008 (for further information please contact Lori.Brown@noaa.gov)

 


 

Title:

HROV: Exploring the ocean’s deepest depths

Date/Location:
Tuesday, 15 April 2008; 11:00 – 12:00 ETZ (SSMC-3, Room #4817, NOAA AUV Working Group / NODC Seminar)
Speaker(s):
Andy Bowen, Brendan Foley & Chris German (Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution)
Abstract:
For the first time since the 1960s, scientists will explore the deepest parts of the oceans with an innovative vehicle capable of working in such an extreme environment. The Nereus vehicle will enable scientists to explore the most remote regions of the oceans such as under the polar ice caps and deep trenches up to depths of 10,972 meters (36,000 feet). Some of these areas were visited very briefly four decades ago by pioneering oceanographers and more recently by researchers from Japan's JAMSTEC. Technology limitations have prevented routine, cost-effective access to these remote regions, and the final 4,500 meters of the ocean remain largely unexplored. The HROV is designed to help scientists with many research needs using a single tool which can operate as an autonomous vehicle (AUV) and in a tethered mode (ROV) during a research cruise, depending on mission needs. This attribute to change modes leads to a new class of Hybrid underwater vehicles (HROV). Instead of hauling multiple research vehicles out to sea, scientists will use the HROV for their entire mission, from seafloor surveys (AUV mode) to sampling of rocks or deep-sea animals (ROV mode). Traditionally, a separate vehicle is used to conduct surveys, while another vehicle performs the close-up work and sampling. The HROV will simply transform between its two modes of operation to accomplish all these tasks. Sea trials took place off the Hawaiian Islands at 2500 meters in November, 2007. The presentation will discuss some of the unanswered scientific questions motivating development of the vehicle, a brief description of the HROV concept and how it works followed by a view forward of how such vehicles can be used for a range of innovative applications, including underwater archeology.
Notes:
For Webcast access: 1) go to http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?i=442112424&p=NODC4817&t=c); 2) type in other required fields (i.e., your name, e-mail, organization); 3) indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy; 4) click on Proceed. For phone access: toll free dial 866-743-9902 using a touch-tone phone; when prompted enter participant code 4689608 followed by a "#". For further information about this seminar please contact Reg Beach (301.734.1016).
About the speaker(s):
BIOS [ PDF]

 


 

Title:

NASA Plans for Advanced Models / Assimilation Systems and Implications for Satellite Data

Date/Location:
Wednesday, 16 April 2008, see JSDA web for time (World Weather Building, Room 707, Camp Springs, MD; JCSDA seminar)
Speaker(s):
Michelle Rienecker (NASA Goddard Space Flight Center; Global Modeling and Assimilation Office)
Abstract:
TBD
Notes:
For questions please contact Ada Armstrong (301-763-8172 x188) and George Ohring (301-763-8154 x352).

 


 

Title:

GMAO's Atmospheric Data Assimilation System – Contributions to the JCSDA and Future Plans

Date/Location:
Wednesday, 16 April 2008, 14:00-15:00h ETZ (World Weather Building, Room 707, Camp Springs, MD; JCSDA seminar)
Speaker(s):
Michelle Rienecker (NASA Goddard Space Flight Center; Global Modeling and Assimilation Office)
Abstract:
The atmospheric data assimilation system used by the Global Modeling and Assimilation Office (GMAO) uses the GEOS-5 finite volume atmospheric model and the Gridpoint Statistical Interpolation (GSI) analysis scheme developed at NCEP. The system is now being used to generate products input to NASA instrument team algorithms and also to generate MERRA, an atmospheric reanalysis for the satellite era. The GEOS-5 DAS is also used to contribute to satellite data assimilation issues relevant to the JCSDA. For example, the adjoint system developed for the DAS has been used to investigate observation impacts and work has begun to investigate the impact of cloud-cleared radiances on forecast skill. This presentation will highlight some recent results and also some preliminary results from a newly developed 4DVAR version of GEOS-5. The atmospheric data assimilation system used by the Global Modeling and Assimilation Office (GMAO) uses the GEOS-5 finite volume atmospheric model and the Gridpoint Statistical Interpolation (GSI) analysis scheme developed at NCEP. The system is now being used to generate products input to NASA instrument team algorithms and also to generate MERRA, an atmospheric reanalysis for the satellite era. The GEOS-5 DAS is also used to contribute to satellite data assimilation issues relevant to the JCSDA. For example, the adjoint system developed for the DAS has been used to investigate observation impacts and work has begun to investigate the impact of cloud-cleared radiances on forecast skill. This presentation will highlight some recent results and also some preliminary results from a newly developed 4DVAR version of GEOS-5.
Notes:
Dial-In number #877-709-5341; International Toll #+1-210-234-0013, Passcode: #14697.
Link(s) to Presentation:
See http://www.jcsda.noaa.gov/JCSDASeminars.php for the presentation on the day of the talk. For further information please contact George Ohring (301-763-8154 x352)

 


 

Title:

The IPCC Assessment Process: Future Projections of Climate Change

Date/Location:
Wednesday, 16 April 2008; 12:00 – 13:00 ETZ; (SSMC-3, 2nd Floor, NOAA Central Library Seminar)
Speaker(s):
Ronald J. Stouffer (Senior Research Meteorologist, Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory)
Abstract:
TBD
Notes:
For Teleconference and further information please contact Mary Lou Cumberpatch (301-713-2600 Ext.129)
About the speaker(s):
BIO [PDF]

 


 

Title:

Building a U.S. National System of Marine Protected Areas (MPAs)

Date/Location:
Thursday, 17 April 2008; 11:00 – 12:00 ETZ; (SSMC-3, Room #4817, NODC Seminar)
Speaker(s):
Lauren Wenzel (NOAA National Marine Protected Areas Center)
Abstract:
In the United States and around the world, marine protected areas (MPAs) are increasingly recognized as an important and promising management tool for conserving vital marine habitats and natural and cultural resources. There are nearly 1,800 existing MPAs in the U.S. that have been established by federal, state, territorial, and local governments using approximately 200 different laws. These MPAs have been designated to achieve a wide range of conservation objectives, ranging from conservation of biodiversity hotspots, to preservation of sunken historic vessels, to protection of spawning aggregations important to commercial and recreational fisheries. Similarly, the level of protection provided by these MPAs ranges from no-take marine reserves to allowing multiple uses, including fishing. Recognizing the significant role that U.S. MPAs play in conserving marine heritage and sustainable use, and the lack of a national framework for comprehensive MPA planning, coordination and support, Presidential Executive Order 13158 of May 26, 2000 calls for the development of a national system of MPAs. This seminar will describe the Revised Draft Framework for Developing the National System of MPAs and plans for its implementation.
Notes:
For VideoTeleConferencing (VTC) access: contact Cheryl.Ingram@noaa.gov (301-713-3284 x155) at least a day before the seminar. For Webcast access: 1) go to http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?i=442112424&p=NODC4817&t=c); 2) type in other required fields (i.e., your name, e-mail, organization); 3) indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy; 4) click on Proceed. For phone access: toll free dial 866-743-9902 using a touch-tone phone; when prompted enter participant code 4689608 followed by a "#". For general questions about this seminar, please contact Hernan Garcia (301-713-3290 x184).
About the speaker(s):
Lauren Wenzel is the National System Coordinator for the National Marine Protected Areas. She is the lead staff for coordinating the National MPA Framework, and also supports the Marine Protected Areas Federal Advisory Committee. Lauren joined the MPA Center in 2003. Before that, she served as Deputy Director for Education, Bay Policy, and Growth Management at the Maryland Department of Natural Resources, where she worked on Chesapeake Bay restoration issues.
Link(s) to Presentation:
Download [PDF ; ~2.5 MB]

 


 

Title:

Bottom-up control of the eastern Bering Sea ecosystem: implications for integrated ecosystem assessment during a period of climate change.

Date/Location:
Thursday, 17 April 2008; 12:00 – 13:00 ETZ; (SSMC-3, 2nd Floor, NOAA Central Library Seminar)
Speaker(s):
Dr. Jeffrey Napp (Alaska Fisheries Science Center) and Dr. Phyllis Stabeno (Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory)
Abstract:
The eastern Bering Sea is responding to climate change which is having a profound impact on all levels of the food chain, including commercial and protected species and humans. Changes in the presence of sea ice (timing, extent, and thickness) impacts the heat content and stratification of the water column, nutrient supplies, the timing and magnitude of the spring bloom, zooplankton biomass and species composition, and fish distributions. NOAA’s North Pacific Climate Regimes and Ecosystem Productivity program (NPCREP) is working with academic and other partners to measure and quantify these changes and synthesize the results. Our research will provide key observations and
the understanding necessary to infer how future changes in climate will impact the abundance and production of ecosystem goods and services.
Notes:
For Teleconference and further information please contact Mary Lou Cumberpatch (301-713-2600 Ext.129)
Link(s) to Presentation:
http://www.lib.noaa.gov/about/news/041708.ppt

 


 

Title:

Quantifying spatial patterns of coral reef fish assemblages to inform marine management actions in Hawaii

Date/Location:
Tuesday, 22 April 2008; 12:00 – 13:00 ETZ (SSMC-4, Room #8150, NOS seminar)
Speaker(s):
Lisa M. Wedding (University of Hawaii/Manoa)
Abstract:
Applying a spatial approach to marine resource management is gaining recognition with the increasing implementation of marine managed areas, ocean zoning, and no-take marine reserves. Accordingly, spatial analysis of coral reef communities is necessary in order to inform the proper placement of these geographically discrete management units and to inform marine spatial management actions. Our research goals involve the quantification of spatial patterns of coral reef fishes and their associated habitat in Hawaii. First, a landscape ecology approach was used to evaluate the recent boundary expansion of a no-take marine reserve on the island of Oahu using the new benthic habitat maps recently created by NOAA’s Biogeography Branch. As a result of the recent boundary expansion, a greater diversity of interconnected habitat types and a broader depth range enabled greater ecosystem function at this site. Second, a geostatistical approach was applied to identify the biogeographic patterns of reef fishes in the Papahanamokuakea Marine National Monument. Endemism, recruitment, and taxonomic patterns were evident along a latitudinal gradient with the northern three atolls showing a unique sub-province within the archipelago. Third, a geographic approach was used to examine the relationship between remotely sensed LIDAR-derived habitat complexity and fish assemblage structure. Measures of habitat complexity derived from LIDAR data showed a strong predictive relationship with fish abundance, species richness, and biomass. The quantification of coral reef ecosystem patterns at multiple spatial scales using a wide range of research tools (e.g., remote sensing, GIS, and in situ ecological studies) have important applications for the spatial management of coral reef ecosystems in Hawaii and worldwide.
Notes:
Presentations are typically available via a combination of phone & webcast. With a reservation, they can also be available by video conferencing to those with appropriate equipment. For phone: dial 866-541-1377, passcode 142625. For webcast: 1) go to http://www.MyMeetings.com, enter the meeting number 449707376 and passcode NOS8150; 2) enter other required fields; 3) indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy; 4) click on Proceed. You must also dial the phone number above so you can hear the presentation. For videoconferencing: contact nos.video.conference@noaa.gov for information on setting up a reservation. Please allow adequate time for testing of connections (at least 24 hours or more) if you do not regularly connect with NOS. For questions: contact Felix Martinez.

