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OneNOAA Science Seminars


Please join us for our upcoming OneNOAA science discussion seminars. This is a joint effort to help share science across NOAA.

i-access to our seminar announcements:

1. Join our seminar email list [nominally, one email per week of upcoming seminars].
To join our email list contact Hernan Garcia

2. Online public access: http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/
Web page developed by Hajure Fontaine


3. Online public access to seminar announcements (No login/password required): GoogleCalendar*
Maintained by Felix A. Martinez

Note the list of upcoming seminars is updated frequently. All constructive suggestions for improving the content of the seminar series are welcome. Anyone can join this email list or make a seminar presentation. All NOAA offices/divisions are welcome to participate and/or join as seminar partners. Please share the seminar announcements with anyone interested. While we try to ensure an accurate listing of seminars, errors do occur. Please notify us of any errors that you find so that we can correct them.



January 2007

Ecosystem based management and public participation in the management of transboundary waters

Thursday, 11 January 2007; 1200-1300h ETZ
(SSMC 3, Room # 13836; NOAA Fisheries Office of Policy Seminar Series)

Speakers:
Dr. Kathryn Mengerink J.D. and Jessica Troell J.D. of the Environmental Law Institute (ELI).

Abstract:
The speakers will present policy analysis work from two ELI projects: Ecosystem based management (early stage-http://www2.eli.org/ocean/projects.htm); and public participation in the management of transboundary waters (final stage-http://www2.eli.org/research/waterparticipation/index.htm).

Speaker Notes: Dr. Mengerink is the director of ELI’s Ocean Program. She received her Ph.D. in Marine Biology from Scripps and her J.D. from Berkeley, with Specialization in Environmental Law. During law school, Dr. Mengerink was a research associate in the Law of the Sea Institute. Ms. Troell is Co-Director of ELI’s Africa Program. She works closely with NGO and governmental partners to implement projects ranging from community fisheries management to access to genetic resources. She leads ELI’s international waters program, which is collaborating with the GEF to develop guidance materials and workshops on public participation in the management of international waters.

Notes: Contact Jason.Didden@noaa.gov for questions or for audio-link information.


The role of good policy analysis and interdisciplinary approaches relating to sustainable ocean shipping

Thursday, 18 January 2007; 1200-1300h ETZ
(SSMC 3, Room # 13836; NOAA Fisheries Office of Policy Seminar Series)

Speaker: James Corbett, P.E., Ph.D. (University of Delaware)

Abstract: Dr. Corbett will present work developing a general model to analyze management of shipping's environmental impacts including: Dimensions in which shipping activity causes marine environmental impacts; The possible futures of freight activity; The technology-policy frameworks within which shipping is regulated; How good policy analyses might transform debate and enable policy dialogue to focus on issues of core values.

Speaker Notes:  Dr. Corbett has a Ph.D. in Engineering and Public Policy from Carnegie Mellon University.  His work as an Associate Professor in the University of Delaware's Marine Policy Program focuses on interdisciplinary technology-policy decision-making and risk assessment in the shipping industry (http://www.ocean.udel.edu/cms/jcorbett/).

Notes: Contact Jason.Didden@noaa.gov for questions or for audio-link information.


An innovative approach to protecting essential fish habitat: TNC's trawler buy out

Thursday, 18 January 2007; 1200 -1300h ETZ

(SSMC 3, Room # 11836, Fisheries Service, Office of Habitat Conservation Seminar)

Speakers: Erika Feller and Steve Copps (The Nature Conservancy)

Abstract: "The Nature Conservancy will talk about how they are working with fishing communities in California's central coast to reduce the impact of trawling on essential fish habitat"

Notes: Contact Julie Nygard (Julie.Nygard@noaa.gov) for questions


Declining Coral Reef Fisheries Resources and the Efficacy of Marine Protected Areas in the Hawaiian Archipelago

Tuesday, 23 January 2007; 12:00 – 13:00 ETZ

(SSMC-4, Room # 8150, NOS seminar)

Speaker: Dr. Alan Friedlander

Email: Alan.friedlander@noaa.gov

Abstract: Coral reef fisheries resources in Hawaii have declined dramatically over the past 100 years as evidenced by order-or-magnitude drops in catch rates and significant decreases in the sizes of many important species targeted by fishers. Adding to this problem is the almost complete lack of information on recreational and other non-commercial catches, which have been shown to constitute the majority of the fishing mortality for a large number of species in Hawaii. To date, conventional management strategies such as size and bag limits, seasonal species closures, and limited great restrictions have done little to alter these downward trends in catches and stock health. It is now becoming evident that ecosystem-based management, in the form of marine protected areas (MPAs), is necessary to conserve biodiversity, maintain viable fisheries, and deliver a broad suite of ecosystem services. Over the past four decades, Hawaii has developed a system of MPAs to conserve and replenish marine resources around the state. Initially established to provide opportunities for public interaction with the marine environment, these MPAs vary in size, habitat quality, and management regimes, providing an excellent opportunity to test hypotheses concerning MPA design and function using multiple discreet sampling units. Digital benthic habitat maps for all MPAs and adjacent habitats were used to evaluate the efficacy of existing MPAs using a spatially-explicit stratified random sampling design. Results showed that a number of fish assemblage characteristics (e.g., species richness, biomass, diversity, size and trophic structure) were significantly higher in MPAs compared with adjacent fished areas across all habitat types. Habitat type, protected area size, and level of protection from fishing were all important determinates of MPA effectiveness with respect to their associated fish assemblages. Although size of these protected areas was positively correlated with a number of fish assemblage characteristics, all appear too small to have any measurable influence on the adjacent fished areas. This is even more evident when fish stocks in the main Hawaiian Islands (MHI) are compared with the northwestern Hawaiian Islands (NWHI) Marine National Monument, now the largest MPA in the world. Differences in assemblage structure represent both near-extirpation of apex predators and heavy exploitation of lower trophic levels in the MHI compared to the largely unfished NWHI. Estimates of MHI and unfished NWHI abundance also allowed us to preliminarily assess the status of 49 previously unassessed fish stocks. Our results suggest that 35% of these species were depleted below typical overfished thresholds in the MHI, with another 10% falling below desired levels. Owing to the time, cost, and myriad problems involved in determining the status of multi-species and multi-gear coral reef fish stocks, large unfished reference areas such as the NWHI can serve as a valuable tool to assess the health of fisheries resources in areas under exploitation. The results from this work provide criteria for more effective MPA design and establish baselines to assess future management strategies in Hawaii and other coral reef ecosystems.

Notes: Presentations are typically available by video, webcast, and phone. For video, contact nos.video.conference@noaa.gov. Please allow adequate time for testing of connections (24 hours or more) if you do not regularly connect with NOS. For phone, dial 866-541-1377, passcode 142625. For webcast: 1. Go to the My Meetings website. 2. Enter the required fields. (Meeting Number: 741804628; Passcode: NCCOS1305; Meeting Host: Science Seminar Host) 3. Indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy. 4. Click on Proceed. 5. Dial into the phone so you can hear too! (NOS staff: instructions for Instant Net Conference and Video Stream can be found at this internal NOS website.) For questions, please contact Felix A. Martinez (301-713-3338 x153).


NOAA Special Symposium Honoring The Career of Dr. D.B. Rao (See announcement)

Friday, 26 January 2007; 0900-1700h ETZ (SSMC3, 4th Floor Large Conference Room)

Abstract: There will be a one day Special Symposium to honor the career of D.B. Rao, who recently retired from NWS/NCEP where he was the head of the Marine Modeling and Analysis Branch. It will be held in SSMC3 in the 4th floor large conference room, this Friday, January 26, from 9-5. Please see the attached Program. It is open to anyone to attend throughout the day (See program: https://intra.nodc.noaa.gov/Information/Training/Seminars/Rao-Poster 012207.pdf)

Notes: Please contact Frank Aikman (frank.aikman@noaa.gov) for questions.


Runoff Generation in Gauged and Ungauged Watersheds: Status and future

Friday, 26 January 2007; 14:00-15:00h ETZ (SSMC II, Room 8246, NOAA NWS Office of Hydrologic Development)

Speaker: Jeffrey J. McDonnell (Richardson Chair in Watershed Science, Dept. of Forest Engineering, Oregon State University)

Abstract: The IAHS Prediction in Ungauged Basins (PUB) Initiative offers an unprecedented opportunity for process hydrologists, modelers and theoreticians to work together on a common problem: reduction of predictive uncertainty. While this topic has been addressed in recent years in the watershed modeling community, only recently have experimentalists begun to explore how conceptual understanding of basin behavior may be used to structure (and reject) new models, be used as soft data in multi-criteria model calibration and to narrow model parameter ranges. This paper attempts to distill the key concepts of runoff generation in an attempt to whittle-down the myriad complexities of hillslope behavior often reported toward defining emergent properties at the basin scale. It is argued that future process studies should be comparative in nature and recognize the limitations to inference from current field practice. New data sources and process ideas may form new measures of model acceptability, as the community moves away from calibration-reliant model schemes to more process-representative descriptions applicable in ungauged basins. For info on PUB see http://www.cig.ensmp.fr/~iahs/ <http://www.cig.ensmp.fr/%7Eiahs/>

Notes: *Go to Meeting information: https://www.gotomeeting.com/join/799053438
Conference Call: Dial 1-800-369-1131 Passcode: 28185# Meeting ID: 799-053-438.


Digital Coast: Legislative Atlas—Know Where the Law Applies

Monday, 29 January 2007; 12:00 – 13:00 ETZ (SSMC-4, Room # 8150, NOS seminar)

Speaker: Joshua Murphy and Melissa Ladd, NOAA/NOS/Coastal Services Center

Email: Joshua.Murphy@noaa.gov

Abstract: Visualizing where laws apply and which agencies have jurisdiction over specific areas and resources helps governing agencies within the region understand complex aspects of legislation and policy that govern coastal and marine resources. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s Coastal Services Center, along with Photo Science, Inc., the National Sea Grant Law Center, and local partners, has developed spatial representations of federal and state legislation and jurisdictional boundaries termed “georegulations.” These georegulations, accompanied by Internet mapping and Web Feature services, are available for viewing, downloading, and analysis via the Legislative Atlas Web site. The project currently covers federal georegulations and agency jurisdictions for the ocean coasts of the continental U.S. and state georegulations for the Gulf of Mexico. The atlas will soon cover federal laws for the entire U.S. and state laws in California, Hawaii, and the Northeast. To find out where coastal and marine laws apply, visit www.csc.noaa.gov/legislativeatlas.

Notes: Presentations are typically available by video, webcast, and phone. For video, contact nos.video.conference@noaa.gov. Please allow adequate time for testing of connections (24 hours or more) if you do not regularly connect with NOS.
For phone, dial 866-541-1377, passcode 142625. For webcast: 1. Go to the My Meetings website. 2. Enter the required fields. (Meeting Number: 741804628; Passcode: NCCOS1305; Meeting Host: Science Seminar Host) 3. Indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy. 4. Click on Proceed. 5. Dial into the phone so you can hear too! (NOS staff: instructions for Instant Net Conference and Video Stream can be found at this internal NOS website.) For questions, please contact Felix A. Martinez (301-713-3338 x153).


Assuring Healthy, Safe and Environmentally Sustainable Seafood Resources: Application of Analytical Tools and Aquaculture Biotechnologies

Monday, 29 January 2007; 16:00 – 17:00 ETZ (SSMC-4, Room # 8150, NOS seminar)

Speaker: Dr. Craig Browdy (NOS/NCCOS/Hollings Marine Laboratory and South Carolina Department of Natural Resources/Seafood Health and Safety)

Email: BrowdyC@dnr.sc.gov

Abstract: An integrated multi-institutional and multi-disciplinary scientific effort focusing on the quality, safety and sustainability of seafood resources is underway at the National Centers for Coastal Oceans Science’s (NCCOS) Hollings Marine Laboratory (HML) in Charleston, SC. The research combines lipid and contaminant analysis capabilities of the Charleston NCCOS laboratories with mariculture and fisheries expertise of the South Carolina Department of Natural Resources to address the public’s need for information and better alternatives to make healthy and environmentally sustainable seafood choices. Two main objectives are being addressed as part of the Center of Excellence in Oceans and Human Health at HML. First, the research applies advanced analytical tools to survey domestic and imported wild and farm raised fish (Red Drum) and crustaceans (penaeid shrimp) locally available for consumption by the public. A survey of Red Drum analyzed fish from environmentally “clean” and “impacted” sites along the southeastern US and Gulf coasts as well as farmed fish from domestic and imported aquaculture sources. Samples were analyzed for fatty acid profiles and for a variety of chemical contaminants: 22 metals, 21 pesticides, 25 PAHs, 79 PCBs, and 13 PBDEs. Fatty acid profiles clearly distinguish between wild and farmed fish and between fish farmed domestically and those imported. Contaminant analyses demonstrated differences between impacted and clean sites and significant levels of DDT compounds were found in some imported samples. A simple risk-benefit model is presented converting EPA/DHA fatty acid and chemical contaminant concentrations into relatively simple terms like “net pathologies” using measurement terms such as “meals per week”. The algorithms are based on USEPA and FDA advisories and metadata analyses of major human epidemiological studies. Application of fatty acid analyses to shrimp samples demonstrates the potential for development of forensic tools to differentiate wild and farm reared shrimp, providing new alternatives for investigation and enforcement of importation and labeling regulations. The second objective focuses on development of new aquaculture alternatives to provide healthy and environmentally friendly seafood choices for consumers. With increasing world consumption of aquaculture-produced seafood, supplies of fish meals and fish oils used in aquaculture feeds will become limiting as pelagic fisheries are depleted. Although, these dietary components provide healthy, essential fatty acids, they also can contain significant concentrations of chemical contaminants. Our research focuses on a holistic approach, replacing fish meals and oils with alternative sources of protein and lipids while maximizing contributions of natural productivity in land based intensive shrimp culture systems. Large scale pond based culture trials over the past three years have demonstrated complete fish meal and oil replacement, providing new alternatives for sustainable seafood production.

Notes: Presentations are typically available by video, webcast, and phone. For video, contact nos.video.conference@noaa.gov. Please allow adequate time for testing of connections (24 hours or more) if you do not regularly connect with NOS. For phone, dial 866-541-1377, passcode 142625. For webcast: 1. Go to the My Meetings website. 2. Enter the required fields. (Meeting Number: 741804628; Passcode: NCCOS1305; Meeting Host: Science Seminar Host) 3. Indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy. 4. Click on Proceed. 5. Dial into the phone so you can hear too! (NOS staff: instructions for Instant Net Conference and Video Stream can be found at this internal NOS website.) For questions, please contact Felix A. Martinez (301-713-3338 x153).


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February 2007

George Washington Carver -- Voluntary Weather Observer
Thursday, 01 February 2007; 11:00 -12:00 ETZ (SSMC-3, Room # 4817, NODC seminar)

Speaker: Doria Grimes (Chief, Contract Operations Branch, NOAA Central Library)

Email: Doria.Grimes@noaa.gov

Abstract: From Nov. 1899 through Jan. 1932, daily weather observations were submitted from Tuskegee, Alabama, on government Form 1009 as part of the Cooperative Observer Program. Most of these daily observations were handwritten and signed by George Washington Carver. How was he able to execute daily weather observations in conjunction with his teaching, travel, and research activities with peanuts, pecans, soybeans, fertilizers, cotton, etc? Did he labor as meticulously with this data as he did with his agricultural products? Not really! A review of correspondence to and from Carver and the U.S. Department of Agriculture Weather Bureau reveal interesting facets of his personality and accomplishments during this period. The Tuskegee weather observations have been imaged and are now available online at http://docs.lib.noaa.gov/rescue/gw_carver_tuskegee/data_rescue_tuskegee_observations.html. Funding for this project was made available from the NOAA Climate Database Modernization Program and the National Oceanographic Data Center. Presentation Available On-Line: https://intra.nodc.noaa.gov/Information/Training/Seminars/George Washington Carver rev.ppt

Notes: VideoTeleConferencing (VTC)/phone available upon request by contacting Cheryl Ingram (Cheryl.Ingram@noaa.gov) at least a day before the seminar. For questions, please contact Hernan Garcia (301-713-3290 x184)


The Coast and Geodetic Survey: Scientists, Sailors, Surveyors, Chartmakers

Tuesday, 06 February 2007; 1200-1300 ETZ (NOAA Science Auditorium)

Speaker: Albert Theberge (NOAA Central Library)

Notes: See http://www.preserveamerica.noaa.gov/heritageweek.html Shipwrecks of the Northwestern Hawaiian islands Marine National Monument


Thursday, 08 February 2007; 1200-1300 ETZ (NOAA Science Auditorium)

Speaker: Hans Van Tilburg (NOAA National Marine Santuaries Maritime Heritage Program)

Notes: See http://www.preserveamerica.noaa.gov/heritageweek.html


New England's first fisheries crisis: Economy, ecology, and fishery politics on the southern coast, 1830-1870.

Monday 12 February 2007; 1200-1300 ETZ (NOAA Science Auditorium)

Speaker: Mathew McKenzie (University of Connecticut)

Notes: See http://www.preserveamerica.noaa.gov/heritageweek.html


The Role of IMARPE in The Management of The Peruvian Fisheries: Managing The Peru Current Ecosystem in a Highly Variable Environment

Monday, 12 February 2007; 14:30-15:30 ET (SSMC3, NOAA Central Library, Joint NODC/NOAA Library Seminar)

Speaker: Admiral Hector Soldi (Director, Peruvian Marine Research Institute, IMARPE)

E-mail: presidencia@imarpe.gob.pe

Abstract: The ocean off the west coast of South America is notable because it produces more fish per unit area than any other region in the world oceans. However, this area is intimately linked to the ocean-atmosphere coupling over the tropical Pacific, and therefore subject to large year-to-year and decade-to-decade fluctuations in regional ocean climate. Operational fisheries management is the main role of IMARPE. This task is now evolving away from a monospecific to an "Ecosystem-Based" paradigm. This new approach appears to be particularly appropriate for the Humboldt or Peru Current System, where the uncertainty associated with high ocean variability and regime shifts represent major challenges for Ecology and Fisheries research. After many years of managing the main anchovy fisheries stocks in Peru, IMARPE has developed several tools using experience and existing models to manage this complex ocean ecosystem and its main fisheries. However, several conditions like the large fishing fleet and the impact of warm periods associated with El Nino in the anchovy stock are still important challenges in the management of the Peruvian Fisheries. Presentation Available On-Line: https://intra.nodc.noaa.gov/Information/Training/Seminars/Hector_Soldi_IMARPE.ppt

Notes: Admiral Hector Soldi will be visiting NODC/World Data Center for Oceanography, Silver Spring 12-14 February 2007. For questions, please contact Hernan Garcia (301-713-3290 x184)


The Distributed Large Basin Runoff Model: a Tool for Hydrologic and Water Quality Assessment
Monday, 12 February 2007; 14:00-15:00 ETZ (SSMC2, Room 8246; Office of Hydrologic Development Seminar)

Speaker: Carlo DeMarchi (School of Natural Resources and Environment, University of Michigan / NOAA Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory)

Abstract: Agricultural non-point source contamination of water resources by pesticides, animal wastes, and soil erosion is a major problem in much of the Great Lakes Basin. Point source contaminations, such as combined sewer outflows, also add wastes to water flows. Sediment, waste, pesticide, and nutrient loadings to surface and subsurface waters can result in oxygen depletion (BOD and COD loadings) and eutrophication in receiving lakes, as well as secondary impacts such as harmful algal blooms and beach closures due to viral and bacterial and/or toxin delivery to affected sites. Prediction of various ecological system variables or consequences (such as beach closings), as well as effective management of pollution at the watershed scale, require estimation of both point and non-point source material transport through a watershed by hydrological processes. The Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory is developing an integrated, spatially distributed, physically-based water quality model to evaluate both agricultural non-point source loadings from soil erosion, animal manure, and pesticides, and point source loadings at the watershed level. Such model combines an existing physically based distributed surface/subsurface hydrology model (the Distributed Large Basin Runoff Model) with databases for animal manure, fertilizers, and pesticides distributions in the watershed, soil erosion models, and pollutant and sediment transport models. The seminar will focus on the development and application of the DLBRM hydrologic model and on the expansion of its capabilities to water quality. Further, an example of the combination of the DLBRM with a lake circulation model will be presented. Dr. De Marchi graduated at the University of Padova, Italy, in System Engineering, and received a master degree in Engineering from the University of California, Davis, and a Ph.D. in Civil Engineering from the Georgia Institute of Technology. He also worked at International Institute for Applied System Analysis in Vienna, Austria, and is currently a Research Investigator at the School of Natural Resources and Environment of the University of Michigan. Dr. De Marchi has worked on remote sensing of precipitation using satellite images in the Nile River basin and in watershed hydrology and water quality modeling in the Lagoon of Venice, Eastern Europe, and the Great Lakes region.

Notes: Join on-line: https://www.gotomeeting.com/join/172920700 ; Conference Call: Telecon: 1-877-774-5038 ; Passcode: 925335# ; Meeting ID: 172-920-700. For questions please contact Pedro.Restrepo@noaa.gov.


Radar Monitoring of Forested Wetland Hydrology: Implications for Decision Support Systems

Wednesday, 14 February at 1:00 PM ETZ (SSMC2, Room 8246; Office of Hydrologic Development Seminar)

Speaker: Megan Lang (Agricultural Research Service)

Abstract: Wetlands provide important services to society but Mid-Atlantic wetlands are at high risk for loss, with forested wetlands being especially vulnerable. Hydrology (flooding and soil moisture) controls wetland function and extent but it may be altered due to changes in weather and anthropogenic influence. Broad-scale forested wetland hydrology is difficult to monitor using ground-based and traditional remote sensing methods. C-band synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data could improve the capability to monitor forested wetland hydrology. This information is management applicable and can be used to parameterize decision support systems, such as water quality models. Other types of active sensors, including lidar and laser altimeters, can be used to supplement the information derived from the radar systems.

Notes: Join on-line: https://www.gotomeeting.com/join/394609465. Conference Call: Telecon: 1-877-774-5038; Passcode: 925335#; Meeting ID: 394-609-465. For questions please contact Pedro.Restrepo@noaa.gov.


Modeling Bacterial Transport in Coastal Waters

Wednesday, 21 February 2007; 12:00-13:00 ETZ (SSMC-4, Room #8150, NOS seminar)

Speaker: Dr. Philip Roberts (Georgia Institute of Technology and NOAA Oceans and Human Health Initiative Distinguished Scholar)

Email: proberts@ce.gatech.edu Abstract: A large fraction of the world's population lives near coastal waters. These waters are the recipients of their wastewater via outfalls and other sources of bacteria and pathogens, especially creeks and rivers. Beaches and shorelines are also major recreation sites, but exposure of bathers to bacteria and pathogens can constitute a health hazard, and high bacterial levels at beaches result in beach closures with large economic impacts. How can we predict bacterial transport in coastal waters and how can we design outfalls and coastal sanitation schemes that are economical and protect public health and the environment? In this seminar we will discuss recent research governing the hydrodynamic aspects of wastewater mixing in coastal waters, particularly related to ocean outfalls discharging buoyant effluent into stratified environments. New laboratory techniques using three-dimensional laser-induced fluorescence, field experiments on outfall mixing, and mathematical modeling of coastal water dispersion will be discussed. An application of these methods to the design of a sanitation system in Cartagena, Colombia will be presented. Recent research conducted on Lake Michigan with NOAA under the Oceans and Human Health Initiative on the hydrodynamics of river plumes and modeling of the microbial contaminants contained in them and proposed interdisciplinary hydrodynamic and microbial research will also be discussed.

Notes: Presentations are typically available by video, webcast, and phone. For video, contact nos.video.conference@noaa.gov. Please allow adequate time for testing of connections (24 hours or more) if you do not regularly connect with NOS. For phone, dial 866-541-1377, passcode 142625. For webcast: 1. Go to the My Meetings website. 2. Enter the required fields. (Meeting Number: 741804628; Passcode: NCCOS1305; Meeting Host: Science Seminar Host) 3. Indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy. 4. Click on Proceed. 5. Dial into the phone so you can hear too! (NOS staff: instructions for Instant Net Conference and Video Stream can be found at this internal NOS website). For questions about this seminar, please contact Felix A. Martinez (301-713-3338 x153).


The 2005 and 2006 New England red tides: mechanisms, management challenges, and implications for future forecasting capabilities

Thursday, 22 February 2007; 11:30 - 12:30 ETZ (SSMC-4, Room #8150, NOS seminar)

Speaker: Donald M. Anderson (Biology Department, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution)

Email: danderson@whoi.edu

Abstract: A massive red tide of Alexandrium fundyense affected southern New England in 2005, closing nearshore shellfish beds from Maine to Massachusetts and 40,000 km2 of offshore federal waters. This was the largest regional bloom in at least 30 years. In 2006, another A. fundyense bloom developed that initially had many of the same characteristics as the 2005 event. Although paralytic shellfish poisoning (PSP) toxicity in 2006 was still extensive, the bloom did not affect southern Gulf of Maine waters to the same extent as in 2005. This presentation will present observations on the 2005 and 2006 Alexandrium events and will use state-of-the-art computer simulations and sensitivity analyses to identify the key factors that contributed to bloom development and that regulated the observed interannual variability in PSP toxicity within the region. The long-term implications of the blooms will also be discussed, as there is good reason to believe that the western Gulf of Maine region will experience more frequent and more intense PSP outbreaks in the coming years, compared to the last decade. The challenges and potential for an operational red tide forecasting system in the Gulf of Maine will also be discussed. 

