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OneNOAA Science Seminars



2006 OneNOAA Science Discussion Seminars

[Seminar Partner's contacts]

[2005 OneNOAA Science Seminars] [2007 OneNOAA Science Seminars]

Last updated:

Friday, February 11, 2011

Please join us for our upcoming "One NOAA" science discussion seminars. This is a joint effort to help share science across NOAA.

i-access to our seminar announcements:

1. Join our seminar announcements e-mail list [nominally, one email per week sent on Mondays].
To join our email list contact Hernan Garcia or a seminar partner.

2. Online public access: http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/
Web page originally developed by Hajure Fontaine
; Maintained by Hernan Garcia

3. GoogleCalendar online public access: GoogleCalendar*
Maintained by Felix A. Martinez

General notes about the OneNOAA science seminars:

  • Please check for seminar additions and changes (i.e., cancelations, etc.). [RSS available]
  • Constructive suggestions for improving the content of the seminar series are welcome [Please contact Hernan Garcia or a seminar partner].
  • All NOAA offices/divisions are welcome to participate and/or join as seminar partners (Joining is easy, see seminar format).
  • Please share the seminar announcements with anyone interested. Please notify us of any errors that you find so that we can correct them.
  • Remote access to seminars is available when indicated via web/phone access. When available, seminar presentations will be available for download (see Notes for each seminar).

 


January 2006

 

Argo float and Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) data at NODC
Thursday, 12 January 2006 ; 1100-1200h ET (SSMC3, room 4817, NODC seminar)
Speaker: Charles Sun (NODC)
Email: Charles.Sun@noaa.gov
Abstract: Argo is a global array of free-drifting profiling floats that measure temperature and salinity of the upper 2000 m of the ocean. Argo is a contributor to the WCRP's Climate Variability and Predictability Experiment (CLIVAR) project and to the Global Ocean Data Assimilation Experiment (GODAE). The Argo array is part of the Global Climate Observing System/Global Ocean Observing System GCOS/ GOOS). The Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) is a cooperative international program designed to develop and maintain a global ocean temperature-salinity resource with data that are as up-to-date and of the highest quality as possible for operations and research.
Notes: VideoTeleConferencing (VTC)/phone available upon request by contacting Cheryl Ingram (Cheryl.Ingram@noaa.gov) at least a day before the seminar. For questions about this seminar please contact Hernan Garcia.


Ecosystem Services and Investment Opportunities: The science behind responsible investing
Tuesday, 17 January 2006 ; 1200-1300h ET (SSMC-3, room 4527, NOS seminar)
Speaker: Bruce M. Kahn (Citigroup Global Markets)
Abstract: Increasingly, investors want their equity holdings to reflect their social or environmental values. They wish to avoid companies that profit from activities they oppose, and support companies that behave in ways they consider appropriate or responsible. At the same time,however, most of these investors still want or need to earn a reasonable return on their portfolio. In this seminar, we will review whether thedamage costs imposed on the environment by industrial resource uses (often referred to as externalities) can be reflected in financialmarkets. We review the trends in socially responsible investing and assess the social and environmental benefits of these movements of capital. Emerging methods of assessing corporate environmental performance, using these metrics in capital markets and rating publiclytraded companies requires collaboration between ecosystem scientists and business analysts.
Notes: In response to a high level of interest, this talk will be in SSMC-3, Room 4527 - the 4th floor large conference room. As there is no video in this room, the talk will no longer be available by video. You can still join by phone and we are trying to get the talk and an article posted for you before the talk. If all goes well, the ppt will be available for download by 11am at: http://www.coastalscience.noaa.gov/documents/Investing.pdf. The article should be posted at: http://www.coastalscience.noaa.gov/documents/icv_frontiers.pdf. If the links don't work it means we couldn't get the talks posted - you are still welcome to listen in.


Integrated in situ ocean data delivery for low and high bandwidth internet connections
Thursday, 26 January 2006 ; 1100-1200h ET (SSMC-3, Room 4817, NODC seminar)
Speaker: Charles Sun (NODC)
Email: Charles.Sun@noaa.gov
Abstract: The Pacific regional ocean data and information portal (PRODIP) is an information system developed at the U.S. National Oceanographic Data Center (NODC) for delivering integrated real-time and historical environmental datasets to remote users with high and low bandwidth Internet connections. A schematic diagram appeared at the end of this abstract illustrates a conceptual design of the PRODIP which has four major components: 1.) Data acquisition component, 2.) Data access component, 3.) Data selection component, and 4.) Data delivery component. The PRODIP can be found at http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/prodip/index.htm. The goals for this system are: (1) to develop and implement an operational Pacific regional ocean data and information portal for high bandwidth users that facilitates exploration of in-situ data through a “one-stop shopping” (single interface) that integrates real-time data streams with archives across the Internet and (2) to provide synchronization software and DVDs or CD-ROMS containing the integrated dataset from NODC to users without a high-speed network. The synchronization software is then used to periodically update the CD/DVD-ROM-based archive with new data. The success of this project will provide a prototype for the next generation of NOAA products and services that are responsive to needs of the Pacific region ocean communities, governments and business. The developmental and implemental strategy and framework of the project provide adequate coverage and efficient sharing and continuity of high quality data in the islands of Hawaii, the Northwestern Hawaii Islands, and the American Flag Territories.
Presentation available online: TBD
Notes: VideoTeleConferencing (VTC)/phone available upon request by contacting Cheryl Ingram (Cheryl.Ingram@noaa.gov) at least a day before the seminar. For questions about this seminar please contact Hernan Garcia.


Subdivide and Capture: Zoning Policies in the Northeast
Thursday, 26 January 2006 ; 1200-1300h ET (SSMC-3, Room 14836, Office of Science and Technology’s Division of Economics and Social Analysis seminar)
Speaker: Steve Edwards (NEFSC)
Abstract: TBA
Presentation available online: http://www.st.nmfs.gov/st5/brown_bag_sessions/2006/documents/Sub-divide%20and%20Capture_Zip.ppt
Notes: This seminar is part of the Office of Science and Technology’s Division of Economics and Social Analysis 2006 Economics and Social Science Brown Bag Series. Contact Kristy.Wallmo@noaa.gov for more information.


Connectivity in the Caribbean: Can "living tracers of connectivity" tell us something about oceanography and fisheries in the greater Caribbean region
Friday, 27 January 2006, 1300-1400h ET (SSMC-4, Room 8150 -8th floor large conference room-, NOS seminar)
Speaker: Pat Colin (Director of the Coral Reef Research Foundation in Palau)
Abstract: Most reef fishes in the tropical western North Atlantic region are widely dispersed, often throughout the entire region. A number of smaller fishes, however, have more limited distributions which at first seem anomalous. The neon gobies (Elacatinus) are the most speciose fish genus in the region and have abrupt breaks in species ranges, disjunct distributions and multiple color variations of species. Their distributions have an oceanographic underpinning largely revealed due to increase knowledge of surface circulation in the region through satellite-tracked drifters. Limited external ecological connectivity, as evidenced by endemism and restricted oceanic circulation, is found in four regions; the Panama bight, the Gulf of Honduras, the Cayman Islands/western Cuba area and the northern/central Bahamas. The Bahamian region has several endemic fishes and its unusual oceanic current regime produces what can be called "the Bahamas Enclave" in the central to northeastern Bahamas. Minor marine zoogeographic barriers, such as the Mona Channel, are identified and their mode of operation considered. The planktonic larval life of these gobies is similar to many other reef fishes and the patterns revealed may be reflected in ecological connectivity of many reef fishes of fishery importance. Dispersal of the eggs and larvae of large reef fishes may be much more limited than previously thought. Eggs and larvae are not easily entrained into oceanic circulation from coastal waters and is a factor that has been ignored in considerations of connectivity based on current modeling.
Notes: Contact mark.mohs@noaa.gov to arrange for video conferencing. To join us by phone, dial 866-541-1377, passcode 142625 (con.9849337) If you are dialing in or participating by video and have trouble with the connection, please call 301-713-4043.


February 2006

 

General Equilibrium Models for Ecosystem Management
Thursday, 02 February 2006 ; 1200-1300h ET (SSMC-3, Room 14836, Office of Science and Technology’s Division of Economics and Social Analysis seminar)
Speaker: John Tschirhart (University of Wyoming)
Abstract: TBA
Presentation available online: http://www.st.nmfs.gov/st5/brown_bag_sessions/2006/documents/Tschirhart_paper.pdf
Notes: This seminar is part of the Office of Science and Technology’s Division of Economics and Social Analysis 2006 Economics and Social Science Brown Bag Series. Contact Kristy.Wallmo@noaa.gov for more information.


Demonstration of a Global Modeling Methodology to Determine the Relative Importance of Local and Long-Distance Sources
Friday, 03 February 2006 ; 1330-1430h ET (SSMC-3, Room 3404, ARL seminar)
Speaker: Roland R. Draxler (ARL)
Abstract: A global 3D transport-dispersion model was used to simulate 85Kr background concentrations at five sampling locations along the US east coast during 1982 through 1983. The samplers were originally established to monitor the 85Kr plume downwind of the Savannah River Plant (SRP), a nuclear fuel reprocessing facility. The samplers were located 300 to 1000 km downwind of the SRP. In the original analyses of the measurements, a constant value, different for each sampling station, was subtracted from the measurements to obtain the part of the measurement representing the SRP plume. The use of a 3D global model, which includes all the 85Kr sources, was able to reproduce the day-to-day concentration variations at the sampling locations with correlation coefficients of 0.34 to 0.47. These 3D model values were then subtracted from the measured concentrations at each sampler which then represents the portion of the measurement that can be attributed to emissions from the SRP. The revised plume estimates were a factor of 1.3 to 2.5 times higher than the old method using a constant background subtraction. The greatest differences in the plume estimates occurred at the most distant sampling stations.
Presentation available online: TBD
Notes: For information about this seminar, please contact Betty Wells (Betty.Wells@noaa.gov), 301-713-0684, ext. 100.