 


 

Title:

Going Against the Flow - Non-Conventional Wisdom in the Management of Fisheries

Date/Location:
Wednesday, 23 April 2008; 12:00 - 13:00 ETZ (SSMC-3, 2nd Floor, NOAA Central Library Seminar)
Speaker(s):
Dr. John Everett (formerly Chief of the Division of Research of NOAA Fisheries)
Abstract:
Dr. Everett will discuss his findings concerning the menhaden fisheries and the effects of scallop dredging.
Notes:
For Teleconference and further information please contact Mary Lou Cumberpatch (301-713-2600 Ext.129)

 


 

Title:

Compilation of the oceanographic database for the Nordic Seas

Date/Location:
Thursday, 24 April 2008; 11:00 – 12:00 ETZ; (SSMC-3, Room #4817, NODC Seminar)
Speaker(s):
Dr. Alexander Korablev (AARI / NERSC)
Abstract:
A technology of the database compilation applied for the Nordic Seas (Norwegian, Iceland, Greenland and Barents Seas) from collection of the initial data sources to production of merged, quality-duplicate controlled database is discussed. Special attention focused on algorithms of merging procedure, quality control, duplicates analysis, vertical interpolation and description of the final dataset. Results of the AARI contribution into UNESCO/IOC/GODAR project are presented.
Notes:
For VideoTeleConferencing (VTC) access: contact Cheryl.Ingram@noaa.gov (301-713-3284 x155) at least a day before the seminar. For Webcast access: 1) go to http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?i=442112424&p=NODC4817&t=c); 2) type in other required fields (i.e., your name, e-mail, organization); 3) indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy; 4) click on Proceed. For phone access: toll free dial 866-743-9902 using a touch-tone phone; when prompted enter participant code 4689608 followed by a "#". For general questions about this seminar, please contact Hernan Garcia (301-713-3290 x184).
About the speaker:
Dr. Korablev received a Ph.D degree in oceanography (2001). He has worked at the Arctic and Antarctic Research Institute (AARI, St.Petersburg, Russia) in the ocean and atmosphere interaction department (senior scientist). Since June 2007, he holds a research scientist position at the Nansen Environmental and Remote Sensing Center (NERSC, Bergen, Norway). His research interests are in ocean climate variability in the Nordic Seas, water masses, oceanographic fronts, convection, and developing of oceanographic databases.
Link to Presentation:
Download [PDF; ~3.7 MB]

 


 

Title:

The California Ocean Uses Atlas Project: Providing the Missing Link for Place-Based Management of Marine Ecosystems

Date/Location:
Friday, 25 April 2008; 12:00 – 13:00 ETZ (SSMC-4, Room #8150, NOS seminar)
Speaker(s):
Charles M. Wahle, Ph.D. (Senior Scientist, NOAA National MPA Center)
Abstract:
The CA Ocean Uses Atlas project is an innovative public-private partnership between NOAA’s Marine Protected Areas Center (MPA Center) and the Marine Conservation Biology Institute (MCBI). Funded with matching grants from the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation and the Resources Legacy Fund, the Atlas project will fill a critical information gap in ocean management by documenting, for the first time, the full range of significant human uses of the ocean in state and federal waters off the coast of California. Human use patterns will be mapped by regional experts in workshops throughout the state, beginning in September. The resulting spatial data and derived map products will be provided to ocean management agencies and interested stakeholders engaged in a variety of ongoing conservation efforts to plan, implement and evaluate place-based management on the west coast.
Notes:
Presentations are typically available via a combination of phone & webcast. With a reservation, they can also be available by video conferencing to those with appropriate equipment. For phone: dial 866-541-1377, passcode 142625. For webcast: 1) go to http://www.MyMeetings.com, enter the meeting number 449707376 and passcode NOS8150; 2) enter other required fields; 3) indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy; 4) click on Proceed. You must also dial the phone number above so you can hear the presentation. For videoconferencing: contact nos.video.conference@noaa.gov for information on setting up a reservation. Please allow adequate time for testing of connections (at least 24 hours or more) if you do not regularly connect with NOS. For questions: contact Felix Martinez.

 


 

Title:

The Arctic Marine Environment: How it's changing and why

Date/Location:
Friday, 25 April 2008; 10:30-11:30 ETZ (NOAA Satellite Operations Facility (NSOF) 2001 Conference Room, National/Naval Ice Center seminar)
Speaker(s):
Dr. Jackie Richter-Menge (Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory)
Abstract:
Dramatic evidence of change in the Arctic environment, many would argue in the global environment, is the recent reduction in the extent of the summer sea ice cover. Observing and, importantly, understanding trends in the characteristics of the Arctic marine environment are keys in the development of tools to forecast and plan for future change. This presentation will highlight the state-of-the-knowledge in this complex atmosphere-sea ice-ocean environment from these various perspectives: observing, understanding and predicting.
Notes:
National/Naval Ice Center, NOAA Satellite Operations Facility (NSOF), 4251 Suitland Road, Washington, D.C. 20395. For further information please contact Pablo Clemente-Colón.
About the speaker(s):
Dr. Jackie Richter-Menge, a leading Research Scientist with the Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory (CRREL) and Chair of the SCICEX Advisory Board.

 


 

Title:

Long-term water mass properties variation in the Nordic Seas

Date/Location:
Monday, 28 April 2008; 11:00 – 12:00 ETZ; (SSMC-3, Room #4817, NODC Seminar)
Speaker(s):
Dr. Alexander Korablev (AARI / NERSC)
Abstract:
The database compiled for the Nordic Seas (NS) was used both for long-term water mass properties variation study from observed level profiles and production of a climatology. The climatology derived from objectively analyzed (OA) monthly fields computed by means of block variant of ordinary kriging system. Only high quality profiles with more than two measured levels were used to avoid instrumental and vertical biases in gridded fields and analysis. Comparison with available high resolution climatologies computed from different underlying datasets and dissimilar methods have shown quite significant distinctions. Changes of the ocean climate in the Nordic Seas reveal steady states and regimes transitions during the study period since 1900 until 2006. The temporal-spatial pattern of large-scale temperature, salinity and density anomalies shows event-like behavior with different duration, magnitude and penetration depth depending on advection peculiarity of Atlantic/Polar waters into the region and atmospheric forcing. Significant modification of the water mass properties in the NS shapes advection characteristics into the Arctic, vertical exchanges, formation of intermediate, deep and overflows waters. Two different regimes are obvious from the observations with weakened/enhanced downward heat/salt fluxes. Present state of Atlantic water propagated with Norwegian current is characterized by warm and salty conditions resulted in very strong negative density anomaly advected into Arctic. Time/depth diagrams for key areas of the NS and large- scale anomaly fields for abnormal regimes are presented and discussed.
Notes:
For VideoTeleConferencing (VTC) access: contact Cheryl Ingram (301-713-3284 x155) at least a day before the seminar. For general questions about this seminar, please contact Igor Smolyar (301-713-3290 Ext 188).
About the speaker:
Dr. Korablev received a Ph.D degree in oceanography (2001). He has worked at the Arctic and Antarctic Research Institute (AARI, St.Petersburg, Russia) in the ocean and atmosphere interaction department (senior scientist). Since June 2007, he holds a research scientist position at the Nansen Environmental and Remote Sensing Center (NERSC, Bergen, Norway). His research interests are in ocean climate variability in the Nordic Seas, water masses, oceanographic fronts, convection, and developing of oceanographic databases.
Link to Presentation:
Download [PDF; ~ 12.9 MB]

 


 

Title:

Remote Estimation of Carbon Dioxide Fluxes: Potential for the New Generation of Operational Meteorological Satellites

Date/Location:
Tuesday, 29 April 2008; 10:00 – 11:00 ETZ; (World Weather Building, Room 707, Camp Springs, MD; NESDIS-STAR seminar)
Speaker(s):
Anatoly A. Gitelson (Centre for Advanced Land Management Information Technologies, School of Natural Resources, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, NL)
Abstract:
Accurate estimation of spatially distributed CO2 fluxes is of great importance for regional and global studies of carbon balance. We have found that in irrigated and rainfed crops (maize and soybean) as well as in grasslands, carbon dioxide exchange is closely related to total crop and grass chlorophyll content. The finding allowed development of a new technique for remote estimation of chlorophyll specifically for assessing carbon dioxide exchange / gross primary production (GPP). The technique is based on reflectance in two spectral channels: the near-infrared and either the green or the red-edge. The technique provided accurate estimations of daily carbon dioxide exchange. Validation using independent datasets for irrigated and rainfed maize and soybean documented the robustness of the technique. We report also about applying the developed technique for GPP retrieval from data acquired by both an airborne hyperspectral imaging spectrometer (AISA-Eagle) and ETM+ Landsat. The Chlorophyll Index, retrieved from Landsat ETM+ data, was found to be an accurate surrogate measure for daily carbon dioxide exchange with a root mean square error of GPP prediction of less than 1.58 g C m^-2d^-1 in a GPP range of 1.88 g C m^-2d^-1 to 23.1 g C m^-2d^-1. These results suggest new possibilities for analyzing the patio-temporal variation of the GPP of crops using not only the extensive archive of Landsat Thematic Mapper imagery acquired since the early 1980s but also the 500-m/pixel data currently being acquired by MODIS.
Notes:
The seminar can be dialed in at 1-800-857-9600 with passcode 32579. For further information please contact Jerry Zhan [(301) 763-8042 Ext148] or Patricia Thompson [(301) 763-8204 Ext 104].

 


 

Title:

Radiance Data Assimilation for the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) Model: Overview and Results

Date/Location:
Tuesday, 29 April 2008; 14:00 -15:00 ETZ (World Weather Building, Room 707, Camp Springs, MD; JCSDA seminar)
Speaker(s):
Zhiquan Liu (National Center for Atmospheric Research)
Abstract:

The Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model and its variational assimilation system (WRF-Var) are widely used by both the research community and some operational centers. A general satellite radiance assimilation framework has been developed in the WRF-Var system over the past three years. The WRF-Var radiance assimilation capability was designed to meet the requirements of both basic research and operational applications,and will be available to the research community along with the community WRF system. Radiance assimilation capabilities in the WRF-Var - the fast radiative transfer model, bias correction algorithm, quality control, and observation error tuning - will be described. Both the RTTOV and CRTM radiaitve transfer systems are incorporated into the WRF-Var system. Case study results on assimilating AMSU-A observations to improve Katrina track and intensity analysies and forecasts will be presented. Extended experiments over different regions to assess radiance assimilation impact yield encouraging results. Preliminary findings on cloud/rain affected radiance assimilation using CRTM will also be shown. The presentation will conclude with a demonstration of radiance assimilation with the WRF- 4DVAR system.