Notes: Presentations are typically available by video, webcast, and phone. For video, contact nos.video.conference@noaa.gov. Please allow adequate time for testing of connections (24 hours or more) if you do not regularly connect with NOS. For phone, dial 866-541-1377, passcode 142625. For webcast: 1. Go to the My Meetings website. 2. Enter the required fields. (Meeting Number: 741804628; Passcode: NCCOS1305; Meeting Host: Science Seminar Host) 3. Indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy. 4. Click on Proceed. 5. Dial into the phone so you can hear too! (NOS staff: instructions for Instant Net Conference and Video Stream can be found at this internal NOS website). For questions about this seminar, please contact Felix A. Martinez (301-713-3338 x153).


PaCOOS: Developing NOAA's Ecological Observing System for the California Current LME
Friday, 23 February 2007; 12:00-13:00 ETZ (SSMC3, Room 15817; Office of Habitat Conservation seminar)

Speaker: Jonathan Phinney

Abstract: The Integrated Ocean Observing (IOOS) products are to develop ocean forecasts and assessments for managers and the public. Both forecasts and assessments are in the early phases of development. Forecasts could include fisheries and harmful algal blooms (HAB's) projections (ecological forecasts), drought and hurricane prediction (climate forecasts) and wave height and currents fields (transportation forecasts) while assessments are being developed through an Integrated Ecological Assessment model. Implementation for IOOS rests on 11 Regional Associations nationwide, including two in California, in collaboration with state and federal government agencies. The RA's role is to augment and improve existing government ocean data and infrastructure needs and forecasts. While the IOOS governance structure divides the West Coast into three regions, there is one major oceanographic feature affecting the entire California ecosystem, the California Current, entering the coastal region from the North Pacific at Vancouver Island, BC and exiting at the Baja Peninsula, Mexico. Also lacking in the governance structure is the importance of ecological connectivity between coastal and offshore waters; for example habitat connectivity for anadromous fish. The Pacific Coast Ocean Observing System (PaCOOS) is the developing government ecological observing "backbone" along the entire California Current. Its purpose is to bring cohesion to the government observing assets along the West Coast and its members include academic institutions, federal and state government agencies as well as the RA's. Initial focus has been on data integration but also assessing existing fisheries "forecasts" for salmon such as stock assessments and other available models.

Notes: DIAL-IN NUMBERS: 877-918-6315 ; PASSCODE: HABITAT; NET CONFERENCING PARTICIPANT ACCESS INFORMATION: https://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join/ ; CONFERENCE NUMBER: PH6037191 ; AUDIENCE PASSCODE: HABITAT ; You can join the event directly at: https://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?i=PH6037191&p=HABITAT&t=c .
Please contact Julie Nygard (Julie.Nygard@noaa.gov) for questions about this seminar.


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March 2007

Ocean Heat Content Variability (1955-2006) and the Earth's Heat Balance

Monday 5 March 2007; 15:30 -16:30h ETZ
(SSMC3, Room 4817, NODC Seminar)

Speaker: Tim Boyer (NODC)

Email:
boyer@nodc.noaa.gov

Abstract:
A talk to be delivered at the 2nd Alexander Von Humboldt Conference on The Role of Geophysics in Natural Disaster Prevention in Lima, Peru (March 2007). The talk will focus on the oceans role in the Earth's heat balance and changes in the Ocean Heat content over the last 50 years.

Notes:
VideoTeleConferencing (VTC)/phone available upon request by contacting Cheryl Ingram (Cheryl.Ingram@noaa.gov) at least a day before the seminar. For questions about this seminar, please contact Hernan Garcia (301-713-3290 x184).


Modeling River Ice and River Ice Jams with HEC-RAS

Wednesday, 7 March 2007; 14:00-15:00 ETZ (SSMC4, Room 8150; Office of Hydrologic Development Seminar) * Notice different room *

Speaker: Dr. Stephen Daily (USACE ERDC-CRREL)

Abstract: This one hour presentation will present an overview of simulating river ice using the Hydrologic Engineering Center's River Analysis System (HEC-RAS). RAS is designed to perform one-dimensional hydraulic calculations for a full network of natural and constructed channels and provide input and output information in tabular and graphical formats. HEC-RAS has the capability to simulate the presence of river ice covers of known thickness and roughness and estimate the thickness and hydraulic roughness of wide-river ice jams under steady flow conditions. This presentation will focus on the theory of simulating stationary ice covers, estimating the thickness of wide river ice jams using the ice jam force balance equation, input data requirements, parameter selection, and simulation results.

Notes: Webinar information: https://www.gotomeeting.com/register/212694145. For questions about this seminar please contact Pedro.Restrepo@noaa.gov.


What Americans Really Think About Climate Change - Attitude Formation and Change in Response to a Raging Scientific Controversy

Thursday, 08 March 2007; 12:00 - 13:00 ETZ (SSMC-4, Room 1W611, NOS seminar)

Speaker: Dr. Jon A Krosnick (Stanford University)

Email: krosnick@stansford.edu

Abstract: During the past decade, many scientific experts have been frustrated by the American public's apparent indifference to climate change and the threats it may pose. Just a few weeks ago, a headline on newspapers across the country proclaimed: "Scientists and the American Public Disagree Sharply Over Global Warming." Is it really true? Do Americans really not yet accept the opinions of scientific experts on climate change? In this presentation, Professor Jon Krosnick will present findings from a series of national surveys that he has designed and conducted since 1996, tracking what Americans do and do not believe on this issue and what they do and do not want to have done about it. The survey results are surprising in many ways. Dr. Krosnick is the Frederic O. Glover Professor in Humanities and Social Sciences and professor of communication, political science, and psychology at Stanford University. For 25 years, Professor Krosnick has conducted research exploring how the American public's political attitudes are formed, change, and shape thinking and action. He is principal investigator of the American National Election Study, the nation's preeminent academic project exploring voter decision-making and political campaign effects. A widely-recognized expert on questionnaire design and survey research methodology, he is a senior fellow at the Woods Institute for the Environment at Stanford, which supported his most recent survey on Americans' attitudes on the environment conducted in collaboration with ABC News and Time magazine.

Notes: Presentations are typically available by video, webcast, and phone. For video, contact nos.video.conference@noaa.gov. Please allow adequate time for testing of connections (24 hours or more) if you do not regularly connect with NOS. For phone, dial 866-541-1377, passcode 142625. For webcast: 1. Go to the My Meetings website. 2. Enter the required fields. (Meeting Number: 741804628; Passcode: NCCOS1305; Meeting Host: Science Seminar Host) 3. Indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy. 4. Click on Proceed. 5. Dial into the phone so you can hear too! (NOS staff: instructions for Instant Net Conference and Video Stream can be found at this internal NOS website). For questions, please contact Felix A. Martinez (301-713-3338 x153). **THIS SEMINAR WILL NOT BE AVAILABLE VIA VIDEO LINK**


Caribbean Decision Support System

Tuesday, 13 March 2007; 12:00 - 13:00 ETZ (SSMC-4, Room #8150, NOS seminar)

Speaker: Dr. Steve Schill (The Nature Conservancy)

Email: sschill@tnc.org

Abstract: The Nature Conservancy and its partners developed the Caribbean Decision Support System (CDSS) as a tool to improve the linkage between biodiversity conservation objectives and such human development-related programs as disaster mitigation/response/planning, economic growth (especially tourism and fishing), and land and water use planning. The effort began over four years ago, when the Conservancy and its partners undertook an intensive Ecoregional Assessment of the Greater Caribbean Basin. The effort included a detailed examination of both the region's biological diversity and its socioeconomic factors. It represents the most comprehensive database of biodiversity and socio-economic information in existence for the Greater Caribbean basin. Despite many successes, conservation-planning efforts often overlook potential links to human activities and human-development related programs largely because biodiversity analysis is often focused exclusively on biological patterns and processes. Similarly, planning for human development activities is largely focused on sector-specific interventions, without consideration of the clear linkages between biodiversity health and human well-being. The CDSS was developed to help to bridge this gap. The CDSS can help address such key strategic questions as: Where are healthy ecosystem services most critical for local and national-scale economic development (especially tourism and fishing)? Where are human and biological communities most vulnerable to disaster? Where will unregulated tourism development seriously affect the viability and resilience of representative networks of conservation areas and threaten both species and natural processes? 

Notes: Presentations are typically available by video, webcast, and phone. For video, contact nos.video.conference@noaa.gov. Please allow adequate time for testing of connections (24 hours or more) if you do not regularly connect with NOS. For phone, dial 866-541-1377, passcode 142625. For webcast: 1. Go to the My Meetings website. 2. Enter the required fields. (Meeting Number: 741804628; Passcode: NCCOS1305; Meeting Host: Science Seminar Host) 3. Indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy. 4. Click on Proceed. 5. Dial into the phone so you can hear too! (NOS staff: instructions for Instant Net Conference and Video Stream can be found at this internal NOS website.) For questions, please contact Felix A. Martinez (301-713-3338 x153).


Responses and feedbacks of the land surface to changes in climate: Policy implications
Thursday 15 March 2007; 12:00 -13:00h ETZ (SSMC3, Room 4817, NODC Seminar)

Speaker: Dr. Paul Higgins (Senior Policy Fellow, American Meteorological Society)

Email: phiggins@ametsoc.org

Abstract: Different species, populations, and individuals disperse and migrate at different rates. The rate of movement that occurs in response to changes in climate, whether fast or slow, will shape the distribution of natural ecosystems in the decades to come. This talk examines how vegetation's capacity to disperse and migrate may affect biophysical and biogeochemical characteristics of the land surface under anthropogenic climate change. I will demonstrate that the effectiveness of plant migration strongly influences carbon storage, evapotranspiration, and the absorption of solar radiation by the land surface. As a result, changes in the magnitude, and in some cases the sign, of feedbacks from the land surface to the climate system occur. Therefore, future climate projections depend on much better understanding of and accounting for dispersal and migration. Furthermore, these results have potentially significant implications for climate policy. Society faces four possible approaches to addressing the threat posed by climate change: 1) allow impacts to occur and then deal with them, 2) reduce emissions of greenhouse gases in order to reduce the magnitude of climate change, 3) build our capacity to deal with climate impacts when they occur, and 4) deploy additional global changes that seek to balance the impact of rising greenhouse gas concentrations. How we balance the competing risks and opportunities associated with each approach is primarily a question of values not scientific knowledge. Nevertheless, accounting for biological responses and feedbacks implies a shift in policy preferences toward avoidance of impacts relative to adaptation. 

About the Speaker: Dr. Paul Higgins is a senior policy fellow at the American Meteorological Society in Washington, DC. His current policy interests include: US climate policy, incentives to promote international cooperation, policy measures that reduce distributional costs and maximize economy-wide benefits, and links between climate change, health, and energy security. He also oversees the Congressional Science Fellowship (see http://www.ametsoc.org/atmospolicy/bios/higginsbio.html).

Notes: VideoTeleConferencing (VTC)/phone available upon request by contacting Cheryl Ingram (Cheryl.Ingram@noaa.gov) at least a day before the seminar. For questions about this seminar, please contact Hernan Garcia (301-713-3290 x184).


Toxic Free Radical Produced by Pfiesteria piscicida: A New Paradigm in Marine Toxins

Monday, 19 March 2007; 12:00-13:00 ETZ (SSMC-3, Room #4527, NOS seminar)

Speaker: Dr. Peter Moeller (Lead, Toxin/Natural Products Chemistry Program), NOS/NNCOS/Hollings Marine Laboratory

Email: peter.moeller@noaa.gov

Abstract: Metal-containing organic toxins produced by Pfiesteria piscicida are responsible for highly toxic free radical production. These unstable compounds were characterized for the first time by corroborating data generated from a number of analytical chemistry techniques including EPR, NMR, and mass spectrometry. The toxicity of the metal-containing toxins is due to metal-mediated free radical production. The ephemeral nature of these radical species explains the observed on/off nature of toxicity associated with Pfiesteria, as well as previously reported difficulty in observing the molecular target. This discovery represents the first formal isolation and characterization of a radical forming toxic organic-ligated metal complex isolated from estuarine/marine dinoflagellates. Reported findings underscore the active role of metals interacting with biological systems in the estuarine environment. 

Notes: Presentations are typically available by video, webcast, and phone. For video, contact nos.video.conference@noaa.gov. Please allow adequate time for testing of connections (24 hours or more) if you do not regularly connect with NOS. For phone, dial 866-541-1377, passcode 142625. For webcast: 1. Go to the My Meetings website. 2. Enter the required fields. (Meeting Number: 741804628; Passcode: NCCOS1305; Meeting Host: Science Seminar Host) 3. Indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy. 4. Click on Proceed. 5. Dial into the phone so you can hear too! (NOS staff: instructions for Instant Net Conference and Video Stream can be found at this internal NOS website.) For questions, please contact Felix A. Martinez (301-713-3338 x153). **THIS SEMINAR WILL NOT BE AVAILABLE VIA VIDEO LINK**
Ecosystem-based management in the real world

Tuesday, 27 March 2007; 12:00-13:00 ETZ (SSMC-4, Room #8150, NOS seminar)

Speaker: Josh Sladek Nowlis (NOAA Fisheries/Southeast Fisheries Science Center)

Email: Joshua.Nowlis@noaa.gov

Abstract: Current efforts towards ecosystem-based management are in peril of being deemed ineffective or irrelevant. Though these high-risk, high-reward approaches have a place, we have put little focus on practical steps we can take to add better ecological understanding to existing observational and modeling capabilities used to manage living marine resources. A diverse set of colleagues and I have provided a number of illustrations of how to do this. In the San Andrés archipelago, Colombia, we devised a habitat classification system and proved it captured the spatial ecology of the local coral reef ecosystems. The classification system allowed us to increase the statistical power of our monitoring, and the Colombian government to guide management decisions. My graduate student and I are applying the same concept to pelagic fisheries, using satellite-derived oceanographic characteristics to define habitats. In Hawaii, we used ecological techniques and understanding, along with the invaluable unfished reference area encompassed by the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands Marine National Monument, to preliminarily assess nearly 60 previously unassessed species simultaneously—an unprecedented feat. Our assessments highlighted the complex ecological effects of fishing and allowed us to test the degree to which closed areas in the main Hawaiian Islands adequately represent pristine ecosystems. Finally, an understanding of ecology and system planning have allowed colleagues and I to better inform managers of the trade-offs inherent in fishery management decisions. Some basic trade-offs are a direct result of the properties of production in fished species. Understanding these properties sheds light on how to manage trade-offs, which was the basis of an evaluation of the total allowable catch-setting system for North Pacific groundfish. That evaluation indicated that more attention might be paid to the resiliency, or sustainability, of the systems used for less-studied species. Similar techniques were used to illustrate the value of a more conservative rebuilding strategy for Gulf of Mexico vermilion snapper. Together, these studies show that the use of ecology, combined with an understanding of management objectives and needs, can strengthen our management of living marine resources in real-world situations.

Notes: Presentations are typically available by video, webcast, and phone. For video, contact nos.video.conference@noaa.gov. Please allow adequate time for testing of connections (24 hours or more) if you do not regularly connect with NOS. For phone, dial 866-541-1377, passcode 142625. For webcast: 1. Go to the My Meetings website. 2. Enter the required fields. (Meeting Number: 741804628; Passcode: NCCOS1305; Meeting Host: Science Seminar Host) 3. Indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy. 4. Click on Proceed. 5. Dial into the phone so you can hear too! (NOS staff: instructions for Instant Net Conference and Video Stream can be found at this internal NOS website). For questions, please contact Felix A. Martinez (301-713-3338 x153).
Carbon Cycle in the Arctic as a part of the Global Carbon Cycle

Thursday 29 March 2007; 11:00 -12:00h ETZ (SSMC3, Room 4817, NODC Seminar)

Speaker: Dr. Olga Alexandrova (P.P. Shirshov Institute of Oceanology, Russian Academy of Sciences)

Email: Olga.Alexandrova@asu.edu

Abstract: The Global Carbon Cycle (GCC) determines the main parameters of biosphere. These parameters include gas exchange between ocean, atmosphere and geosphere, fluxes of greenhouse gases such as CO2 and CH4, affecting the global climate; GCC has a large influence on bioproductivity, microbiological activity, and transformation of biogenic substances. Carbon fluxes in the ocean and exchange between different reservoirs are one of the main focuses of the studies conducted in the P.P. Shirshov Institute of Oceanology of Russian Academy of Sciences. Arctic Carbon Cycle was recognized as an important part of the GCC because of the large stores of carbon in the region. A contemporary picture of the stocks and fluxes of the carbon cycle in the Arctic and the role of the Arctic in the contemporary global carbon cycle is discussed.
About the Speaker: Dr. Alexandrova is visiting NODC from March 28-30, 2007. For questions, please contact Igor.Smolyar@noaa.gov.

Notes: VideoTeleConferencing (VTC)/phone available upon request by contacting Cheryl Ingram (Cheryl.Ingram@noaa.gov) at least a day before the seminar. For questions about this seminar, please contact Hernan Garcia (301-713-3290 x184).

Endocrine Disruption Research at the National Fisheries Research and Development Institute (NFRDI) in South Korea

Friday, 30 March 2007; 12:00-13:00 ETZ (SSMC-4, Room #8150, NOS seminar)

Speaker(s): Drs. Minkyu Choi and Un-Ki Hwang (NFRDI, Ministry of Maritime Affairs and Fisheries)

Email(s): mkchoi@momaf.go.kr and vngi@nfrdi.re.kr

Abstract: Endocrine disruptors are chemicals that can mimic or inhibit natural hormones in the body, and can impact vital life processes including development, growth, metabolism, and reproduction. There is concern that the presence of these chemicals in the environment, for example, could be impacting both economically and ecologically important species of fish. Organic chemicals such as dioxins and metals such as aluminum and cadmium can affect both whole organisms and cell cultures. Drs. Choi and Hwang will be presenting an overview of the endocrine disruption research at NFRDI, including their work to assess chemical contaminant hotspots in Masan Bay near Busan, South Korea, and work to assess the impacts of trace elements on fish hepatocyte cultures.

Notes: Presentations are typically available by video, webcast, and phone. For video, contact nos.video.conference@noaa.gov. Please allow adequate time for testing of connections (24 hours or more) if you do not regularly connect with NOS. For phone, dial 866-541-1377, passcode 142625. For webcast: 1. Go to the My Meetings website. 2. Enter the required fields. (Meeting Number: 741804628; Passcode: NCCOS1305; Meeting Host: Science Seminar Host) 3. Indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy. 4. Click on Proceed. 5. Dial into the phone so you can hear too! (NOS staff: instructions for Instant Net Conference and Video Stream can be found at this internal NOS website). For questions about this seminar, please contact Felix A. Martinez (301-713-3338 x153).


Back to top

April 2007

X-Informatics – From Raw Data to Information and Knowledge

Monday, 02 April 2007; 13:30-14:30 ETZ
(SSMC-2 Room 8246, Office of Hydrologic Development Seminar)

Speaker: Peter Bajcsy (Research Scientist at National Center for Supercomputing Applications [NCSA], Adjunct Assistant Professor in CS and ECE Departments at University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign [UIUC]).

Abstract: This talk will present a common foundation of X-informatics from a computer science perspective. As the information technology reaches multiple scientific disciplines, scientists in several domains tackle the problems of going from raw data/measurements to information and knowledge, frequently denoted as informatics. The complexity of these informatics problems requires inter-disciplinary expertise that bridges boundaries across hardware, software and domain users (hence referred to as X-informatics). This talk will provide several examples of geo-, hydro-, bio-, medical image-, document- and sensor-informatics solutions drawing from our research that will lead to a common foundation of X-informatics from a computer science perspective. The common foundation blocks of X-informatics will include methodologies and scientific frameworks for data source understanding, data representation and management, data integration, feature extraction, feature selection, analysis and synthesis, creation of cyber-environments and gathering of lineage information as would be demonstrated by examples from the scientific disciplines, such as agriculture, environmental engineering, hydrology, structural engineering, biology, clinical medicine, neuroscience, and ophthalmology, as well as from military, homeland security and education.

About the speaker: Peter Bajcsy has earned his Ph.D. degree from the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, IL, 1997, and M.S. degree from the Electrical Engineering Department, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, 1994. He is currently with the National Center for Supercomputing Applications at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Illinois, working as a research scientist on problems related to (1) theoretical modeling and experimental understanding of multi-instrument measurement systems generating multi-dimensional multi-variate data, (2) automation of common image pre-processing and analysis tasks, and (3) development of cyber-environments. In the past, he had worked on real-time machine vision problems for semiconductor industry and synthetic aperture radar (SAR) technology for government contracting industry. He has developed several software systems for automatic feature extraction, feature selection, segmentation, classification, tracking and statistical modeling from electro-optical, SAR, laser and hyperspectral data sets. Dr. Bajcsy’s scientific interests include image and signal processing, statistical data analysis, data mining, pattern recognition, novel sensor technology, and computer and machine vision.

Notes: Please join Prof. Peter Bajcsy from NCSA on Monday, April 2 at 1:30 PM Eastern Daylight Time at https://www.gotomeeting.com/join/585725087 .

Conference Call: Telecon: 1-877-774-5038 Passcode: 925335# Meeting ID: 585-725-087. For questions about this seminar please contact Pedro.Restrepo@noaa.gov.


Elwha and Glines Canyon Dam Removals: An overview of upcoming Pacific Northwest nearshore ecosystem restoration

Wednesday, 4 April 2007; 3:00-4:00 pm (SSMC-3, Room #15836, NMFS Office of Habitat Conservation Seminar)

Speaker: Anne Shaffer (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife)

Email: shaffjas@dfw.wa.gov

Abstract: Anne Shaffer will be presenting an overview of her work on the nearshore component of the Elwha River dam removals and restoration. She is a marine habitat biologist with the Science Division of the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife and the coordinator of the Elwha Nearshore consortium, a group of approximately 20 scientists and managers dedicated to promoting and understanding, at an ecosystem scale, the nearshore habitat restoration associated with the Elwha dam removals. Ms. Shaffer's work over the last twenty years has focused on nearshore: upland interactions as well as ecosystem management and applied research of nearshore habitats. Presentation available on-line: You can download Anne's power point presentation from the NMFS ftp site at ftp://hqftp.nmfs.noaa.gov. You must use internet explorer to access the site and then use the following information: login: visitor; password: fishtail (Both are cap-sensitive; use lowercase). The presentation is called Elwha.

Notes: Call in available (1-866-423-3432; Leader Code: 6882916; Participant Code: 4941511). Further questions, please contact Kimberly.Lellis@noaa.gov and Jennifer.Koss@noaa.gov.


New opportunities in beach water quality monitoring

Wednesday, 11 April 2007; 12:00 – 13:00 ETZ (SSMC-4, Room #8150, NOS seminar)

Speaker(s): Stephen B. Weisberg (Executive Director; Southern California Coastal Water Research Project Authority)

Email(s): stevew@sccwrp.org

Abstract: Beach water quality is presently assessed using culture-based measurements of enterococcus and fecal coliform indicator bacteria. The advent of molecular methods provides new opportunities to improve upon these decades-old procedures. Molecular methods provide the means for measuring existing indicators faster and to expand the range of possible target organisms for such assessments. This talk will introduce the Southern California Coastal Water Research Project Authority and its role in helping to transition these methods out of the laboratory and into routine practice in monitoring California beaches. The talk will describe studies to assess readiness and applicability of rapid methods for measuring existing targets. It will also describe epidemiological studies being conducted to assess whether the health risk relationship associated with new, alternative target organisms improves upon that relationship for existing indicators.

Notes: Presentations are typically available by video, webcast, and phone. For video, contact nos.video.conference@noaa.gov. Please allow adequate time for testing of connections (24 hours or more) if you do not regularly connect with NOS. For phone, dial 866-541-1377, passcode 142625. For webcast: 1. Go to the My Meetings website. 2. Enter the required fields. (Meeting Number: 741804628; Passcode: NCCOS1305; Meeting Host: Science Seminar Host) 3. Indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy. 4. Click on Proceed. 5. Dial into the phone so you can hear too! (NOS staff: instructions for Instant Net Conference and Video Stream can be found at this internal NOS website). For questions about this seminar, please contact Felix A. Martinez (301-713-3338 x153).


Positive feedback and the development of ecosystem disruptive algal blooms

Monday, 16 April 2007; 12:00 – 13:00 ETZ (SSMC-4, Room 8150, NOS seminar)

Speaker(s): William Sunda [Research Chemist, Center for Coastal Fisheries and Habitat Research (CCFHR), NCCOS, NOS]

Email(s): bill.sunda@noaa.gov

Abstract: Harmful algal blooms (HABs) have occurred with increasing frequency in recent years with eutrophication and other anthropogenic alterations of coastal ecosystems. Many of these blooms severely disrupt ecosystem function, and can be referred to as ecosystem disruptive algal blooms (EDABs). These blooms are typically caused by toxic or unpalatable species that decrease grazing rates by herbivores, and thereby disrupt transfer of nutrients and energy to higher trophic levels, and decrease nutrient recycling. Many factors, such as nutrient availability and herbivore grazing have been proposed to separately influence EDAB dynamics, but interactions among these factors have rarely been considered. Here we describe positive feedback interactions among nutrient availability, herbivore grazing, and nutrient cycling, which can substantially influence the dynamics of EDAB events. The positive feedbacks result from reduced grazing rates on EDAB species, which promote the proliferation of these algae and decrease grazer-mediated recycling of nutrients. These effects in turn decrease nutrient availability. Since many EDAB species are well-adapted to nutrient-stressed conditions and many exhibit increased toxin production and toxicity under nutrient limitation, positive feedbacks are established which can greatly increase the rate of bloom development, and promote bloom persistence and adverse effects. Conceptual and numerical modeling of these interactions will be presented.