Hawaii Coral Reef Initiative Update: An Evolving Program
Monday, 06 February 2006, 1200-1300h ET (SSMC-4, Room 8150, NOS seminar)
Speaker: Michael P. Hamnett (Executive Director, Research Corporation of the University of Hawaii)
Abstract: Mike Hamnett, Principal Investigator of the Hawaii Coral Reef Initiative Research Program will give an overview of the evolving priorities for the HCRI research, monitoring, and public education and awareness program. He will describe how the program has evolved since 1998, some interesting results of project just completed in December 2005, and the priorities for 2006.
Notes: Contact mark.mohs@noaa.gov to arrange for video conferencing. To join us by phone, dial 866-541-1377, passcode 142625 (con.9849337) If you are dialing in or participating by video and have trouble with the connection, please call 301-713-4043.


NOAA's Ecosystem Approach to Management
Tuesday, 07 February 2006, 1400-1500h ET [SSMC-4, Room 8150 and room 13153 (overflow room with Jack on video), NOS seminar]
Speaker: Jack Dunnigan (NOS Assistant Administrator and former Ecosystem Goal Team lead)
Abstract: The U.S. Ocean Action Plan, in response to the U.S. Commission on Ocean Policy Report, firmly endorses the importance of focusing on Ecosystem Approaches to Management (EAM). To address this mandate, NOAA has developed a vision for an EAM, and detailed its mission and outcomes for sustainable use of the nation’s coastal and marine resources. NOAA’s EAM is a holistic, evolutionary management strategy designed to improve the health and productivity of coastal and marine ecosystems. An EAM moves current management practices from sectoral, short-term perspectives, with humans independent of ecosystems to ecosystem-based, long-term perspectives and humans integral to ecosystems. NOAA’s vision incorporates collaboration among NOAA, other federal, state, tribal, and local agencies, NGOs, academic and business communities. EAM within NOAA includes seven strategies: collaborative, adaptive, incremental, geographically specifying management areas, accounts for ecosystem knowledge and uncertainties, and balances diverse societal objectives. These strategies will provide greater biological, physical, and socio-economical understanding of ecosystems. NOAA’s future steps towards EAM include improving internal integration and coordination to produce better products and services, while collaborating with partners to begin the regional process of ecosystem-based management. The new management practices will be geographically specified located in the 10 recently delineated U.S. Regional Ecosystems based on the Large Marine Ecosystem model. NOAA’s Ecosystem Goal Team (EGT) was formed to help coordinate and promote NOAA EAM efforts (see the EGT website: http://ecosystems.noaa.gov/).
Notes: For video, dial the NOS bridge or contact nos.video.conference@noaa.gov for help. For phone, dial 866-541-1377, passcode 142625. For webstream, go to http://hood.nos.noaa.gov/nccos/videostream.sdp. You will need QuickTime to see the presentation. QuickTime can be downloaded from http://www.apple.com/quicktime/download/standalone.html. Note: those watching the webstream will see and hear Jack but will not see the slides. If you have trouble connecting, call us at 410-271-9623.


Office of Security at NOAA, working together to make the DOC a more secure environment for all
Thursday, 09 February 2006 ; 1000-1100h ET (SSMC-3, Room 4817, NODC seminar)
Speaker: Richard L Duncan (Security Manager, Office of Security at NOAA)
Email: Richard.L.Duncan@noaa.gov
Abstract: A discussion about NOAA security: Q&A
Notes: VideoTeleConferencing (VTC)/phone available upon request by contacting Cheryl Ingram (Cheryl.Ingram@noaa.gov) at least a day before the seminar. For questions about this seminar please contact Hernan Garcia.


Interannual to Interpentadal changes in the salinity of the North Atlantic from in situ measurements
Wednesday, 15 February 2006 ; 1100-1200h ET (SSMC-3, Room 4817, NODC seminar)
Speaker: Tim Boyer (NODC)
Email: Tim.Boyer@noaa.gov
Abstract: Recent studies have shown significant regionally coherent linear trends in salinity in the upper 3000 meters of the North Atlantic over the last 45 years. Imposed on these linear trends are shorter time-scale fluctuations in the salinity of the North Atlantic,from internnual to decadal, which are also important for understanding earth's climate system. For example, recent work has looked at salinity changes on an interannual time scale for a limited number of years in the 1990s and found some correlation with the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO). The present work examines changes in salinity on five-year (pentadal) time scales using in situ measurements. The source of data is the World Ocean Database (WOD). The method involves calculating mean salinity anomaly fields from monthly climatologies for each pentad from 1955-59 to 2000-2004 for different standard isobaric levels. Different pentads are then compared to reveal patterns of change between the time periods. Results show relatively high salinity over much of the western subpolar North Atlantic in periods 1962-66, 1970-74, and 1991-95. Relatively low salinities occurred in the same area in periods 1970-74 and 1982-86. Opposite relative salinity anomalies occurred in the eastern subpolar North Atlantic in all these periods except 1970-74 which had relatively low salinities in the eastern as well as the western part of the subpolar North Atlantic. The observed patterns are coherent down to at least 500 meters along a section at 55° north latitude. Salinity anomaly patterns south of 42° north latitude are less apparent in the North Atlantic.
Notes: VideoTeleConferencing (VTC)/phone available upon request by contacting Cheryl Ingram (Cheryl.Ingram@noaa.gov) at least a day before the seminar. For questions about this seminar please contact Hernan Garcia.


Structure in the Sea: Genetics through stories written for non-geneticists
Thursday, 16 February 2006, 1200-1300h ET (SSMC-3, Room 11836, NOS seminar)
Speaker: Barbara L. Taylor (NOAA Southwest Fisheries Science Center)
Abstract: Barbara will talk about several interesting findings and principles her program has encountered in the last several years using humpback whales, killer whales, and harbor seals as examples.
Presentation available online: TBD
Notes: Phone and video conferencing not available.


Science Journalism and the News Media: A Key Societal Institution in "Epochal" Evolution...Or in Crisis?
Wednesday, 22 February 2006, 1200-1300h ET (SSMC-4, Room 8150, NOS seminar)
Speaker: Bud Ward
Abstract: Sign abound that the mainstream news media -- on which the general public has relied for its information (and misinformation?) about science and environmental news -- are at the beginning of a profoundly significant evolution. From a loss of nearly 50 percent of their viewership just three decades ago for the network primetime news programs...to the rise of Google and the fall of daily newspaper readership... to massive consolidation of media ownerships...the warning signs are everywhere. How will these historical changes in science communications through the mass media affect scientists doing the research and the public needing to better understand it? And what can the science community do now to begin preparing itself for the media emerging at its very doorstep?
Presentation available online: TBD
Notes: For video, dial the NOS bridge or contact nos.video.conference@noaa.gov for help. For phone, dial 866-541-1377, passcode 142625. For webcast: 1. Go to: http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?i=741804628&p=NCCOS1305&t=c 2. Enter the required fields. 3. Indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy. 4. Click on Proceed. Meeting Number is 741804628, Passcode is NCCOS1305, Meeting Host is Science Seminar Host.


An overview of the NOAA Ocean Explorer program
Thursday, 23 February 2006 ; 1100-1200h ET (SSMC-3, Room 4817, NODC seminar)
Speaker: Fred Gorell (Ocean Explorer)
Emails: Fred.Gorell@noaa.gov
Abstract: The NOAA Ocean Exploration program strives to engage broad audiences to enhance America’s environmental literacy through the excitement of ocean discovery. Fred Gorell will present an informal overview of this exciting NOAA program, how it got started, where it is now, and future plans. Steve Rutz will present a few remarks on developing an end-to-end data management system between data collected during Ocean Explorer cruises and NODC.
Presentation available online: TBD
Notes: VideoTeleConferencing (VTC)/phone available upon request by contacting Cheryl Ingram (Cheryl.Ingram@noaa.gov) at least a day before the seminar. For questions about this seminar please contact Hernan Garcia.


Status of coral reefs in tsunami affected countries: 2005
Tuesday, 28 February 2006, 1200-1300h ET (SSMC4, Room 8150, NOS seminar)
Speaker: Clive Wilkenson (ICRAN)
Abstract: Following the December 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami event, the International Coral Reef Initiative asked its operational networks, the Global Coral Reef Monitoring Network, Reef Check, ReefBase, and the Coral Reef Degradation in the Indian Ocean (CORDIO), to compile a report on the post-tsunami status of coral reefs in affected countries. Joining this effort were: Department of State, NOAA, AusAid, UNEP, IUCN, WWF, IOC/UNESCO, CRC Reef, Government of Japan (Ministry of Environment), International Ocean Initiative. The new report reveals that many coral reef ecosystems in the region were surprisingly resilient to the effects of the tsunamis, and also were largely responsible for protecting other marine systems from the ravages of the tsunamis. In addition to providing information on the effects of the tsunami, the report seeks to raise awareness of the critical role that coastal resources play in the lives of many people in the impacted areas and offers recommendations on how to mitigate similar disasters in the future, including the need for an early warning system and greater attention to sound coastal and fisheries management.
Presentation available online: TBD
Notes: For video, dial the NOS bridge or contact nos.video.conference@noaa.gov for help. For phone, dial 866-541-1377, passcode 142625. For webcast: 1. Go to: http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?i=741804628&p=NCCOS1305&t=c 2. Enter the required fields. 3. Indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy. 4. Click on Proceed. Meeting Number is 741804628, Passcode is NCCOS1305, Meeting Host is Science Seminar Host.