Notes:
For questions please contact Ada Armstrong (301-763-8172 x188) and George Ohring (301-763-8154 x352).
About the speaker(s):
http://www.mmm.ucar.edu/people/liuz/
Link(s) to Presentation:
See http://www.jcsda.noaa.gov/JCSDASeminars.php on the date of the talk for the presentation slides.

 



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May

 

 

Title:

Numerical Simulation of Tropical Cyclone Intensity Change with High Resolution WRF Model and Assimilation of Multi-Sensor Remote Sensing and In-Situ Data

Date/Location:
Wednesday, 07 May 2008; 11:00 -12:00 ETZ (World Weather Building, Room 707, Camp Springs, MD; JCSDA seminar)
Speaker(s):
Xuanli Li (Department of Meteorology, University of Utah)
Abstract:
Tropical cyclone (TC) intensity forecasting is a challenging problem in both the research and operational communities. With the advanced research version of the WRF model, several case studies are conducted to investigate two main problems: 1) What are the factors limiting the TC intensity forecast? 2) To what extent can data assimilation helps improve the TC intensity forecast? To achieve the above goals, high resolution numerical simulations are performed. Comprehensive satellite and in-situ data sets, collected from the NASA Tropical Cloud Systems and Processes (TCSP) Experiment, are assimilated into the WRF model with its 3DVAR system. The results show that the forecast of TC intensity is highly sensitive to the physical parameterizations in the WRF model. It is also indicated that the WRF model has a problem capturing the rapid intensity change of TCs. The QuikSCAT ocean surface winds, GOES-11 AMVs, dropsonde data, and airborne Doppler radar data from the TCSP mission show significant impacts on the storm vortex structure and environmental features. The enhanced data has greatly improved the intensity, track, and precipitation forecasts of TCs.
Notes:
For questions please contact Ada Armstrong (301-763-8172 x188) and George Ohring (301-763-8154 x352).
About the speaker(s):
http://www.met.utah.edu/people/graduate/xuanlili
Link(s) to Presentation:
Visit the JCSDA site on the day of the talk for the presentation file: http://www.jcsda.noaa.gov/JCSDASeminars.php

 


 

Title:

Satellite-Based Thunderstorm Nowcasting

Date/Location:
Wednesday, 07 May 2008; 14:00-15:00 ETZ (SSMC-2 2nd floor conference room 2358; NWS - Science and Technology Seminar)
Speaker(s):
Brian Vant-Hull / Bob Rabin (NOAA-CREST / NSSL)
Abstract:
A collaborative framework is being pursued by personnel at NOAA/NESDIS, the NOAA/NWS Meteorological Development Laboratory (MDL), the NOAA/OAR National Severe Storms Laboratory (NSSL), and the NOAA Cooperative Remote Sensing Science and Technology Center (CREST) at the City College of New York (CCNY) to develop a prototype satellite-based nowcasting capability for the New York City metropolitan area. This nowcasting capability would also serve as a test bed for MDL efforts in implementing satellite based nowcasting capability throughout the United States as part of the System for Convection Analysis and Nowcasting (SCAN) which is a component of the NWS’ Advanced Weather Information and Processing System (AWIPS). Still in the exploratory phase of the project, the CREST nowcasting team has implemented the Hydro-Estimator (HE: NESDIS) and Rapidly Developing Thunderstorm (RDT: Meteo-France) models to compare their ability to detect convective cells. We have also employed other collaborators to run the FORTRACC (Daniel Vila) and K-Means Correlation (Valiappa Lakshaman) models to compare their forecasting abilities. The results of these comparisons will be discussed, and ideas to improve detection and extrapolation of convective storms will be demonstrated.
Notes:
For further information please contact Bob Glahn (301-713-1768).

 


 

Title:

A Versatile Nowcast-Prediction System for Military-Defense-Aviation Applications

Date/Location:
Thursday 08 May 20088, 10:00 to 11:00 EDT (SSMC-2 2nd floor conference room 2358; NWS - Science and Technology Seminar)
Speaker(s):

Dave Stauffer (Penn State University)

Abstract:
A versatile nowcast-prediction system has been developed at Penn State University. It can produce nowcasts from mobile, on-site computing platforms located in the back of HMMWVs. The nowcast-prediction system can provide on-the-battlefield support to local Army field artillery operations or drop down rapidly relocatable domains for forecasts anywhere in the world. This is made possible through a centralized Department of Defense (DoD) / Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA) computing facility which is responsible for hazard prediction and consequence assessment. The system includes data pre-processing to drive a full-physics non-hydrostatic mesoscale model with continuous data assimilation and optional on-the-fly bias reduction and diagnostic-variable post-processing. Running on modest single-node or multi-node computers or large massively parallel computing platforms, it is a fully automated system with varying degrees of user control. Descriptions and sample outputs of systems that we have built for the U. S. Army, Marines and DoD/ DTRA are presented as background for discussion of how this type of system may be tailored for aviation and airport use.
Notes:
For further information please contact Bob Glahn (301-713-1768).

 


 

Title:

Short-term ensemble streamflow forecasting – A Hydrologic Model Output Statistics (HMOS) approach

Date/Location:
Thursday 08 May 20088, 13:00 to 14:30 EDT (SSMC-2, Room 8246; OHD Hydrologic Ensemble Prediction (HEP) Group seminars)
Speaker(s):

Satish Regonda (1,2), Hank Herr (1), Bill Lawrence (3), and DJ Seo (1,4)
(1) NOAA/NWS/Office of Hydrologic Development
(2) Riverside Technology, Inc.
(3) NOAA/NWS/Arkansas-Red River Basin River Forecast Center
(4) University Corporation for Atmospheric Research

Abstract:
We present a simple approach, the Hydrologic Model Output Statistics (HMOS) streamflow ensemble processor, to generate reliable streamflow ensemble forecasts from the operational single-value forecasts. The proposed approach classifies discharge forecasts into two categories, high and low flows, and develops linear regression for each category between observed and forecast streamflows in the normal space that minimizes an objective function in flow space. The technique applies statistical bias correction and quantifies uncertainty associated with the forecast. An objective function, which is a weighted sum of root mean square error and errors in the probability distribution, is developed and minimized. A 10-year archive of operational stage/streamflow forecasts at ten locations in the ABRFC is used in the study. The forecasts are single-value predictions issued daily at 6-hour intervals for 5 days into the future. The operational forecasts are archived as ‘river stage’ forecasts, and are converted into discharge forecasts via rating curves. The forecasts include modifications applied by human forecasters based on their local knowledge, hydrologic expertise, and model guidance. Thus, these forecasts reflect all uncertainties associated with the entire forecast process, including the input and hydrologic uncertainties. The approach is applied and ensemble forecasts are generated in dependent validation mode at the ten locations in the ABRFC. Ensemble forecasts are then verified via the Ensemble Verification System (EVS). In this presentation, we describe the basic science behind the technique, its limitations, its place and role in the eXperimental Ensemble Forecast System (XEFS), development and implementation of the alpha-test versions of the HMOS hindcaster and the real-time processor, and ongoing testing and evaluation of them and the resulting streamflow ensemble forecasts.
Notes:
Remote access: Conference Call: (866) 713-2373 Code: 9960047; https://www1.gotomeeting.com/join/315915743 . For futher information please contact ken.pavelle@noaa.gov.

 


 

Title:

Ballard Maritime Academy students return

Date/Location:
Monday, 12 May 2008; 12:00 - 13:00 ETZ (SSMC-3, 2nd Floor, NOAA Central Library Seminar)
Speaker(s):
Students from Ballard Maritime Academy, Seattle, Washington
Abstract:
Students will discuss how they have benefited from the program, an overview of the academy's curriculum, and how NOAA plays a role in supporting the academy. There will be a game at the end...with prizes!
Notes:
For Teleconference and further information please contact Mary Lou Cumberpatch (301-713-2600 Ext.129)

 


 

Title:

Climate Change Impacts on Renewable Energy In Alaska

Date/Location:
Tuesday, 13 May 2008; 10:00-11:00 am Alaska Local Time (Duckering Building Room 535, University of Alaska/Fairbanks, ACCAP/Alaska Climate Teleconference seminar)
Speaker(s):
Gwen Holdmann (Alaska Center for Energy and Power)
Abstract
With rising fuel costs, tapping local renewable resources for energy as an alternative to fossil fuels is gaining more and more attention throughout the state. Projected increases in temperature and precipitation from climate change may have consequences for the long term health of renewable energy projects, such as reduced water availability and increased sedimentation for hydroelectric and geothermal projects, changes in available biomass, and shifting wind, wave, and tidal patterns. Join us for a discussion of how climate change is likely to impact renewable energy production in Alaska.
Notes:
To Participate / Log-In to the Alaska Climate Teleconference: 1) Dial: 1-800-893-8850. 2) When prompted, enter the PIN code: 7531823. PLEASE MUTE YOUR PHONE DURING THE PRESENTATION. The audio is very sensitive and your external conversations and typing can be heard by other participants and disrupt the presentation. Thank You. To view the presentation during a teleconference: 1) Point your web browser to: http://www.shareitnow.com 2) Click on the blue *Join a Meeting* button on the left side bar. 3) For Presenter ID enter: accap@uaf.edu. If you do not see anything on your screen, click on the refresh button on the top bar. For optimal viewing, we suggest selecting 'Always resize to fit window (max 100%)' under 'View.' For Macintosh computer users: A copy of the presentation will also be available on the ACCAP website: www.uaf.edu/accap. See the right-hand column under "Highlights." To join us in person: If you are in Fairbanks, you are welcome to join us in person on the UAF campus, Duckering Building Room 535. Map: http://www.uaf.edu/campusmap/(purple zone). Registration: Pre-registration is not required but is strongly encouraged as it helps us to moderate the discussion. To register please contact: Sarah Trainor, ACCAP Coordinator and Research Scientist, (907) 474-7878, accap@uaf.edu, fnsft@uaf.edu, or fill out the web-form at: http://www.uaf.edu/accap/teleconference.htm#register. For more information about the Alaska Climate Teleconferences and the Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy, please contact Sarah Trainor (telephone and email above) or visit our website: http://www.uaf.edu/accap/.