Notes:
Presentations are typically available by video, webcast, and phone. For video, contact nos.video.conference@noaa.gov. Please allow adequate time for testing of connections (24 hours or more) if you do not regularly connect with NOS. For phone, dial 866-541-1377, passcode 142625. For webcast: 1. Go to the My Meetings website. 2. Enter the required fields. (Meeting Number: 741804628; Passcode: NCCOS1305; Meeting Host: Science Seminar Host) 3. Indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy. 4. Click on Proceed. 5. Dial into the phone so you can hear too! (NOS staff: instructions for Instant Net Conference and Video Stream can be found at this internal NOS website.)


Census of Marine Life Program Overview (CoML)
16 April 2007; 11:45 AM to 12:45 PM (SSMC 3, Room 11836; Office of Ocean Exploration Seminar)

Speaker(s): Dr. Andy Rosenberg (University of New Hampshire)

Abstract: This seminar will speak to the program’s genesis, its overarching research mission & goals, and its implementation framework.

Notes: All Office of Ocean Exploration Census of Marine Life (CoML) “Making Ocean Life Count” Lunchtime Seminar seminars are listed at http://explore.noaa.gov/about/seminar.html. Presentations will be available by phone and webcast. For phone, dial 1-877-973-0627, passcode: 530761. A live video webcast feed will be available for remote users at www.explore.noaa.gov. For questions please contact: Reginald.Beach@noaa.gov, Margot.Bohan@noaa.gov, and/or Nicolas.Alvarado@noaa.gov.



History of Marine Animal Populations (HMAP)

Tuesday, 17 April 2007; 11:45 AM to 12:45 PM (SSMC 4, Room 10153; Office of Ocean Exploration Seminar)

Speaker(s): Dr. Jeff Bolster (University of New Hampshire) Abstract: This seminar will focus on the historical component of CoML that aims to improve our understanding of ecosystem dynamics, specifically with regard to long-term changes in stock abundance, the ecological impact of large-scale harvesting by man, & the role of marine resources in historical development of human society. About the speaker: W. Jeffrey Bolster is a member of the Department of History at the University of New Hampshire, where he holds the James H. and Claire Short Hayes Chair in the Humanities. He has held fellowships from the Smithsonian Institution and the NEH, and he served one year as the Fulbright Distinguished Chair in American Studies at the University of Southern Denmark. Before training as a maritime historian at Brown University (M.A.) and the Johns Hopkins University, (Ph.D.) he went to sea for ten years as a licensed master and mate on oceanographic research vessels and sailing schoolships. Best known for his prize-winning book Black Jacks: African American Seamen in the Age of Sail (Harvard, 1997) he has also published on the environmental history of coastal New England. He is currently part of the HMAP team (History of Marine Animal Populations) at UNH, which is reconstructing abundance and distribution of mid-nineteenth-century cod stocks on the Scotian Shelf and in the Gulf of Maine.

Notes: All Office of Ocean Exploration Census of Marine Life (CoML) “Making Ocean Life Count” Lunchtime Seminar seminars are listed at http://explore.noaa.gov/about/seminar.html. Presentations will be available by phone and webcast. For phone, dial 1-877-973-0627, passcode: 530761. A live video webcast feed will be available for remote users at www.explore.noaa.gov.

For questions please contact: Reginald.Beach@noaa.gov, Margot.Bohan@noaa.gov, and/or Nicolas.Alvarado@noaa.gov.


The international Global Earth Observation System of Systems (GEOSS)
Tuesday, 17 April 2007; 19:00h ETZ (SSMC-2, Room 2358; NWS / IEEE Women in Engineering Seminar)

Speaker: Helen Wood (NOAA's GEOSS Integration Manager)

Email: Helen.Wood@noaa.gov

Abstract: Ms. Wood will give a brief overview of the international Global Earth Observation System of Systems activity and the U.S. national effort, with particular focus on expected societal benefits from this important initiative. The intergovernmental Group on Earth Observations (GEO) is leading a worldwide effort to build a Global Earth Observation System of Systems -- termed GEOSS. This is an activity that the U.S. initiated in 2003. Its purpose is to provide comprehensive, coordinated Earth observations from thousands of sensors worldwide, transforming the data they collect into vital information for society. Since its inception, some 66 governments and more than 40 international organizations have joined the activity from around the world. Back home, the U.S. has formed a national, interagency planning and coordination committee, USGEO, that reports to the President's National Science and Technology Council.

About the speaker: Helen Wood is a senior advisor for the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). In her previous position, she directed near real-time data processing, analysis and distribution operations for NOAA's fleet of environmental satellites. She has had extensive experience with the GEOSS activity both nationally and internationally. She served as Director of the Secretariat for the intergovernmental Group on Earth Observations from its formation in 2003 until September 2005. In June 2006, she was designated the NOAA GEOSS Integration Manager. Recently she was appointed co-chair of the USGEO subcommittee.

Notes: Please RSVP by 13 April 2007 by contacting Deirdre.R.Jones@noaa.gov, Varetta.Huggins@noaa.gov, or RosDiana.Ginocchi@noaa.gov. Light snacks will be provided before the meeting at 6:30 p.m., and afterwards everyone is welcome to join us at a nearby restaurant for food, drinks, networking, and socializing.

Patterns & Processes of the Ecosystems of the Northern Mid-Atlantic (MAR-ECO)

Thursday, 19 April 2007; 11:45 AM to 12:45 PM (SSMC 4, Room 10153; Office of Ocean Exploration Seminar)

Speaker(s): Dr. Mike Vecchione, NMFS National Systematics Laboratory

Abstract: MAR-ECO is an international research project including scientists from 16 nations. Norway, represented by the Institute of Marine Research and the University of Bergen, co-ordinates the project which will enhance our understanding of occurrence, distribution and ecology of animals and animal communities along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge between Iceland and the Azores. The Mid-Atlantic Ridge is the volcanic mountain range in the middle of the ocean, marking the spreading zone between the Eurasian and American continental plates. The groups of animals being studied include fishes, crustaceans, cephalopods and a wide range of gelatinous animals (e.g. jellyfishes and siphonophores) living either near the seabed or in midwater above the ridge.

About the speaker: Born in a town called Neptune, Michael Vecchione went to sea as a cabin boy on a three-masted schooner in Maine at the age of 16. He completed undergraduate studies in biology at the University of Miami in 1972, and then spent four and a half years as a U.S. Army officer. He has been working on cephalopods since his graduate studies on planktonic molluscs during 1976-79 at the Virginia Institute of Marine Science (VIMS), the School of Marine Science for the College of William and Mary. After receiving the Ph.D degree there, he worked briefly for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service before accepting a faculty position at McNeese State University where he studied cephalopods, zooplankton, and ichthyoplankton in addition to teaching from 1981-86. In 1986 he moved to his present position as Cephalopod Biologist at the National Systematics Laboratory (NSL), a NOAA Fisheries lab located at the National Museum of Natural History where he is a Research Associate of the Smithsonian Institution. He has been Director of the NSL since 1997. He also established and served from 2000-2002 as Director of a Cooperative Marine Education and Research program at VIMS, where he is an adjunct faculty member. Vecchione is a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and Past-President of the Cephalopod International Advisory Council.

Notes: All Office of Ocean Exploration Census of Marine Life (CoML) “Making Ocean Life Count” Lunchtime Seminar seminars are listed at http://explore.noaa.gov/about/seminar.html. Presentations will be available by phone and webcast. For phone, dial 1-877-973-0627, passcode: 530761. A live video webcast feed will be available for remote users at www.explore.noaa.gov. For questions please contact: Reginald.Beach@noaa.gov, Margot.Bohan@noaa.gov, and/or Nicolas.Alvarado@noaa.gov.


COMARGE Relevance to NOAA 2010 and beyond: Understanding and Managing the Largest Steep-Gradients Environment on Earth

24 April 2007; 11:45 AM to 12:45 PM (SSMC 4, Room 8150; Office of Ocean Exploration Seminar)

Speaker(s): Dr. Bob Carney, Lousiana State University

Abstract: COMARGE (Continental MARGins Ecosystems) is a Census of Marine Life project seeking to understand bottom and near-bottom ecosystems from the edge of the continental shelf to the slope base (~200 – 3500m). This system is characterized by steeper physical gradients than encountered elsewhere in the ocean: photic to dark, warm to cold, food-rich to food-poor, sands to clay sediments, from moderate to crushing hydrostatic pressure, etc. In yet poorly understood ways these gradients may be the cause of dramatic bathymetric gradients in species composition, decreasing biomass, and biodiversity. NOAA’s limited activity in COMARGE-type research mirrors a more pervasive lack of US activity in a vast ecosystem heavily investigated for scientific resource management by EU nations, Russia, Australia, and Japan. Dr. Carney’s seminar will describe the COMARGE perspective on steep-gradient ecosystems, briefly describe on-going at-sea efforts, and consider NOAA’s appropriate role in coming years. COMARGE is supported by a grant from the A.P. Sloan Foundation to Dr. Carney at LSU. The project is managed as an international effort among LSU, IFREMER, and Institut Oceanographic, Paris. Dr. Myriam Sibuet serves with Dr. Carney as Co-Directors.

About the speaker: Bob Carney is a professor of Oceanography and Coastal Studies at LSU and has served there in various administrative, academic, and research roles for 20 years. He has maintained a continuous interest in deep benthic ecosystems since his first cruise aboard the R/V Eastward as a Duke undergrad in 1967. Graduate work was begun at Texas A&M and completed at Oregon State in 1976 following an interruption for military service. At both universities he studied the spatial distributions of echinoderms collected in systematic trawling surveys. His “in residence” Washington experience began as a Smithsonian postdoc in 1977 and ended in 1981 after three years at NSF where he was Director of the Biological Oceanography Program. Funding from Sea Grant, NURP, and OE has been critical to his deep-sea research along with support from NSF, ONR, MMS, and EPA. Service to NOAA includes committee and review participation beginning in 1979 for Sea Grant, NOAA-supported NRC committees, NURP, OE, and NODC.

Notes: All Office of Ocean Exploration Census of Marine Life (CoML) “Making Ocean Life Count” Lunchtime Seminar seminars are listed at http://explore.noaa.gov/about/seminar.html. Presentations will be available by phone and webcast. For phone, dial 1-877-973-0627, passcode: 530761. A live video webcast feed will be available for remote users at www.explore.noaa.gov. For questions please contact: Reginald.Beach@noaa.gov, Margot.Bohan@noaa.gov, and/or Nicolas.Alvarado@noaa.gov.


A Global Census of Life Marine Life on Seamounts (CenSeam)

25 April 2007; 11:45 AM to 12:45 PM (SSMC 4, Room 10153; Office of Ocean Exploration Seminar)

Speaker(s):
Dr. Tim Shank, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

Abstract: The CenSeam science plan is focused on 3 questions: (1) What factors drive seamount community structure, diversity, and endemism, both at the scale of whole seamounts and individual habitats within seamounts? (2) What key processes operate to cause differences between seamounts, and between seamount and non-seamount regions? (3) What are the impacts of fisheries on seamount community structure and function? This seminar will address what CenSeam has accomplished to date and what the future holds in terms of increasing our knowledge and understanding of these important but little known ecosystems.

Notes: All Office of Ocean Exploration Census of Marine Life (CoML) “Making Ocean Life Count” Lunchtime Seminar seminars are listed at http://explore.noaa.gov/about/seminar.html. Presentations will be available by phone and webcast. For phone, dial 1-877-973-0627, passcode: 530761. A live video webcast feed will be available for remote users at www.explore.noaa.gov. For questions please contact: Reginald.Beach@noaa.gov, Margot.Bohan@noaa.gov, and/or Nicolas.Alvarado@noaa.gov.


Census of Marine Zooplankton (CMarZ)

26 April 2007; 11:45 AM to 12:45 PM
(SSMC 3, Room 13836; Office of Ocean Exploration Seminar)

Speaker(s): Dr. Ann Bucklin, University of Connecticut Abstract: This seminar will address how CMarZ is striving to attain a more complete knowledge of biodiversity hotspots and unexplored ocean regions, new understanding of the functional role of biodiversity in ocean ecosystems, and better characterization of global-scale patterns of zooplankton biodiversity in the world oceans.

Notes: All Office of Ocean Exploration Census of Marine Life (CoML) “Making Ocean Life Count” Lunchtime Seminar seminars are listed at http://explore.noaa.gov/about/seminar.html. Presentations will be available by phone and webcast. For phone, dial 1-877-973-0627, passcode: 530761. A live video webcast feed will be available for remote users at www.explore.noaa.gov.

For questions please contact: Reginald.Beach@noaa.gov, Margot.Bohan@noaa.gov, and/or Nicolas.Alvarado@noaa.gov.
Fisheries Management Under Cyclical Population Dynamics

Monday 30 April 2007 ; 12:00-13:00h

(SSMC-3, Room 12836; Division of Economics and Social Science Analysis of the Office of Science and Technology Seminar)

Speaker(s): Professor Wolfram Schlenker (Economics Department at Columbia University);

Abstract: Almost all fishery models assume time-invariant parameter values of the underlying biological growth function except for an i.i.d. error term. We present an analysis of the economic implications of cyclical growth parameters in both single and multi-species models, which are frequently observed in many real-world fisheries. Neither optimal harvest rates nor optimal escapement (remaining fish stock after fishing) remain constant as standard models would predict. The amplitude of the optimal escapement is increasing in the amplitude of the biological growth function. Moreover, the optimal harvest rate lags the cycle of the biological growth function, i.e., the highest harvest rate is observed after biological conditions have started to decline and the optimal escapement level has already decreased. This is in sharp contrast to current policies which are in phase with biological conditions and hence imply an increase/decrease in harvest quotas when the biological system is improving/deteriorating. In our model, harvest closures are only optimal during time periods when growth parameters are improving most rapidly.

Notes: For questions about this seminar please contact Michelle.McGregor@noaa.gov



Back to top

May 2007

The Farm Bill, Biofuels and Health of Our Coastal Ecosystems

Tuesday, 01 May 2007; 11:30 – 12:30 ETZ (SSMC-4, Room #8150, NOS seminar)

Speaker(s): Dr. Thomas W. Simpson (College of Agricultural and Natural Resources, University of Maryland) Email(s): tsimpson@umd.edu

Abstract: Currently, the most widespread pollution threat to the Nation’s coastal waters is from nutrients with an estimated two-thirds of coastal rivers and bays moderately to severely degraded from nutrient pollution. This pollution has led to multiple impacts on coastal waters including hypoxia (i.e. “dead zones”), loss of seagrass beds, degradation of coral reefs, alterations of food webs and increases in harmful algal blooms. The largest single contributor overall to nutrients entering the Nation’s coastal waters in many locations, such as the Gulf of Mexico and Chesapeake Bay which both have large hypoxic zones in summer, is from nonpoint source agricultural runoff. By far the largest source of funding for programs that have multiple benefits, including the control of nonpoint sources of nutrients, is contained within the USDA conservation programs of the Farm Bill. The U.S. Ocean Commission in 2004 recommended that “The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) should align its conservation programs and funding with other programs aimed at reducing nonpoint source pollution, such as those of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.” The Farm Bill is expected to be reauthorized this year and there have been many calls for its programs that reduce polluted runoff to be strengthened. Recent and dramatic trends in agriculture, driven by the push to produce ethanol from corn and other crops, threaten to increase nutrient runoff, further highlighting the urgency of addressing this issue. Several existing and innovative agricultural programs that have a high potential to reduce nutrient runoff will be discussed along with suggestions on how to increase their application and strategic targeting through changes to the Farm Bill. Connections between the Farm Bill and biofuel trends will also be discussed.

Notes: Presentations are typically available via video, phone/webcast. For video: contact nos.video.conference@noaa.gov for information on setting connection. Please allow adequate time for testing of connections (24 hours or more) if you do not regularly connect with NOS. For phone: dial 866-541-1377, passcode 142625. For webcast: 1. Go to My Meetings, enter meeting number 449707376 and passcode NOS8150 if needed; 2) Enter other required fields; 3) Indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy; 4) Click on Proceed; 5) Dial into the phone so you can hear presentation.


Census of Marine Life Gulf of Mexico Area Program (GoMEX)

01 May 2007; 11:45 AM to 12:45 PM (SSMC 3, Room 13836; Office of Ocean Exploration Seminar)

Speaker(s): Dr. Wes Tunnel, Texas A&M University

Abstract: TBD

Notes: All Office of Ocean Exploration Census of Marine Life (CoML) "Making Ocean Life Count" Lunchtime Seminar seminars are listed at http://explore.noaa.gov/about/seminar.html. Presentations will be available by phone and webcast. For phone, dial 1-877-973-0627, passcode: 530761. A live video webcast feed will be available for remote users at www.explore.noaa.gov. For questions please contact: Reginald.Beach@noaa.gov, Margot.Bohan@noaa.gov, and/or Nicolas.Alvarado@noaa.gov.


Biogeography of Deepwater Chemosynthetic Ecosystems (ChEss)

02 May 2007; 11:45 AM to 12:45 PM (SSMC 3, Room 13836; Office of Ocean Exploration Seminar)

Speaker(s): Dr. Chris German, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

Abstract: TBD

Notes: All Office of Ocean Exploration Census of Marine Life (CoML) “Making Ocean Life Count” Lunchtime Seminar seminars are listed at http://explore.noaa.gov/about/seminar.html. Presentations will be available by phone and webcast. For phone, dial 1-877-973-0627, passcode: 530761. A live video webcast feed will be available for remote users at www.explore.noaa.gov. For questions please contact: Reginald.Beach@noaa.gov, Margot.Bohan@noaa.gov, and/or Nicolas.Alvarado@noaa.gov.


What is GEOSS and Why Do We Care?

Wednesday 02 May 2007; 1200 -1300h ETZ
(SSMC3, 2nd Floor, NOAA Library Seminar)

Speaker: Helen Wood (NOAA's GEOSS Integration Manager)

Email: Helen.Wood@noaa.gov

Abstract: GEOSS stands for the Global Earth Observation System of Systems. The intergovernmental Group on Earth Observations (GEO) is leading a worldwide effort to build a GEOSS. This is an activity that NOAA and the United States initiated in 2003. Its purpose is to provide comprehensive, coordinated Earth observations from thousands of instruments worldwide, transforming the data they collect into vital information for society. Since then over 65 governments and more than 40 international organizations have joined the activity from around the World. Back home, the US has formed a national, interagency planning and coordination committee, the "USGEO", that reports to the President's National Science and Technology Council. NOAA Administrator Conrad Lautenbacher is the US co-chair of GEO. In June 2005 he named Helen Wood as the NOAA GEOSS Integration Manager. Earlier she served as Director of the Secretariat for the intergovernmental Group on Earth Observations, from its formation in 2003 until September 2005. Recently she was appointed co-chair of the USGEO.

Notes: Call in information: Phone number: 866-631-5469 ; Participant code: 3958086. Powerpoint presentation (pdf; ~2.2MB) of talk available. For questions about this seminar please contact Mary.Lou.Cumberpatch@noaa.gov or Albert.E.Theberge.Jr@noaa.gov (see http://www.lib.noaa.gov/docs/news/news.html).


4th Oceanographic Data Panel Meeting between NODC and the Korea NODC (KODC)

Thursday 03 May 2007; 12:00 -13:00h ETZ (SSMC3, Room 4817, NODC Seminar)

Speakers: Freud Park and Kenneth Casey (NODC)

Email: Freud.Park@noaa.gov & Kenneth.Casey@noaa.gov

Abstract: An informal presentation of highlights of the 4th Oceanographic Data Panel Meeting between NODC and the Korea Oceanographic Data Center (KODC) held on February 27 - March 1, 2007 at the National Fisheries Research and Development Institute (NFRDI) in Busan, Korea.

Notes: VideoTeleConferencing (VTC)/phone available upon request by contacting Cheryl Ingram (Cheryl.Ingram@noaa.gov) at least a day before the seminar. For questions about this seminar, please contact Hernan Garcia (301-713-3290 x184).


In Search of the Holy Grail: Ecological Forecasting in Chesapeake Bay

Friday, 04 May 2007; 12:00 – 13:00 ET (SSMC-4, Room #8150, NOS seminar)

Speaker(s): Raleigh R. Hood, University of Maryland’s Horn Point Laboratory; and Christopher W. Brown, NOAA/NESDIS/Center for Satellite Applications and Research

Email(s): rhood@hpl.umces.edu; christopher.w.brown@noaa.gov

Abstract: We will give an update on our operational modeling efforts aimed at nowcasting and forecasting higher order biological phenomena, specifically focusing on the Sea Nettle (Chrysaora quinquecirrha) and a harmful algal bloom species (Karlodinium veneficum). In addition, we will report on our efforts to develop an open source, operational hydrodynamic and biogeochemical model of Chesapeake Bay that can be used to provide nowcasts and short-term forecasts of physical and biogeochemical properties in situ.

Notes: Presentations are typically available via video, phone/webcast. For video: contact nos.video.conference@noaa.gov for information on setting connection. Please allow adequate time for testing of connections (24 hours or more) if you do not regularly connect with NOS. For phone: dial 866-541-1377, passcode 142625. For webcast: 1. Go to My Meetings, if needed select “join an event” and enter meeting number (449707376) and passcode (NOS8150); 2) Enter other required fields; 3) Indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy; 4) Click on Proceed; 5) Dial into the phone so you can hear presentation.


Census of Marine Life Gulf of Maine Area Program (GoMA)

8 May 2007; 11:45 AM to 12:45 PM (SSMC 4, Room 8150; Office of Ocean Exploration Seminar)

Speaker: Dr. Lew Incze (University of Southern Main)

Abstract: The Gulf of Maine Area Program includes the U.S. and Canada and has three focus areas: (1) explore the biodiversity of the GoM area; (2) help build an understanding of how patterns of biodiversity contribute to over-all functioning of the GoM system; and (3) help establish a framework for applying this understanding toward ecosystem-based approaches to management. These large goals are in part or in whole the subject of other activities and programs in the area as well, but our program is unique in trying to integrate these objectives at the particular scale that we are. I will review achievements to date and developing approaches to this important challenge.

About the speaker: Dr. Incze serves as Chief Scientist for the Gulf of Maine Area Program of the Census of Marine Life. He is a Research Professor in the Department of Environmental Science and Director of the Aquatic Systems Group, both housed in the School of Applied Science, Engineering and Technology at the University of Southern Maine. The Aquatic Systems Group brings together faculty from several departments and colleges within the university to strengthen research and educational opportunities in aquatic systems, including aquatic ecology and related earth sciences, computing, geospatial analysis, policy and planning. He received a B.S. in Biology from Cornell University (1976), a M.S. in Oceanography from the University of Maine (1979), and a Ph.D. in Fisheries from the University of Washington (1983). His research interests include plankton ecology, recruitment dynamics, coupled physical-biological interactions, marine resources and conservation sciences.

Notes: All Office of Ocean Exploration Census of Marine Life (CoML) “Making Ocean Life Count” Lunchtime Seminar seminars are listed at http://explore.noaa.gov/about/seminar.html. Presentations will be available by phone and webcast. For phone, dial 1-877-973-0627, passcode: 530761. A live video webcast feed will be available for remote users at www.explore.noaa.gov. For questions please contact: Reginald.Beach@noaa.gov, Margot.Bohan@noaa.gov, and/or Nicolas.Alvarado@noaa.gov.


Ocean Biogeographic Information System (OBIS)

14 May 2007; 11:45 AM to 12:45 PM (SSMC 4, Room 8150; Office of Ocean Exploration Seminar)

Speaker(s): Dr. Edward Vanden Berghe (Flanders Marine Institute Vlaams Instituut voor de Zee)

Abstract: This seminar will demonstrate why OBIS may be the most authoritative web-based provider of global geo-referenced information on marine species. In addition to gathering and maintaining marine species-level and habitat-level databases, OBIS provides a variety of spatial query tools for visualizing geographical relationships among species, and between species and their environment.

Speaker Bio: Dr Edward Vanden Berghe is the current Executive Director of the Ocean Biogeographic Information System (OBIS), the information component of the Census of Marine Life (CoML), an international discovery program representing a network of more than 1700 researchers in 73 nations engaged in a 10-year initiative to assess and explain the diversity, distribution, and abundance of life in the oceans - past, present, and future. OBIS is the most authoritative web-based provider of global geo-referenced information on marine species. In addition to gathering and maintaining marine species-level and habitat-level databases, it provides a variety of spatial query tools for visualizing geographical relationships among species, and between species and their environment. In his previous position, as Manager of the Flanders Marine Data- and Information Centre (VMDC), Based at the Flanders Marine Institute (VLIZ), he was responsible to manage a small team, developing databases and web applications for marine data and information. Some of the systems were developed on behalf of external, national and international projects; the most important of these is the EU network of excellence on ‘Marine Biodiversity and Ecosystem Functioning (MarBEF)’. Part of the activities for MarBEF was to manage the European Register of Marine Species (ERMS) and the European node of the Ocean Biogeographic Information System (EurOBIS). Before going to VLIZ, Dr Vanden Berghe held various positions in Kenya, an in the Free University Brussels. In Kenya, he was involved in biogeographical data management at the National Museums of Kenya, and in oceanographic data- and information management at the Kenya Marine and Fisheries Research Institute. One of the main issues that have engaged him in recent work is to make biodiversity data available through the internet, free and open for everyone to use - policy issues connected to this, how to ensure that data originators are properly acknowledged, and that contributing data to on-line systems is recognised in career advancement. Another issue driving his professional activities is to try and educate scientists and science students in proper data management, including archiving and submitting research data to deep repositories. Dr Edward Vanden Berghe holds a PhD in Zoology from the Free University Brussels.

Notes: All Office of Ocean Exploration Census of Marine Life (CoML) “Making Ocean Life Count” Lunchtime Seminar seminars are listed at http://explore.noaa.gov/about/seminar.html. Presentations will be available by phone and webcast. For phone, dial 1-877-973-0627, passcode: 530761. A live video webcast feed will be available for remote users at www.explore.noaa.gov. For questions please contact: Reginald.Beach@noaa.gov, Margot.Bohan@noaa.gov, and/or Nicolas.Alvarado@noaa.gov.