March 2006

Global Sea Level Rise
Thursday, 02 March 2006 ; 1100-1200h ET (SSMC-3, 2nd floor, Room 2501, NODC seminar)
Speaker: Laury Miller (Chief, NOAA Laboratory for Satellite Altimetry)
Email: Laury.Miller@noaa.gov
Abstract: TBA
Notes: VideoTeleConferencing (VTC)/phone available upon request by contacting Cheryl Ingram (Cheryl.Ingram@noaa.gov) at least a day before the seminar. For questions about this seminar please contact Hernan Garcia.


On the NODC user services
Thursday, 09 March 2006 ; 1100-1200h ET (SSMC-3, Room 4817, NODC seminar)
Speakers: Patricia Kirk and Mary Hollinger (NODC)
Email: patricia.t.kirk@noaa.gov & mary.b.hollinger@noaa.gov
Abstract: An informal discussion of the history of NODC user services. The NODC user services provide customers with both prepared, off-the-shelf products such as publications or CD-ROMs and data products produced from data selectively retrieved from the NODC archives.
Notes: VideoTeleConferencing (VTC)/phone available upon request by contacting Cheryl Ingram (Cheryl.Ingram@noaa.gov) at least a day before the seminar. For questions about this seminar please contact Hernan Garcia.


The impact of profiling float data on the estimation of mean climatological temperature and salinity
Monday, 13 March 2006 ; 1100-1200h ET (SSMC-3, Room 4817, NODC seminar)
Speaker: Tim Boyer (NODC)
Email: Tim.Boyer@noaa.gov
Abstract: Profiling floats have greatly expanded the spatial and temporal reach of subsurface oceanographic temperature and salinity data collection. We now have a source of data from geographic areas and seasons which were previously data sparse or never even sampled. This creates the possibility to enhance estimation of climatological fields for both temperature and salinity, leading to better initial and boundary conditions for models, among other benefits. But this also creates new problems in the estimation of climatological fields. All float data has been collected within the last 11 years, the majority in the last 5 years. Climatologies could potentially be skewed toward values prevalent in the last 5 years, especially for salinity. Further, profiling floats come with their own set of problems, including pressure hysteresis and salinity drift. The sheer amount of data coming in also presents challenges in quality assurance. We use the profiling float data from the last 11 years to perform some experiments to quantify the impact of profiling floats on climatological mean fields of temperature and salinity. Further experiments use the delayed mode salinity data in climatologies to assess the impact of these data in comparison to the real time salinity. Finally, the additional quality control needed to prepare the profiling float data for use in climatological calculations is detailed. The data used are the float data from the GODAE server, along with float data available from the WOCE data set and from the GTSPP data set. Other data types are from the World Ocean Database.
Presentation available online: TBD
Notes: VideoTeleConferencing (VTC)/phone available upon request by contacting Cheryl Ingram (Cheryl.Ingram@noaa.gov) at least a day before the seminar. For questions about this seminar please contact Hernan Garcia.


NOAA fisheries service and satellite data - Where are we, and where are we going?
Tuesday, 14 March 2006, 1500-1600h ET (SSMC-1, Room 8331, NESDIS seminar)
Speaker: Cara Wilson (PFEL, SFSC)
Abstract: This talk will be the culmination of a series of seminars given at eight NOAA Fisheries Service laboratories since June 2005. Recent developments in the transitioning of NASA’s research satellite data into NOAA operational products and the impacts to NOAA Fisheries Service will be presented. Cara will also review the current usage of satellite data within NOAA Fisheries Service and discuss issues related to satellite data that need improvement.
Presentation available online: TBD
Notes: VideoTeleConferencing (VTC)/phone not available.


Modeling the Connectivity and Production of Lobster Populations in the Gulf of Maine
Thursday, 16 March 2006, 1230-1330h ET (SSMC-4, Room 8150, NOS seminar)
Speaker: Lew Incze (University of Southern Maine)
Abstract: We have incorporated a synthesis of >15 years of lobster (Homarus americanus) life history data from the western Gulf of Maine into two parallel modeling efforts to link egg production and larval transport patterns to the distribution of recruitment and fishery yields. Early life history calculations are coupled to the operational circulation model (4 km resolution) of the Gulf of Maine Ocean Observing System, with output (larval supply) aggregated at moderately large scales for use by resource managers and the industry. The fishery production model begins with benthic settlement estimates at the management scales, thus linking the two modeling approaches. Modeling strategies, results and future applications are discussed. This project was funded by the Center for Sponsored Coastal Ocean Research.
Presentation available online: TBD
Notes: For video, dial the NOS bridge or contact nos.video.conference@noaa.gov for help. For phone, dial 866-541-1377, passcode 142625. For webcast: 1. Go to: http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?i=741804628&p=NCCOS1305&t=c 2. Enter the required fields. 3. Indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy. 4. Click on Proceed. Meeting Number is 741804628, Passcode is NCCOS1305, Meeting Host is Science Seminar Host.


150 Years of Discovering the Seafloor - A Chronicle of Seafloor Mapping and Discovery
Thursday, 16 March 2006 ; 1100-1200h ET (SSMC-3, Room 4817, NODC seminar)
Speaker: Albert E. Theberge (NOAA Central Library)
Email: Albert.E.Theberge.Jr@noaa.gov
Abstract: An informal discussion of the history of ocean floor mapping.
Presentation available online: TBD
Notes: VideoTeleConferencing (VTC)/phone available upon request by contacting Cheryl Ingram (Cheryl.Ingram@noaa.gov) at least a day before the seminar. For questions about this seminar please contact Hernan Garcia.


Integrated Ocean Observing System (IOOS) 101
Thursday, 23 March 2006 ; 1300-1600h ET (SSMC-3, Room 4527)
Abstract: NOAA IOOS 101 is a 3 hour seminar intended to provide information on how we are moving the nation forward on IOOS. The seminar is open to all NOAA employees. Participants will gain first hand information about the components of IOOS and the increased interoperability among its various observing systems. The Integrated Ocean Observing System (IOOS), which includes a coastal and global component, is a major U.S. contribution to the Global Ocean Observing System (GOOS). GOOS is the ocean component of the larger Global Earth Observation System of Systems (GEOSS). Given the social, economic, and scientific benefits of an integrated Earth information and data management system, the U.S. Ocean Action Plan prioritized the continued development of GEOSS, GOOS, and IOOS. NOAA participates in each of these systems and has recently been named as the federal lead for the administration and implementation of the IOOS. NOAA also contributes considerable observing, modeling, and analysis capabilities to both the coastal and global components. Further information: Jennifer Werner (Jennifer.Werner@noaa.gov; 301-713-9880 Ext 174/209)
Presentation available online: Presentations (pdf format) on IOOS Ocean Observing System, IOOS: The Global Component, The Role of Ecosystems Observing and IOOS, Introduction to DMAC are available at https://inside.nos.noaa.gov/noc/docs/products/welcome.html (see NOAA’s IOOS 101 Seminar, March 23, 2006 ; use your NOAA email login/password).


NOAA's Role in Ocean and Atmospheric Observations
Thursday, 30 March 2006 ; 1100-1200h ET (SSMC-3, 2nd floor, NOAA Central Library, NODC seminar)
Speaker: Timothy R.E. Keeney (NOAA Deputy Assistant Secretary of Commerce for Oceans and Atmosphere)
Abstract: NOAA is part of a large national and international cooperative effort to bring together existing and new hardware and software and making it compatible in order to supply critical data and information from our ocean and atmospheric observations systems. The U.S. and other nations have a unique role in developing and maintaining a system that will is collecting data, working to enhance data distribution, and eventually provide models to help all of the world's nations. The U.S. will contribute to this Global Earth Observation System of Systems (GEOSS) with data and integration models from our Integrated Ocean Observing System (IOOS) which is being developed by several agencies but will now be led by NOAA. Mr Timothy R.E. Keeney, Deputy Assistant Secretary of Commerce for Oceans and Atmosphere will provide an overview of NOAA's role as a leader in IOOS and GEOSS. Mr. Keeney will also discuss how the integration of NOAA's observation platforms are essential to meeting NOAA's Climate, Weather and Water, Commerce and Transportation and Ecosystem Goals as well as the major societal goals of IOOS and GEOSS.
Presentation available online: http://www.pco.noaa.gov/presentation.htm (see Tim Keeney, Deputy Assistant Secretary, Moving Forward: NOAA and Earth Observation Systems, March 30th, 2006)
About the speaker: Additional information about Timothy R.E. Keeney (http://www.noaa.gov/keeney.html). Please contact Joanna Gordon (Joanna.Gordon@noaa.gov) for further information about Timothy R.E. Keeney.
Notes: No VideoTeleConferencing (VTC)/phone available for this seminar. Note that this seminar will take place in SSMC-3, 2nd floor, NOAA Central Library main floor (1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD). Please contact Hernan E. Garcia (301-713-3290 Ext. 184; Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov) or Skip Theberge (301-713-2600 Ext. 115; Albert.E.Theberge.Jr@noaa.gov) for further information.