 


 

Title:

Models in support of decision making: deliberative effectiveness, explanatory effectiveness, and policy relevance of models in natural resources management. Case studies in the Laurentian Great Lakes

Date/Location:
Wednesday, 14 May 2008; 12:00 – 13:00 ETZ (SSMC-4, Room #8150, NOS seminar)
Speaker(s):
Emily Therese Cloyd (U.S. Climate Change Science Program Office)
Abstract:
This study focused on how participants experienced the process of using models to support policy decisions and what their experiences suggest for designing future processes. We analyzed four cases in which computer simulation models served as decision support tools, all drawn from the Laurentian Great Lakes: (1) target phosphorus loads in the Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement (GLWQA); (2) toxic chemicals management under the GLWQA (e.g., polychlorinated biphenyls, PCBs); (3) salmonid stocking levels in Lake Ontario; and (4) water level regulation in Lake Ontario and the upper St. Lawrence River. For each case, we assessed how models have been used in decision making, their strengths and weaknesses as decision tools, the ways they have enhanced or undermined decision processes, and ways their development and use could be improved. We conducted in-depth interviews with modelers, managers, decision-makers, and stakeholders and drew on scientific and technical literature related to each case in order to understand the "success" of models as decision support tools in three areas: (1) deliberative effectiveness (fostering communication among participants); (2) explanatory effectiveness (achieving a shared understanding of the problem and solutions); and (3) policy relevance (relevant to the actual policy decisions being made). For each case study and for the study as a whole we note lessons learned and recommendations for future applications of models as decision support tools. While in each case models served important roles as decision support tools, their full value was rarely realized due to failures of planning and communication among managers, decision-makers, modelers and stakeholders at one or more points in the process. We also developed two conceptual tools to help in future modeling-decision making processes: a modes/functions matrix that can be used to explain how models are and could be used in environmental policy decision processes, and a conceptual framework for the integrated modeling and decision making process that can be used to plan and implement the process.

Related document: JP Manno, R Smardon, JV DePinto, ET Cloyd, and SM Del Granado. 2008. The use of models in Great Lakes decision making: an interdisciplinary synthesis. Randolph G. Pack Environmental Institute: Syracuse, NY. Occasional Paper 16. 95 pp. [PDF; ~8.4 MB]
Notes:
Presentations are typically available via a combination of phone & webcast. With a reservation, they can also be available by video conferencing to those with appropriate equipment. For phone: You must dial 866-541-1377, and then follow the instructions. When prompted enter the passcode 142625. Please use your phone’s mute button (or toggle *6) during the presentation until you are ready to ask questions. For webcast: 1) go to https://www.mymeetings.com/emeet/join/index.jsp?customHeader=mymeetings, enter the meeting number 449707376 and passcode NOS8150; 2) enter other required fields; 3) indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy; 4) click on Proceed; 5) you must also dial in by phone to listen (see instructions above). For videoconferencing: contact nos.video.conference@noaa.gov for information on setting up a reservation. Please allow adequate time for testing of connections (at least 24 hours or more) if you do not regularly connect with NOS. For questions: contact Felix Martinez.

 


 

Title:

Green Infrastructure: Linking Landscapes and Communities

Date/Location:
Tuesday, 20 May 2008; 12:00 – 13:00 ETZ (SSMC-4, Room #8150, NOS seminar)
Speaker(s):
William F. Precht (Program Manager, Damage Assessment and Restoration Program, NOAA/NOS/ONMS/Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary)
Abstract:
Acroporid corals are currently expanding their geographic ranges northward in the western Atlantic: (1) living thickets of Acropora cervicornis were discovered off Fort Lauderdale, Florida in 1998, where they had not been reported previously; (2) A. palmata was observed for the first time in 2002 on reefs of the Flower Garden Banks in the northern Gulf of Mexico; (3) A. palmata has recently been observed as far north as Palm Beach County, Florida were it had not been extant in >7,000 yrs; and (4) acroporid corals have recently been observed in the northernmost Bahamas growing directly on a relict, fossil reef. The recent expansion of cold-sensitive acroporids is associated with decadal-scale increases in annual sea-surface temperature (SST). The present range extension of acroporids has a paleoecological counterpart that can be used to model the future response of these coral assemblages. During the early to middle Holocene (9-5 ka), SST’s favored the growth of Acropora-dominated reefs along the southeast coast of Florida, the northernmost Bahamas and the Flower Garden Banks. As temperatures cooled after the mid-Holocene, the northern limit of reef growth regressed (contracted) southward. Under current scenarios of global warming, the continued, northward expansion of Acropora spp. in the western Atlantic is a strong possibility.
Notes:
Presentations are typically available via a combination of phone & webcast. With a reservation, they can also be available by video conferencing to those with appropriate equipment. For phone: You must dial 866-541-1377, and then follow the instructions. When prompted enter the passcode 142625. Please use your phone’s mute button (or toggle *6) during the presentation until you are ready to ask questions. For webcast: 1) go to https://www.mymeetings.com/emeet/join/index.jsp?customHeader=mymeetings, enter the meeting number 449707376 and passcode NOS8150; 2) enter other required fields; 3) indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy; 4) click on Proceed; 5) you must also dial in by phone to listen (see instructions above). For videoconferencing: contact nos.video.conference@noaa.gov for information on setting up a reservation. Please allow adequate time for testing of connections (at least 24 hours or more) if you do not regularly connect with NOS. For questions: contact Felix Martinez.

 


 

Title:

Structural and Biological Components to Coral Reef Damage Restoration

Date/Location:
Wednesday, 21 May 2008; 12:00 – 13:00 ETZ (SSMC-4, Room #8150, NOS seminar)
Speaker(s):
Tom Moore ( NMFS/Habitat Restoration Division)
Abstract:
U.S. reefs are annually impacted by 3-4 large ship groundings, hundreds of small boat groundings, and other destructive injuries resulting from improper anchoring and fishing practices. These physical impacts are major threats to coral reef health and integrity and present a direct disturbance to the coral environment that can completely alter a reef's structure and function. After these acute disturbances, fragments are subject to abrasion, scour, and sedimentation which ultimately result in death. In addition, if these fragments are subjected to currents or wave energy, they can abrade and injure nearby corals that were unaffected by the initial impact causing a much greater area of injury. Unchecked, these damages can result in reef loss and instability, reducing coastal protection, causing economic impact to local fisheries, and eliminating key tourist attractions on which many coastal economies depend. However, if dislodged fragments can be collected and stabilized shortly after physical impact, then the probability of survival increases substantially, and the effects on nearby healthy corals can be reduced. In addition to direct fragment reattachment in the aftermath of large incidents it is critical to conduct structural restoration to prevent the expansion of instability in the reef framework from the impact and allow natural recovery processes to begin. The talk will mainly focus on the importance of coral restoration (short-term and long-term) in the aftermath of physical impact events, but I also plan to touch on some of the more pro-active measures that are being considered as overall reef restoration/recovery strategies (nurseries, increased herbivory, reduction of LBS, etc).
Notes:
Presentations are typically available via a combination of phone & webcast. With a reservation, they can also be available by video conferencing to those with appropriate equipment. For phone: dial 866-541-1377, passcode 142625. For webcast: 1) go to http://www.MyMeetings.com, enter the meeting number 449707376 and passcode NOS8150; 2) enter other required fields; 3) indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy; 4) click on Proceed. You must also dial the phone number above so you can hear the presentation. For videoconferencing: contact nos.video.conference@noaa.gov for information on setting up a reservation. Please allow adequate time for testing of connections (at least 24 hours or more) if you do not regularly connect with NOS. For questions: contact Felix Martinez.

 


 

Title:

Air Force Weather Agency (AFWA) sponsored Data Assimilation Advancements in the Land Information System

Date/Location:
Wednesday, 21 May 2008, 14:00 - 15:00 ETZ (World Weather Building, Room 707, Camp Springs, MD; JCSDA seminar)
Speaker(s):
John Eylander (Air Force Weather Agency)
Abstract:
The Air Force Weather Agency is actively collaborating with NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) Hydrological Sciences Branch personnel to further develop the Land Information System (LIS) as a replacement to AFWA Agriculture Meteorological (AGRMET) model. The higher spatial resolution, modular design, and configurable grid capability in LIS will arm AFWA with an enhanced surface modeling system to help support global and regional DoD joint service surface characterization requirements and NWP surface layer initialization needs. Since 2005, AFWA has sponsored several LIS science and infrastructure advancement projects including precipitation analysis improvements, Ensemble Kalman Filter data assimilation module integration, LIS and Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) coupling evaluation, and CRTM interface design. AFWA is also working with the NASA GSFC Snow Team to advance AFWA's global snow measuring capability, using newer satellite systems and more complex data merging techniques to better capture global snow cover and depth measurements. Finally, AFWA is embarking on a new plan to greatly improve its cloud analysis system, which will further improve the resolution and capabilities of the cloud analysis used to calculate the surface energy budget. The infrastructure advancements, along with our strong working relationship with the NCEP land team, will ultimately lead to a much improved AFWA surface characterization system supporting the nation's armed services.
Notes:
For questions please contact Ada Armstrong (301-763-8172 x188) and George Ohring (301-763-8154 x352).
Link(s) to Presentation:
Please visit: http://www.jcsda.noaa.gov/JCSDASeminars.php to download the presentation on the day of the talk

 


 

Title:

The 3 Things You Need to Know About Tsunamis

Date/Location:
Wednesday, 21 May 2008; 12:00 - 13:00 ETZ (SSMC-3, 2nd Floor, NOAA Central Library Seminar)
Speaker(s):
Dr. Eddie Bernard (Director of NOAA's OAR Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory)
Abstract:
Dr. Eddie N. Bernard will tell you what you need to know when you feel the ground shaking beneath you. Don't live in a tsunami-risk area? Do you travel to a coastal region or an island? Know of people who do? Want to know how to pronounce "tsunami" correctly? Come hear Dr. Bernard talk about these interesting, but potentially dangerous and devastating events, and what NOAA has done to help protect lives and property in tsunami-risk areas.
Notes:
Call-in Information for the seminar: 866-631-5469 Participant Code - 3958086. For Teleconference and further information please contact Mary Lou Cumberpatch (301-713-2600 Ext.129).

 


 

Title:

Marine Spatial Planning: A Framework for Decision-Making in the Marine Environment

Date/Location:
Wednesday, 28 May 2008; 14:30 – 15:30 ETZ (SSMC-4, Room #8150, NOS seminar)
Speaker(s):
Adam Bode (NOAA/NOS/Coastal Services Center)
Abstract:
As nations increasingly look to the oceans for food, commerce, recreation, and energy, forward-thinking strategies are needed in order to realize the most efficient and productive use of this sought-after natural resource. Marine spatial planning (MSP), a relatively new concept in the U.S., is analogous to spatial or land use planning in the terrestrial environment. It describes the process used to make smart ocean-related decisions and policies. The National Marine Protected Areas Center, The Nature Conservancy, and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service are just a few of the many institutions furthering MSP efforts. Join the NOAA Coastal Services Center to learn of the Center’s efforts in addressing marine spatial planning. Attendees engaged in marine spatial planning efforts at other organizations are invited to contribute to the discussion that follows.
Notes:
Presentations are available remotely via a combination of phone & webcast. Please be aware that remote access is limited to 50 connections on a first-come-first served basis, so we cannot guarantee participation. To participate remotely you must: 1) Dial 866-541-1377, and then wait for instructions. When prompted enter passcode 142625 followed by the # sign. Please use your phone’s mute button (or toggle *6) during the presentation until you are ready to ask questions. 2) Go to the webcast site at https://www.mymeetings.com/emeet/join/index.jsp?customHeader=mymeetings 3) Enter meeting number 449707376 and passcode NOS8150. 4) Enter other required fields. 5) Indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy and click Proceed. For questions: contact Felix Martinez (Felix.Martinez@noaa.gov).