Census of the Diversity of Abyssal Marine Life (CeDAMar)

15 May 2007; 11:45 AM to 12:45 PM (SSMC 4, Room 8150; Office of Ocean Exploration Seminar) [Note new location]

Speaker(s): Dr. Craig Smith (University of Hawai’i)

Abstract: The abyssal seafloor is a vast ecosystem, covering more than half of the Earth’s surface, and underlying > 50% of the US exclusive economic zone. Nonetheless, it has remained very poorly studied, with the total area sampled covering but a few hectares. Some previous studies suggest the abyssal seafloor is a major cradle of biodiversity, while others suggest it is largely a diversity “sink.” CeDAMar (the Census of Diversity of Abyssal Marine Life) is an integrated series of international oceanographic expeditions, involving of 150 scientists from 51 institutions in14 countries, designed to address critical gaps in our understanding of the patterns and causes of biodiversity in the abyss. Our results indicate that local biodiversity is extremely high, with 2000 species of bacteria, 250 species of protozoans, and 500 species of invertebrates (worms, crustaceans and molluscs) typically found at single abyssal sites. More than 90% of the thousands of invertebrate species collected during CeDAMar are new to science, highlighting our extremely poor understanding of abyssal diversity and evolution. CeDAMar scientist have applied modern molecular techniques for the first time to the abyssal fauna revealing remarkable distribution patterns that vary with faunal type. Some groups, for example the protozoan foraminiferans, contain species distributed from the Arctic to the Antarctic, demonstrating the existence of cosmopolitan abyssal species. Other faunal groups, such as the polychaete worms and isopod crustaceans, exhibit substantial species turnover over distances of 1500 km, suggesting the individual basins may have developed large numbers of endemic species. Nematode worms, until recently thought to be species poor in the abyss, exhibit a surprising number of apparently unique abyssal taxa, suggesting that the very deep ocean has fostered adaptive radiations, and is not simply a tomb for starving individuals washed from shallower habitats. Unexpectedly, times-series studies at abyssal stations show that populations of echinoderms respond to large-scale, climate-driven changes in the productivity patterns in the upper ocean. Because these abyssal species rely on the export of food through vast volumes of the ocean, their populations appear to be sensitive indicators of ecosystem change in surface waters and the ocean’s interior. Thus, to assess the ocean’s health, to evaluate its levels of biodiversity, and to manage the impacts of human activities (e.g., fishing, mineral extraction and fossil fuel burning), it is imperative to monitor and to continue to explore the abyss, the ocean’s largest ecosystem.

Speaker Bio: Craig Smith is a Professor of Oceanography at the University of Hawaii with strong interests in biodiversity, disturbance ecology and human impacts in seafloor ecosystems. His exploration and conservation efforts have focused on the vast and poorly understood deep-sea, where high diversity, fragile habitats, and slow recovery rates cause ecosystems to be especially sensitive to human impacts. Smith has conducted research in Antarctica, mangroves, submarine canyons, whale-fall communities, cold seeps, continental slopes and abyssal plains to obtain a broad perspective of natural and stressed marine ecosystems. Smith obtained his Ph.D. from Scripps Institution of Oceanography in 1983, and then used a postdoctoral fellowship at Woods Hole Oceanography Institution to explore colonization processes in intertidal communities. Subsequently, he spent four years at the University of Washington, exploring the effects of natural disturbance, mining and radioactive waste disposal on deep-sea communities. In 1988 he moved to the University of Hawaii, where he has organized international projects to address chances of species extinctions from deep-sea mining, and has worked extensively with International Seabed Authority to predict and manage the environmental impacts of nodule mining in the abyssal Pacific. His other research activities, including studies of whale-fall communities and Antarctic food webs, help to elucidate the effects of human activities and global change on marine ecosystems. Smith recently received a Pew Fellowship in Marine Conservation for his conservation work in the vast and poorly understood deep-sea. He has served as Chief Scientist over 50 research expeditions from the equator to Antarctica, has participated in ~220 submersible and ROV dives, and has published over ~100 papers in the scientific literature.

Notes: All Office of Ocean Exploration Census of Marine Life (CoML) “Making Ocean Life Count” Lunchtime Seminar seminars are listed at http://explore.noaa.gov/about/seminar.html. Presentations will be available by phone and webcast. For phone, dial 1-877-973-0627, passcode: 530761. A live video webcast feed will be available for remote users at www.explore.noaa.gov. For questions please contact: Reginald.Beach@noaa.gov, Margot.Bohan@noaa.gov, and/or Nicolas.Alvarado@noaa.gov.


Pacific Ocean Shelf Tracking Project (POST)

16 May 2007; 11:45 AM to 12:45 PM (SSMC 4, Room 10153; Office of Ocean Exploration Seminar)

Speaker(s): Dr. David Welch (Kintama Research Corporation)

Abstract: POST, the Pacific Ocean Shelf Tracking array, is currently the world’s largest telemetry system for studying the movements and survival of marine fish. It is also intended to be the exemplar for the Ocean Tracking Network (the subject of the May 18th talk by Ron O’Dor). OTN is intended to form “an array of POST arrays”, sitting on the continental shelves of all the continents on the planet. As such, it provides a prime example of what the evolving OOS system might look like. POST was one of the Census of Marine Life’s original field projects, a natural fit given the CoML’s focus on distribution, diversity, and abundance of marine life. However, POST is also starting to prove itself in addressing key US policy questions for fisheries, and thereby demonstrating the fundamental linkage between these biological questions and vexing high-level policy issues. POST thus forms an interesting example of how the development of a highly quantitative tool looking at basic biological processes can inform and reinvigorate the science of fisheries management—and ocean research. The operational considerations involved in developing POST include the need for: (A) Developing large-scale and high volume methods for conducting surgery on thousands of test animals while ensuring the highest ethical standards of fish handling and surgical procedures are met; (B) Developing technical methods for deploying and maintaining a very large scale permanent tracking array on the seabed; and (C) Ensuring that the data are recovered in very high yield to validate the array concept and provide meaningful scientific results to justify the support for building (and expanding) the array. I review the technical operation of POST from the twin perspectives of ethical animal use and technical operation of a large-scale engineering system. In the final section of the talk, I review the performance of the array in addressing key policy questions concerning the management of Columbia & Fraser R salmon populations.

Speaker Bio: David Welch received a B.Sc. in Biology and Economics from the University of Toronto and a Ph.D. in Oceanography from Dalhousie University (Halifax, Nova Scotia) in 1985. He is the former head of the Canadian government’s High Seas Salmon Program at DFO, which he started in 1990 after a quarter century hiatus in ocean research on salmon. During the next decade he was responsible for studying the ocean biology of Pacific salmon, and provided some of the first compelling evidence for a potentially profound impact of global warming on Pacific salmon in the ocean. He is the chief architect of the Census of Marine Life’s project POST and President of Kintama Research. Welch started Kintama in 1990 to develop the pioneering technology platform necessary for delivering data from a permanent ocean array capable of directly measuring survival of migrating fish in the ocean. The success of POST can be measured from three perspectives: (1) It is the largest and most complex marine tracking array under single management anywhere in the globe, with a current geographic span of almost 2,500 km; (2) The Canadian Government committed $45M Cdn starting in 2007 to champion the globalization of the POST array as the Ocean Tracking Network; (3) The array is now capable of measuring the movements and survival of fish as small as 12.5 cm year-round, and may be capable of tracking fish as small as 10 cm by 2008. As a result, the marine science community is now on the brink of being able to conduct direct quantitative experimental studies in the ocean on fish of the kind that transformed chemistry and physics one and two centuries ago. Dr Welch has previously acted as scientific spokesman for the World Wildlife Fund on the issue of global warming, and has been invited to testify on the results of his research on the ocean biology of Pacific salmon at the U.S. Senate. Dr Welch speaks fluent Japanese and lives on Vancouver Island in Nanaimo, British Columbia.

Notes: All Office of Ocean Exploration Census of Marine Life (CoML) “Making Ocean Life Count” Lunchtime Seminar seminars are listed at http://explore.noaa.gov/about/seminar.html. Presentations will be available by phone and webcast. For phone, dial 1-877-973-0627, passcode: 530761. A live video webcast feed will be available for remote users at www.explore.noaa.gov. For questions please contact: Reginald.Beach@noaa.gov, Margot.Bohan@noaa.gov, and/or Nicolas.Alvarado@noaa.gov.


AIAA and NOAA are joining together to offer you an opportunity to look at Network Centric Concepts at work in civil government

Wednesday, 16 May 2007 ; 09:00 to 15:00 h ( AIAA and NOAA joint seminars; Location: see notes below)

Speakers: Several speakers (See PDF description)

Abstract: AIAA and NOAA are joining together to offer you an opportunity to look at Network Centric Concepts at work in civil government.

Notes: Starting at 9:00 am and continuing until 3:00 pm (Registration opens at 8:30 and closes at 10:00).

Location: Room 6057, Department of Commerce Headquarters, Herbert C. Hoover Building, 14th Street and Constitution Ave, NW, Washington, DC. Seminars sponsored by the NOAA National Weather Service Office of Science and Technology and the AIAA NetCentric Program Committee, the AIAA Society & Aerospace TC, and the AIAA National Capital Section. The cost is $30.00 for lunch and logistics. For more information and to register, contact Marcie Jones (AIAANATLCAPSEC@aol.com; Phone (301)812-0103) or Tim Howard (timothy.howard@noaa.gov; Phone: (301) 713-1570 x143). Attendance is limited to the first 90 people who register. See PDF description.


International Oceanographic Data and Information Exchange (IODE) 19th Session highlights

Thursday 17 May 2007; 12:00 -13:00h ETZ (SSMC3, Room 4817, NODC Seminar)

Speaker: Robert (Bob) Gelfeld (NODC)

Email: Robert.Gelfeld@noaa.gov

Abstract: The IOC’s International Oceanographic Data and Information Exchange (IODE) was established in 1961 to enhance marine research, exploitation and development by facilitating the exchange of oceanographic data and information between participating Member States and by meeting the needs of users for data and information products. The Nineteenth Session of the IOC Committee on International Oceanographic Data and Information Exchange (IODE-XIX) was held at the Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics (ICTP) in Trieste, Italy between 12 and 16 March 2007. This seminar will describe highlights of this meeting.

Notes: VideoTeleConferencing (VTC)/phone available upon request by contacting Cheryl Ingram (Cheryl.Ingram@noaa.gov) at least a day before the seminar. For questions about this seminar, please contact Hernan Garcia (301-713-3290 x184).


Serving the Coastal Manager: Results of the NOAA Coastal Services Center’s 2006 Coastal Resource Management Customer Survey

Thursday, 17 May 2007; 11:30 – 12:30 ETZ (SSMC-4, Room #8150, NOS seminar)

Speaker(s): Dr. Chris Ellis (NOAA/NOS/Coastal Services Center)

Email(s): Chris.Ellis@noaa.gov

Abstract: The NOAA Coastal Services Center’s primary initiatives address those issues considered most important to coastal managers—hazards, habitats, resilient communities, land and water use, and information access to support sound, informed decision-making. In an effort to assess both customer satisfaction and to better understand the important issues affecting the coastal management community, the Center sponsors a survey every three years to gather such information. The data are then used to establish Center priorities and evaluate its activities. This discussion will highlight survey findings on a variety of topics. Topics include priority coastal management issues, expressed needs for social science tools and support, desired data layers for geographic information system projects, training, and other related decision-support tools and technical assistance. Information will be presented primarily from a national perspective, with select, notable points from various regional U.S. geographies. The 2006 Coastal Resource Management Customer Survey report is currently available on the NOAA Coastal Services Center’s Web site at www.csc.noaa.gov/survey/. This is the fourth such survey; previous surveys were administered in 1996, 1999, and 2002. Notes: Presentations are typically available via video, phone/webcast. For video: contact nos.video.conference@noaa.gov for information on setting connection. Please allow adequate time for testing of connections (24 hours or more) if you do not regularly connect with NOS. For phone: dial 866-541-1377, passcode 142625. For webcast: 1. Go to My Meetings, enter meeting number 449707376 and passcode NOS8150 if needed; 2) Enter other required fields; 3) Indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy; 4) Click on Proceed; 5) Dial into the phone so you can hear presentation.


Canadian Global Ocean Tracking Network (OTN)

17 May 2007; 11:45 AM to 12:45 PM
(SSMC 4, Room 10153; Office of Ocean Exploration Seminar)

Speaker(s): Dr. Ron O'Dor, Consortium for Oceanographic Research and Education

Abstract: Media coverage of the founding meeting for the Ocean Tracking Network (OTN), referred to it as "the Internet for fish." With OTN now a Pilot Project for the IOC’s Global Ocean Observing System the analogy is apt because, as with the Internet, a global group of users is pressing for standards and protocols to allow universal storage and sharing of a broad spectrum of information. Also like the Internet, once society makes a significant investment and stabilizes the playing field, industry will be able to invest, secure in the understanding that the new products they develop will remain compatible with a wide-spread system. This presentation will summarize some recurring themes from tracking and telemetry workshops around the world - ways that industry believes it can deliver a picture of the complex interactions of physics and biology that are the world's oceans. This is a picture that scientists and managers need in order to protect and restore ocean productivity.

Speaker Bio: Currently Census of Marine Life (COML) Senior Scientist, after degrees in biochemistry and medical physiology a post-doc at Cambridge University and Stazione Zoologica, Naples, turned him to cephalopods and marine biology. Studies on cephalopod behaviour and physiology in nature using acoustic telemetry led to involvement in large scale tracking arrays. Within COML he is developing the Ocean Tracking Network (OTN) to monitor marine animals from 20g salmon to 20MT whales with arrays to detect globally unique codes. Tags lasting up to 20 years give new time-series perspectives on changes in individual movements in response to climate change and acoustical downloading archival tags will provide records of the oceanography experienced by, and interactions among, tagged species.

Notes: All Office of Ocean Exploration Census of Marine Life (CoML) “Making Ocean Life Count” Lunchtime Seminar seminars are listed at http://explore.noaa.gov/about/seminar.html. Presentations will be available by phone and webcast. For phone, dial 1-877-973-0627, passcode: 530761. A live video webcast feed will be available for remote users at www.explore.noaa.gov. For questions please contact: Reginald.Beach@noaa.gov, Margot.Bohan@noaa.gov, and/or Nicolas.Alvarado@noaa.gov.


Census of Coral Reefs (CReefs)

22 May 2007; 11:45 AM to 12:45 PM (SSMC 3, Room 13836; Office of Ocean Exploration)

Speaker(s): Dr. Nancy Knowlton (University of California San Diego)

Abstract: CReefs research focuses on biodiversity broadly, including the many species typically not censused in coral and fish surveys. The four central questions that govern the project are: 1. How many species occur on coral reefs and what are the patterns of species diversity for all reef species across gradients of human disturbance? Can these patterns be predicted by more limited assessments (e.g. of fishes and corals)? 2. What kinds of species are obligatorily associated with healthy coral reefs and how widely are they distributed? What are the implications for conservation and management? 3. What are the prospects for maintenance of species diversity on reefs suffering various levels of human impacts? 4. How much and what kinds of taxonomic and ecological information are required to manage reefs effectively? Are cost effective proxies possible? The first CReefs field effort, the “Census of Coral Reef Ecosystems: Understudied Species and the Biodiversity of French Frigate Shoals (FFS), NWHI Marine National Monument,” was conducted 8-28 Oct 2006 aboard the NOAA ship Oscar Elton Sette. The expedition, funded almost entirely by multi-institutional in-kind support (>$1M), focused on biodiversity of understudied/unknown reef-associated invertebrates, algae, and microbes. ). This international effort, led by NOAA’s Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center, utilized 14 sampling methodologies designed to have minimal ecological impacts on 12 reef habitat types. Artificial Reef Matrix Structures (ARMS, Zimmerman 2004) were deployed for testing as a legacy method. Preliminary analyses indicate that ~1611-2151 unique morpho-species were documented, with >100 probable new species/new records. DNA was collected for the Barcode of Life initiative, and taxonomists are now analyzing the samples. The cruise and newly developed website (www.creefs.org) received wide international media attention. NOAA Pacific Region Integrated Data Enterprise (PRIDE) funds will support incorporation of these (and other NOAA) data into OBIS via the Pacific Basin Information Node (PBIN).

Speaker Bio: Dr. Nancy Knowlton is founder and Director of the Center for Marine Biodiversity and Conservation (CMBC), and holds the John Dove Isaacs Chair in Natural Philosophy at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography of the University of California at San Diego. Her research focuses on the ecology and evolution of coral reef organisms using a variety of techniques, including molecular genetics, field studies, and mathematical modeling. Her analyses have led to the now widespread recognition that estimates of marine diversity are probably too low by a factor of ten. Dr. Knowlton received her undergraduate degree at Harvard University and her PhD at the University of California at Berkeley, and was a professor at Yale University prior to moving to the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute, where she continues to maintain a part-time position. She currently serves on the National Geographic Society’s Committee on Research and Exploration and Conservation Trust Committee, chairs the World Bank’s Targeted Research Program for Coral Reefs, and is one of three principle investigators of the Census of Marine Life’s Coral Reef Initiative - CReefs - together with Julian Caley of AIMS and Rusty Brainard of NOAA. She is an elected fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and an Aldo Leopold Fellow.

Notes: All Office of Ocean Exploration Census of Marine Life (CoML) “Making Ocean Life Count” Lunchtime Seminar seminars are listed at http://explore.noaa.gov/about/seminar.html. Presentations will be available by phone and webcast. For phone, dial 1-877-973-0627, passcode: 530761. A live video webcast feed will be available for remote users at www.explore.noaa.gov. For questions please contact: Reginald.Beach@noaa.gov, Margot.Bohan@noaa.gov, and/or Nicolas.Alvarado@noaa.gov.


Natural Geography in Near Shore Areas (NaGISA)

23 May 2007; 11:45 AM to 12:45 PM (SSMC 3, Room 11836; Office of Ocean Exploration Seminar)

Speaker(s): Dr. Brenda Konar (University of Alaska Fairbanks)

Abstract: Come to this seminar to hear about NaGISA, a collaborative effort aimed at inventorying & monitoring biodiversity in the narrow inshore zone of the world's oceans at depths of less than 20 meters, the area people know best and impact most. This project’s ultimate goal is a series of well-distributed standard transects from the high intertidal zone to 20 meters water depth around the world, the inventory of which can be repeated over a 50-year or even greater time frame. Speaker Bio: As an Associate Professor of Marine Biology at the University of Alaska Fairbanks School of Fisheries and Ocean Sciences, much of Brenda Konar’s research is focused on nearshore ecology. Specifically, she is interested in habitat characterizations, monitoring programs, and experimental process studies that examine influences of various biotic and abiotic factors. She has worked on a wide-variety of organisms from large marine mammals (grey whales and sea lions) to macroalgae and in a variety of regions (from the Arctic to the Antarctic). Some of her current studies include: evaluating walrus foraging habitats in the North Pacific, determining essential juvenile fish habitat in the nearshore waters of Kachemak Bay, Alaska, examining recovery of hard-bottom communities in the Beaufort Sea, and of course, NaGISA.

Notes: All Office of Ocean Exploration Census of Marine Life (CoML) “Making Ocean Life Count” Lunchtime Seminar seminars are listed at http://explore.noaa.gov/about/seminar.html. Presentations will be available by phone and webcast. For phone, dial 1-877-973-0627, passcode: 530761. A live video webcast feed will be available for remote users at www.explore.noaa.gov. For questions please contact: Reginald.Beach@noaa.gov, Margot.Bohan@noaa.gov, and/or Nicolas.Alvarado@noaa.gov.


Warming and freshening of Baffin Bay, 1916-2003

Wednesday 23 May 2007; 11:00 -12:00h ETZ (SSMC3, Room 2501, NODC Seminar)

Speaker: Melissa Zweng (University of Delaware, Newark)

Email: mzweng@UDel.Edu

Abstract: Regression analysis of historical hydrographic data is used to determine changes in temperature and salinity in Baffin Bay for the time period from 1916 to 2003. We find two distinct sets of changes in Baffin Bay: First, areas affected by the Atlantic inflow to Baffin Bay show substantial and statistically significant warming trends. In the more than 2000 m deep basin, the warming peaks at 0.11 ± 0.06ºC/ decade-- at 700 m depth below the 640 m sill depth of Davis Strait connecting Baffin Bay to the North Atlantic Ocean. A vertical heat flux divergence of 0.25 W/m2 is required to warm Baffin Bay below 900 m by the amount observed. The required heat appears to be advected from the shelf and slope regions of the eastern Labrador Sea via Davis Strait along the west Greenland shelf break and diffuses vertically and horizontally into the deep central basin. Second, areas affected by Arctic inflow to Baffin Bay show a marginally significant freshening of up to about 0.086 ± 0.039 psu/decade. This freshening trend extends along the western margin of Baffin Island to Davis Strait and into the Labrador Sea. The freshening in the northern reaches of Baffin Bay is similar in size to that at its southern reaches.

Notes: VideoTeleConferencing (VTC)/phone not available. For questions about this seminar, please contact Hernan Garcia (301-713-3290 x184).


The Far-East Research Hydrometeorological Institute, Vladivostok

Thursday 24 May 2007; 11:00 -12:00h ETZ (SSMC3, Room 4817, NODC Seminar)

Speaker: Andrey Kruts (Director of the Regional Oceanographic Data Center, Vladivostok)

Email: akruts@ferhri.ru

Abstract: The Far Eastern Regional Hydrometeorological Research Institute (FERHRI) of the Russian Federal Service for Hydrometeorology and Environmental Monitoring (Roshydromet) was established in Vladivostok in February 1950. Andrey Kruts, Director of the Regional Oceanographic Data Center, Vladivostok and Julia Kruts, Far-East Research Hydrometeorological Institute, Vladivostok, will be visiting NODC/WDC May 12 - Jun 1, 2007. They will describe highlights of this institute.

Notes: VideoTeleConferencing (VTC)/phone available upon request by contacting Cheryl Ingram (Cheryl.Ingram@noaa.gov) at least a day before the seminar. For questions about this seminar, please contact Hernan Garcia (301-713-3290 x184).


Ensemble Streamflow Forecasting with the Coupled GFS-Noah Modeling System

Thursday, 24 May 2007; 13:00-14:00 ETZ (SSMC4, Room 8246; Office of Hydrologic Development Seminar)

Speaker: Zoltan Toth (Environmental Modeling Center/NCEP/NOAA)

Email: Zoltan.Toth@noaa.gov

Abstract: A major application of numerical weather prediction (NWP) is to provide forcing to hydrological models to generate streamflow forecasts in a one-way or two-way coupled mode. Since precipitation/runoff forecasts exhibit large uncertainties, hydrologic forecasts should be framed in a probabilistic form and follow an ensemble approach. Using NCEP’s Global Ensemble Forecast System (GEFS) coupled with the Noah Land Surface Model (Noah LSM), this study evaluates the quality of the output of the coupled air-land ensemble system as external forcing for river routing ensemble forecasting. A streamflow “analysis” is generated following the methodology of the North America Land Surface Data Assimilation (NLDAS) project over the CONUS domain, by forcing the Land-River system with observed precipitation. This analysis is used as the initial condition for the river routing model in the coupled air-land-river forecast system, and as a proxy for truth in the verification of the experimental ensemble river flow forecasts. Quantitative evaluation of the streamflow forecasts revealed that (1) The coupled GFS-Noah forecasting system, with a river routing model attached, reasonably captures analyzed streamflows; (2) The GEFS ensemble mean forecasts, and especially the GEFS ensemble based probabilistic forecasts, have more skill than the ensemble control or even a higher resolution single control forecast (GFS); (3) Bias (systematic error) is a significant part of the total forecast error which can possibly be reduced through a suitable bias-correction algorithm; (4) For larger river basins, the ensemble forecasts exhibit skill even without a bias correction; (5) For medium and small river basins, the shorter-range forecasts suffer from considerable under-dispersion, i.e., insufficient spread. These preliminary results suggest that the GEFS-Noah system provides reasonable forcing to hydrological models although a procedure to downscale precipitation is needed for shorter range (up to 5-7 days) predictions especially for smaller and medium-sized basins.

Notes: Go to meeting: https://www.gotomeeting.com/join/620376384; Conference Call: Telecon: 1-877-774-5038 Passcode: 925335#; Meeting ID: 620-376-384. For questions about this seminar please contact Pedro.Restrepo@noaa.gov.


Arctic Ocean Biodiversity (ArcOD)

24 May 2007; 11:45 AM to 12:45 PM (SSMC 3, Room 11836; Office of Ocean Exploration Seminar)

Speaker(s): Dr. Rolf Gradinger, University of Alaska Fairbanks

Abstract: The Arctic Ocean is the most extreme ocean on the planet given its year-round existing ice cover and the seasonality of light. It also holds a multitude of unique life forms, highly adapted in their life history, ecology and physiology to the extreme and seasonal conditions of their environment. Yet, our knowledge of what currently lives in the Arctic Ocean is still rudimentary. This seminar will describe the ArcOD project, a relatively new initiative aimed at documenting the Arctic’s current biodiversity on a Pan-Arctic scale.