April 2006

 

Determining Fish Habitat Utilization Patterns and the Efficacy of Marine Protected Areas in Hawaii via Integrated Coral Reef Ecosystem Mapping and Monitoring
Tuesday, 4 April 2006, 1200-1300h ET (SSMC-4, Room 8150, NOS seminar)
Speaker: Alan Friedlander (NOS/NCCOS)
Abstract: Over the past four decades, Hawaii has developed a network of 11 Marine Life Conservation Districts (MLCDs) to conserve and replenish marine resources around the state. Initially established to provide opportunities for public interaction with the marine environment, MLCDs vary in size, habitat quality, and management regimes. The evolution of MLCDs into a spatial management tool used to protect marine ecosystems presents an excellent opportunity to test hypotheses concerning marine protected area (MPA) design and function. Digital nearshore habitat maps developed by NOAA's Biogeography Team were used to structure field investigations and identify patterns of habitat use for various fish species in order to define essential fish habitat and biologically relevant boundaries for MPAs. Results of the study show that the abundance and distribution of species and assemblages was strongly tied to habitat type. Structurally complex hardbottom habitats harbored the greatest diversity and the highest biomass of fishes. Management also played an important role, as MLCDs had higher values for most fish assemblage characteristics (e.g. biomass, size, diversity) than adjacent areas where fishing was permitted. In addition, apex predators and other target species were more abundant and larger in MLCDs, illustrating the effectiveness of these closures in conserving fish populations. Habitat complexity, quality, size and level of protection from fishing were important determinates of MLCD effectiveness. Most MLCDs in Hawaii are currently too small and encompass too few habitat types to provide substantial benefits to coastal reef fisheries. In addition, MLCDs currently encompass less than 1% of the total reef area of the main Hawaiian Islands. Future protected area design in the main Hawaiian Islands needs to incorporate a mosaic of habitats at larger spatial scales to support viable reef fish populations.
Presentation available online: TBD
Notes: For video, dial the NOS bridge or contact nos.video.conference@noaa.gov for help. For phone, dial 866-541-1377, passcode 142625. For webcast: 1. Go to: http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?i=741804628&p=NCCOS1305&t=c 2. Enter the required fields. 3. Indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy. 4. Click on Proceed. 5. Dial into the phone so you can hear too! Meeting Number is 741804628, Passcode is NCCOS1305, Meeting Host is Science Seminar Host.


The Enhanced Multisensor Precipitation Estimator and Nowcaster – Improving WFO Flash Flood Services
Wednesday, 5 April 2006, 1400-1500h ET (SSMC-2, Room 2358, NWS seminar)
Speaker: Richard Fulton (Hydrologic Science and Modeling Branch Hydrology Laboratory NWS Office of Hydrologic Development)
Abstract: The Multisensor Precipitation Estimator (MPE) was delivered to the Weather Forecast Offices (WFOs) and River Forecast Centers (RFCs) several years ago within AWIPS to provide improved methods for estimating rainfall from WSR-88D radar, rain gauges, and GOES satellite for input into hydrologic forecast models. Although MPE satisfies current requirements for river forecasting at the RFCs, it falls short in providing rainfall products of sufficient temporal and spatial resolution at the WFOs for flash flood monitoring and warning in small stream basins. A new enhanced version of MPE, called EMPE, has been developed as part of the Advanced Hydrologic Prediction Services program. The EMPE will satisfy these more stringent requirements and provide increased flexibility for both WFOs and RFCs. In addition, a new Multisensor Precipitation Nowcaster (MPN) algorithm has been developed from the legacy Flash Flood Potential algorithm and integrated with EMPE to provide new regional, gridded, short-term rainfall forecasts for increased warning lead time. These two prototype systems have been running continuously since 2004 in an off-line test and demonstration mode at the Hydrology Laboratory and have recently been given high priority for integration within AWIPS to improve flash flood-related GPRA performance measures. The EMPE and MPN algorithms will be described and new capabilities that are enabled by these enhancements will be presented.
Notes: National Weather Service - Science and Technology Seminar. Contact Bob Glahn at (301-713-1768 ; Harry.Glahn@noaa.gov).


Development and Implementation of National Ocean Service Operational Coastal and Estuarine Forecast Systems
Thursday, 6 April 2006 ; 1100-1200h ET (SSMC-3, Room 4817, NODC seminar)
Speaker: Frank Aikman (NOS)
Email: Frank.Aikman@noaa.gov
Abstract: NOAA’s National Ocean Service (NOS) is involved in the application of hydrodynamic models and the development of operational forecast systems in estuaries and the coastal ocean. These models and systems have applications in the support of safe and efficient navigation and emergency response, as well as marine geospatial and ecosystem applications. Nowcast/forecast systems developed in-house for the Chesapeake Bay, the Port of New York and New Jersey, and Galveston Bay are now operational. Models developed elsewhere have recently been transitioned to operational status for Lake Erie and Lake Michigan and for the St Johns River, FL. Forecast systems will be operationally implemented in the future for the remaining three Great Lakes (Huron, Ontario, and Superior) and numerous other ports, estuaries and coastal regions. Once tested, fully evaluated and deemed accurate by NOS standards, the nowcast/forecast systems are transitioned into the operational environment. The components of a real-time estuarine modeling system are discussed in terms of a “standard” Coastal Ocean Modeling Framework (COMF) which enhances the efficiency of research, development, transition and operations. The COMF includes the essential operational management of observations and forecasts of atmospheric, ocean and riverine inputs, as well as operational quality control and the dissemination of results. The COMF is intended to stimulate a community approach to coastal modeling, providing tools and protocols, and to abide by IOOS and ESMF standards. Some examples of ecological applications of hydrodynamic models are also discussed. Frank Aikman is in the Marine Modeling & Analysis Programs, Coast Survey Development Laboratory, NOAA’s National Ocean Service.
Notes: VideoTeleConferencing (VTC)/phone available upon request by contacting Cheryl Ingram (Cheryl.Ingram@noaa.gov) at least a day before the seminar. For questions about this seminar please contact Hernan Garcia.


Assessing the Role of Habitat in Structuring Coral Reef Fish Assemblages in Hawaii: Implications for MPA Design at Multiple Spatial Scales
Thursday, 6 April 2006, 1500-1600h ET (SSMC-4, Room 8150, NOS seminar)
Speaker: Lisa Wedding
Abstract: Coral reef communities demonstrate habitat heterogeneity across spatial scales varying from centimeters to kilometers. Habitat is a major determinant of fish assemblage structure in the marine environment, and coral reef fishes respond to habitat at a range of spatial scales. Our work has taken a multi-scaled approach to assessing the role of habitat in structuring coral reef fish assemblages in the Hawaiian Islands. Developing a better understanding of fisheries-habitat linkages is an important consideration with respect to marine biodiversity conservation and management, as well as MPA design. Results at the micro-scale (cm3) show that coral reef fish assemblages respond to habitat complexity, based on reef hole volume, at these small spatial scales. In addition, areas of high spatial complexity at the meso-scale (100 m2) were shown to harbor greater fish biomass and higher species diversity relative to other habitats. Benthic habitat maps were developed to examine meso-scale fish habitat utilization patterns. Our results provided insight into level of habitat connectivity across the seascape and assisted in the identification of essential fish habitat areas that serve a nursery role for several species. Considering the documented importance of the relationship between habitat complexity and fish assemblage structure at the micro and meso-scales, it is critical to improve methods of calculating habitat complexity in the marine environment at larger geographic scales that are more consistent with management decisions and ecosystem function. Our current work is focused on utilizing remotely sensed data to obtain measurements of habitat complexity at the macro-scale (km2). Remotely sensed LIDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) data gives accurate, high-resolution bathymetry at a broad spatial scale. We are developing cost effective methods for determining habitat complexity at scales that are commensurate with the resources and applicable to regional-level management actions. The integration of habitat complexity measurements at multiple spatial scales can greatly informed management decisions with respect to MPA design and evaluation by identifying juvenile nursery habitats, areas of high biodiversity, and by better understanding linkages among ecosystem components.
Presentation available online: TBD
Notes: For video, dial the NOS bridge or contact nos.video.conference@noaa.gov for help. For phone, dial 866-541-1377, passcode 142625. For webcast: 1. Go to: http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?i=741804628&p=NCCOS1305&t=c 2. Enter the required fields. 3. Indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy. 4. Click on Proceed. 5. Dial into the phone so you can hear too! Meeting Number is 741804628, Passcode is NCCOS1305, Meeting Host is Science Seminar Host.