 


 

Title:

Experimental Storm Surge Simulations for Hurricane Katrina

Date/Location:
Wednesday, 28 May 2008; 13:00 - 14:00 ETZ (SSMC-2; Room 2358, OHD seminar) [Note: Room Change]
Speaker(s):
Dr. Hassan Mashriqui (NWS Office of Hydrologic Development)
Abstract:
The ADvanced CIRCulation model (ADCIRC) began to be used experimentally to forecast surge for approaching hurricanes beginning in 2002. Since then, a research team at the Louisiana State University Hurricane Research Center has submitted 33 forecasts to emergency management personnel for 10 hurricanes making landfall in the Gulf of Mexico. The operational potential was well demonstrated during the approach of Hurricane Katrina when 7 forecasts were issued prior to the landfall on August 29, 2005. Very good agreement between simulated surge elevation and high water marks was achieved in ADCIRC runs based on National Hurricane Center advisories issued up to 2 days before landfall. This presentation will focus on surge height, direction of flow and surge speed produced by ADCIRC model during hurricane Katrina.
Notes:
Teleconference: (877) 952-3426 Code: 3482582; https://www1.gotomeeting.com/join/432482076. For further information please contact ken.pavelle@noaa.gov and Donna.Page@noaa.gov

 


 

Title:

NOAA's North Atlantic Regional Team (NART): improving NOAA’s productivity and value [Note: Seminar POSTPONED]

Date/Location:
Thursday, 29 May 2008; 11:00-12:00 ETZ (SSMC-3, Room #4817, NODC Seminar)
Speaker(s):
Peyton Robertson (Director, NOAA Chesapeake Bay Office)
Abstract:
TBD: NOAA established Regional Teams to help develop and implement strategies for addressing regional priority areas....
Notes:
For VideoTeleConferencing (VTC) access: contact Cheryl.Ingram@noaa.gov (301-713-3284 x155) at least a day before the seminar. Presentations are available remotely via a combination of phone & webcast. For Webcast access: 1) go to http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?i=442112424&p=NODC4817&t=c); 2) type in other required fields (i.e., your name, e-mail, organization); 3) indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy; 4) click on Proceed. For phone access: toll free dial 866-743-9902 using a touch-tone phone; when prompted enter participant code 4689608 followed by a "#". Webcast & Phone access is limited to 50 connections on a first-come-first served basis. For general questions about this seminar, please contact Hernan Garcia (301-713-3290 x184).

 


 

Title:

Green Infrastructure: Linking Landscapes and Communities

Date/Location:
Thursday, 29 May 2008; 14:30 – 15:30 ETZ (SSMC-4, Room #8150, NOS seminar)
Speaker(s):
Josh Murphy (NOAA/Coastal Services Center)
Abstract:
Green infrastructure refers to an interconnected network of natural areas and open spaces that conserves natural ecosystem values and functions and provides an array of benefits to people and wildlife. A green infrastructure approach to strategic land conservation helps communities balance environmental and economic goals, promoting strategies that lead to sustainable land uses. In this capacity, green infrastructure serves as a potential framework to guide coastal communities as they develop and implement multi-objective land use plans. This presentation will outline the fundamentals of green infrastructure, its benefits to coastal communities, and how it can be integrated into current and future NOAA activities related to land conservation and hazards resilience.
Notes:
Presentations are available remotely via a combination of phone & webcast. Please be aware that remote access is limited to 50 connections on a first-come-first served basis, so we cannot guarantee participation. To participate remotely you must: 1) Dial 866-541-1377, and then wait for instructions. When prompted enter passcode 142625 followed by the # sign. Please use your phone’s mute button (or toggle *6) during the presentation until you are ready to ask questions. 2) Go to the webcast site at https://www.mymeetings.com/emeet/join/index.jsp?customHeader=mymeetings 3) Enter meeting number 449707376 and passcode NOS8150. 4) Enter other required fields. 5) Indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy and click Proceed. For questions: contact Felix Martinez.

 


 

Title:

Data Assimilator for Hydrology Laboratory's Research Distributed Hydrologic Model (DA for HL-RDHM)

Date/Location:
Thursday, 29 May 2008, 13:00 - 14:30 EDT (SSMC-2, Room 8246; OHD Hydrologic Ensemble Prediction (HEP) Group seminars)
Speaker(s):
Haksu Lee, Dong-Jun Seo (NOAA/NWS/OHD, UCAR) and Victor Koren (NOAA/NWS/OHD)
Abstract:
A prototype data assimilator for gridded SAC and kinematic-wave routing models in the Hydrology Laboratory's Research Distributed Hydrologic Model (HL-RDHM) has been developed. Based on 4DVAR (4 dimensional variational data assimilation), the prototype DA assimilates streamflow, in-situ soil moisture, gridded precipitation, climatological potential evaporation data to reduce uncertainty in the model initial conditions for improved monitoring and prediction of streamflow and soil moisture at the outlet and interior points within the catchment. Due to large degrees of freedom involved, data assimilation into distributed hydrologic models is complex. To understand and assess sensitivity of the performance of DA to uncertainties in the model initial conditions and in the data, two synthetic experiments have been carried out. Results from the synthetic experiments shed much light on the potential and limitations with DA into distributed models. For initial real-world assessment, the prototype DA has also been applied to ELDO2 in ABRFC. We present the results and describe the next steps.
Notes:
Remote access: Conference Call: (866) 713-2373 Code: 9960047; https://www1.gotomeeting.com/join/405563133. For futher information please contact ken.pavelle@noaa.gov.

 


Back to top

June

 

Title:

Bias of North American Mesocale (NAM) Model Forecasts of Summer Rainfall over Central U.S. and Impact of FORMOSAT-3/COSMIC Observations on Global Forecast System (GFS) Predictions in the Northern Hemisphere

Date/Location:
Tuesday, 03 June 2008, 10:00-11:00 ETZ (World Weather Building, Room 707, Camp Springs, MD; JCSDA seminar)
Speaker(s):
Shih-Yu (Simon) Wang (Dept. of Geological and Atmospheric Sciences, Iowa State University)
Abstract:
It is known that operational mesoscale forecast models do not perform well on propagating summer rainfall over the central United States. Such precipitation characteristics are coupled with subsynoptic-scale perturbations embedded in the midtropospheric flows. Analysis of the North American Mesoscale model (NAM) forecasts found that the model tends to generate the perturbations with a propagation speed that is too slow. The speed bias results in displaced rainfall forecasts. The GFS assimilation of FORMOSAT-3/COSMIC data in an experimental run during summer 2006 was evaluated. The diagnostic analysis was focused on the global stationary wave structure in the Northern Hemisphere. Results show that large impacts of the FORMOSAT- 3/COSMIC observations are mainly distributed over the major mountain ranges and the western tropical Pacific warm pool. Water vapor flux convergence is found to be enhanced over the warm pool region, resulting in more precipitation in the GFS forecasts.
Notes:
Phone Dial-In Numbers: Domestic: 800-988-9362; International: 1-773-756-0828 (Passcode: 23080). For questions please contact Ada Armstrong (301-763-8172 x188) and George Ohring (301-763-8154 x352). World Weather Building Science Center, 5200 Auth Road, Camp Springs, MD 20746.
Link(s) to Presentation:
See http://www.jcsda.noaa.gov/JCSDASeminars.php the day before the talk for presentation materials.

 


 

Title:

Have Humans Affected Atlantic Hurricane Climate?

Date/Location:
Tuesday, 03 June 2008; 12:00 - 13:00 ETZ (SSMC-3, 2nd Floor, NOAA Central Library Seminar)
Speaker(s):
Tom Knutson (GFDL)
Abstract:
Climate scientist and modeler Tom Knutson will share his most recent findings concerning the link between greenhouse gas-induced warming and intensity and frequency of hurricanes. Will hurricanes increase? Will they be more intense? Will associated rainfall increase? Will we have more or less land-falling hurricanes? Join Tom Knutson as he presents the findings of his most recent research. And learn about the controversies surrounding this subject.
Notes:
Call-in Information for the seminar: 866-631-5469; Participant Code - 3958086. For Teleconference and further information please contact Mary Lou Cumberpatch (301-713-2600 Ext.129)

 


 

Title:

Mercury in the Environment -- Where does the mercury in your fish come from? [Note: Seminar POSTPONED]

Date/Location:
Thursday, 05 June 2008; 12:00 - 13:00 ETZ (SSMC-3, 2nd Floor, NOAA Central Library Seminar)
Speaker(s):
Dr. Mark Cohen (OAR Air Resources Laboratory)
Abstract:
TBD
Notes:
For Teleconference and further information please contact Mary Lou Cumberpatch (301-713-2600 Ext.129)

 


 

Title:

The Climate Test Bed

Date/Location:
Friday, 06 June 2008; 12:00 - 13:00 ETZ (Center for Satellite Applications and Research, World Weather Building, Science Center, Room 707, 5200 Auth Road, Camp Springs; STAR seminar)
Speaker(s):
Fiona Horsfall (NCEP / Climate Prediction Center)
Abstract:
NOAA has identified a significant demand for a concentrated research effort in support of an overarching objective of the Climate Research and Modeling Program of the NOAA Climate Goal, specifically, "..to develop and improve the capability to make intra-seasonal, seasonal, and decadal-scale predictions of climate and projections of future climate change on global to regional scales." Improvements in the predictive capability on weekly, monthly, seasonal and decadal time scales can be greatly accelerated by leveraging the expertise within the external research community. To harvest this expertise, NOAA has formed the Climate Test Bed (CTB) to accelerate the transfer of research and development into improved NOAA operational climate forecasts, products, and applications. This presentation will describe CTB activities and plans as they support the paradigms of research-to-operations (R2O) and operations-to-research (O2R). More information can be found at: [PDF].
Notes:
Call-in information for the seminar: 1-866.541.9958 Passcode: 2531766. For Teleconference and further information please contact Ralph Ferraro (301-405-0893).