Speaker Bio: Rolf Gradinger, Ph.D., is an Assistant Professor at the School of Fisheries and Ocean SciencesUniversity of Alaska-Fairbanks. He studied biology at the Universities in Mainz and Kiel, Germany finishing his Masters and PhD degrees at Kiel University. Since completing his PhD, Dr. Gradinger’s main interest has been in Arctic sea ice ecology, which he explored as a PostDoc and Assistant Professor while at two institutions in Germany. In 2001, he moved to Alaska, where he continues to work today as a polar ecologist at the Insitute of Marine Science of the School of Fisheries and Ocean Sciences, University of Alaska-Fairbanks. Dr. Gradinger has most recently been devoting his time to exploring the diversity of life in Arctic sea ice, participating in two NOAA OE-funded Arctic expeditions (with ice breaker vessels) and two OE-funded trips to Arctic native communities. In addition to his field research interests, he is leading the CoML ArcOD project with Russ Hopcroft and Bodil Bluhm; he is also a member of various national research committees (e.g. UNOLS AICC, NSF BEST Scientific Steering Group), and is editor of the journal, Polar Biology. Beyond his pursuits in polar marine ecology, Dr. Gradinger is interested in classical music, birding, fishing, and kayaking.

Notes: All Office of Ocean Exploration Census of Marine Life (CoML) “Making Ocean Life Count” Lunchtime Seminar seminars are listed at http://explore.noaa.gov/about/seminar.html. Presentations will be available by phone and webcast. For phone, dial 1-877-973-0627, passcode: 530761. A live video webcast feed will be available for remote users at www.explore.noaa.gov. For questions please contact: Reginald.Beach@noaa.gov, Margot.Bohan@noaa.gov, and/or Nicolas.Alvarado@noaa.gov.


Communicating the role of local ecological knowledge and traditional community structure in environmental decision making

Tuesday, 29 May 2007; 12:00 – 13:00 ETZ (SSMC-4, Room #8150, NOS seminar)

Speaker(s): Tim Kelly and Perry Pickert, Friday’s Films Email(s): tim@fridaysfilms.com; perry@fridaysfilms.com

Abstract: In an era of youtube and myspace, community-based videos are being exposed to huge audiences. San Francisco-based film makers Tim Kelly and Perry Pickert will present their journey into the world of environmental education films. In addition, they will provide advice on how to utilize this communication tool as an effective mechanism for building awareness of the value of incorporating local ecological knowledge and traditional community structure into the policy making process. In this presentation, Tim and Perry will introduce and present their 20 minute film “Seeds of the Future” showcasing the current status and prospect for protection of fish spawning aggregations in Fiji. They will then answer questions about the film, the filmmaking process, their approach to environmental film making, and discuss how internet distribution has changed the landscape of media. Friday’s Films was founded in 2002 to tell the unique story of Bahamian fishermen in “Hanging in The Balance: The Future of Fishing In The Bahamas.” This film sparked variety of other productions across the Pacific, Asia, North America, and the Caribbean. Fridays Films is based in San Francisco, California and produces documentary, industrial, and multi-media programming.

Notes: Presentations are typically available via video, phone/webcast. For video: contact nos.video.conference@noaa.gov for information on setting connection. Please allow adequate time for testing of connections (24 hours or more) if you do not regularly connect with NOS. For phone: dial 866-541-1377, passcode 142625. For webcast: 1. Go to My Meetings, enter meeting number 449707376 and passcode NOS8150 if needed; 2) Enter other required fields; 3) Indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy; 4) Click on Proceed; 5) Dial into the phone so you can hear presentation.


Barcoding Census of Marine Life DNA Barcoding Protocol (DNA Barcoding)

30 May 2007; 11:45 AM to 12:45 PM (SSMC 4, Room 10153; Office of Ocean Exploration Seminar)

Speaker(s): Dr. Dirk Steinke, University of Guelph

Abstract: TBD

Notes: All Office of Ocean Exploration Census of Marine Life (CoML) “Making Ocean Life Count” Lunchtime Seminar seminars are listed at http://explore.noaa.gov/about/seminar.html. Presentations will be available by phone and webcast. For phone, dial 1-877-973-0627, passcode: 530761. A live video webcast feed will be available for remote users at www.explore.noaa.gov. For questions please contact: Reginald.Beach@noaa.gov, Margot.Bohan@noaa.gov, and/or Nicolas.Alvarado@noaa.gov.


Plant communities of Jug Bay wetlands and how they are influenced by hydrology and animal disturbance

Wednesday, 30 May 2007; 12:00 – 13:00 ETZ (SSMC-4, Room #8150, NOS seminar)

Speaker(s): Andrew H. Baldwin (Department of Environmental Science & Technology, University of Maryland)

Email(s): baldwin@umd.edu

Abstract: The vegetation of tidal freshwater marshes is temporally dynamic and spatially variable due to a number of factors, including hydrology and animal activity. The Jug Bay marshes are species-rich compared with salt and brackish marshes, and exhibit zonation into high and low marsh plant communities. Annual species are roughly as abundant as perennials, although the abundance of annuals varies between years. Dominant perennial species include arrow arum (Peltandra virginica), rice cutgrass (Leersia oryzoides), bur-reed (Sparganium americanum), and spatterdock (Nuphar luteum), while abundant annuals include tearthumbs (Polygonum spp.), bur-marigold (Bidens laevis), and jewelweed (Impatiens capensis). Research my lab has conducted at Jug Bay has focused on influence of hydrology and animal activity on plant community structure. Studies have included four experiments in Billingsley Marsh, including field, greenhouse, and seed bank studies on the effects of hydrology on plant communities, and a field exclosure experiment to examine effects of animals on high and low marsh vegetation. Additionally, we described the influence of a beaver dam in the marsh south of Route 4 on hydrology and vegetation. Finally, we studied vegetation, soil, hydrology, and seed banks of marshes north and south of Maryland Route 4 as reference sites for vegetation studies at restored tidal freshwater marshes along the Anacostia River in Washington, D.C. (Kingman and Kenilworth marshes). The hydrologic studies show that increasing the frequency and duration of flooding reduces the diversity of marsh vegetation, and suggest that the effect of flooding on reducing diversity is greater if it occurs earlier rather than later in the growing season. In the exclosure study, I found that animal disturbance (e.g., grazing or physical disturbance by geese, carp, and muskrat) can strongly reduce seedling establishment by some annual species (Zizania aquatica and Bidens laevis), but that the effect depends on hydrology: a strong animal effect was seen in the low marsh but not in the high marsh. By increasing flooding, the beaver dam significantly reduced plant biomass in impounded wetlands. This research in the Jug Bay wetlands underscores the importance of interactions between biotic and abiotic variables in maintaining spatial and temporal complexity in the vegetation of these systems.

Notes: Presentations are typically available via video, phone/webcast. For video: contact nos.video.conference@noaa.gov for information on setting connection. Please allow adequate time for testing of connections (24 hours or more) if you do not regularly connect with NOS. For phone: dial 866-541-1377, passcode 142625. For webcast: 1. Go to My Meetings, enter meeting number 449707376 and passcode NOS8150 if needed; 2) Enter other required fields; 3) Indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy; 4) Click on Proceed; 5) Dial into the phone so you can hear presentation.


Tagging of Pacific Pelagics (TOPP)

31 May 2007; 11:45 AM to 12:45 PM (SSMC 3, Room 11836; Office of Ocean Exploration Seminar)

Speaker(s): Dr. Daniel Costa, University of California Santa Cruz

Abstract: TBD

Notes: All Office of Ocean Exploration Census of Marine Life (CoML) “Making Ocean Life Count” Lunchtime Seminar seminars are listed at http://explore.noaa.gov/about/seminar.html. Presentations will be available by phone and webcast. For phone, dial 1-877-973-0627, passcode: 530761. A live video webcast feed will be available for remote users at www.explore.noaa.gov. For questions please contact: Reginald.Beach@noaa.gov, Margot.Bohan@noaa.gov, and/or Nicolas.Alvarado@noaa.gov.


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June 2007

The Canadian Census of Marine Life (CAN)

05 June 2007; 11:45 AM to 12:45 PM
(SSMC 4, Room 8150; Office of Ocean Exploration Seminar)

Speaker(s): Dr. Mike Sinclair, Department of Fisheries and Oceans Canada

Abstract:  TBD

Notes:  All Office of Ocean Exploration Census of Marine Life (CoML) “Making Ocean Life Count” Lunchtime Seminar seminars are listed at http://explore.noaa.gov/about/seminar.html. Presentations will be available by phone and webcast. For phone, dial 1-877-973-0627, passcode: 530761. A live video webcast feed will be available for remote users at www.explore.noaa.gov. For questions please contact: Reginald.Beach@noaa.gov, Margot.Bohan@noaa.gov, and/or Nicolas.Alvarado@noaa.gov.


Future of Marine Animal Populations (FMAP)

06 June 2007; 11:45 AM to 12:45 PM (SSMC 4, Room 8150; Office of Ocean Exploration Seminar)

Speaker(s): Dr. Ian Jonsen, Dalhousie University, Canada

Abstract:  TBD

Notes:  All Office of Ocean Exploration Census of Marine Life (CoML) “Making Ocean Life Count” Lunchtime Seminar seminars are listed at http://explore.noaa.gov/about/seminar.html. Presentations will be available by phone and webcast. For phone, dial 1-877-973-0627, passcode: 530761. A live video webcast feed will be available for remote users at www.explore.noaa.gov. For questions please contact: Reginald.Beach@noaa.gov, Margot.Bohan@noaa.gov, and/or Nicolas.Alvarado@noaa.gov.


International Census of Marine Microbes (ICoMM)

Thursday 07 June 2007; 11:45 AM to 12:45 PM (SSMC 4, Room 8150; Office of Ocean Exploration Seminar)

Speaker(s): Dr. Mitch Sogin, Marine Biological Laboratory

Abstract:  TBD

Notes:  All Office of Ocean Exploration Census of Marine Life (CoML) “Making Ocean Life Count” Lunchtime Seminar seminars are listed at http://explore.noaa.gov/about/seminar.html. Presentations will be available by phone and webcast. For phone, dial 1-877-973-0627, passcode: 530761. A live video webcast feed will be available for remote users at www.explore.noaa.gov. For questions please contact: Reginald.Beach@noaa.gov, Margot.Bohan@noaa.gov, and/or Nicolas.Alvarado@noaa.gov.


Non-linear response of deep-sea red shrimp (Aristeus antennatus) catches to environmental forcings in a submarine canyon in NW Mediterranean Sea

Friday 08 June 2007; 11:00 -12:00h ETZ (SSMC3, Room 4817, NODC Seminar)

Speaker:  Dr. Nixon Bahamon (Institute of Marine Sciences, Barcelona, Spain)

Email(s): bahamon@icm.csic.es

Abstract:  The deep-sea shrimp Aristeus antennatus plays a key ecological role along the continental margins of the Northwestern Mediterranean Sea. Their populations are spatio-temporal structured under the influence of the submarine canyons, one of the main geormorphological traits of this area. Individuals of this species dwell from 600 to ­ 900 m depth coinciding with the lower boundary of Levantine Intermediate Water (LIW) and the upper boundary of Western Mediterranean Deep Water. The species is highly commercially exploited representing about 25% of total demersal catches. In spite of its economic relevance and recent unexpected sudden reduction of catches along the NW Mediterranean coast, a few studies have provided insights of the environmental conditions forcing the shrimp distribution. Using generalized additive models and regression trees, a time series of daily catches of A. antennatus carried out during a whole year period were evaluated in relation to daily averaged values of temperature, salinity, mean kinetic energy (MKE) and eddy kinetic energy (EKE). We found that the relationship between shrimp and water temperature is not significant; the highest catch values take place on relatively saltier waters (between 38.5 ­ 38.6) showing small MKE values (between 6 and 9 cm^2 s^-2) and regular values of EKE (between 10 and 20 cm^2 s^-2). We conclude that abundance of A. antennatus is non-linearly constrained by the environmental conditions, and under relatively steady temperature values it prefers relatively saltier (LIW) and low-strength waters showing moderate mesoscale variability.

Notes: VideoTeleConferencing (VTC)/phone available upon request by contacting Cheryl Ingram (Cheryl.Ingram@noaa.gov) at least a day before the seminar. For questions about this seminar, please contact Hernan Garcia (301-713-3290 x184).


Exploitation of spawning aggregations: Uncertain future in a sea of change

Tuesday, 12 June 2007; 12:00 – 13:00 ETZ (SSMC-4, Room #8150, NOS seminar)

Speaker(s): Chris Jeffrey, NOAA/NOS/NCCOS/ Center for Coastal Monitoring and Assessment; Felix Martinez, NOAA/NOS/NCCOS/Center for Sponsored Coastal Ocean Research.

Email(s): chris.jeffrey@noaa.gov ; felix.martinez@noaa.gov

Abstract: The NOS/NCCOS/Center for Sponsored Coastal Ocean Research in collaboration with its sister center the Center for Coastal Monitoring and Assessment and as part of its research prioritization process will like to present a short film on the relationship between tropical commercial fish spawning aggregations and the fishermen that exploit them.  We will follow the film with a short open forum to promote a discussion among participants on the issues that impact these aggregations and the types of policies and management practices needed to protect such fragile resources.

Notes: Presentations are typically available via video, phone/webcast.  For video: contact nos.video.conference@noaa.gov for information on setting connection.  Please allow adequate time for testing of connections (24 hours or more) if you do not regularly connect with NOS.  For phone: dial 866-541-1377, passcode 142625. For webcast: 1. Go to My Meetings, enter meeting number 449707376 and passcode NOS8150 if needed;  2) Enter other required fields; 3) Indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy; 4) Click on Proceed; 5) Dial into the phone so you can hear presentation.


An Overview of the National Coastal Data Development Center (NCDDC) ** POSTPONED **

Thursday 14 June 2007; 11:00 -12:00h ETZ (SSMC3, Room 4817, NODC Seminar)

Speaker:  Scott Mowery

Email: Scott.Mowery@noaa.gov

Abstract:  The mission of NCDDC is to support ecosystem stewardship by providing access to the nation's coastal data resources.

Notes: VideoTeleConferencing (VTC)/phone access available upon request by contacting Cheryl Ingram (Cheryl.Ingram@noaa.gov) at least a day before the seminar. For questions about this seminar, please contact Hernan Garcia (301-713-3290 x184).


A system for Operational Flash Flood Guidance Worldwide

Friday, June 22 at 1:00 pm ETZ (SSMC-2, Room 8246;  Office of Hydrologic Development Seminar)

Speaker: Dr. Konstantine P. Georgakakos (Hydrologic Research Center, San Diego, CA)

Email: KGeorgakakos@hrc-lab.org

Abstract: Flash floods have the dubious distinction of having the highest mortality rate of people affected among natural disasters.  The world loses more than 5,000 people annually to these natural killers. A flash flood is defined by WMO and the AMS as a relatively small scale short fuse flooding event with response times 6 hours or less.  Moderate to heavy rainfall that often persists on certain areas, soils that are thin or near saturation, extensive impervious areas, steep slopes that create fast moving flood waves, and development in flash flood prone areas, all conspire in various combinations to create this lethal problem, especially in developing regions of the world.  Technological advances in remote sensing technology, communication networks, distributed computing and speeds, combined with forecaster experience in local conditions and availability of up-to-the-minute local information are the basic ingredients of a global approach to reducing life loss.  The Hydrologic Research Center in partnership with National and International Agencies and with public and private philanthropic funding has developed an implementation plan for empowering the weather services worldwide to respond effectively to the occurrence of these events.  The Flash Flood Guidance System (FFGS) planned combines computational components and a system of distributed forecaster-centered functions that promote capacity-building nationally and regionally, encourage communication with disaster response agencies and support the cooperation of hydrologists and meteorologists at the national and regional level worldwide.  This presentation discusses the basic components of this implementation plan.

Notes: Go to Meeting and telephone information follows:  https://www.gotomeeting.com/join/262460929 ; Conference Call:  Telecon: 1-877-774-5038, Passcode: 925335#, Meeting ID: 262-460-929. For questions about this seminar please contact Pedro.Restrepo@noaa.gov.



Cooperative Management for the Shared Fisheries Resources of the China Seas

June 27, 2007 ; 1200-1300h ETZ in SSMC-3, 2nd Floor
(NOAA Library, Sponsored by NOAA Fisheries Office of Science and Technology)

Speaker:  Guifang (Julia) Xue, Law of the Sea Institute, Ocean University of China,  Sponsored by NOAA Fisheries Office of Science and Technology.

Abstract: The Yellow Sea and East China Sea ( China Seas) are semi-enclosed seas where the fish stocks are mainly shared among China, Japan, and South Korea (the China Seas states). The shared nature of fish stocks makes their conservation and management difficult, and efforts by any single state are incomplete and ineffective. The LOSC grants coastal states sovereign rights and jurisdiction over the resources of their EEZs, but the China Seas states have not reached agreement on their EEZs boundaries due to overlapping claims. Fisheries disputes have been common and the cooperative management of the shared resources needs to be promoted. The seminar will firstly review: 1) the existing bilateral fisheries agreements between China and Japan, and China and South Korea; 2) the necessity for cooperative management of the shared resources and the LOSC frameworks applicable to such cooperation; and 3) the challenges from a Chinese perspective. The second part of the seminar will provide a case study of fisheries co-operation between China and Vietnam for the Gulf of Tonkin. It will review the management measures pertaining to the Agreed Zones under the Agreement, and will highlight the achievements of the Agreement and pinpoints the crucial role of implementation to the success of the fisheries co-operation.

Notes: For more information see http://www.lib.noaa.gov/docs/news/news.html.

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July 2007

NOAA’s Undersea Research at Lee Stocking Island: An Ecosystem Approach

Wednesday, 11 July 2007; 12:00 – 13:00 ETZ (SSMC-4, Room #8150, NOS seminar)

Speaker(s): Dr. John Marr, Perry Institute for Marine Science and National Undersea Research Center - Caribbean

Email(s): jmarr@perryinstitute.org

Abstract: As one of six National Undersea Research Centers, the Caribbean Marine Research Center supports underwater research primarily in ecosystem science goals. CMRC is administered through the Perry Institute for Marine Science and operates a marine laboratory and field station on Lee Stocking Island in the Exuma, Bahamas.  The existing infrastructure includes housing for staff/visitors, modern laboratory facilities, seawater systems, diving equipment including small boats, and some light and heavy equipment; it is leased to the Perry Institute for $1/yr until 2026 and has included substantial investments from both NOAA and NSF. The facility provides access to diverse habitats such as seagrass beds, sandflats, mangroves, tidal channels, coral patch reefs, coral reef slopes and deep (>2000 m) ocean. Using submersibles, ROVs, and both air and mixed-gas, scientific diving takes place in depths ranging from 1 to 91 meters. In 2004-05, over 7,300 dives and 6,900 hours of bottom time were conducted, resulting in the most recorded dives for any underwater research facility in the Caribbean. The program has made important differences to ocean resource management by developing long-term data sets and working with internationally recognized researchers and educators interested in ecosystem science and marine conservation.

Notes: Presentations are typically available via video, phone/webcast.  For video: contact nos.video.conference@noaa.gov for information on setting connection.  Please allow adequate time for testing of connections (24 hours or more) if you do not regularly connect with NOS.  For phone: dial 866-541-1377, passcode 142625. For webcast: 1. Go to My Meetings, enter meeting number 449707376 and passcode NOS8150 if needed;  2) Enter other required fields; 3) Indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy; 4) Click on Proceed; 5) Dial into the phone so you can hear presentation.


Historical Ecology of the Florida Keys Coral Reef Ecoregion

Thursday, 12 July 2007; 11:30 – 12:30 ETZ (SSMC-4, Room #8150, NOS seminar)

Speaker(s): Loren McClenachan (EPA Fellow at the Scripps Institute of Oceanography )

Email(s): lmcclenachan@ucsd.edu

Abstract: The National Marine Sanctuary Program will host Loren McClanachen, EPA Fellow at the Scripps Institute of Oceanography, for her talk on the historical Ecology of the Florida Keys. She will be presenting her work conducted in 2006-2007 to review and compile historical sources from which biological indicators on the marine ecosystems of the Florida Keys can be derived. The Florida Keys holds the largest and most diverse coral reef ecosystem in the continental United States, but reefs in the Florida Keys have been degraded by centuries of overfishing and habitat loss. Understanding the degree of change that has occurred over time and how the ecosystem functioned in a more pristine state is essential for management and restoration of Florida’s ecologically and economically important reef communities. Historical ecology uses a variety of sources --ranging from 18th century ship's logs to early fisheries reports and settler's journals--to reconstruct historic ecosystems and determine the degree of change that has occurred.  The data location and collection effort was extremely successful and the quantity of digitalized data far exceeded expectations. Over 500 sources, including natural history descriptions, maps and charts, family and personal papers, and state and colonial records, were collected and digitized from 18 archives in the U.S., U.K, Spain, and the Bahamas. These documents allows us to understand the timeline of events influencing the ecological history of the Florida Keys and surrounding coral reef ecosystems and form the basis of a historical narrative describing the ecological and human setting in the Florida Keys ecoregion, as well as broader economic links in the Atlantic basin driving exploitation of marine animals.  

Notes: Presentations are typically available via video, phone/webcast.  For video: contact nos.video.conference@noaa.gov for information on setting connection.  Please allow adequate time for testing of connections (24 hours or more) if you do not regularly connect with NOS.  For phone: dial 866-541-1377, passcode 142625. For webcast: 1. Go to My Meetings, enter meeting number 449707376 and passcode NOS8150 if needed;  2) Enter other required fields; 3) Indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy; 4) Click on Proceed; 5) Dial into the phone so you can hear presentation.


NOAA's Virtual World: Experiencing the Edge of Space to the Bottom of the Ocean

Friday July 13, 2007; 1200-1300h ETZ in SSMC-3, 2nd Floor (NOAA Central Library)

Speaker:  Eric Hackathorne [NOAA's Earth Systems Research Laboratory (ESRL)]

Abstract:  Soar through a hurricane on the wing of a research aircraft, rise gently through the atmosphere atop a weather balloon or search for a hidden underwater cave on a side trip from a NOAA submersible. These and other virtual adventures are attracting large numbers of "avatars," or virtual selves, to one of the first government-sponsored, Earth-science "island" in the rapidly growing online world Second Life. The NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory developed the site for visitors to collectively share experiences in a virtual world they may not have in the physical world, and learn about the cutting-edge science that NOAA conducts regularly. Eric Hackathorn is the chief architect for NOAA's virtual world and will present an overview of the project. He and his much handsomer counterpart Hackshaven Harford (a virtual representation of himself) will discuss their vision of how NOAA could potentially use this technology in its future infrastructure. Tour NOAA's Virtual Island;

Further reading: See the paper "Networked Virtual Environments and the NIH Mission: How Second Life and other Virtual Systems Can Assist with Collaboration and Citizen Outreach" available online (PDF)

Notes: Call-in information is:  Participant code:  3958086; Phone number: 866-631-5469. For more information see http://www.lib.noaa.gov/docs/news/news.html.



Climate Impacts on the World Ocean: The Challenge of Multiple Stresses
July 19, 2007; 1200-1300h ETZ in SSMC-3, 2nd Floor (NOAA Central Library)

Speaker: Dr. Ed Miles (University of Washington, Seattle)

Abstract: Four new stresses of global and hemispheric scale have emerged to combine with two old stresses to generate impacts for marine ecosystems on a global scale. The four new stresses are: 1. The ocean has taken up about one third of all the anthropogenic carbon released to the atmosphere (~142Pg C). 2. This uptake of carbon dioxide has resulted to date in a reduction of about 0.1 pH units throughout the global surface ocean, with much more implied by the continued increase of CO2 emissions. Increasing acidity threatens all calcareous living organisms in the world ocean. 3. The world ocean has taken up 80-84% of the heat generated by the anthropogenic emissions of CO2. Increases in surface and sub-surface heat are generating large scale biogeographic shifts in the distribution of the most important species targeted by humans as sources of animal protein intake. 4.  Increased surface and sub-surface heat has generated positive feedbacks between the ocean and high latitude ice sheets which significantly increase summer melt rates. This significant input of fresh water also implies increasing probability of stratification in the water column and, as a consequence, decreased productivity. These four new stresses now join two old ones: 5.Increased intensities of land-based pollution of the coastal ocean as a result of population growth, expanding urbanization of the coastal zone, and unwise land-use practices; and 6. The weakened condition of commercial fish populations where significant levels of overfishing have occurred. These six stresses present management challenges on a scale which far surpasses anything we have yet faced  and we have neither the knowledge nor the tools to manage such a suite of multiple stresses. The presentation will summarize an effort to achieve a coordinated approach by the University of Washington, NOAA’s Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory (PMEL), the NOAA/NMFS Northwest Fisheries Science Center and Alaska Fisheries Science Center, in addition to academic specialists in the United States, all of whom combine to focus on the effects of two new stresses: ocean acidification and changing ocean thermal structure. The program that these participants are seeking to construct would focus on addressing five questions: What are the changes to the physical/chemical system in the North Pacific and Bering Sea? What are the biological responses and mechanisms to the carbon-climate system? What are the socioeconomic linkages (mitigation, adaptation, public perception)? What are the projections for the future under various CO2 emission scenarios? What are the vulnerabilities of marine human-environment systems defined in terms of nonlinearities, thresholds, and feedbacks?

Notes: For more information see http://www.lib.noaa.gov/docs/news/news.html.

Communicating the role of local ecological knowledge and traditional community structure in environmental decision making
(Note: this is a repeat performance for NOAA employees and other public in Honolulu, Hawaii of their earlier presentation in Silver Spring, Maryland)

Tuesday, 24 July 2007; 12:00 – 13:00 PST (PSC Conference Room, 737 Bishop St. Suite 1550, Honolulu, Hawaii, NOS seminar)

Speaker(s): Tim Kelly and Perry Pickert, Friday’s Films

Email(s): tim@fridaysfilms.com; perry@fridaysfilms.com

Abstract: In an era of youtube and myspace, community-based videos are being exposed to huge audiences.  San Francisco-based film makers Tim Kelly and Perry Pickert will present their journey into the world of environmental education films.  In addition, they will provide advice on how to utilize this communication tool as an effective mechanism for building awareness of the value of incorporating local ecological knowledge and traditional community structure into the policy making process. In this presentation, Tim and Perry will introduce and present their 20 minute film “Seeds of the Future” showcasing the current status and prospect for protection of fish spawning aggregations in Fiji.  They will then answer questions about the film, the filmmaking process, their approach to environmental film making, and discuss how internet distribution has changed the landscape of media.
Friday’s Films was founded in 2002 to tell the unique story of Bahamian fishermen in “Hanging in The Balance: The Future of Fishing In The Bahamas.”  This film sparked variety of other productions across the Pacific, Asia, North America, and the Caribbean.  Fridays Films is based in San Francisco, California and produces documentary, industrial, and multi-media programming.