The Cod That Wouldn’t Leave and Other Tales of Fish Movement in the NMSP
Friday, 7 April 2006, 1200-1300h ET (SSMC-4, Room 8150, NOS seminar)
Speaker: James Lindholm (Senior Research Biologist, Pfleger Institute of Environmental Research)
Email: james@pier.org
Abstract: The Marine Protected Area (MPA) is now a well established tool for the conservation and management of marine fishes. MPAs are in use world-wide in a variety of shapes and sizes, covering a broad spectrum of management strategies ranging from minimal protection to full no-take protection. And yet, despite this wide use, there continues to be a paucity of data on the movement behavior of fishes relative to the boundaries of MPAs. Acoustic telemetry provides a means to collect these vital movement data at spatial and temporal scales well-matched to most MPAs. Fishes tagged with acoustic transmitters are tracked for time periods ranging from minutes to years, over spatial scales ranging from meters to 100’s of kilometers. NOAA’s National Marine Sanctuary Program encompasses coastal and offshore sites around the nation and provides an excellent opportunity to explore questions relating to fish movement and MPA boundaries. In this presentation, I will describe on-going telemetry research occurring in the Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary off of southern California, Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary, and the Gulf of Maine’s Stellwagen Bank National Marine Sanctuary. Projects in the FKNMS (with Sanctuary Preservation Areas) and in the CINMS (with State Marine Reserves) are explicitly quantifying the efficacy of existing no-take reserves for the conservation of multiple fish species. In the SBNMS, where reserves are yet to be designated, research has been directed toward identifying the habitat-specific movements of fishes such as Atlantic cod to inform any future reserve designation process. I will present results to-date for each of the three projects and describe future plans.
Notes: For video, dial the NOS bridge or contact nos.video.conference@noaa.gov for help. For phone, dial 866-541-1377, passcode 142625. For webcast: 1. Go to: http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?i=741804628&p=NCCOS1305&t=c 2. Enter the required fields. 3. Indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy. 4. Click on Proceed. 5. Dial into the phone so you can hear too! Meeting Number is 741804628, Passcode is NCCOS1305, Meeting Host is Science Seminar Host.


200 Years of Science and Service - The Story of NOAA's Oldest Ancestor Agency
Monday, 10 April 2006 ; 1100-1200h ET (SSMC-3, 2nd floor, NOAA Central Library, NODC seminar)
Speaker: Albert E. Theberge (NOAA Central Library)
Email: Albert.E.Theberge.Jr@noaa.gov
Abstract: On February 10, 1807, Thomas Jefferson signed a bill authorizing the formation of an agency to survey the coast of the United States. This agency ultimately became the United States Coast and Geodetic Survey, the oldest physical science agency in the Federal Government, and NOAA's oldest ancestor agency. This presentation will provide an overview of the history of this agency and its contributions to the science, commerce, and defense of our Nation.
Notes: No VideoTeleConferencing (VTC)/phone available for this seminar. Note that this seminar will take place in SSMC-3, 2nd floor, NOAA Central Library main floor (1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD). Please contact Hernan E. Garcia (301-713-3290 Ext. 184; Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov) or Skip Theberge (301-713-2600 Ext. 115; Albert.E.Theberge.Jr@noaa.gov) for further information. For questions about this seminar please contact Hernan Garcia.


IOCM Benthic Habitat Mapping in the USVI and PR
Tuesday 11 April 2006, 1200-1300h ET (SSMC-4, Room 8150, NOS seminar)
Speaker: Ada Otter
Abstract: Over the past three years, NOAA’s Center for Coastal Monitoring and Assessment (CCMA) Biogeography Team, in partnership with territory, federal, and private sector partners, has been conducting an ongoing NOAA scientific research mission in the US Caribbean to characterize coral reef habitats at depths down to 1000 meters. The multibeam bathymetry and backscatter, Remotely Operated Vehicle (ROV) underwater video, and SCUBA dive ground truth data collected during 2004, 2005, and 2006 Integrated Ocean and Coastal Mapping (IOCM) missions aboard R/V NANCY FOSTER will be used to characterize seafloor topography and to create benthic habitat maps, helping NOAA meet its mapping commitment to the US Coral Reef Task Force. The resulting publicly-distributed data is also a contribution to the greater scientific community interested in the USVI seafloor. The acoustically-derived benthic habitat maps generated from these efforts will be linked to the existing benthic habitat classifications from aerial photography and IKONOS imagery that the Biogeography Program has been providing resource managers since the late 1990’s. All of these intermediary products feed into the long range goals of better understanding the resources within the surveyed reef habitats, and ultimately developing species utilization models linking physical habitats with biological information. During this talk, we will share the results of these three years of data collection and processing, along with the progress towards longer term project goals. In particular, we will discuss the learning process provided by this multi-partner, multi-client project as an implementation of NOAA’s Integrated Ocean and Coastal Mapping (IOCM) policy, combining diverse partners and balancing staffing, funding, and time considerations.
Notes: For video, dial the NOS bridge or contact nos.video.conference@noaa.gov for help. For phone, dial 866-541-1377, passcode 142625. For webcast: 1. Go to: http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?i=741804628&p=NCCOS1305&t=c 2. Enter the required fields. 3. Indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy. 4. Click on Proceed. 5. Dial into the phone so you can hear too! Meeting Number is 741804628, Passcode is NCCOS1305, Meeting Host is Science Seminar Host.


Contribution of NOAA to the U.S. and International Global Ocean Observing System (GOOS)
Thursday, 13 April 2006 ; 1100-1200h ET (SSMC-3, 2nd floor, NOAA Central Library, NODC seminar)
Speaker: Dr. Richard W. Spinrad [Assistant Administrator of NOAA Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research (OAR)]
Abstract: The Global Ocean Observing System (GOOS) is a system for observations, modeling and analysis of marine and ocean variables to support operational ocean services worldwide. GOOS will provide accurate descriptions of the present and future state of the oceans and form the basis for climate change forecasts. The Integrated Ocean Observing System (IOOS), which includes a coastal and global component, is a major U.S. contribution to GOOS. GOOS is the ocean component of the Global Earth Observation System of Systems (GEOSS). Building GEOSS, GOOS, and IOOS are defined as priorities in the U.S. Ocean Action plan. IOOS is designed to meet seven societal goals including improved prediction of climate change and weather, effective mitigation of the effects of natural hazard, safe and efficient marine transportation, homeland security, reduction of public health risks, protection and restoration of healthy coastal ecosystems, and sustainable use of ocean and coastal resources. NOAA is the world leader in implementation of the ocean component of the internationally agreed to “Global Climate Observing System Implementation Plan (GCOS-92)”. For example, NOAA provides approximately 90% of the world’s surface drifting array, 70% of the world’s tropical moorings, 70% of the total deployments of XBTs globally, and has committed to providing 50%, or 1500 profiling floats, to the global Argo array. GCOS-92 is recognized as a priority of the UNFCCC, GEOSS and US CCSP. NOAA contributes significant observing, modeling, and analysis capabilities to both the coastal and global components of IOOS. Additionally, NOAA has been named the lead for administration and implementation of IOOS.
Presentation available online: Richard_Spinrad_NODC_Seminar_041306.pdf
About the speaker: Additional information about Dr. Richard W. Spinrad (http://www.oarhq.noaa.gov/spinrad.html). Please contact Dianne Burgess (Dianne.Burgess@noaa.gov) for further information.
Notes: No VideoTeleConferencing (VTC)/phone available for this seminar. Note that this seminar will take place in SSMC-3, 2nd floor, NOAA Central Library main floor (1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD). Please contact Hernan E. Garcia (301-713-3290 Ext. 184; Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov) for further information.


On the Wanderings Of Nassau Grouper, And Why We Should Care
Monday, 17 April 2006, 1200-1300h ET (SSMC-4, Room 8150, NOS seminar)
Speaker: Brice X. Semmens (Reef Environmental Education Foundation, REEF)
Abstract: Nassau grouper is an important, yet endangered, Caribbean reef resident. The primary threat to this species is harvest during mid-winter spawning aggregations. With money from NOAA’s Coral Reef Conservation Program REEF began an electronic tagging project on Little Cayman Island in order to evaluate the efficacy of newly enacted no-take protections on one of the last remaining large Nassau grouper spawning sites in the Caribbean. This research takes advantage of some of the latest advances in marine acoustics and telemetry. Ultimately, the products of our work will end much of the ‘guess work’ involved with managing and recovering aggregating marine fishes in Florida and throughout the Caribbean.
Notes: For video, dial the NOS bridge or contact nos.video.conference@noaa.gov for help. For phone, dial 866-541-1377, passcode 142625. For webcast: 1. Go to: http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?i=741804628&p=NCCOS1305&t=c 2. Enter the required fields. 3. Indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy. 4. Click on Proceed. 5. Dial into the phone so you can hear too! Meeting Number is 741804628, Passcode is NCCOS1305, Meeting Host is Science Seminar Host.


South Scientific Center of the Russian Academy of Sciences: History, institutes, studies of marine environment
Tuesday, 18 April 2006 ; 1300-1400h ET (SSMC-3, Room 4817, NODC seminar)
Speaker: Dr. Sergey Berdnikov (Deputy Director, South Scientific Center of the Russian Academy of Sciences)
Abstract: Highlights of the South Scientific Center of the Russian Academy of Sciences. Dr. Sergey Berdnikov, a visiting scientist at NODC (4/10/06-4/24/06), has expertice in mathematical methods in marine biology and oceanography. Please contact Igor Smolyar (Igor.Smolyar@noaa.gov) for further information about Dr. Berdnikov.
Notes: VideoTeleConferencing (VTC)/phone available upon request by contacting Cheryl Ingram (Cheryl.Ingram@noaa.gov) at least a day before the seminar. For questions about this seminar please contact Hernan Garcia.


Bjerknes- Like Father--Like Son
Thursday, 20 April 2006 ; 1100-1200h ET (SSMC-3, Room 4817, NODC seminar)
Speaker: Doria Grimes (Chief, Contract Operations Branch NOAA Central Library)
Email: Doria.Grimes@noaa.gov
Abstract: "Bjerknes--Like Father--Like Son" was just published in a special edition of Algorismus: Studien Zur Geschichte Der Mathematik Und Der Naturwissenschaften Herausgegeben Von Menso Folkerts, Heft 52, Dr. Erwin Rauner Verlag, Augsburg, 2005, pp.189-196. This is one of nineteen essays selected from those presented at the International Commission on History of Meteorology Conference, in Polling, Germany in July 2004. The article describes parallel events in the lives of three generations of the Bjerknes family -- Carl Anton (1825-1903), Vilhelm (1862-1951) and Jacob (1897-1975) that are significant to the history and development of modern meteorology.
Notes: VideoTeleConferencing (VTC)/phone available upon request by contacting Cheryl Ingram (Cheryl.Ingram@noaa.gov) at least a day before the seminar. For questions about this seminar please contact Hernan Garcia.