 


 

Title:

Dramatic changes in the structure of Caribbean Coral Reef Fish Assemblages over 5 Decades

Date/Location:
Tuesday, 10 June 2008; 12:00 ETZ (SSMC-4, Room #8150, NOS seminar)
Speaker(s):
Alan Friedlander, NOAA/NOS/NCCOS/CCMA - Biogeography Branch and the Oceanic Institute
Abstract:
Long-term fish monitoring studies supported by the National Park Service (NSP) at the Virgin Islands National Park have been conducted since 1988 and are now a joint NPS and NOAA collaboration. Reef fish monitoring data collected from 1988 to 2006 within Virgin Islands National Park (VINP) and adjacent reefs around St. John, U.S. Virgin Islands (USVI) demonstrated that the most apparent factor influencing reef fish assemblages is large storm events. Storms had differential effects among reefs and species depending on exposure and reef type and although these large storms damaged reef structure and decreased coral cover in shallow water, reef fish abundance and species richness recovered within 3-5 years following these impacts. Analyses provide evidence for two alarming conditions, both of which are important for resource management in VINP. 1) Reef fish assemblages within Virgin Islands National Park are not significantly different than assemblages outside park boundaries, 2) Several species, including some of the most abundant species, demonstrated substantial declines in abundance and frequency of occurrence over the past decade. Some species, such as groupers and snappers (preferred in the local fishery), have documented declines throughout the U.S. Virgin Islands and have fared no better within VINP. Other species may have declined due to the combined effects of habitat change, from both natural and anthropogenic influences, and exploitation. Regardless of causes, we must conclude that the existing management strategies are not adequately protecting resources within the park and are in need of revision. It is imperative that these results be viewed with knowledge that large changes in the entire ecosystem occurred prior to the establishment of monitoring. Large predators (e.g., groupers and snappers) are now in low abundances compared with documented investigations in the 1950-60s. The decline of predators can have profound cascade effects throughout the entire ecosystem and have fundamentally altered the coral reefs of the Virgin Islands as it has elsewhere throughout the Caribbean. This work is one of the longest running research projects in the Caribbean for reef fishes and provides a strong basis for understanding the natural and anthropogenic factors which have affected reef fish assemblages around the island of St. John over the past three decades. The importance of long-term monitoring programs like this one cannot be overstated owing to the dramatic changes that have occurred in the past half century with the USVI and the danger of the “shifting baseline” where expectations are based on the current level of knowledge only. Continuation of this work will provide the National Park Service, the Virgin Islands Government, and other management agencies and stakeholders with the information necessary to make informed decisions on the future of reef fish resources and coral reef ecosystem health in the US Virgin Islands, with implications for the broader Caribbean, and tropical ecosystems worldwide.
Notes:
Presentations are available remotely via a combination of phone & webcast. Please be aware that remote access is limited to 50 connections on a first-come-first served basis, so we cannot guarantee participation. To participate remotely you must: 1) Dial 866-541-1377, and then wait for instructions. When prompted enter passcode 142625 followed by the # sign. Please use your phone’s mute button (or toggle *6) during the presentation until you are ready to ask questions. 2) Go to the webcast site at https://www.mymeetings.com/emeet/join/index.jsp?customHeader=mymeetings 3) Enter meeting number 449707376 and passcode NOS8150. 4) Enter other required fields. 5) Indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy and click Proceed. For questions: contact Felix Martinez.

 


 

Title:

Water Availability in Alaska: Using and Understanding NOAA's Drought Monitor and Drought Outloook

Date/Location:
Tuesday, 10 June 2008; 10:00-11:00 am Alaska Local Time (Duckering Building Room 535, University of Alaska/Fairbanks, ACCAP/Alaska Climate Teleconference seminar)
Speaker(s):
Doug LeCompte (NOAA Climate Prediction Center)
Abstract
Water is important to communities, industry and ecosystems in Alaska. What are NOAA's Drought Monitor and Drought Outlook? How can we use them in planning and decision-making? Join us to address these questions and explore ways that these tools can be more useful to Alaskans. Explore these questions with us in discussion with the creators of these tools.
Notes:
To Participate / Log-In to the Alaska Climate Teleconference: 1) Dial: 1-800-893-8850. 2) When prompted, enter the PIN code: 7531823. PLEASE MUTE YOUR PHONE DURING THE PRESENTATION. The audio is very sensitive and your external conversations and typing can be heard by other participants and disrupt the presentation. Thank You. To view the presentation during a teleconference: 1) Point your web browser to: http://www.shareitnow.com 2) Click on the blue *Join a Meeting* button on the left side bar. 3) For Presenter ID enter: accap@uaf.edu. If you do not see anything on your screen, click on the refresh button on the top bar. For optimal viewing, we suggest selecting 'Always resize to fit window (max 100%)' under 'View.' For Macintosh computer users: A copy of the presentation will also be available on the ACCAP website: www.uaf.edu/accap. See the right-hand column under "Highlights." To join us in person: If you are in Fairbanks, you are welcome to join us in person on the UAF campus, Duckering Building Room 535. Map: http://www.uaf.edu/campusmap/(purple zone). Registration: Pre-registration is not required but is strongly encouraged as it helps us to moderate the discussion. To register please contact: Sarah Trainor, ACCAP Coordinator and Research Scientist, (907) 474-7878, accap@uaf.edu, fnsft@uaf.edu, or fill out the web-form at: http://www.uaf.edu/accap/teleconference.htm#register. For more information about the Alaska Climate Teleconferences and the Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy, please contact Sarah Trainor (telephone and email above) or visit our website: http://www.uaf.edu/accap/.

 


 

Title:

Illustrating and Translating NOAA's Work for Kids.

Date/Location:
Wednesday, 11 June 2008; 12:00-13:00 ETZ (SSMC-3, 2nd Floor, NOAA Central Library Seminar)
Speaker(s):
award winning Author/Illustrator Taylor Morrison
Abstract:
He will explain the process behind researching, writing, and painting book illustrations. Topics include five books on NOAA and it's rich history of Geodetic Surveying, Nautical Charts, Tsunami Warnings, Fire Weather, Tides, and Fisheries. Presentations given around the country at many elementary and middle schools to raise awareness about NOAA.
About the speaker:
Born on 10/21/71. Attended Rhode Island of Design and graduated in 1994 with a BA in Illustration and Animation. Trained under the great painter Tom Sgouros and Author Illustrator David Macaulay. Completed senior degree project about Italian Fresco Painters. After graduation took it door to door to publishers in New York city until Holiday House books published it. Have published 10 books since 1996. Awards include The Boston Globe Horn Book Award for Children's non-fiction 2006, The Society of Illustrators Book art Award 1997, Natural History Magazine best books of 2007, Smithsonian Magazine best books of 1998, The Washington Post,The Texas Blue Bonnet Award 2002, Los Angeles Times Best Books of 2000, Bank Street College of Education, Award from the Secretary of The State of Washington for The Coast Mappers.
Notes:
For more information contact Mary Lou Cumberpatch or Albert E. Theberge (301-713-2600). Teleconference available for NOAA staff only.

 


 

Title:

Complex Effects of Fishing on Pacific Coral Reefs

Date/Location:
Wednesday, 11 June 2008; 12:00 13:00 ETZ (SSMC-4, Room #8150, NOS seminar)
Speaker(s):
Alan Friedlander, NOAA/NOS/NCCOS/CCMA - Biogeography Branch and the Oceanic Institute, email: afriedlander@oceanicinstitute.org
Abstract:

Remote locations with limited fishing pressure are some of the few remaining examples of coral reefs without major anthropogenic influence and these provide a unique opportunity to assess how a natural coral reef ecosystem functions in the absence of ongoing major human intervention. We surveyed coral reefs across a gradient of human disturbance in the northern Line Islands, Central Pacific to establish a baseline for coral reef ecosystem structure under minimal human disturbance and to describe the changes in reef structure that occur with increasing impacts. Major findings include both direct effects of extraction on apex predators and other top-level predatory fishes, and indirect consequences on lower-level assemblage structure. Fish assemblages at remote atolls were dominated in biomass by apex predators and other piscivorous fishes in an inverted biomass pyramid, typified by greater total standing biomass and larger average fish sizes. At fished sites, the fish trophic pyramid was typical (bottom-heavy) with highly abundant small, primarily planktivorous fishes. Observations also suggested that some smaller and less-targeted secondary piscivores are experiencing competitive release in response to density reductions of the larger-bodied and more desirable piscivores targeted by the extraction fisheries.

It is now becoming evident that ecosystem-based management, in the form of marine protected areas (MPAs), is necessary to conserve biodiversity, maintain viable fisheries, and deliver a broad suite of ecosystem services. Over the past four decades, Hawaii has developed a system of MPAs that vary in size, habitat quality, and management regimes, providing an excellent opportunity to test hypotheses concerning MPA design and function using multiple discreet sampling units. Results showed that a number of fish assemblage characteristics (e.g., species richness, biomass, diversity, size and trophic structure) were significantly higher in MPAs compared with adjacent fished areas across all habitat types. Habitat type, protected area size, and level of protection from fishing were all important determinates of MPA effectiveness with respect to their associated fish assemblages. Although size of these protected areas was positively correlated with a number of fish assemblage characteristics, all appear too small to have any measurable influence on the adjacent fished areas. This is even more evident when fish stocks in the main Hawaiian Islands (MHI) are compared with the northwestern Hawaiian Islands, now the largest no-take MPA in the world. Differences in assemblage structure represent both near-extirpation of apex predators and heavy exploitation of lower trophic levels in the MHI compared to the largely unfished NWHI. Estimates of MHI and unfished NWHI abundance also allowed us to preliminarily assess the status of 49 previously unassessed fish stocks. Our results suggest that 75% of these species were depleted below typical overfished thresholds in the MHI. When small no-fishing areas within the MHI were used as reference points, our impression of stock status would have been overly optimistic, particularly for stocks in the worst condition. Owing to the time, cost, and myriad problems involved in determining the status of multi-species and multi-gear coral reef fish stocks, large unfished reference areas such as the NWHI can serve as a valuable tool to assess the health of fisheries resources in areas under exploitation. The results from this work provide criteria for more effective MPA design and establish baselines to assess future management strategies in Hawaii and other coral reef ecosystems.

Notes:
Presentations are available remotely via a combination of phone & webcast. Please be aware that remote access is limited to 50 connections on a first-come-first served basis, so we cannot guarantee participation.
To participate remotely you must: 1) Dial 866-541-1377, and then wait for instructions. When prompted enter passcode 142625 followed by the # sign. Please use your phones mute button (or toggle *6) during the presentation until you are ready to ask questions. 2) Go to the webcast site 3) Enter meeting number 449707376 and passcode NOS8150. 4) Enter other required fields. 5) Indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy and click Proceed. For questions: contact Felix Martinez (Felix.Martinez@noaa.gov).