Notes: This presentation is not available for remote viewing. If interested in the Friday'sFilms documentaries, copies of their films are available for loan at the NOAA Central Library or contact the film makers directly. In the future the films may be available online at the Library's website. Check with the Library for further information.

What Lies Beneath: New Technology to Assess the Threat of Toxic Organic Chemicals in Sediment

Tuesday, 24 July 2007; 12:00 – 13:00 ETZ (SSMC-4, Room #8150, NOS seminar)

Speaker(s): Keith A. Maruya, Southern California Coastal Water Research Project (SCCWRP)

Email(s): keithm@sccwrp.org

Abstract: Harbor and river sediment polluted by toxic organic chemicals such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) is a persistent problem that threatens human health and coastal ecosystems around the country. A portion of these organic pollutants are dissolved in the water permeating sediment and are “bioavailable”—and therefore a threat—to marine life and people that consume seafood. The remaining pollutants bind tightly to sediment particles, which prevents them from entering the food chain.  Traditional methods of monitoring sediment pollution are slow, costly, and unable to assess the percentage of organic pollutants that are actually bioavailable. Coastal managers need a sound, reproducible method to determine the potential bioavailability of organic pollutants in sediment so they can pinpoint those sites in greatest need of remediation and restoration. With support from CICEET, researchers at the Southern California Coastal Water Research Project (SCCWRP) are developing a cost-effective, fiber-based sensor that monitors the bioavailability of organic pollutants in situ, or in the sediment.  Unlike bulk sediment chemistry, the most widely used sediment assessment tool, this sensor uses solid phase microextraction (SPME) technology to quantify the bioavailable fraction, or “porewater concentration,” of organic pollutants in sediment. This enables the user to pinpoint sites with chemicals that could be harmful to aquatic life.  The researchers have demonstrated the SPME sensor’s effectiveness in bench-scale tests and in field trials. It successfully measures porewater concentration of organic pollutants in a manner that correlates with total pollutant concentrations assessed through bulk sediment chemistry. Use of the sensor did not impact aquatic life or the ecosystem. CICEET researchers have partnered with the California State Water Board, which is developing sediment standards and a sediment quality control plan for California’s bays and estuaries.  The State Water Board hopes to use the SPME-based sensor technology to replace complicated and costly sediment chemistry in its efforts to assess sediment quality.  In the next series of tests, researchers will compare measurements of the bioavailability of organic pollutants with measures of toxicity in animals living in the same location where the testing is taking place. If successful, the technology has the potential to be applied in any water body where toxic organic chemical pollution in sediment is a problem.

Notes: Presentations are typically available via a combination of phone & webcast. With a reservation, they can also be available by video conferencing to those with appropriate equipment.  For phone: dial 866-541-1377, passcode 142625.  For webcast: 1) go to http://www.MyMeetings.com, enter the meeting number 449707376 and passcode NOS8150; 2) enter other required fields; 3) indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy; 4) click on Proceed.  You must also dial the phone number above so you can hear the presentation.  For videoconferencing: contact nos.video.conference@noaa.gov for information on setting up a reservation.  Please allow adequate time for testing of connections (at least 24 hours or more) if you do not regularly connect with NOS.

Salt content variability in the near-surface waters of the Gulf of Mexico (1955-2000) [PDF]

Wednesday 25 July 2007; 11:00 -12:00h ETZ (SSMC3, Room 4817, NODC Seminar)

Speaker:  Glenn Russel (NOAA EPP Hollings undergraduate scholar)

Email: Glenn.Russell@noaa.gov

Abstract:
  Salt content  variability in the near-surface waters of the Gulf of Mexico is investigated based on historical oceanographic data derived from the World Ocean Database 2005 (WOD05) and World Ocean Atlas 2005 (WOA05). Most of the variability in salt content is observed in the upper 50 m of the water column. Causes for the changes in salt content are discussed. Mr. Glenn Russell conducted a ca.10-week summer internship with the NODC/OCL (May 29- 27 July, 2007). He is an undergraduate (junior) student at Texas A&M University majoring in marine sciences with a minor in Math. He's a recipient of a NOAA Ernest F. Hollings Undergraduate Scholarship.
On-line access to presentation (PDF):  https://intra.nodc.noaa.gov/Information/Training/Seminars/Seminars2007/Glenn_Russel_Salt_Content_Variability_Presentation_July2007.pdf

Notes: VideoTeleConferencing (VTC)/phone access available upon request by contacting Cheryl Ingram (Cheryl.Ingram@noaa.gov) at least a day before the seminar. For questions about this seminar, please contact Hernan Garcia (301-713-3290 x184).



An Overview of the National Coastal Data Development Center (NCDDC)

Thursday 26 July 2007; 11:00 -12:00h ETZ (SSMC3, Room 4817, NODC Seminar)

Speaker(s):  Joe Stinus & Scott Mowery

Email: Joe.Stinus@noaa.gov & Scott.Mowery@noaa.gov

Abstract:  The mission of NCDDC is to support ecosystem stewardship by providing access to the nation's coastal data resources. Scott Mowery will follow Joe's presentation with a brief on NOAA's Regional Teams and PATT programs
On-line access to Power Point presentation: (1)  https://intra.nodc.noaa.gov/Information/Training/Seminars/Seminars2007/Joe_Stinus_NCDDC_seminar.ppt & (2)  https://intra.nodc.noaa.gov/Information/Training/Seminars/Seminars2007/Scott_Mowery_2007_Regional_Team_Overview.ppt

Notes: Teleconferencing: dial into the MCI teleconferencing center approximately 5 mins. before the start of the seminar. The number to dial is 877-939-5831, when prompted enter passcode 118873. VideoTeleConferencing (VTC) access available upon request by contacting Cheryl Ingram (Cheryl.Ingram@noaa.gov) at least a day before the seminar. For questions about this seminar, please contact Hernan Garcia (301-713-3290 x184).

 

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August 2007

Synoptic Mapping of Coral Reef Ecosystems - the Main Hawaiian Islands

Wednesday, 01 August 2007; 15:00 – 16:00 ETZ (SSMC-4, Room #8150, NOS seminar)

Speaker(s): Dr. Eric Louchard, BAE Systems and Miles Anderson

Email(s): eric.louchard@BAESYSTEMS.com, miles@interpac.net

Abstract: Accurate maps of marine habitats are valuable assets for managing resources, including coral reefs, seagrass beds, sandbars and other important habitats for fisheries, tourism and other aspects of the coastal economy. BAE Systems, (Sensor Systems - Imaging and Surveillance) was contracted for coral reef mapping in the Main Eight Hawaiian Islands (MEHI) using multispectral satellite imagery. Results of the project will further NOAA commitment towards completion of the U.S. Coral Reef Task Force's recommendation to develop shallow-water coral reef ecosystem maps for all U.S. waters by 2009. This presentation will focus on the results of the MEHI project and also detail new technologies and algorithms that may be applied in future mapping projects.

Notes: Presentations are typically available via a combination of phone & webcast. With a reservation, they can also be available by video conferencing to those with appropriate equipment.  For phone: dial 866-541-1377, passcode 142625.  For webcast: 1) go to http://www.MyMeetings.com, enter the meeting number 449707376 and passcode NOS8150; 2) enter other required fields; 3) indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy; 4) click on Proceed.  You must also dial the phone number above so you can hear the presentation.  For videoconferencing: contact nos.video.conference@noaa.gov for information on setting up a reservation.  Please allow adequate time for testing of connections (at least 24 hours or more) if you do not regularly connect with NOS.



The Alaska Native Education Project: a Partnership

Tuesday, 07 August 2007; 12:00 – 13:00 ETZ (SSMC-4, Room #8150, NOS seminar)

Speaker(s): Glenn Seaman (Alaska Department of Fish and Game), Teresa McTigue, Gary Matlock (NOAA/NCCOS)

Email(s): glenn_seaman@fishgame.state.ak.us, terry.mctigue@noaa.gov, gary.matlock@noaa.gov

Abstract: Rural communities in Alaska, particularly Alaska Native villages, have unique science and educational needs formed both by the community's remoteness and it's culture.  NOAA's National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science has partnered with the seven Alaska Tribes in south central Alaska (collectively known as the Chugach Tribes) and the University of Alaska to support science education in remote and Tribal areas that improves science literacy in the region and supports the Tribes' goal of more effective participation in natural resource management.  In this presentation, the authors will provide an overview of both statewide and regional efforts that meet these goals in a way that is sensitive and responsive to the unique cultural and community challenges in rural Alaska.  Discussion will focus on the Chugach region and the Tribal Education Inititive, an effort to provide more meaningful Tribal involvement in management and research in the resources and areas of importance to the communities.

Notes: Presentations are typically available via a combination of phone & webcast. With a reservation, they can also be available by video conferencing to those with appropriate equipment.  For phone: dial 866-541-1377, passcode 142625.  For webcast: 1) go to http://www.MyMeetings.com, enter the meeting number 449707376 and passcode NOS8150; 2) enter other required fields; 3) indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy; 4) click on Proceed.  You must also dial the phone number above so you can hear the presentation.  For videoconferencing: contact nos.video.conference@noaa.gov for information on setting up a reservation.  Please allow adequate time for testing of connections (at least 24 hours or more) if you do not regularly connect with NOS.

"An Inconvenient Truth", a documentary on global warming


Thursday, 09 August 2007; 12:00 – 14:00 ETZ (NOAA Auditorium -Science Center-)

Abstract: The NOAA Central Library will sponsor a showing Al Gore's Academy Award ® winning documentary "An Inconvenient Truth" on the subject of global warming.  Following the 96 minute presentation, Frank Niepold, NOAA Climate Education Coordinator, will lead a short discussion on the topic. Funding to purchase the DVD was provided  by the Friends of the NOAA Library.

Notes:  Due to copyright restrictions, the presentation will neither be web cast nor video-conferenced.  However, NOAA staff are encouraged to borrow the DVD or the book by the same title from the NOAA Central Library. For more information contact Doria Grimes.


Improving Your Presentation Skills (Updated announcement!)

Tuesday, 14 August 2007; 12:00 – 13:00 ETZ (SSMC-3, Room #4527, NOS seminar)

Speaker(s): Donna McCaskill, Communications Director; NOAA Coastal Services Center

Email(s): Donna.Mccaskill@noaa.gov

Abstract: From giving a status report to your peers to making that big presentation in front of an important constituent group, most of our jobs involve public speaking to some degree. This brown bag presentation will focus on communication skills for people in the scientific field. Our speaker, Donna McCaskill, has 25 years of experience helping scientists and other professional communicate through the written and spoken word.

Notes: This presentation will only be available for the local Washington, D.C. audience.


Data Management - Putting the "Integrated" in NOAA's Integrated Ecosystem Assessments

Thursday, 16 August 2007; 11:30 - 12:30 ETZ (SSMC-3, [4th floor large conference room #4527], NODC Seminar)

Speaker: Dr. Steve Murawski (NOAA Ecosystem Goal Team Lead)

Email: Steve.Murawski@noaa.gov

Abstract:  The NOAA Ecosystem Goal Team (EGT) has identified Integrated Ecosystem Assessments (IEAs) as a critical tool to enable NOAA’s ecosystem approach to management. An IEA is a synthesis and quantitative analysis of information on relevant physical, chemical, ecological and human processes in relation to specified ecosystem management objectives.  IEAs focus not on collecting new observations or conducting new research, but on integrating existing datasets to produce more useful assessments, build ecological forecast models, and develop other ecological decision support tools.  The process of integrating and managing existing data sources is complex, and at present, NOAA does not have the full capability to pull these data together into a form that is readily accessible and useable by NOAA scientists producing these assessments.  The EGT is pursuing options for strengthening its data and information management capabilities to support IEAs and these initiatives will be discussed.
Presentation available on-line (PDF): https://intra.nodc.noaa.gov/Information/Training/Seminars/Seminars2007/nesdis_IEA.pdf

About The Speaker: BIO

Notes: Teleconferencing and WebEx access available. For webcast access: 1) go to http://www.MyMeetings.com, enter the meeting number 442112424 and passcode NODC4817 (alternatively direct Participant Join URL: http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?i=442112424&p=NODC4817&t=c); 2) type in other required fields (i.e., your name, e-mail, organization); 3) indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy; 4) click on Proceed. Please contact your IT staff for questions about WebEx. For Teleconference access: For those wanting wanting to participate in seminar via teleconference: dial 1-877-939-5831 (~ 5mins. prior to start of meeting) and when prompted, enter passcode 118873. For questions about teleconferencing, please contact Cheryl Ingram (Cheryl.Ingram@noaa.gov) at least a day before the seminar. For general questions about this seminar, please contact Hernan Garcia (301-713-3290 x184) or Kirsten.Larsen@noaa.gov (301-713-2239 x180).


New England’s Marine Resource Education Program - Bridging the Gap among Fishermen, Scientists and Managers

Tuesday 21 August 2007; 12:00 – 13:00 ETZ (SSMC-3, 2nd Floor, NOAA Central Library)

Speaker(s): Laura Taylor Singer (Gulf of Maine Research Institute)

Abstract:  It has been widely acknowledged that the complex system of fisheries science and management is difficult for many fishermen and others to navigate. Fishermen attending fishery management council meetings, serving as advisors to the management processes, or partnering in collaborative research, require baseline information to be effective in their roles. In addition to information challenges, there are cultural differences among those interested in fisheries management. Often, the issues that arise in a management setting are based on a lack of understanding and trust. In New England, the Marine Resource Education Program (MREP) was created by fishery activists in the region to address these issues. The curriculum, tailored specifically for fishermen and relevant stakeholder groups, covers two topic areas: a three-day Fishery Science Module, followed by a three-day Fishery Management Module. MREP has become a recognized training program for fishermen, managers, scientists and environmentalists in the region and has recently gained national interest.

Notes: See http://www.lib.noaa.gov/docs/news/news.html


What They are Saying: Learning About the Coastal Management Community through the Coastal Zone Conference Series

Thursday, 23 August 2007; 11:30 – 12:30 ETZ (SSMC-4, Room #8150, NOS seminar)

Speaker(s): Jan Kucklick and Ginger Hinchcliff (NOAA Coastal Services Center)

Email(s): Jan.Kucklick@noaa.gov, Ginger.Hinchcliff@noaa.gov

Abstract: The Coastal Zone conference is one of the largest interdisciplinary gatherings of the coastal and ocean resource management community. This biennial conference brings together participants from over 20 countries to share case studies and local approaches to a variety of coastal management issues ranging from climate change, to fisheries management, to coastal hazards, to sediment management. Our speakers, Jan Kucklick, and Ginger Hinchcliff, of the NOAA Coastal Services Cener, will share what they heard and learned from the recent Coastal Zone 07 Conference in Portland, Oregon.   NOAA Coastal Services Center serves as the presenting sponsor of the Coastal Zone conference series.

Notes: Presentations are typically available via a combination of phone & webcast. With a reservation, they can also be available by video conferencing to those with appropriate equipment.  For phone: dial 866-541-1377, passcode 142625.  For webcast: 1) go to http://www.MyMeetings.com, enter the meeting number 449707376 and passcode NOS8150; 2) enter other required fields; 3) indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy; 4) click on Proceed.  You must also dial the phone number above so you can hear the presentation.  For videoconferencing: contact nos.video.conference@noaa.gov for information on setting up a reservation.  Please allow adequate time for testing of connections (at least 24 hours or more) if you do not regularly connect with NOS.


Effects of Human Interferences on Hydrologic Processes –The Modeling Issues

Thursday, 23 August 2007; 13:30 – 14:30 ETZ (SSMC-2, Room #8246, Office of Hydrologic Development Seminar)

Speaker(s): Prof. Ximin Cai (Ven Te Chow Hydrosystems Laboratory, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign)

Abstract:  Effects of human interferences on hydrologic processes have occurred at all scales from local, basin to the global due to various human activities including human influences on climate change and variability, land use and land cover change, flow regulation through dams and reservoirs, water withdrawal and return flow, and irrigation. However, human interferences are still not yet a major focus of scientific studies in the U.S.; the level of integration of data from the human system with standard hydrologic data is limited in current watershed hydrologic studies; and fundamental understanding of the role of human interference effects in the hydrologic cycle is not clear. Some hydrologic models focus on natural processes but ignore human interferences; while others treat human interferences as fixed boundary conditions or inputs.  In particular, numerous model calibration efforts attempt to adjust natural parameters only, assuming the parameters or inputs related to human activities are deterministic.  This can easily end with wrong values of those natural parameters because of the considerable errors in human data used in the models. This presentation discusses the characteristics of human data error, the difficulties in assimilating human data into hydrologic models, and related research issues in improving watershed hydrologic modeling.  Human data errors are usually biased and the statistical properties of the errors are often unknown or not fully known, which may cause non-stationary, unpredictable, and biased error on the model forecast.  Because of the non-Gaussian or biased data errors, determining the true error covariance matrices is a challenge for data assimilation approaches such as the most widely used Kalman filter (KF) and its extensions.  Since watersheds are coupled natural-human systems, research needs to pay explicit attention to human-nature interactions and feedbacks in the hydrologic cycle. Specific questions include what hydrologic processes, at what scale and what local (spatial variability) are especially sensitive to the data errors of a certain type of human interferences.  Addressing these questions will lead to the understanding of watershed behaviors under the combined influences of natural variability and human interferences and of the impact of biased error in human interferences on the simulation of hydrologic processes.  Addressing these questions is also expected to provide guidelines for designing human interference monitoring systems.

Notes: Join on-line: https://www.gotomeeting.com/join/372749737 ; Conference Call: Telecon: 1-877-774-5038; Passcode: 925335#; Meeting ID: 372-749-737. For questions about this seminar please contact Jennifer Kent or Pedro.Restrepo@noaa.gov.


Responsive Management and The Human Dimension of Natural Resource Management

Monday, 27 August 2007; 12:00 – 13:00 ETZ (SSMC-4, Room #8150, NOS seminar)

Speaker(s): Mark Damian Duda (Responsive Management)

Email(s): mark@responsivemanagement.com

Abstract: Responsive Management was established in 1985 by the Western Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies (WAFWA) to assist natural resource agencies better understand and work with their constituents.  WAFWA understood that natural resource agencies approached natural resource management issues in a scientific, deliberate and orderly process, but did not always approach "people" issues in that same scientific, deliberate and orderly manner.  The program developed numerous human dimensions training programs and products for natural resource managers, including how to incorporate the human dimension into natural resource management, public attitude surveys, communications and conflict resolution.  By 1991 Responsive Management became so busy conducting surveys and consulting it was decided it would be best run as a private business since WAFWA did not have the infrastructure to administer the program.  Responsive Management was turned over to then Board Member Mark Damian Duda and incorporated as a private business at that time.  Since then, Responsive Management has conducted almost 1,000 telephone, mail, and internet surveys, focus groups, needs assessments and other human dimensions research projects for numerous natural resource agencies, including the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.  One of these projects includes the recent Coastal Services Center 2006 Coastal Resource Management Survey.  For the U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Responsive Management is currently conducting a programmatic evaluation of the Marine Mammal Health and Stranding Response Program Networks in the Southeast and Southwest Regions and recently completed a needs assessment on Florida manatee education and outreach.  A coastal training needs assessment and market inventory is currently being conducted for Sapelo Island National Estuarine Research Reserve. Come and interact with Mark while he shares his 25 years of human dimensions in natural resource experience with NOAA staff.  Mark holds a MES (Master of Environmental Studies) with an emphasis in natural resource policy and planning from Yale University.  While at Yale, Mark worked with Dr. Stephen Kellert, known for his pioneering work in the human dimensions field.  Mark is also a trained biologist and worked for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration in the 1980s.

Notes: Presentations are typically available via a combination of phone & webcast. With a reservation, they can also be available by video conferencing to those with appropriate equipment.  For phone: dial 866-541-1377, passcode 142625.  For webcast: 1) go to http://www.MyMeetings.com, enter the meeting number 449707376 and passcode NOS8150; 2) enter other required fields; 3) indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy; 4) click on Proceed.  You must also dial the phone number above so you can hear the presentation.  For videoconferencing: contact nos.video.conference@noaa.gov for information on setting up a reservation.  Please allow adequate time for testing of connections (at least 24 hours or more) if you do not regularly connect with NOS.


Persistent Underwater Surveillance Networks Using Micro-sized Sensor Nodes

Wednesday, 29 August 2007; 12:00 ETZ (SSMC-4, Room #8150, NOS seminar)

Speaker(s): Steve Stanic (Naval Research Laboratory, Stennis Space Center, Ms.)

Email(s): steve.stanic@nrlssc.navy.mil

Abstract: The Naval Research Laboratory is currently conducting research and developing technologies to fabricate, deploy, and test, a persistent underwater surveillance network using micro-sensor nodes. These sensor nodes will use micro-modems, high-frequency directional communication transducers, and be capable of interfacing with numerous miniature and nano sized sensor packages. Calculations have shown that sensor node life cycles could approach 6 to 12 months depending on the surveillance and signal processing demands. Sensor life times could be extended indefinitely by using microbial power generation. It is anticipated that these nodes would ultimately be the size of a “coke can” and deployable from small surface craft, underwater vehicles, and air born assets. The cost per unit could be as low as $200-300. Potential applications could include riverene surveillance, harbor and ship protection, coral reef management, and environmental monitoring.

Notes: Presentations are typically available via a combination of phone & webcast. With a reservation, they can also be available by video conferencing to those with appropriate equipment.  For phone: dial 866-541-1377, passcode 142625.  For webcast: 1) go to http://www.MyMeetings.com, enter the meeting number 449707376 and passcode NOS8150; 2) enter other required fields; 3) indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy; 4) click on Proceed.  You must also dial the phone number above so you can hear the presentation.  For videoconferencing: contact nos.video.conference@noaa.gov for information on setting up a reservation.  Please allow adequate time for testing of connections (at least 24 hours or more) if you do not regularly connect with NOS.

 

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September 2007

The Integration of Estuary Acoustic Seabed Mapping to the Requirements of Ecosystem Based Management

Wednesday, 05 September 2007; 12:00 – 13:00 ETZ (SSMC-4, Room #8150, NOS seminar)

Speaker(s): Dr. Gary Smith, Washington College/Center for Environment and Society

Email(s): garysmith@randommotionllc.com

Abstract: The Chesapeake Bay oyster, although a sessile invertebrate, exhibits habitat information needs in common with many of the designated American fish species upon which Ecosystem Based Management (EBM) is now focused. Among these, a lack of relevant and detailed knowledge regarding the spatial extent, and scale variable character, of the seabed habitat greatly hinders our ability to assess and effectively manage the resource. Population assessments and predictive models still lack the most basic information concerning, habitat distribution and quality, as well as antecedent biological and geological controls that appear to govern natural oyster bed location, evolution, and survival. We developed integrated Geographical Information System (GIS) remote acoustic survey techniques which allowed for more realistic charting, assessment, and quantification of estuarine benthic oyster habitat. Principal in this effort were analysis and representational enhancements to Acoustic Seabed Classification. This remote acoustic surveying technology allows for a statistically based classification of bottom habitat.  This work evolved on the concept of a platform or a systems approach to EBM, where the end requirements of data collection and information needs were used to design the approach to data acquisition and processing. Acoustic techniques, validation techniques and sampling, were designed to be collected in common, processed and linked by the same GIS system. New techniques in representational analysis, sharing much in common with satellite technologies, were integrated for the development of habitat assessment. This approach provided for more realistic representations of bottom heterogeneity and transitions within the nearshore environment than has been previously available. An additional focus of this work was the demonstration of a method we have referred to as “Scale Specific Sampling.” This approach, based on advances in precision bottom sample positioning, when linked to detailed seabed mapping, has shown improvement in the quality and information content of benthic habitat sampling.

Notes: Presentations are typically available via a combination of phone & webcast. With a reservation, they can also be available by video conferencing to those with appropriate equipment.  For phone: dial 866-541-1377, passcode 142625.  For webcast: 1) go to http://www.MyMeetings.com, enter the meeting number 449707376 and passcode NOS8150; 2) enter other required fields; 3) indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy; 4) click on Proceed.  You must also dial the phone number above so you can hear the presentation.  For videoconferencing: contact nos.video.conference@noaa.gov for information on setting up a reservation.  Please allow adequate time for testing of connections (at least 24 hours or more) if you do not regularly connect with NOS.


California sea lions and the biotoxin domoic acid:  morbidity and mortality patterns and potential implications for the population

Wednesday, 05 September 2007, 2:00 pm ETZ (SSMC-3, Room 14836)

Speaker(s):  Drs. Adriana C Bejarano,  Frances Gulland, Fran Van Dolah, Teri Rowles and Lori Schwacke

Abstract: TBD

Notes:  Seminar hosted by the Cooperative Center for Marine Animal Health, the Office of Protected Resources, and the National Center for Coastal Ocean Science. Both video conference and WebX access will be provided if there is sufficient interest.  Please contact Dr. Teri Rowles (Teri.Rowles@noaa.gov) by August 31 if you want to participate in this seminar through either video conference or WebX.