Record Breaking Coral Bleaching in the Caribbean: The 2005 Coral Bleaching Event
Thursday, 20 April 2006, 1200-1300h ET (SSMC-4, Room 8150, NOS seminar)
Speaker: Mark Eakin (Coordinator, NOAA Coral Reef Watch)
Email: Mark.Eakin@noaa.gov
Abstract: The summer of 2005 was a year for extremely powerful hurricanes in the Atlantic basin, It was also a year in which widespread coral bleaching occurred throughout the Caribbean. Dr. Mark Eakin, Coordinator of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s (NOAA’s) Coral Reef Watch, will examine how NOAA forecast this event and as a result how researchers in over 20 countries collaborated on documenting it . Data comparison indicated a strong linear relationship between heat stress and bleaching intensity. Coral bleaching was severe exceeding 90% at many sites and extended across most of the wider Caribbean region. Dr. Eakin has worked for NOAA since 1991. From 2000-2005, Dr. Eakin directed NOAA Paleoclimatology (part of NOAA’s National Climatic Data Center), and was Director of the World Data Center for Paleoclimatology in Boulder, CO. Prior to that, he was a program manager for the NOAA Office of Global Programs in Silver Spring, MD, funding and coordinating research to improve our understanding of climate variability in the past, how to predict it in the future and the influence of climate variability and change on our environment. Dr. Eakin received his Ph.D. in Biological Oceanography from the University of Miami in 1991 specializing in coral reef ecology, especially the impact of El Niño on eastern Pacific coral reefs.
Notes: For video, dial the NOS bridge or contact nos.video.conference@noaa.gov for help. For phone, dial 866-541-1377, passcode 142625. For webcast: 1. Go to: http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?i=741804628&p=NCCOS1305&t=c 2. Enter the required fields. 3. Indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy. 4. Click on Proceed. 5. Dial into the phone so you can hear too! Meeting Number is 741804628, Passcode is NCCOS1305, Meeting Host is Science Seminar Host.


The National Estuarine Research Reserve System (NERRS) newly telemetered water and weather data: An integral part of IOOS
Wednesday, 26 April 2006 ; 1100-1200h ET (SSMC-3, Room 4817, NODC seminar)
Speaker: Elizabeth L. Ebersole (NOAA Estuarine Reserves Division)
Email: Beth.Ebersole@noaa.gov
Abstract: Elizabeth Ebersole is the Integrated Ocean Observing System Coordinator for the NOAA Estuarine Reserves Division. The National Estuarine Research Reserve System (NERRS) is a network of protected areas established for long-term research, education and stewardship. She will describe the NERRS newly telemetered water and weather data as an integral part of the IOOS backbone, how we are making our data available to data users throughout NOAA and outside NOAA, and how we are ensuring that our data meet evolving guidance.
Notes: VideoTeleConferencing (VTC)/phone available upon request by contacting Cheryl Ingram (Cheryl.Ingram@noaa.gov) at least a day before the seminar. For questions about this seminar please contact Hernan Garcia.


May 2006

Bleaching on the Great Barrier Reef, Australia: Climate context and severity of the 2006 bleaching event
Tuesday, 02 May 2006 ; 0930-1030h ET (SSMC-4, Room 8150, NODC/Coral Reef Watch seminar)
Speaker: Dr. William Skirving (NOAA/NESDIS/Coral Reef Watch)
Email: William.Skirving@noaa.gov
Abstract: The Great Barrier Reef (GBR) is one of the best known coral reef ecosystems in the world. It is over 2000 km long and contains over 3000 individual reefs. Prior to 1998, no significant bleaching events had been reported and very little bleaching had ever been seen. Since 1998, it would seem that most years bring some bleaching somewhere on the reef, or so the press would have you believe. Late 2005 saw the worst bleaching event in the Caribbean on record. Following hot on the heels of this event was a mild bleaching event in the GBR that was reported in the press as being very severe. Such is the magnetism of the GBR that this story almost outdid the news reports about the Caribbean event. This talk uses NESDIS Coral Reef Watch's HotSpot product suite to put the 2006 GBR bleaching event into the context of SST trends and bleaching events on the GBR for the past 20 years. Dr. William Skirving is a NOAA Coral Reef Watch scientist based in Queensland, Australia.
Presentation available online: You can also contact Jessica Morgan (jessica.morgan@noaa.gov) to receive presentation via email.
Notes: For phone, dial 866 836-3293, passcode 459201.


International Polar Year 2007-2008: Resources on Polar Research in the NOAA Central Library Network, a Selected Bibliography
Thursday, 04 May 2006 ; 1100-1200h ET (SSMC-3, Room 4817, NODC seminar)
Speaker: Doria Grimes and Anna Fiolek (NOAA Central Library)
Email: Doria.Grimes@noaa.gov & Anna.Fiolek@noaa.gov
Abstract: The NOAA Central Library's newest online product International Polar Year 2007-2008: Resources on Polar Research in the NOAA Central Library Network, a Selected Bibliography was unveiled at the Fourth Presidential History Symposium and at the Ninth Atmospheric Librarians Conference during the American Meteorological Society's Annual Conference in Atlanta, GA. The online bibliography contains 182 pages and links to the full text of 147 publications in the NOAA Central Library and to other web sites of IPY material. Compiled by Anna Fiolek, this comprehensive bibliography is accessible via the library's home page under NOAA Central Library Bibliographies and also in NOAALINC, the NOAA library catalog. Each imaged document is also accessible from the bibliography and through the phrase "International Polar Year" in NOAALINC. The online links are available in both PDF and Microsoft Word format at: IPY2007.pdf ; Bibliographies/IPY2007.doc
Notes: VideoTeleConferencing (VTC)/phone available upon request by contacting Cheryl Ingram (Cheryl.Ingram@noaa.gov) at least a day before the seminar. For questions about this seminar please contact Hernan Garcia.


The life and work of Austin Clark, an early Twentieth Century marine biologist
Thursday, 04 May 2006 ; 1200-1300h ET (SSMC-3, 2nd Floor, NOAA Central Library brown bag seminar)
Speaker: Dr. David Pawson (Smithsonian Institution)
Abstract: Dr. David Pawson, Senior Scientist at the Smithsonian Museum of Natural History will present a NOAA Heritage Seminar "Austin Hobart Clark, Naturalist on the “Albatross” in 1906 and Smithsonian Curator 1908-1950. Want a recipe for greatness? Take 13 months collecting birds in the Caribbean in 1903, add 7 months on the “Albatross” in 1906, then 41 years as a Smithsonian scientist, studying sea lilies and feather stars. Throw in numerous outreach efforts, such as pioneering Radio Smithsonian programs in the 1920’s, then mix in hundreds of weekends collecting butterflies. Publish 650 papers and books. Simmer for 50 years. Result: Austin Hobart Clark, one of our greatest all-round scientists.
About the speaker: Additional information about Dr. David Pawson (http://www.mnh.si.edu/expeditions/galapagos/davep's.htm).
Notes: Call Mary Lou Cumberpatch (301-713-2600 ext.129) or Skip Theberge (301-713-2600 ext. 115) for further information (see http://www.lib.noaa.gov/docs/news/news.html).


The application of the biophysical and social sciences to the conservation of coral reefs: Lessons from the Pacific Islands
Friday, 05 May 2006, 1500-1600h ET (SSMC-4, Room 8150, NOS seminar)
Speaker: Bob Richmond (University of Hawaii)
Abstract: Present U.S. policy for the protection of coral reefs is lagging far behind the available science. Sufficient biophysical data on coral reef organisms and processes exist, yet the present legislative framework allows for the continued degradation and outright loss of economically, ecologically and culturally valuable coral reefs and related resources. A notable disconnect exists between biophysical scientists and policy makers, with social scientists emerging as bridge builders. Elements of the cultures of a number of Pacific Islands have made it possible to apply scientific data to policy development and implementation within relatively short time periods (weeks to months). Case histories of CSCOR/CRES* supported research in the western Pacific serve as models of how communities and individual stakeholders can effectively integrate into the process of addressing coral reef preservation as a legacy for future generations. CRES Center for Sponsored Coastal Ocean Research/Coral Reef Ecosystem Studies.
Notes: For video, dial the NOS bridge or contact nos.video.conference@noaa.gov for help. For phone, dial 866-541-1377, passcode 142625. For webcast: 1. Go to: http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?i=741804628&p=NCCOS1305&t=c 2. Enter the required fields. 3. Indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy. 4. Click on Proceed. 5. Dial into the phone so you can hear too! Meeting Number is 741804628, Passcode is NCCOS1305, Meeting Host is Science Seminar Host.