 


 

Title:

Out of the Blue: A history of Lightning, Science, Superstition, and Amazing Stories of Survival

Date/Location:
Thursday, 12 June 2008; 12:00 - 13:00 ETZ (SSMC-3, 2nd Floor, NOAA Central Library Seminar)
Speaker(s):
John S. Friedman
Abstract:
TBD
Notes:
For Teleconference and further information please contact Mary Lou Cumberpatch (301-713-2600 Ext.129)

 


 

Title:

Remarks by the NOAA DUS Mary M. Glackin

Date/Location:
Friday, 13 June 2008; 11:00-12:00 ETZ (SSMC-3, 2nd Floor NOAA Central Library, NODC Seminar)
Speaker(s):
Mary M. Glackin (NOAA Deputy Under Secretary for Oceans and Atmosphere)
Abstract:
TBD
Notes:
Presentations are available remotely via a combination of webcast and/or phone. For Webcast access: 1) go to http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?i=745846978; 2) type in other required fields (i.e., your name, e-mail, organization; Note that no meeting password is needed -leave blank-); 3) indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy; 4) click on Proceed. For phone access: toll free dial 877-916-2513 using a touch-tone phone; when prompted enter participant code 5877174 followed by a "#". Webcast & Phone access is limited to 50 connections on a first-come-first served basis. No VideoTeleConferencing (VTC) access will be available. For general questions about this seminar, please contact Hernan Garcia
About the speaker:
Mary M. Glackin has been the Deputy Under Secretary for Oceans and Atmosphere since December 2, 2007. In this role she is responsible for the day-to-day management of NOAA’s domestic and international operations. Glackin has more than 15 years of senior executive level experience working in numerous NOAA line offices. She served as the acting Assistant Administrator for Weather Services and Director, National Weather Service from June 12, 2007, through September 15, 2007. Before that, she was the Assistant Administrator for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s (NOAA) Office of Program Planning and Integration. From 1999 until 2002, she served as the Deputy Assistant Administrator for the National Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Service of NOAA. From 1993 to 1999, she worked as the Program Manager for the Advanced Weather Interactive Processing System (AWIPS) with the National Weather Service (NWS), NOAA. Prior to this, Ms. Glackin was both a meteorologist and computer specialist in various positions within NOAA where she was responsible for introducing improvements into NWS operations by capitalizing on new technology systems and scientific models. She is the recipient of the Presidential Rank Award (2001), Charles Brooks Award for Outstanding Services to the American Meteorological Society, the NOAA Bronze Medal (2001), the Federal 100 Information Technology Manager Award (1999), the NOAA Administrator’s Award (1993), and the Department of Commerce Silver Medal Award (1991). She is a Fellow of the American Meteorological Society and a member of the National Weather Association and the American Geophysical Union. Ms. Glackin has a B.S. degree from the University of Maryland. BIO source: http://www.noaa.gov/glackin.html

 


 

Title:

A Sampling of NOAA's Best Research Accomplishments

Date/Location:
Monday, 16 June 2008; 11:00 – 12:00 ETZ; (SSMC-3, Room #4527 -Large Conference Room-, NODC Seminar)
Speaker(s):
Richard W. Spinrad, Ph.D., CMarSci (NOAA Assistant Administrator for Oceanic and Atmospheric Research)
Abstract:
Earlier this year NOAA released a new five-year research plan. This plan recognizes research as the foundation for all NOAA products and services. NOAA’s research portfolio is shaped by the needs of NOAA service providers, by specific mandates, and by collecting input from a variety of stakeholders. NOAA evaluates research success by three measures: relevance, performance, and quality. Successes highlighting the research to operations/applications process will be discussed. Examples include climate modeling, technologies for improving severe weather detection and forecasts such as hurricane and tornado prediction, ecological forecasting, tsunami detection, and the impacts of anthropogenic CO2 increases on marine ecosystems. These will be discussed as well as challenges to improving NOAA services of the future.
Notes:
Presentations are available remotely via webcast and/or phone. For Webcast access: 1) go to http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?i=745846978; 2) type in other required fields (i.e., your name, e-mail, organization; Note that no meeting password is needed -leave blank-); 3) indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy; 4) click on Proceed. For phone access: toll free dial 877-916-2513 using a touch-tone phone; when prompted enter participant code 5877174 followed by a "#". Webcast & Phone access is limited to 50 connections on a first-come-first served basis. For general questions about this seminar, please contact Hernan Garcia. No VideoTeleConferencing (VTC) access will be available. Questions about Dr. Spinrad seminar content should be sent to Sandra.Honda@noaa.gov or Mary.Ann.Kutny@noaa.gov.
About the speaker:

Dr. Richard Spinrad is NOAA's Assistant Administrator for the Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research (OAR). See BIO

Link to Seminar Announcement:
Link to seminar announcement [PDF]

 


 

Title:

A decision-support tool for an ecosystem approach to oyster restoration and management

Date/Location:
Wednesday, 18 June 2008; 12:00 – 13:00 ETZ (SSMC-4, Room #8150, NOS seminar)
Speaker(s):
Elizabeth North (University of Maryland/Center for Environmental Studies)
Abstract:
We present a decision-support tool that links ecosystem prediction and human use in a flexible optimization framework that makes location-specific recommendations, predicts benefits, and quantifies the associated costs of management actions in the form of lost opportunities. This proof-of-concept Oyster Restoration Optimization model (ORO) incorporates predictions from three-dimensional water quality (NPDZ with oyster filtration) and larval transport models; calculates size- and salinity-dependent growth, mortality, and fecundity of oysters; and includes economic costs of restoration efforts. Model results indicate that restoration of oysters in different regions of the Chesapeake Bay would maximize different suites of benefits due to interactions between the physical characteristics of a system and non-linear biological processes. For example, restoration locations that would maximize harvest are not the same as those that would maximize spawning stock enhancement. Although preliminary, the ORO model demonstrates that our understanding of circulation patterns, single-species population dynamics and their interactions with the ecosystem can be integrated into one quantitative framework that optimizes funding resources and provides explicit advice along with testable predictions. The strengths and constraints of the ORO model as tool to support restoration efforts and ecosystem-based fisheries management will be discussed.
Notes:
Presentations are available remotely via a combination of phone & webcast. Please be aware that remote access is limited to 50 connections on a first-come-first served basis, so we cannot guarantee participation. To participate remotely you must: 1) Dial 866-541-1377, and then wait for instructions. When prompted enter passcode 142625 followed by the # sign. Please use your phone’s mute button (or toggle *6) during the presentation until you are ready to ask questions. 2) Go to the webcast site at https://www.mymeetings.com/emeet/join/index.jsp?customHeader=mymeetings 3) Enter meeting number 449707376 and passcode NOS8150. 4) Enter other required fields. 5) Indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy and click Proceed. For questions: contact Felix Martinez.

 


 

Title:

NOAA Plans for Advanced Models / Assimilation Systems and Implications for Satellite Data

Date/Location:
Wednesday, 18 June 2008, see JSDA web for time (World Weather Building, Room 707, Camp Springs, MD; JCSDA seminar)
Speaker(s):
Steve Lord (NOAA / National Centers for Environmental Prediction)
Abstract:
TBD
Notes:
For questions please contact Ada Armstrong (301-763-8172 x188) and George Ohring (301-763-8154 x352). World Weather Building Science Center, 5200 Auth Road, Camp Springs, MD 20746.

 


 

Title:

Joint US-Ghana Observer Training-A Model for the Future? [Note: Seminar POSTPONED]

Date/Location:
Thursday, 19 June 2008; 12:00 - 13:00 ETZ (SSMC-3, 2nd Floor, NOAA Central Library Seminar)
Speaker(s):
Theresa Turk (NMFS Office of Science and Technology)
Abstract:
In response to the recent Magnuson-Stevens Reauthorization Act (2006) that encourages NOAA to help other nations in their capacity building efforts, NOAA partnered with the Ministry of Fisheries-Ghana to conduct a joint US-Ghana observer training workshop in Tema, Ghana. The United States Navy also assisted in this workshop by providing training facilities and many of forms of support during the project. The presentation will discuss the training that was provided, roles of the partners, lessons learned, and potential future projects.
Notes:
For Teleconference and further information please contact Mary Lou Cumberpatch (301-713-2600 Ext.129)

 


 

Title:

Oil Spill in Tae-an Peninsula of Korea

Date/Location:
Tuesday, 24 June 2008; 11:00 – 12:00 ETZ; (SSMC-3, Room #4817, NODC Seminar)
Speaker(s):
Dr. Yoon Lee (Director General of Maritime Environment Department of National Fisheries Research Development Institute -NFRDI-)
Abstract:
TBD
Notes:
For VideoTeleConferencing (VTC) access: contact Cheryl.Ingram@noaa.gov (301-713-3284 x155) at least a day before the seminar. For Webcast access: 1) go to http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?i=745846978; 2) type in other required fields (i.e., your name, e-mail, organization; Note leave meeting password blank); 3) indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy; 4) click on Proceed. For phone access: toll free dial 877-916-2513 using a touch-tone phone; when prompted enter participant code 5877174 followed by a "#". Webcast & Phone access is limited to 50 connections on a first-come-first served basis. For general questions about this seminar, please contact Freud Park (301-713-3272 ext. 157).

 


 

Title:

Application of Data Collected from ARGO Drifters, NOAA Satellite Tracked Buoys in the East Sea of Korea

Date/Location:
Wednesday, 25 June 2008; 11:00 – 12:00 ETZ; (SSMC-3, Room #4817, NODC Seminar)
Speaker(s):
Dr. Young-sang Suh (Director of Ocean Research Division of National Fisheries Research Development Institute -NFRDI-)
Abstract:
TBD
Notes:
For VideoTeleConferencing (VTC) access: contact Cheryl.Ingram@noaa.gov (301-713-3284 x155) at least a day before the seminar. For Webcast access: 1) go to http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?i=745846978; 2) type in other required fields (i.e., your name, e-mail, organization; Note leave meeting password blank); 3) indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy; 4) click on Proceed. For phone access: toll free dial 877-916-2513 using a touch-tone phone; when prompted enter participant code 5877174 followed by a "#". Webcast & Phone access is limited to 50 connections on a first-come-first served basis. For general questions about this seminar, please contact Freud Park (301-713-3272 ext. 157).

 


 

Title:

High frequency radar and mapping coastal currents

Date/Location:
Wednesday, 25 June 2008; 12:00 - 13:00 ETZ (SSMC-3, 2nd Floor, NOAA Central Library Seminar)
Speaker(s):
Jack Harlan (NOS/ASTADM)
Abstract:
TBD
Notes:
For Teleconference and further information please contact Mary Lou Cumberpatch (301-713-2600 Ext.129)

 


 

Title:

We and Nitrogen: Explosives to Eutrophication

Date/Location:
Thursday, 26 June 2008; 12:00 - 13:00 ETZ (SSMC-3, 2nd Floor, NOAA Central Library Seminar)
Speaker(s):
Dr. Jawed Hameedi (NOS/CCMA)
Abstract:
TBD
Notes:
For Teleconference and further information please contact Mary Lou Cumberpatch (301-713-2600 Ext.129)

 


 

Title:

Some Oceanographic Features in South Sea of Korea

Date/Location:
Thursday, 26 June 2008; 11:00 – 12:00 ETZ; (SSMC-3, Room #4817, NODC Seminar)
Speaker(s):
Dr. Yongkyu Choi (Director National Fisheries Research Development Institute -NFRDI-)
Abstract:
Water characteristics specifically during dry and wet seasons were analyzed, using temperature and salinity data held by Korea Oceanographic Data Center (KODC).
Notes:
For VideoTeleConferencing (VTC) access: contact Cheryl.Ingram@noaa.gov (301-713-3284 x155) at least a day before the seminar. For Webcast access: 1) go to http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?i=745846978; 2) type in other required fields (i.e., your name, e-mail, organization; Note leave meeting password blank); 3) indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy; 4) click on Proceed. For phone access: toll free dial 877-916-2513 using a touch-tone phone; when prompted enter participant code 5877174 followed by a "#". Webcast & Phone access is limited to 50 connections on a first-come-first served basis. For general questions about this seminar, please contact Freud Park (301-713-3272 ext. 157).