The Evolution of Advanced Weather Interactive Processing System (AWIPS)

Wednesday,  05 September 2007, 2:00 – 3:00 p.m. ETZ (SSMC-2, Room 2358, NWS, Science and Technology Seminar)

Speaker(s): Jason Tuell (Analysis Branch Systems Engineering Center Office of Science and Technology)

Abstract: AWIPS, the integrating element of the National Weather Service modernization, is undergoing an extensive software re-architecture and conversion to a Service Oriented Architecture (SOA). Raytheon Technical Services will be converting the AWIPS infrastructure to an SOA over the next year, then migrating the current baseline software and functionality to the new architecture by FY2009.  Deployment of the next generation of AWIPS is expected to be completed in FY2010. Extensive progress has been made in the last year.  The new architecture has been defined and delivered in the form of the AWIPS Development Environment version 1.0.  Over the next 18 months, Raytheon will use the ADE 1.0 to migrate the functionality represented by more than 4.5M lines of code to the new architecture.  At the end of this migration, the new system will deliver today’s functionality with a more modern and robust architecture.  The National Weather Service plans to deliver significant new system enhancements built on this new architectural foundation.  This seminar will describe the current progress of the transition to the new architecture along with future plans for AWIPS Evolution.  This seminar will also describe some of the attendant benefits of the new architecture and approach.

Notes: For more information please contact: Bob Glahn at (301) 713-1768 (Harry.Glahn@noaa.gov)


 
CLIVAR and Carbon Hydrographic Data Office (CCHDO) tentative title

Tuesday, 11 September 2007; 11:00 - 12:00 ETZ (SSMC-3,  Room 4817, NODC Seminar)

Speaker(s):  Dr. James H. Swift (Scripps Institution of Oceanography, UCSD)

Email:  jswift@ucsd.edu

Abstract: The CCHDO's primary mission is to be a repository and distribution center for CTD and Hydrographic data sets of the highest possible quality. These data are a product of WOCE, CLIVAR and numerous other oceanographic research programs -- past, present and to come.

Notes: For questions about teleconferencing, please contact Cheryl Ingram (Cheryl.Ingram@noaa.gov) at least a day before the seminar. For general questions about this seminar, please contact Hernan Garcia (301-713-3290 x184).


Droughts and flooding rains in Australia

Tuesday, 11 September 2007; 2:00 to 3:00 pm ETZ (SSMC-2, Room 8246, OHD seminar)

Speaker(s): Dr. Dörte Jakob (Australian Bureau of Meteorology)

Abstract: Australia is the driest inhabited continent. Why do you spend time on reviewing methods for design rainfall estimation? Australia is also a continent with highly variable rainfall. While much of Australia is still in a severe drought, major flooding has occurred during June 2007. The current methods for design rainfall estimation in Australia were developed in the 1980s. A pilot study is underway to develop new methods. Results from the pilot study will be presented. If reservoirs in large parts of Australia are less than half-full, why are you concerned about how climate change might affect estimates of Probable Maximum Precipitation (used in estimating the PMP Design Flood)? For most catchments in Australia, even the largest observed storms on record have rainfall depths which are typically below 25% of the relevant PMP estimates. However, for some storms rainfall depths have reached up to 85% of the corresponding PMP estimate. According to the Fourth Assessment Report of the IPCC, rainfall intensity is projected to increase under climate change, even in regions where mean precipitation decreases. Moisture availability, storm efficiency and storm types were investigated to answer the question whether PMP estimates might change under a changing climate.

Notes: Remote access information TBD. For more information about this seminar please contact: Geoffrey.Bonnin@noaa.gov

Urban Aerosol Effects on Clouds, Rainfall and Surface Energy Budget

Wednesday, 12 September 2007; 2:00 PM ETZ (SSMC-3, Room 3404;  ARL seminar)

Speaker:  Menglin Jin (NASA GSFC/U of MD, Marshall Sheperd, Atmospheric Sciences Program, The University of Georgia, Michael D. King, NASA GSFC)

Email: mjin@atmos.umd.edu

Abstract:  Urbanization is one of the extreme cases of human being-natural climate system interactions. We use satellite observations to address how urban aerosols  affect both surface and atmospheric conditions and radiation at diurnal, weekly, and seasonally scales. Analyses of 6-year MODIS aerosol measurements, together with clouds, rainfall, surface temperature and in situ AERONET data reveal that urban aerosol has clear modifications on warm cloud droplet size, but less significant effect on rainfall at monthly scale. In addition, aerosol effect may be stronger over sea surface than over urban surface. Further more, urban aerosol reduces surface energy budget up to 20-40Wm-2, which further reduces surface skin temperature. Nevertheless, urban heat island effect is larger than aerosol-skin temperature effect, and consequently urban surfaces are warmer than non-urban regions in daytime and nighttime.

Terrace Structure of the Shallow Dry Tortugas Coral Reef Ecosystem

Thursday, 13 September 2007, 11:30 – 12:30 ETZ (SSMC-4, Room #8150, NOS seminar)

Speaker(s): John C. Brock (USGS Center for Coastal and Watershed Studies)

Email(s): jbrock@usgs.gov

Abstract: Terraces have been recognized in many reef systems around the world, and on last interglacial reefs, this geomorphology has been linked to changes in sea level regimes.  In parallel, many reef systems have an ecological zonation that correlates coarsely with geomorphology.  However, benthic habitat mapping of coral reef ecosystems is typically accomplished by the classification of multi-spectral images acquired from satellites or aircraft, an approach that omits the use of reef morphology in defining habitat boundaries.  Aircraft lidar surveys can map fine scale reef structure, and enable the recognition of terraces on shallow coral reef ecosystems that may control the distribution of benthic communities.  We evaluated the hypothesis that the shallow Dry Tortugas coral reef ecosystem is geomorphologically organized into terraces that act to control ecological zonation.  Following a NASA airborne lidar survey in August 2004 that resulted in a one-meter scale topographic map, the Wilcox signed rank test was used to verify the presence of terraces on Garden Key Bank, Pulaski Bank and Loggerhead Key Bank, the major geomorphic units of the shallow Dry Tortugas.  Next, the boat-mounted Along Track Reef Imaging System (ATRIS) was used to collect voluminous observations of benthic class and topographic complexity to investigate correlation between the recognized terracing and the spatial structure of benthic habitats.  A Jaccard Dissimilarity analysis of interpreted ATRIS benthic images collected on transects across all three major banks of the Dry Tortugas revealed significant within and between bank differences in terrace benthic community composition.

Notes: Presentations are typically available via a combination of phone & webcast. With a reservation, they can also be available by video conferencing to those with appropriate equipment.  For phone: dial 866-541-1377, passcode 142625.  For webcast: 1) go to http://www.MyMeetings.com, enter the meeting number 449707376 and passcode NOS8150; 2) enter other required fields; 3) indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy; 4) click on Proceed.  You must also dial the phone number above so you can hear the presentation.  For videoconferencing: contact nos.video.conference@noaa.gov for information on setting up a reservation.  Please allow adequate time for testing of connections (at least 24 hours or more) if you do not regularly connect with NOS.


Social Science Tools and Information

Tuesday, 18 September 2007; 12:00 – 13:00 ETZ (SSMC-4, Room #8150, NOS seminar)

Speaker(s): Hansje Gold-Krueck ( NOAA Coastal Services Center).

Email(s): Hansje.Gold-Krueck@noaa.gov

Abstract: When it comes to managing natural resources, the people side of the equation is very important. HumanDimensions.gov, or HD.gov, is dedicated to the application of social science for natural resource management professionals. This brown bag presentation will discuss social science basics, the tools available from this site, and a little bit about how the site was developed amongst hundreds of partners.

Notes: Presentations are typically available via a combination of phone & webcast. With a reservation, they can also be available by video conferencing to those with appropriate equipment.  For phone: dial 866-541-1377, passcode 142625.  For webcast: 1) go to http://www.MyMeetings.com, enter the meeting number 449707376 and passcode NOS8150; 2) enter other required fields; 3) indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy; 4) click on Proceed.  You must also dial the phone number above so you can hear the presentation.  For videoconferencing: contact nos.video.conference@noaa.gov for information on setting up a reservation.  Please allow adequate time for testing of connections (at least 24 hours or more) if you do not regularly connect with NOS.


Integrated Ocean Observing System (IOOS): An Overview

Wednesday, 19 September 2007; 12:00 – 13:00 ETZ (SSMC-3, 2nd Floor, NOAA Central Library/NODC Seminar)

Speaker(s): Zdenka Willis (Director, IOOS)

Abstract: NOAA is leading interagency and regional efforts to build the U.S. Integrated Ocean Observing System (IOOS). IOOS is a coordinated network of people and technology that work together to generate and disseminate continuous data on our coastal waters, Great Lakes, and oceans. IOOS is our nation’s ocean contribution to the Global Earth Observation System of Systems, an international effort designed to monitor Earth and transmit observations globally.  The goal of IOOS is to expand and improve our ability to collect, deliver, and use ocean information—providing information in the right format at the right time to scientists, managers, businesses, governments, and the public.

Presentation Available On-Line: See power point slides

Notes: For more information see http://www.lib.noaa.gov/docs/news/news.html.

MOS Probability Forecasts: Part 1 - Event Probabilities (See Part 2 seminar on 3 October 2007)

Wednesday, 19 September 2007; 14:00 - 15:00 P.M. ETZ (SSMC#2, Room 2358,  NWS - Science and Technology Seminars)

Speaker(s): Kathy Gilbert and Judy Ghirardelli (Meteorological Development Laboratory, Office of Science and Technology)

Abstract: Probabilistic weather forecasting may finally be on the upswing. Contributing to the renewed interest is the 2006 National Research Council report “Completing the Forecast.” Probability of precipitation forecasts have been issued to the public since 1966, but most other forecasts are single-value or of a descriptive nature. The Meteorological Development Laboratory (MDL) has been providing probabilistic guidance forecasts of several weather elements in various formats for many years. These forecasts are of specific events, such as the probability of thunderstorms, or of categories of variables that have very skewed distributions and do not lend themselves to statistical treatment as continuous variables. Examples of these latter forecasts include the probability of ceiling height less than 500 ft. and the probability of greater than one inch of rain. These are essentially “event” probabilities. More recently, we have been developing methods to deal with probability distributions of continuous variables such as maximum temperature. All of these forecasts are, of course, based on output of numerical models. With the latest development, ensembles produced by the National Centers for Environmental Prediction have been used.  The first seminar will describe MDL’s probabilistic forecasts of weather events and lay the groundwork for the next seminar which will describe the techniques and results of producing probabilistic forecasts of continuous variables.

Notes: The flier can be viewed at http://www.weather.gov/mdl/seminar/. Further information, please contact Harry.Glahn@noaa.gov.  Please pass this information along as appropriate.  For remote access, contact Carl McCalla.

 

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October 2007

Outreach with Positive Outcomes

Wednesday, 03 October 2007; 11:00 - 12:00 ETZ (SSMC-3,  Room 4817, NODC Seminar)

Speaker:  Michael Crane (NODC)

Email:  Michael.Crane@noaa.gov

Abstract: The vital life process of an agency is the dynamic interaction with the internal and external environment within the community.  Outreach must be an active and continuous activity.  The focus of this talk will be the structure of a positive outreach design that generates significant outcomes. At the conclusion, cuisine will be provided!
Presentation available on-line: OutreachwithPositiveOutcomes.pdf

Notes: For questions about teleconferencing, please contact Cheryl Ingram (Cheryl.Ingram@noaa.gov) at least a day before the seminar. For general questions about this seminar, please contact Hernan Garcia (301-713-3290 x184).


MOS Probability Forecasts: Part 2 - Probability Distributions of Continuous Variables (See Part 1 seminar on 19 September 2007)

Wednesday, 03 October 2007; 14:00 - 15:00 P.M. ETZ (SSMC#2, Room 2358,  NWS - Science and Technology Seminars)

Speaker(s): Matt Peroutka (Meteorological Development Laboratory, Office of Science and Technology)

Abstract: Probabilistic weather forecasting may finally be on the upswing. Contributing to the renewed interest is the 2006 National Research Council report “Completing the Forecast.” Probability of precipitation forecasts have been issued to the public since 1966, but most other forecasts are single-value or of a descriptive nature. The Meteorological Development Laboratory (MDL) has been providing probabilistic guidance forecasts of several weather elements in various formats for many years. These forecasts are of specific events, such as the probability of thunderstorms, or of categories of variables that have very skewed distributions and do not lend themselves to statistical treatment as continuous variables. Examples of these latter forecasts include the probability of ceiling height less than 500 ft. and the probability of greater than one inch of rain. These are essentially “event” probabilities. More recently, we have been developing methods to deal with probability distributions of continuous variables such as maximum temperature. All of these forecasts are, of course, based on output of numerical models. With the latest development, ensembles produced by the National Centers for Environmental Prediction have been used.  The first seminar will describe MDL’s probabilistic forecasts of weather events and lay the groundwork for the next seminar which will describe the techniques and results of producing probabilistic forecasts of continuous variables.

Notes: The flier can be viewed at http://www.weather.gov/mdl/seminar/. Further information, please contact Harry.Glahn@noaa.gov.  Please pass this information along as appropriate.  For remote access, contact Carl McCalla.



Development of the Ocean GeoPortal: An Educational and Data Harvesting Tool

Tuesday, 09 October 2007; 11:00 - 12:00 ETZ (SSMC-3, Room #4817, NODC Seminar)

Speaker:  Daniel Cole (Geographic Information Systems Coordinator, Smithsonian Institution)

Email: coled@si.edu

Abstract:  The Ocean GeoPortal will encompass the geo-referenced portion of NMNH’s 33 million marine specimens from eight of the museum’s divisions (Invertebrate Zoology, Fish, Mammals, Amphibians and Reptiles, Minerals, Botany, and Paleobiology).  These large data sets may be combined for display and analysis (based on fields of taxonomy, location, depth, collector, ship, expedition, etc) with environmental data sets from our partners at NOAA, in addition to any world-wide or site-specific data sets from our collaborators (NASA, USGS, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute, Scripps, Monterey Bay Research Institute, National Geographic Society, New England Aquarium, other Smithsonian research units and other academic institutions with marine programs). We plan to provide extensive data bases for outside scientists to harvest spatial data through the GIS Portal Toolkit (GPTK) software.  Through customization of the GeoPortal, we also plan to provide educational materials developed by collaborators, including static and interactive maps for K-12 and the general public to access and learn, as well as incorporating on-line lessons and virtual field trips into customized versions of ArcIMS and GPTK, along with links to the planned Google Ocean.

Presentation available on-line:  Geoportal seminar (PDF): OceanGeoPortal.pdf ; Geoportal web links: OceanGeoPortalflyer-1.doc

Notes: Participants for this seminar via teleconference should dial 1-877-939-5831, when prompted enter passcode 118873. Other teleconferencing, WebEx, videoTeleConferencing (VTC) access available upon request by contacting Cheryl.Ingram@noaa.gov (301-713-3284 x155) at least a day before the seminar. For general questions about this seminar, please contact Hernan Garcia (301-713-3290 x184).


Carpentaria Ghostnet Programme

Tuesday, 09 October 2007; 12:00 – 13:00 ETZ (SSMC-4, Room #8150, NOS seminar)

Speaker(s): Gary Luchi, Queensland Project Facilitator, Carpentaria Ghostnet Programme

Email(s): gary@ghostnets.com.au

Abstract: Ghost nets are fishing nets that have been lost accidentally, deliberately discarded, or simply abandoned at sea. They travel the oceans of the world with the currents and tides, continually fishing as they progress through the waters. As they are unatteded and roaming, they fish indiscriminately, not only catching threatened species but undersized and protected fish as well.  The Gulf of Carpentaria (GoC) is a large and almost completely landlocked body of water in northern Australia that acts as a catchment for all ghost nets from the Indo/Pacific region. It is a very remote part of Australia consisting of mainly isolated pockets of Indigenous communities and mining towns.  The Carpentaria Ghostnet Programme (http://www.ghostnets.com.au/) is working with a wide range of culturally diverse populations with varying capacity for action. This talk will address the problems, issues and successes of this unique program.  
“The Ghost Net Project is for people from (Indigenous) communities all around the Gulf of Carpentaria to find ways to work together to get rid of marine debris in their sea country.” Djawa Yunupingu, Dhimurru Land Management Aboriginal Corporation  

Notes: Presentations are typically available via a combination of phone & webcast. With a reservation, they can also be available by video conferencing to those with appropriate equipment.  For phone: dial 866-541-1377, passcode 142625.  For webcast: 1) go to http://www.MyMeetings.com, enter the meeting number 449707376 and passcode NOS8150; 2) enter other required fields; 3) indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy; 4) click on Proceed.  You must also dial the phone number above so you can hear the presentation.  For videoconferencing: contact nos.video.conference@noaa.gov for information on setting up a reservation.  Please allow adequate time for testing of connections (at least 24 hours or more) if you do not regularly connect with NOS.


Ecohydrology and Its Relevance to Hydrologic Forecasting at Climatic Time Scales

09 October 2007; 14:00 – 15:00 ETZ (SSMC-2, Room #8246, Office of Hydrologic Development Seminar)

Speaker(s): Dr. John P. Kochendorfer

Abstract:  Ecohydrology is one of the current buzz words in our field. This presentation begins with a brief and playful examination of the origins and many definitions of the concept. The bulk of the presentation is devoted to the author’s own ecohydrological research. In particular, it provides an overview of the formulation and application to the central U.S. of the Statistical-Dynamical Ecohydrology Model (SDEM), which is essentially a monthly, two-soil-layer implementation of Peter Eagleson’s groundbreaking statistical-dynamical, soil-vegetation-climate model. The presentation concludes with a discussion of how such a model might be applied to hydrologic forecasting on climatic time scales.

Notes: Join on-line: https://www.gotomeeting.com/join/652404372 ; Conference Call: Telecon: 1-877-774-5038; Passcode: 925335#; Meeting ID: 652-404-372. For questions about this seminar please contact Pedro.Restrepo@noaa.gov.



U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission: Regulatory Framework for High-Level Waste and A Risk-Informed
Performance-Based Approach Applied to Yucca Mountain, Nevada


Thursday, 11 October 2007; 11:00 - 12:00 ETZ (SSMC-3, Room #4817, NODC Seminar)

Speaker:  Dr. Andrew C. Campbell

Email:  Andy.Campbell@noaa.gov

Abstract:  TBA

Presentation available on-line: ACampbell_NODC_NOAA_Oct_2007.pdf

About the speaker: Biography_for_Andy_Campbell.pdf

Notes: VideoTeleConferencing (VTC) access available upon request by contacting Cheryl.Ingram@noaa.gov (301-713-3284 x155) at least a day before the seminar. For general questions about this seminar, please contact Hernan Garcia (301-713-3290 x184).


The Chesapeake Bay Forecast System

Friday, October 12, 2007; 1 -2 pm (SSMC-3; Room 7836; Coast Survey Development Laboratory Seminar)

Speaker:  Professor Raghu Murtugudde (Earth System Science Interdisciplinary Center and Cooperative Institute of Climate Studies at the University of Maryland)

Abstract:  The Earth System Science Interdisciplinary Center (ESSIC) and Cooperative Institute of Climate Studies (CICS) at the University of Maryland are developing a fully integrated, biogeochemical model of the Chesapeake Bay watershed and the estuary. This Chesapeake Bay Forecast System (CBFS), consisting of a coupled Atmospheric/ Land/Ocean model complete with biological and geochemical components, is being assembled with existing models and will include assimilation of in-situ and satellite-derived measurements to enable near-real time applications and climate change research. The system includes the Weather Service’s Weather Research & Forecasting (WRF) model as the atmospheric component, the U.S. Department of Agricultural Research Service’s Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) as the hydrological model, and Rutgers University’s Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS) as the coastal ocean model. Objectives of the CBFS and its output will be described and discussed.

Notes: For questions about this seminar, please contact Frank Aikman (301-713-2809 x101)

Why study biodiversity? An example from the Island of Tobago, West Indies

Friday, 19 October 2007; 12:00 - 13:00 ETZ (SSMC-3,  2nd Floor, NODC/NOAA Library Seminar)

Speaker:  Dave Hardy

Email:  Dave.Hardy@noaa.gov

Abstract: Since 1962 I have been conducting a study of bodiversity on the Island of Tobago, West Indies. This effort has resulted in the discovery of 52 new taxa (1 family, 2 genera, and 52 new species). During the same time period (1962 to present), ten species (5 birds, 3 reptiles, 1 mammal, and 1 crustacean) have apparently become extint on the Island. The impact of extinction on the environment will probably not be fully understood until we have identified as many un-discovered species as possible. There is thus an urgent need for in-depth studies of biodiversity not only in Tobago, but throughout the World.

Notes: Teleconferencing available upon request by contacting Mary Lou Cumberpatch (301-713-2600 Ext.129; Mary.Lou.Cumberpatch@noaa.gov). See also http://www.lib.noaa.gov/docs/news/news.html


Innovative Tools to Motivate Watershed Stewardship

Friday, 19 October 2007; 12:00 – 13:00 ETZ (SSMC-4, Room #8150, NOS seminar)

Speaker(s): Christine Feurt, Ph.D., Coastal Training Program Coordinator, Wells National Estuarine Research Reserve and Director, Center for Sustainable Communities Department of Environmental Studies, University of New England

Email(s): cfeurt@wellsnerr.org or cfeurt@une.edu

Abstract: Barriers to watershed stewardship are frequently misunderstood. Timely application of scientific research and technological innovations with potential to contribute to improvements in coastal water quality can be blocked when adopters of the information fail to recognize or understand the relevance or benefits. This research used an innovative interdisciplinary approach to understand and overcome barriers to science translation in municipal decision-making about non-point source pollution. This research combined and evaluated methodology and theory concerning the role of cultural models in environmental decision-making with the process and strategies of Collaborative Learning to facilitate science translation and community based ecosystem management. Cultural models are shared perceptions and attitudes about how the world works. They are implicit, taken for granted and frequently operate below the level of consciousness. This research discovered that differing cultural models of water and pollution play a role in the definition, perception and behaviors that people adopt toward water management. Differences in the cultural models of municipal officials and water program managers contribute to different perspectives about strategies for protecting water. This case study evaluates the “Protecting Our Children’s Water” project implemented by the Coastal Training Program of the Wells National Estuarine Research Reserve in southern Maine. This project used an innovative blend of social science research and Collaborative Learning to motivate implementation of watershed management plans to address nonpoint source pollution associated with land use practices. The process of forming two watershed councils in southern Maine, designing a series of training workshops and tracking progress on watershed plan implementation will be described. The role of science as a motivator, the nature of conflict surrounding property rights and the importance of project framing for municipal decision making will be presented. Provocative findings with implications for the design of educational messages about nonpoint source pollution will be included.

Notes: Presentations are typically available via a combination of phone & webcast. With a reservation, they can also be available by video conferencing to those with appropriate equipment.  For phone: dial 866-541-1377, passcode 142625.  For webcast: 1) go to http://www.MyMeetings.com, enter the meeting number 449707376 and passcode NOS8150; 2) enter other required fields; 3) indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy; 4) click on Proceed.  You must also dial the phone number above so you can hear the presentation.  For videoconferencing: contact nos.video.conference@noaa.gov for information on setting up a reservation.  Please allow adequate time for testing of connections (at least 24 hours or more) if you do not regularly connect with NOS.


Observations from the Louisiana and Texas Hypoxic Zones: summer 2007

Monday, 22 October 2007; 12:00 – 13:00 ETZ (SSMC-4, Room #8150, NOS seminar)

Speaker(s): Dr. Steven F. DiMarco ( Texas A&M University)

Email(s): sdimarco@tamu.edu

Abstract: The 2007 season of coastal hypoxia of the Texas-Louisiana Shelf contained several surprises. Predicted to be the largest hypoxic area to date, low dissolved oxygen concentrations were seen mostly offshore south of Atchafalaya in March. Physical conditions likely led to large variability of the distribution of low oxygen bottom waters in July. Light winds allowed low oxygen conditions to persist in the western region until tropical storms affected the region in mid-September. Unusually large rainfall over Texas led to stratified conditions along coastal Texas. A one day rapid response cruise on 08 August was deployed near Freeport, TX, to assess the severity and extent of low oxygen conditions which persisted since early June. The Texas hypoxia was dispersed by Hurricane Humberto on 18 September.

Notes: Presentations are typically available via a combination of phone & webcast. With a reservation, they can also be available by video conferencing to those with appropriate equipment.  For phone: dial 866-541-1377, passcode 142625.  For webcast: 1) go to http://www.MyMeetings.com, enter the meeting number 449707376 and passcode NOS8150; 2) enter other required fields; 3) indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy; 4) click on Proceed.  You must also dial the phone number above so you can hear the presentation.  For videoconferencing: contact nos.video.conference@noaa.gov for information on setting up a reservation.  Please allow adequate time for testing of connections (at least 24 hours or more) if you do not regularly connect with NOS.

1. The experience of operational hydrological forecasting in the Russian Federation & 
2. The current state of the hydrological network of ROSHYDROMET and prospects for its further improvement


29 october 2007; 13:00-14:00 ETZ (SSMC2, Room 8246; Office of Hydrologic Development Seminar)

Speaker: Dr. Sergei Borshch (Hydrometeorological Research Center of the Russian Federation)

Email:  borsch@mecom.ru

Abstract: Dr. Borshch will give a two-part seminar at OHD  The first part of the seminar is entitled "The experience of operational hydrological forecasting in the Russian Federation," and the second part is entitled: "The current state of the hydrological network of ROSHYDROMET and prospects for its further improvement". See abstract here: https://intra.nodc.noaa.gov/Information/Training/Seminars/Seminars2007/Abstract_of_Dr_Borshch_presentation.pdf

Notes: Goto Meeting information: Please join Sergei Borshch's seminar on Monday, October 29 at 1:00 PM Eastern Daylight Time at  https://www.gotomeeting.com/join/499002808. Conference Call: Telecon: 1-877-774-5038, Passcode: 925335#, Meeting ID: 499-002-808. For questions please contact Pedro.Restrepo@noaa.gov.