A Reanalysis of North Pacific Sea Surface Temperatures Using State-Space Techniques: The PDO Redefined
Tuesday, 09 May 2006 ; 1200-1300h ET (SSMC-3, 2nd Floor, NOAA Central Library seminar)
Speaker: Roy Mendelssohn (PFEG)
Abstract: The first part of the talk will be a non-technical overview of the state-space related methodologies that are used to analyze oceanographic and atmospheric series, and a discussion of some of the issues in accurately identifying shifts or non-stationarities in time series. In the second part of the talk, the speaker will present a reanalysis of the North Pacific sea surface temperatures (SST) used in estimating the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO) using a combination of state-space decomposition and subspace identification techniques.
Notes: Call Mary Lou Cumberpatch (301-713-2600 ext.129) or Skip Theberge (301-713-2600 ext. 115) for further information (see http://www.lib.noaa.gov/docs/news/news.html).


NOAA Library Web Services: Where Google has yet to Go!
Thursday, 11 May 2006 ; 1100-1200h ET (SSMC-3, Room 4817, NODC seminar)
Speakers: Mary Lou Cumberpatch and Dottie Anderson (NOAA Central Library)
Email: Mary.Lou.Cumberpatch@noaa.gov & Dorothy.Anderson@noaa.gov
Abstract: Mary Lou Cumberpatch (Reference/Web Librarian) and Dottie Anderson (Head of Reference Services), of the NOAA Central Library, will present an overview of web-based library services. Learn about access to 1) electronic journals 2) article databases, including Scopus, which indexes over 14,000 journals, 3) Worldcat, the worldwide library catalog of over 61,000,000 items, 4) digital preservation of NOAA documents 5) Interlibrary Loan 6) customized citation alerts, and 7) the future of library services.
Notes: VideoTeleConferencing (VTC)/phone available upon request by contacting Cheryl Ingram (Cheryl.Ingram@noaa.gov) at least a day before the seminar. For questions about this seminar please contact Hernan Garcia.


Ecosystem Approaches to Management (EAM)
Friday, 19 May 2006 ; 1300-1500h ET (SSMC-3, Room 4527, NOS seminar)
Speaker: Dr. Steve Murawski (Director of Scientific Programs, Chief Science Advisor, NOAA Fisheries Service, and Ecosystem Goal Team Lead)
Abstract: NOAA’s vision for EAM includes an explicit definition of EAM that provides contrast with the ways management activities are now generally conducted in the marine and coastal environment. In the last three months alone, the Joint Ocean Commissions report card, NOAA’s external Ecosystem Task Team draft report, CORE’s letter to VADM Lautenbacher, and Congressional movement on Magnuson Stevens Act (MSA) Reauthorization have all called for NOAA to move forward on EAM in the context of its current statutory or trust authorities. To effectively meet existing requirements and take on new responsibilities, we will need to develop new ways of integrating data collection, analysis, modeling and management activities, all of which require substantial engagement of external partners at all geographic scales. Dr. Murawski's talk will cover what EAM is and what the NOAA vision is for applying it throughout Ecosystem Goal Team (EGT) programs.
Presentation available online: https://nightshark.nmfs.noaa.gov/hc/ecosystemsmanagement/murawski_may19.ppt
Notes: Teleconference & Webcast details: The presentation will be available via teleconference & webcast via Webex (see details below). You may follow the instructions below to receive the presentation at a work station and also participate in discussions. For greater efficiency and to reduce costs, participants on the webcast are encouraged to form groups (e.g., use one computer with a projector). Contact Kay McGraw (Kay.McGraw@noaa.gov) or Marti McGuire (Marti.McGuire@noaa.gov) by MAY 16 if you plan to join via teleconference/webcast so we can plan accordingly &/or if you have questions. Instructions for teleconference & webcast: Step 1 LOG IN TO THE WEB PORTION OF THE CONFERENCE: 1. Click on https://premconf.webex.com; 2. Click Attend a Web Meeting - Unlisted Meeting 3. Enter Meeting Number: 741 306 620 4. Enter your Name (First and Last) and Email address. 5. Click the Join Now button and you will be joined to the conference. Step 2 DIAL INTO THE AUDIO PORTION OF THE CONFERENCE: Dial-In Number: 877-805-0964 Participant Code: 248596. Key Pad Codes: *1 to hear a help menu. *0 to reach an operator. *6 to mute or "un-mute" line. *4 to increase conference volume. *7 to decrease conference volume. *5 to increase your voice volume. *8 to decrease your voice volume.


Interactive Data Language (IDL): Overview and examples of use at NODC
Friday, 26 May 2006 ; 1100-1200h ET (SSMC-3, Room 4817, NODC seminar)
Speaker: Charles Sun (NODC)
Email: Charles.Sun@noaa.gov
Abstract: IDL is a commercial software package for data analysis, visualization, and cross-platform application development.
Presentation available online: https://intra.nodc.noaa.gov/Information/Training/Seminars/Charles_Sun_NODC_Seminar_052606.ppt
Notes: VideoTeleConferencing (VTC)/phone available upon request by contacting Cheryl Ingram (Cheryl.Ingram@noaa.gov) at least a day before the seminar. For questions about this seminar please contact Hernan Garcia.


June 2006

 

The Coast & Geodetic Survey and the "Pre-history" of Modern Oceanography
Thursday, 01 June 2006 ; 1100-1200h ET (SSMC-3, Room 4817, NODC seminar)
Speaker: John Cloud (Geographer/Writer/Editor NOAA Central Library)
Email: John.Cloud@noaa.gov
Abstract: The earth sciences were mobilized for World War II, and in some sense they never returned to pre-war conditions of status and funding. Most treatments of the history of oceanography identify a golden age of research and discovery following the war, culminating in plate tectonics and a new synthesis of the continents and oceans. But these were based on pre-war discoveries now largely forgotten or ignored. An example is the Coast & Geodetic Survey's Radio Acoustic Ranging (RAR), which truly revolutionized hydrographic surveying between WW I and WW II. In order to make RAR work, the Survey discovered the deep sound channel of the ocean. Perfected RAR allowed bathymetry to be extended over continental margins, revealing submarine canyons and complex undersea topography un-explainable by current models of tectonic processes-- and hence favored new ideas about how earth systems functioned. But during the war the developers of RAR willingly abandoned it for electronic positioning systems, and after the war the significance of RAR to the earth sciences was lost. The seminar will feature a re-construction of C & GS chart 5101A (San Diego to Santa Rosa Island), the first hydrographic chart ever to contour bathymetry all the way to the bottom.
Notes: VideoTeleConferencing (VTC)/phone available upon request by contacting Cheryl Ingram (Cheryl.Ingram@noaa.gov) at least a day before the seminar. For questions about this seminar please contact Hernan Garcia.


Coastal Response Research Center
Tuesday, 06 June 2006 ; 1200-1300h ET (SSMC-4, room 8153, NOS seminar)
Speaker: Amy Merten (NOS)
Email: Amy.Merten@noaa.gov
Abstract: The Coastal Response Research Center, a partnership between NOAA’s Office of Response and Restoration and the University of New Hampshire, focuses on research to advance the knowledge, technology and practice of spill response and restoration. After completing four funding cycles, the Center has funded 19 projects ($2.8 M), ten of which have examined toxicological endpoints from pulse exposures of single PAHs, mixtures of PAHs from water-accommodated fractions and chemically-enhanced fractions of oils ($1.5 M). Five of the ten studies conduct bioassays using chemically dispersed oil in their experimental designs. Species used have ranged in trophic levels and sensitivities, thus providing a range of effects. Most of the studies have conducted detailed chemical analysis in characterizing exposures. Three of the studies present different methods for modeling PAH toxicity: total lipid model (equilibrium partitioning, individual based), time-dependent toxicity (toxico-kinetic, individual-based), and toxicity at different life stages (Leslie matrix, population-based). The presentation will highlight projects which may be of interest to the broader NOAA community and will open discussion for methods for translating the existing research into field products, improved decision-making, and management.
Notes: For video, dial the NOS bridge or contact nos.video.conference@noaa.gov for help. For phone, dial 866-541-1377, passcode 142625. For webcast: 1. Go to: http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?i=741804628&p=NCCOS1305&t=c 2. Enter the required fields. 3. Indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy. 4. Click on Proceed. 5. Dial into the phone so you can hear too! Meeting Number is 741804628, Passcode is NCCOS1305, Meeting Host is Science Seminar Host.


Debating the Deliberate Introduction of Non-Native Oysters to the Chesapeake Bay: A Historical Analysis
Tuesday, 06 June 2006 ; 1200-1300h ET (SSMC-3, 2nd floor, NOAA Central Library seminar)
Speaker: Christine Keiner (Rochester Institute of Technology)
Abstract: In this talk I will examine the ongoing debate over introducing non-native oysters to the Chesapeake Bay, with a special emphasis on the historical context of the Maryland and Virginia oyster industries. In response to plummeting oyster harvests, over the past several years Virginia has forged ahead with experiments on the Asian Suminoe oyster, whereas Maryland has proceeded more cautiously. Despite the fears of environmentalists and some scientists that such an introduction could unleash ecological havoc, oyster industry members in both states have shown strong support for what they see as their economic salvation. The story is more complex, however, due to the different oystering traditions of the two states. Virginia oystermen, with their long history of private aquaculture, are more likely to accept the introduction of sterile, contained Asian oysters, a proposition which, though expensive, would limit the unknown ecological consequences of an invasive species. On the other hand, their Maryland counterparts have no tradition of private oyster farming, and thus argue that the only way to maintain their fiercely-cherished freedom is by allowing reproducing Suminoes to populate the bay. I will discuss the current controversy in the context of these historical circumstances, and look forward to engaging with NOAA personnel involved in Suminoe research.
Notes: No videoTeleConferencing (VTC)/phone available.