 

 


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July

 

Title:

Long-term variation of oceanic conditions in the Korean waters

Date/Location:
Tuesday, 01 July 2008; 11:00 – 12:00 ETZ; (SSMC-3, Room #4817, NODC Seminar)
Speaker(s):
Dr. In Seong Han (National Fisheries Research Development Institute -NFRDI-)
Abstract:
TBD
Notes:
For VideoTeleConferencing (VTC) access: contact Cheryl.Ingram@noaa.gov (301-713-3284 x155) at least a day before the seminar. For Webcast access: 1) go to http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?i=745846978; 2) type in other required fields (i.e., your name, e-mail, organization; Note leave meeting password blank); 3) indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy; 4) click on Proceed. For phone access: toll free dial 877-916-2513 using a touch-tone phone; when prompted enter participant code 5877174 followed by a "#". Webcast & Phone access is limited to 50 connections on a first-come-first served basis. For general questions about this seminar, please contact Freud Park (301-713-3272 ext. 157).

 


 

Title:

TBD

Date/Location:
Thursday, 17 July 2008; 12:00 - 13:00 ETZ (SSMC-3, 2nd Floor, NOAA Central Library Seminar)
Speaker(s):
Zdenka Willis (IOOS)
Abstract:
TBD
Notes:
For Teleconference and further information please contact Mary Lou Cumberpatch (301-713-2600 Ext.129)

 


 

Title:

Uncertainty in the Arctic Water Cycle

Date/Location:
Tuesday, 29 July 2008; 10:00-11:00 am Alaska Local Time (Duckering Building Room 535, University of Alaska/Fairbanks, ACCAP/Alaska Climate Teleconference seminar)
Speaker(s):
Jessie Cherry (University of Alaska)
Abstract
TBD
Notes:
To Participate / Log-In to the Alaska Climate Teleconference: 1) Dial: 1-800-893-8850. 2) When prompted, enter the PIN code: 7531823. PLEASE MUTE YOUR PHONE DURING THE PRESENTATION. The audio is very sensitive and your external conversations and typing can be heard by other participants and disrupt the presentation. Thank You. To view the presentation during a teleconference: 1) Point your web browser to: http://www.shareitnow.com 2) Click on the blue *Join a Meeting* button on the left side bar. 3) For Presenter ID enter: accap@uaf.edu. If you do not see anything on your screen, click on the refresh button on the top bar. For optimal viewing, we suggest selecting 'Always resize to fit window (max 100%)' under 'View.' For Macintosh computer users: A copy of the presentation will also be available on the ACCAP website: www.uaf.edu/accap. See the right-hand column under "Highlights." To join us in person: If you are in Fairbanks, you are welcome to join us in person on the UAF campus, Duckering Building Room 535. Map: http://www.uaf.edu/campusmap/(purple zone). Registration: Pre-registration is not required but is strongly encouraged as it helps us to moderate the discussion. To register please contact: Sarah Trainor, ACCAP Coordinator and Research Scientist, (907) 474-7878, accap@uaf.edu, fnsft@uaf.edu, or fill out the web-form at: http://www.uaf.edu/accap/teleconference.htm#register. For more information about the Alaska Climate Teleconferences and the Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy, please contact Sarah Trainor (telephone and email above) or visit our website: http://www.uaf.edu/accap/.

 

 


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August

 

Title:

TBD

Date/Location:
Wednesday, 27 August 2008; 12:00 - 13:00 ETZ (SSMC-3, 2nd Floor, NOAA Central Library Seminar)
Speaker(s):
Dr. John L. "Jack" Hayes (Assistant Administrator for Weather Services and Director, National Weather Service)
Abstract:
TBD
Notes:
For Teleconference and further information please contact Mary Lou Cumberpatch (301-713-2600 Ext.129)

 


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September

 

Title:

Oceanic and coral reef ecology (tentative)

Date/Location:
Friday, 12 September 2008; 12:00 - 13:00 ETZ (SSMC-3, 2nd Floor, NOAA Central Library Seminar)
Speaker(s):
Dr. Nancy Knowlton (Smithsonian Institution)
Abstract:
Dr. Nancy Knowlton, holder of the Sant Chair, the first endowed ocean science chair at the Smithsonian Institution, will discuss her work on oceanic and coral reef ecology
Notes:
For Teleconference and further information please contact Mary Lou Cumberpatch (301-713-2600 Ext.129)

 


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October

 

No Seminars Scheduled


 

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November

No Seminars Scheduled


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December

 

No Seminars Scheduled



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Concept: The "OneNOAA" science seminar series are an opportunity to share and promote constructive discussion of the work conducted at NOAA, and elsewhere with colleagues and guests speakers in an informal setting.


Seminar Partner's contacts


NESDIS / National Oceanographic Data Center
(NODC) seminars:
Location: Unless otherwise indicated, NODC seminars are held in conference Room 4817 (SSMC-3, 4th Floor; 1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD 20910). NESDIS Seminars: Check locations. Information/questions? Please contact Hernan Garcia (301-713-3290 Ext 184). Notes: For VideoTeleConferencing (VTC) access: contact Cheryl.Ingram@noaa.gov (301-713-3284 x155) at least a day before the seminar. For Webcast access: 1) go to http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?i=442112424&p=NODC4817&t=c); 2) type in other required fields (i.e., your name, e-mail, organization); 3) indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy; 4) click on Proceed. For phone access: toll free dial 866-743-9902 using a touch-tone phone; when prompted enter participant code 4689608 followed by a "#".

NOS seminars:
Location:  Unless otherwise indicated, seminars are typically held in the NOS conference Room# 8150 (SSMC-4, 8th Floor)
Information/questions? Please contact Felix A. Martinez (301-713-3338 x153) NOS/NCCOS/Center for Sponsored Coastal Ocean Research. Notes: Presentations are available remotely via a combination of phone & webcast. Please be aware that remote access is limited to 50 connections on a first-come-first served basis, so we cannot guarantee participation. To participate remotely you must: 1) Dial 866-541-1377, and then wait for instructions. When prompted enter passcode 142625 followed by the # sign. Please use your phone’s mute button (or toggle *6) during the presentation until you are ready to ask questions. 2) Go to the webcast site at https://www.mymeetings.com/emeet/join/index.jsp?customHeader=mymeetings 3) Enter meeting number 449707376 and passcode NOS8150. 4) Enter other required fields. 5) Indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy and click Proceed.


Fisheries Service, Office of Habitat Conservation seminars:
Location: Check announcements
Information/questions? For more information or to suggest a speaker, contact Julie Nygard (Julie.Nygard@noaa.gov ) or Perry Gayaldo (Perry.Gayaldo@noaa.gov)

Air Resources Laboratory seminars:
Location: Check announcements
Information/questions? Please contact  Betty Wells (Betty.Wells@noaa.gov)

National Weather Service - Office of Hydrologic Development
Location:  Check announcements
Information/questions? For more information or to suggest a speaker, contact Pedro.Restrepo@noaa.gov

National Weather Service - Science and Technology Seminars
Location:  Check announcements
Information/questions? For more information or to suggest a speaker, contact Bob Glahn at (301-713-1768 ; Harry.Glahn@noaa.gov)

National Marine Fisheries Service Office of Policy Seminars
Location:  Check announcements
Information/questions? For more information or to suggest a speaker, please contact Anne.Isham@noaa.gov (301) 713-9070 ext 116).

NOAA Chesapeake Bay Office (NCBO): NCBO focuses multiple NOAA capabilities on Chesapeake Bay restoration through science, service, and stewardship of the Bay ecosystem.
Location:  Check announcements
Information/questions? For more information or to suggest a speaker, please contact Kim.Couranz@noaa.gov (410) 267-5673.

NOAA Central Library brown bag seminars:
Location: All NOAA central library brown bag seminars (unless otherwise noted) are held from 1200-1300h ET in SSMC-3, 2nd Floor (main floor), 1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring. Information/Questions? Contact Mary Lou Cumberpatch (301-713-2600 Ext.129; Mary.Lou.Cumberpatch@noaa.gov) or Albert (Skip) Theberge (301-713-2600 Ext. 115; Albert.E.Theberge.Jr@noaa.gov).

NOAA NMFS Office of Protected Resources (OPR) seminars
Location:  Check announcements
Information/questions? For Webex access and further information please contact Jaclyn Taylor [(301) 713-2322 ext 118]

Office of Ocean Exploration
Location: Check announcements
Information/questions? For questions please contact: Reginald.Beach@noaa.gov, Margot.Bohan@noaa.gov, and/or Nicolas.Alvarado@noaa.gov.

NOAA’s National Climatic Data Center
Location: Check announcements
Information/questions? For questions please contact Sharon LeDuc (828-271-4848)

Joint Center for Satellite Data Assimilation (JCSDA) Seminars:
Location: Unless noted otherwise, all seminars take place at World Weather Building Science Center, 5200 Auth Road, Camp Springs, MD 20746.
Seminar web?: http://www.jcsda.noaa.gov/JCSDASeminars.php
Information/questions? For questions please contact Ada Armstrong (301-763-8172 x188) and George Ohring (301-763-8154 x352)

Center for Satellite Applications and Research (STAR) Seminars:
Location: Unless noted otherwise, all seminars take place at Center for Satellite Applications and Research, World Weather Building, Science Center, Room 707, 5200 Auth Road,
Camp Springs, MD 20746.
Seminar web?: http://www.orbit.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/seminars.php
Information/questions? For questions please contact Lori K. Brown (301-361-0637).

National/Naval Ice Center (NATICE) Seminars
Location: Unless noted otherwise, all seminars take place at NOAA Satellite Operations Facility (NSOF), 4251 Suitland Road, Washington, D.C. 20395.
Information/questions? Please contact Pablo Clemente-Colón

 

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Seminar Locations (unless otherwise indicated)

NOAA Silver Spring Campus

  • SSMC-1 (Silver Spring Metro Center, Building 1): 1335 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD, 20910, USA.
  • SSMC-2 (Silver Spring Metro Center, Building 2): 1325 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD, 20910, USA.
  • SSMC-3 (Silver Spring Metro Center, Building 3): 1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD, 20910, USA.
  • SSMC-4 (Silver Spring Metro Center, Building 4): 1305 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD, 20910, USA.
  • SSMC-5 (NOAA Science Center/Auditorium): 1301 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD, 20910, USA.

NOAA Camp Springs Campus

  • World Weather Building, Science Center, Room 707, 5200 Auth Road, Camp Springs, MD 20746, USA.

NOAA Satellite Operations Facility (NSOF)

  • NOAA Satellite Operations Facility (NSOF), 4251 Suitland Road, Washington, D.C. 20395.

 

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Sample Seminar Format

 

Title:


Date/Location:
 
Speaker(s):
 
E-mail(s):
 
Abstract:
 
Notes:
 
About the speaker(s):
 
Link(s) to Presentation:
 

 

 

 

NOAA Staff Locator

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


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