Delaware Bay Benthic Mapping Project: Mapping The Distribution of Bottom Sediments, Key Habitats, and Sub-Bottom Imaging in the Delaware Bay and River

Monday, 29 October 2007; 12:00 – 13:00 ETZ (SSMC-4, Room #8150, NOS seminar)

Speaker(s): Bartholomew D. Wilson (Delaware Coastal Program/DNREC)

Email(s): Bartholomew.Wilson@state.de.us

Abstract: The Coastal Program of Delaware's Division of Soil and Water Conservation (DNREC), the University of Delaware, Partnership for the Delaware Estuary, and the State of New Jersey have partnered in carrying out a bottom and sub-bottom imaging project to identify and map the benthic habitat and sub-bottom sediments of Delaware Bay and River. This project integrates the use of three types of acoustical systems: Roxann seabed classification, chirp sub-bottom profiling, and multi-beam bathymetric mapping. Verification of the acoustic data is performed through the collection of grab and core samples. Having now completed its fourth year of an expected seven year timeline, over 320 square miles of shallow estuarine bottom has been mapped, approximately 50% of the total bay and river area. This project has identified the spatial extent and relative density of the bays oyster bed, which has allowed for the first time the regional resource managers to evaluate the true status of oyster habitat in the bay. Chirp-sonar and bottom sediment data were integrated together to identify sand resources for beach replenishment that satisfy grain size and volumetric requirements while minimize the impact upon ecologically rich areas of biodiversity. This mapping project has also located keys habitats for such species as Atlantic Sturgeon, Saballaria vulgaris, and Horseshoe Crabs; while also resulted in a greater understanding of the local and regional sediment distribution patterns and transport pathways.

Notes: Presentations are typically available via a combination of phone & webcast. With a reservation, they can also be available by video conferencing to those with appropriate equipment.  For phone: dial 866-541-1377, passcode 142625.  For webcast: 1) go to http://www.MyMeetings.com, enter the meeting number 449707376 and passcode NOS8150; 2) enter other required fields; 3) indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy; 4) click on Proceed.  You must also dial the phone number above so you can hear the presentation.  For videoconferencing: contact nos.video.conference@noaa.gov for information on setting up a reservation.  Please allow adequate time for testing of connections (at least 24 hours or more) if you do not regularly connect with NOS.


Bio-assessment Tools for the Development of Biocriteria

Wednesday, 31 October 2007; 12:00 – 13:00 ETZ (SSMC-4, Room #8150, NOS seminar)

Speaker(s): Dr. William Fisher, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency

Email(s):
fisher.william@epa.gov

Abstract: Dr. William Fisher from EPA's Environmental Effects Laboratory, located in Gulf Breeze, Fl.  Dr. Fisher is leading the development of EPA's biocriteria program. Dr. Fisher’s seminar will focus on the 1) development of EPA's bioassessment protocol and monitoring strategy to assess anthropogenic effects in coral reef ecosystems and 2) the implementation of EPA's biocriteria program as a management tool. ** Note: Dr. Fisher is visiting NOAA’s Center for Coastal Monitoring and Assessment (CCMA) to discuss potential for future collaboration between CCMA and EPA. Additionally, three scientists from CCMA will be participating in EPA's research cruise in the Virgin Islands scheduled to occur December 2007.**

Notes: Presentations are typically available via a combination of phone & webcast. With a reservation, they can also be available by video conferencing to those with appropriate equipment.  For phone: dial 866-541-1377, passcode 142625.  For webcast: 1) go to http://www.MyMeetings.com, enter the meeting number 449707376 and passcode NOS8150; 2) enter other required fields; 3) indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy; 4) click on Proceed.  You must also dial the phone number above so you can hear the presentation.  For videoconferencing: contact nos.video.conference@noaa.gov for information on setting up a reservation.  Please allow adequate time for testing of connections (at least 24 hours or more) if you do not regularly connect with NOS.


 

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November 2007

NCAR’s Societal Impacts Program Research and Outreach

Thursday, 01 November 2007; 13:00 – 14:00 p.m. ET (SSMC#2, Room 10246; Science and Technology Seminar)

Speaker(s): Jeffrey K. Lazo and Julie Demuth (National Center for Atmospheric Research NCAR)

Abstract: The NCAR Societal Impacts Program (SIP) was created in 2004 and is funded by NCAR and NOAA‘s U.S. Weather Research Program.  The goal of SIP is to improve the societal gains from weather forecasting by infusing social science and economic research, methods, and capabilities into the planning, execution, and analysis of weather information, applications, and research directions.  This talk will provide an overview of the mission and activities of the SIP including current efforts on capacity building, outreach and education, information resources, and primary research and support of other social science research activities.   We will then discuss the WAS*IS program, including an October 2007 NWS-funded WAS*IS workshop in Kansas City.  The WAS*IS program is a movement to comprehensively integrate social science into meteorological research and practice in a sustained manner.  WAS*IS primarily is doing this through workshops that emphasize learning relevant ideas, methods, and examples as well as building an interdisciplinary community of practitioners, researchers, and stakeholders. To date, over 20 NWS employees have participated in the WAS*IS workshops. The seminar will conclude with a discussion of current analysis of a recent nationwide study of over 1500 households to access people‘s (a) sources, perceptions, uses and value of weather forecast information, and (b) interpretation of, use of, and preferences for weather forecast uncertainty information.  Results show that the average household accesses weather forecast information from various sources 115 times a month.  For the over 113 million U.S. households--and accounting for the 3.6% of respondents who say they do not use weather forecasts--this equates to over 150 billion forecasts accessed each year.  Additional results suggest that a significant majority of people are willing to receive forecasts that contain uncertainty information, and many people actually prefer uncertainty forecasts.  Moreover, people have preferences for how that information is conveyed.  We will discuss more about our key survey findings, implications of the results, and additional research needed to address remaining knowledge gaps in these areas.

Notes: For further information about this seminar, please contact contact: Bob Glahn at (301) 713-1768.



Ocean activities at the Brazilian NODC

Friday, 2 November 2007 ; 1100-noon EST (SSMC-3, Room  4817, NODC seminar)

Speaker: Lieutenant Vladimir Maluf  (Brazilian Navy, Directorate of Hydrography and Navigation)

Title:  Ocean activities at the Brazilian NODC.

Abstract:  none

Notes: VideoTeleConferencing (VTC)/phone available upon request by contacting Cheryl Ingram (Cheryl.Ingram@noaa.gov) at least a day before the seminar.


ESTIMATING FUTURE VALUE OF ALASKA PUBLIC INFRASTRUCTURE AT RISK TO CLIMATE CHANGE

Tuesday, 13 November 2007; 10:00-11:00am  Alaska Daylight/Standard Time (RISA/ACCAP seminar via teleconference only)

Speaker:  Peter Larsen, The Nature Conservancy

Abstract: Alaska's public infrastructure is disigned for a cold climate. We can expect 10-20% higher costs for infrastructure replacement due to climate change. Join us for a discussion of work conducted at the Institute of Social and Economic Research to update a public infrastructure database and estimate future costs to infrastructure replacement due to climate change.

Notes: The NOAA Alaska Regional Collaboration Team is partnering with the Alaska Climate Change Assessment Program (ACCAP). ACCP is part of the NOAA Regional Integrated Sciences and Assessments (RISA). For further information about this seminar please contact: Sarah Trainor, ACCAP Coordinator and Research Scientist, (907) 474-7878, fnsft@uaf.edu (see also http://www.uaf.edu/accap/teleconference.htm). How to Participate / Log-In to the Alaska Climate Teleconference: 1) With a regular telephone dial: 1-800-893-8850; 2) When prompted, enter the PIN code: 7531823;  PLEASE MUTE YOUR PHONE DURING THE PRESENTATION. The audio is very sensitive and your external conversations and typing can be heard by other participants. To view the presentation during a teleconference: 1) Point your web browser to: http://www.shareitnow.com; 2) Click on the blue Join a Meeting button on the left side bar; 3) For Presenter ID enter: accap@uaf.edu.


ENDURANCE:  Environmentally Non-Disturbing Under-ice Robotic Antarctic Explorer

Wednesday, 14 November 2007; 12:00 - 13:00 ETZ (SSMC-3, Room #4817,  Office of Ocean Exploration Seminar)

Speaker: Dr. William Stone (Stone Aerospace)

Email: bill.stone@stoneaerospace.com

Abstract:  Planning for the NASA robotic mission to Europa to search for microbiological life in the sub-surface ocean beneath the 5 kilometer icecap of that Jovian moon has led to the development of two ambitious fully autonomous underwater research vehicles that are pushing the envelop for AUVs.  From 2004-2007 the DEPTHX project developed and tested concepts for automated 3D mapping and an associated navigational technique known as simultaneous localization and mapping (SLAM).  3D-SLAM allowed DEPTHX to become the first autonomous vehicle to explore, un-tethered, into subterranean hydrothermal vents.   It returned home on its just-created 3D maps that were acquired during the original exploration.   A second objective of the DEPTHX program was to test new architectures for conducting science autonomy in unexplored environments.  Both objectives were dramatically demonstrated on the Zacaton 3 expedition in May of 2007.   ENDURANCE -- a new AUV based on DEPTHX technology  -- is currently under development for deployment below ice in West Lake Bonney, Antarctica, in the fall of 2008.  ENDURANCE code development is focused on extending science autonomy to such capabilities as full sub-surface 3D mapping of West Lake Bonney;  3D and photo mosaic automated imaging of sub-surface Taylor Glacier; and to completely automated grid sampling of the highly stratified lake while minimizing environmental impact.   The hat trick for ENDURANCE is an autonomous egress and docking behavior that will bring it back and up a melt hole only half a meter larger in diameter than the vehicle itself at the conclusion of each mission.  Dr. Stone was PI for DEPTHX and is Co-I and lead AUV designer for ENDURANCE.  Website:  www.stoneaerospace.com

Notes: VideoTeleConferencing (VTC) access available upon request by contacting Cheryl.Ingram@noaa.gov (301-713-3284 x155) at least a day before the seminar. For general questions about this seminar, please contact Reg Beach (301.734.1016) or Hernan Garcia (301-713-3290 x184).


Inter-Basin Freshwater Disparity and Ocean Thermohaline Circulation

Monday, 19 November 2007; 11:00 - 12:00 ETZ (SSMC-3, Room #4817, NODC Seminar)

Speaker:  Dr. Dan Seidov (NODC)

Email:  Dan.Seidov@noaa.gov

Abstract:  The current paradigm of the global ocean thermohaline circulation (THC) is that the driving force of THC—the Meridional Overturning Circulation—is controlled almost exclusively by freshwater fluxes across the sea surface in the Nordic Seas and northern North Atlantic (NNA). A generalized version of this paradigm suggests that the balance between North Atlantic Deep Water (NADW) and Antarctic Deep Water (AADW) is responsible for the so-called “global ocean conveyor belt”— a system of ocean currents connecting different ocean basins and most notably – the northern North Atlantic and northern North Pacific Oceans – the most distant regions of the world ocean. The sea surface salinity (SSS) contrast between the Atlantic and Pacific oceans is the key for the present-day THC operation. However, it remained largely unknown how fragile is this SSS contrast and how large the freshwater cycling in the ocean-atmosphere system should be to maintain the global conveyor and whether this contrast does indeed depend on freshwater balance in the northern part of the Atlantic Ocean. Recent modeling efforts challenge the view of THC as a system operated from NNA. It has been shown that a slight disparity in freshwater redistribution between the Atlantic and Pacific oceans can be sufficient for building up and maintaining a global conveyor-type ocean thermohaline circulation. Relatively small changes in this disparity leading to change in sea surface salinity (SSS) contrasts between the northern parts of the Atlantic and Pacific oceans and in the north-south SSS contrasts within the northern parts of both oceans (not only in the Atlantic Ocean, as many believe) can easily change the operation of the entire global conveyor.

Notes: VideoTeleConferencing (VTC) access available upon request by contacting Cheryl.Ingram@noaa.gov (301-713-3284 x155) at least a day before the seminar. For general questions about this seminar, please contact Hernan Garcia (301-713-3290 x184).


NODC Office Safety Is Your Responsibility


Thursday, 29 November 2007; 11:00 - 12:00 ETZ (SSMC-3, Room #4817, NODC Seminar)

Speaker(s):  Cheryl Ingram, Josepth Shirley, Hernan Garcia (NODC)

Email:  Cheryl.Ingram@noaa.gov, Joseph.Shirley@noaa.gov, Hernan.garcia@noaa.gov

Abstract:  TBA

Notes: VideoTeleConferencing (VTC) access available upon request by contacting Cheryl.Ingram@noaa.gov (301-713-3284 x155) at least a day before the seminar. For general questions about this seminar, please contact Hernan Garcia (301-713-3290 x184).

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December 2007

Technical review on database design and development for historical Korea oceanographic data sets

Tuesday, 04 December 2007; 12:00 - 13:00 ETZ (SSMC-3, Room #4817, NODC Seminar)

Speaker:  Freud Park (NODC)

Email:  Freud.Park@noaa.gov

On-line access to Power Point presentation: 
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/docs/07/FreudPark_KOD_Seminar.pdf

Notes: VideoTeleConferencing (VTC) access available upon request by contacting Cheryl.Ingram@noaa.gov (301-713-3284 x155) at least a day before the seminar. For general questions about this seminar, please contact Hernan Garcia (301-713-3290 x184).


A User-Driven Meso-Gamma-Scale Numerical Modeling and Visualization System for
Weather-Sensitive Decision Making


Wednesday, 05 December 2007; 14:00 – 15:00 p.m. ET (SSMC#2, Room 2358; Science and Technology Seminar)

Speaker(s):
Lloyd Treinish (Project Scientist, Big Green Innovations IBM Systems & Technology Group, Yorktown Heights, New York)

Abstract:
  In many businesses, the decision maker in operational settings requires predictive information to make appropriate choices, which may have a significant economic or societal impact.  However, there may be a real or perceived mismatch between available information and the requirements of such a decision maker to enable planning instead of reaction based upon temporal, spatial or content considerations.  The conventional solution is to scale the predictive modeling to address gaps in resolution and physics.  This suggests a role for meso-gamma-scale (cloud-scale) numerical weather models, which have shown promise for many years as a potential enabler of proactive decision making.  In addition to such models having an increased computational burden, the usability of the data may decrease significantly.  To study these mismatches, we examined business operations that are sensitive to short-term weather and environmental factors by adapting and enhancing extant numerical weather prediction codes coupled with appropriate visualizations and analyses that are tailored to the application and function only at the relevant scale.  We have created an operational test-bed for such user-driven predictive simulation and visualization called "Deep Thunder".  It currently provides 24-hour forecasts as a service at one to two kilometer resolution for several metropolitan areas in the United States, which are updated at least twice daily. Another goal is to reduce the window of uncertainty from the perspective of specific business problems associated with the impact, timing and location of relevant weather events.  Hence, our work has included a focus on high-performance computing, visualization, and automation.  Part of the rationale for this focus is practicality to enable these capabilities to be available as a service.  Given the time-critical nature of weather-sensitive business decisions, if the relevant content can not be provided sufficiently fast, then it has no value.  Such end-to-end computations need to be completed at least an order of magnitude faster than real-time.  But rapid computation is insufficient if the results can not be easily and quickly utilized.  Thus, a variety of fixed and interactive flexible two- and three-dimensional visualizations have been implemented.

Notes:
For further information about this seminar, please contact contact: Bob Glahn at (301) 713-1768.


Building the Larger Community

Wednesday, 12 December 2007; 11:00 - 12:00 ETZ
(SSMC-3, Room #4817,NODC Seminar)

Speaker(s):
  Michael Crane (NODC) & Ronnie Taylor (National Geodetic Survey)

Email:
Michael.Crane@noaa.gov

Abstract:
  Each Federal agency has physical and fiscal limits for implementing the mission.  At the same time the work of an agency is always in context to the Larger Community – the national to neighborhood scale of institutions, organizations, associations, businesses, agencies and individuals.   Process improvement depends in doing more with less direct resources.  This talk will focus on the benefits of combining expertise and energy for the common good.  The One NOAA concept that has been so successful today is the result of previous visions and test “marketing” for amassing critical knowledge and positive interactions.  This marshalling of common interest with the distributed expertise can be applied for the external community.  The talk concludes with the update of the Building of the Larger Community through the Mission ACCESS approach.  ACCESS is the Accelerated Coastal Community Environmental Science Service program developed beginning 1998 and continuing today.

About the speaker: http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/docs/07/Michael_Crane.pdf

Notes: VideoTeleConferencing (VTC) access available upon request by contacting Cheryl.Ingram@noaa.gov (301-713-3284 x155) at least a day before the seminar. For general questions about this seminar, please contact Hernan Garcia (301-713-3290 x184).

Webcast access: 1) go to http://www.MyMeetings.com, enter the meeting number 442112424 and passcode NODC4817 (alternatively direct Participant Join URL: http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?i=442112424&p=NODC4817&t=c); 2) type in other required fields (i.e., your name, e-mail, organization); 3) indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy; 4) click on Proceed. Please contact your IT staff for questions about WebEx


OBIS, Ocean Biogeographical information System: integrating the oceans’ species-based distribution data

Wednesday, 12 December 2007; 12:00 - 13:00 ETZ (SSMC-3, Room #4817,NODC Seminar)

Speaker(s):  Dr. Edward Vanden Berghe (Executive Director, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey)

Email: evberghe@iobis.org

Abstract:  The Ocean Biogeographic Information System (OBIS) is an authoritative web-based provider of global marine species distribution information. It integrates data from a large number of different providers, and redistributes the available data through its web site. It provides a variety of spatial query tools for visualizing geographical relationships among species, and between species and their environment.  OBIS is growing rapidly to become the national, regional, and international infrastructure for information on marine species and their distribution and abundance. OBIS is the information component of the Census of Marine Life (CoML), and the marine node of the Global Biodiversity Information Facility (GBIF). The World Register of Marine Species (WoRMS) is developed as a taxonomic reference, in collaboration with the community of marine taxonomists. OBIS is a true distributed system, facilitating access to biogeographical data from many different sources. The data users gain by having a one-stop shop for biogeographical data. The data providers gain, by increased visibility of their data, and the potential for collaborative ventures and extra use of the data. We are eager to work together with as many potential providers as possible, and are hoping to forge close collaboration with the US National Oceanographic Data Center (NODC), and its World Data Center for Oceanography, Silver Spring.

Presentation available on-line: http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/docs/07/OBIS_for_NODC.ppt


Notes: VideoTeleConferencing (VTC) access available upon request by contacting Cheryl.Ingram@noaa.gov (301-713-3284 x155) at least a day before the seminar. For general questions about this seminar, please contact Hernan Garcia (301-713-3290 x184).

Webcast access: 1) go to http://www.MyMeetings.com, enter the meeting number 442112424 and passcode NODC4817 (alternatively direct Participant Join URL: http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?i=442112424&p=NODC4817&t=c); 2) type in other required fields (i.e., your name, e-mail, organization); 3) indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy; 4) click on Proceed. Please contact your IT staff for questions about WebEx.

Teleconference - Dial 877-9395831 and enter passcode 118873 about 1 min before the seminar start time.



Positioning NOAA for Tomorrow's Opportunities

Thursday, 13 December 2007; 11:30-12:30 ETZ (SSMC3,  Conference Room #4527; NOAA Library Seminar)

Speaker: Vice Admiral Conrad C. Lautenbacher, JR., U.S. Navy (Ret.), NOAA Administrator

Abstract:
Come join VADM Lautenbacher as he shares his thoughts on how NOAA has evolved during his tenure and how NOAA can be prepared for the transition from his administration to the next. He will highlight many of NOAA’s recent accomplishments and discuss some of the challenges and opportunities that lay ahead for NOAA. Following VADM Lautenbacher's presentation, a holiday reception will be held in the NOAA Central Library on the 2nd Floor of SSMC #3. The NOAA Holiday Band and Chorus will provide entertainment at this event.  Refreshments including soft drinks, holiday desserts, and light hors d'oeuvres will be available for all.

Notes: See http://www.lib.noaa.gov/docs/news/news.html


Last Ice: The Fate of Bering Sea Mammals in Response to Climate Change [note new date]

Tuesday, 18 December 2007; 10:00-11:00am Alaska Daylight/Standard Time (RISA/ACCAP seminar via teleconference only)

Speaker:  Gary Hufford (National Weather Service)

Abstract: Sea ice in the Bering Sea is beginning to recede apparently in response to climate change. Walrus and Ribbon Seals seek ice floes as habitat where they breed, give birth and haulout to rest. This makes the walrus and ribbon seal vulnerable to and an indicator of climate change. There is also evidence that the walrus may play a role in the productivity of the Bering Sea by releasing nutrients trapped in pore waters of the bottom sediment when they feed. Join us for this teleconference to learn more and and discuss the potential implications of loss of these species.

Notes: The NOAA Alaska Regional Collaboration Team is partnering with the Alaska Climate Change Assessment Program (ACCAP). ACCP is part of the NOAA Regional Integrated Sciences and Assessments (RISA).

For further information about this seminar please contact: Sarah Trainor, ACCAP Coordinator and Research Scientist, (907) 474-7878, fnsft@uaf.edu (see also http://www.uaf.edu/accap/teleconference.htm).

How to Participate / Log-In to the Alaska Climate Teleconference: 1) With a regular telephone dial: 1-800-893-8850; 2) When prompted, enter the PIN code: 7531823;  PLEASE MUTE YOUR PHONE DURING THE PRESENTATION. The audio is very sensitive and your external conversations and typing can be heard by other participants. To view the presentation during a teleconference: 1) Point your web browser to: http://www.shareitnow.com; 2) Click on the blue Join a Meeting button on the left side bar; 3) For Presenter ID enter: accap@uaf.edu. 


Seminar Partner's contacts

Partners: NODC, NOS, OHC, ARL, OHD, NMFS, NWS, NOAA Library, NCBO & Office of Ocean Exploration.


National Oceanographic Data Center
(NODC) seminars:
Location: Unless otherwise indicated, seminars are held in the NODC conference Room 4817 (SSMC-3, 4th Floor)
Information/questions?
Please contact Hernan Garcia (301-713-3290 Ext 184; Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov),
NODC
- Ocean Climate Laboratory
Notes: Teleconferencing, videoTeleConferencing (VTC) access available upon request by contacting Cheryl.Ingram@noaa.gov(301-713-3284 x155) at least a day before the seminar.
Webcast access: 1) go to http://www.MyMeetings.com, enter the meeting number 442112424 and passcode NODC4817 (alternatively direct Participant Join URL: http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?i=442112424&p=NODC4817&t=c); 2) type in other required fields (i.e., your name, e-mail, organization); 3) indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy; 4) click on Proceed. Please contact your IT staff for questions about WebEx.

NOS seminars:
Location:  Unless otherwise indicated, seminars are typically held in the NOS conference Room# 8150 (SSMC-4, 8th Floor)
Information/questions? Please contact Felix A. Martinez (301-713-3338 x153) NOS/NCCOS/Center for Sponsored Coastal Ocean Research
Notes: Presentations are typically available via video, phone/webcast.  
For video: contactnos.video.conference@noaa.gov for information on setting connection.  Please allow adequate time for testing of connections (24 hours or more) if you do not regularly connect with NOS. 
For phone: dial 866-541-1377, passcode 142625.
For webcast: 1. Go to My Meetings, if needed select “join an event” and enter meeting number (449707376) and passcode (NOS8150);  2) Enter other required fields; 3) Indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy; 4) Click on Proceed; 5) Dial into the phone so you can hear presentation.

Fisheries Service, Office of Habitat Conservation seminars:
Location: Check announcements
Information/questions?
For more information or to suggest a speaker, contact Julie Nygard (Julie.Nygard@noaa.gov ) or Perry Gayaldo (Perry.Gayaldo@noaa.gov)

Air Resources Laboratory seminars:
Location: Check announcements
Information/questions? Please contact  Betty Wells (Betty.Wells@noaa.gov)

National Weather Service - Office of Hydrologic Development
Location:  Check announcements
Information/questions? For more information or to suggest a speaker, contact Pedro.Restrepo@noaa.gov

National Weather Service - Science and Technology Seminars
Location:  Check announcements
Information/questions? For more information or to suggest a speaker, contact Bob Glahn at (301-713-1768 ; Harry.Glahn@noaa.gov)

National Marine Fisheries Service Office of Policy Seminars
Location:  Check announcements
Information/questions? For more information or to suggest a speaker, please contact Anne.Isham@noaa.gov (301) 713-9070 ext 116).

NOAA Chesapeake Bay Office (NCBO): NCBO focuses multiple NOAA capabilities on Chesapeake Bay restoration through science, service, and stewardship of the Bay ecosystem.
Location:  Check announcements
Information/questions? For more information or to suggest a speaker, please contact Kim.Couranz@noaa.gov (410) 267-5673.

NOAA Central Library brown bag seminars (see listing at http://www.lib.noaa.gov/docs/news/news.html):
Location: All NOAA central library brown bag seminars (unless otherwise noted) are held from 1200-1300h ET in SSMC-3, 2nd Floor (main floor), 1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring.
Information/Questions?
For more information or to suggest a speaker, contact Mary Lou Cumberpatch (301-713-2600 Ext.129; Mary.Lou.Cumberpatch@noaa.gov) or Skip Theberge (301-713-2600 Ext. 115; Albert.E.Theberge.Jr@noaa.gov).

Office of Ocean Exploration Census of Marine Life Lunchtime Seminar Series Lunchtime “Making Ocean Life Count” Seminar Series
Location: Check announcements
Information/questions? 
For questions please contact: Reginald.Beach@noaa.gov, Margot.Bohan@noaa.gov, and/or Nicolas.Alvarado@noaa.gov.

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