The NOAA Climate Program Office (CPO) Climate Variability and Predictability Program (CLIVAR)
Thursday, 08 June 2006 ; 1100-1200h ET (SSMC-3, Room 4817, NODC seminar)
Speaker: Dr. James Todd (Program Manager, Climate Variability and Predictability, NOAA Office of Global Programs)
Email: James.Todd@noaa.gov
Abstract: CLIVAR (Climate Variability and Predictability) is an international, interdisciplinary research effort within the World Climate Research Programme (WCRP) focusing on the variability and predictability of the slowly varying components of the climate system. CLIVAR investigates the physical and dynamical processes in the climate system occurring on seasonal, interannual, decadal and centennial time-scales. In the U.S., NOAA, NSF, NASA and DOE support CLIVAR research. Today’s presentation will focus on the federal and extramural research supported by the Climate Variability and Predictability (CVP) program of NOAA’s Climate Program Office.
Notes: VideoTeleConferencing (VTC)/phone available upon request by contacting Cheryl Ingram (Cheryl.Ingram@noaa.gov) at least a day before the seminar. For questions about this seminar please contact Hernan Garcia.


“State-of-the-art information fusion technologies and services for enterprise systems” by Battelle
Tuesday, 13 June 2006 ; 1230-1400h ET (SSMC-4, room 8153, NOS seminar)
Speaker: Sally Yozell (Vice President BD)
Abstract: Battelle, a leader in research and development as a non-profit, privately owned trust company, has developed information fusion services to support enterprise level analysis and decision support applications. The solution is a combination of Battelle know-how, COTS, and internally developed tools to rapidly fusion disparate data sources. In addition to following Extract, Transform, and Load (ETL) and Enterprise Information Integration (EII) best practices, advanced heuristics built into the Analyzer, Harvester, and Virtualizer products shortens the time data architects need to build virtual data stores that are a composite of your enterprise data. Add on products like Lexicon Manager also performs data quality during use and thus will improve your decisions. The presentation will be followed by a demo for those interested.
Notes: For video, dial the NOS bridge or contact nos.video.conference@noaa.gov for help. For phone, dial 866-541-1377, passcode 142625. For webcast: 1. Go to: http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?i=741804628&p=NCCOS1305&t=c 2. Enter the required fields. 3. Indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy. 4. Click on Proceed. 5. Dial into the phone so you can hear too! Meeting Number is 741804628, Passcode is NCCOS1305, Meeting Host is Science Seminar Host.


Southern Scientific Research Institute of Marine Fisheries and Oceanography (YugNIRO): Brief Description
Thursday, 15 June 2006 ; 1100-1200h ET (SSMC-3, Room 4817, NODC seminar)
Speaker: Dr. Boris G. Trotsenko (Deputy Director, YugNIRO)
Email: island@crimea.com
Abstract: Dr. Boris Trotsenko is responsible for coordinating research programs at the Southern Scientific Research Institute of Marine Fisheries and Oceanography (YugNIRO). The YugNIRO is located in the city of Kerch in the region of Crimea (Ukraine). Dr. Trotsenko has been working at YugNIRO since 1980. He received his Ph.D. in Geography (Oceanology) from the Leningrad Hydrometeorological Institute, USSR (now the Russian State Hydrometeorological Institute) in 1991 specializing in fisheries oceanology, studying the impacts of environmental conditions on state and behavior of commercial marine species. In this talk, he will describe the YugNIRO’s role and activities in scientific support for fisheries in the Ukraine. Dr. Trotsenko is a visiting research scientist at NODC (May 17 to Jun 16, 2006) working on oceanographic and meteorological data provided by YugNIRO through the Global Oceanographic Data Archaeology and Rescue (GODAR) and the World Ocean Database project data exchange project as part of the World Data Center System. He has been collaborating with NODC since 1993.
Notes: VideoTeleConferencing (VTC)/phone available upon request by contacting Cheryl Ingram (Cheryl.Ingram@noaa.gov) at least a day before the seminar. Please contact Daphne Johnson (Daphne.Johnson@noaa.gov) for further information about Dr. Trotsenko.


Emergency procedures for SSMC occupants
Thursday, 29 June 2006 ; 1100-1200h ET (SSMC-3, Room 4817, NODC seminar)
Speaker: Jimmy Griffith (NOAA Emergency Preparedness Officer)
Email: James.e.Griffith@noaa.gov
Abstract: Jimmy Griffith is the NOAA Emergency Preparedness Officer. He will provide remarks on the SSMC occupant emergency plan procedures and Q/A.
Notes: VideoTeleConferencing (VTC)/phone available upon request by contacting Cheryl Ingram (Cheryl.Ingram@noaa.gov) at least a day before the seminar. For questions about this seminar please contact Hernan Garcia.


July 2006

 

NOAA's Vision and Future
Thursday, 13 July 2006 ; 1100-1200h ET (SSMC-3, 2nd Floor, NOAA Central Library, NODC seminar)
Speaker: Scott Rayder (NOAA Chief of Staff)
Email: Scott.Rayder@noaa.gov
Abstract: NOAA’s Vision is an informed society that uses a comprehensive understanding of the role of the oceans, coasts and atmosphere in the global ecosystem to make the best social and economic decisions. While NOAA has a broad mission, budget realities are forcing the organization to become more efficient and cost-effective in how information is collected, stored, analyzed, and distributed. Scott Rayder, NOAA’s Chief of Staff, will discuss how NOAA must adapt to budget constraints while still meeting its goal of an informed society which uses data to save lives and protect property. In addition to discussing the current budget situation, he will also discuss new technologies and components of NOAA’s observational network and the role of NOAA’s workforce in enhancing efficiency.
Notes: For questions about this seminar please contact Hernan Garcia.


A Master's Level Certificate in Ocean Observing Systems at Texas A&M University
Monday, 17 July 2006 ; 1100-1200h ET (SSMC-3, Room 4817, NODC seminar)
Speaker: Dr. Steven F. DiMarco (Associate Professor, Dept. of Oceanography Texas A&M University)
Email: sdimarco@tamu.edu
Abstract: The College of Geosciences at Texas A&M University announces an exciting new Graduate Certificate in Ocean Observing System whose objective is to train a new generation of ocean professionals knowledgeable in the development, design, and implementation of real-time operational systems, services, and products. The Certificate is offered under the non-thesis Master of Geosciences Degree and is designed to be completed in two calendar years.The program will provide training in a range of subjects: in situ observations, fundamentals of ocean science, remote sensing technologies, graphical information systems, and others. The presentation will focus on the description and rationale of the Cerificate Program.
Notes: VideoTeleConferencing (VTC)/phone available upon request by contacting Cheryl Ingram (Cheryl.Ingram@noaa.gov) at least a day before the seminar. For questions about this seminar please contact Hernan Garcia.


Relative Flash Flood Potential Index (FFPI)
Tuesday, 18 July 2006, 1130-1230h ET (SSMC-2, Room 8246, NWS/Office of Hydrologic Development)
Speaker: Greg Smith (NWS Colorado Basin River Forecast Center, Salt Lake City, Utah)
Abstract: The recent modernized method for generating gridded flash flood guidance (FFG) relies significantly on the soil moisture states of the National Weather Service River Forecast System (NWSRFS) SACramento Soil Moisture Accounting model (SAC-SMA). The SAC-SMA tension water component or “tank” deficits must be overcome before runoff is generated. These SAC-SMA parameters are generally calibrated for basins much larger than those typically associated with flash floods in the southwest United States. These SAC-SMA parameters are not scaleable to smaller basins and frequently the tension water deficits become very large resulting in significantly inflated FFG values. This method also requires that a SAC-SMA segment exist for the area for which FFG values are desired. The heavy reliance on soil moisture and lack of blanket NWSRFS SAC-SMA coverage has limited the application of the modernized FFG generation method in the southwestern U. S., particularly in areas where rainfall intensity and land characteristics are the primary factors affecting the occurrence of flash floods. In areas where the modernized FFG method is not employed, FFG is usually based on local methods, knowledge, or ‘rules of thumb’. With these latter methods the FFG usually lacks adequate spatial resolution to take complete advantage of the Flash Flood Monitoring and Prediction (FFMP) application. The core function of the FFMP is to map reflectivity information from radar bins to pre-defined hydrologic basins. The application derives rainfall rates and associates rainfall accumulations with each hydrologic basin. A limitation of the FFMP-FFG system is its inability to discern basin physiographic characteristics. To FFMP basin rainfall accumulations, rate, and FFG-exceeding values may be treated equally regardless of a basin’s physiographic make-up, such as soil type, slope, forest cover, or level of urbanization. A theoretical index that represents a basin’s level of hydrologic response to heavy rainfall was developed at the Colorado Basin River Forecast Center. The derivation of this relative flash flood potential index (FFPI) requires raster (gridded) datasets of soil type, forest cover, land-use, slope, and, where available, wildfire burn information. Subjective factors of importance have been applied to the attributes associated with these data types resulting in an index ranging from 1 to 10. Grid cells with higher values would then have a hydrologic response and thus greater relative flash flood threat based on these physiographic characteristics. The analysis was performed in a GIS environment and grid cells were then summarized to provide an index for the same hydrologic basins used by the FFMP application. The goal was to provide a simplistic index to assist users of FFMP in discerning how these hydrologic basins might react. The FFPI concept has generated a surprising level of NWS as well as international interest. The FFPI has been adopted by the AHPS FF Services Team as a priority project and it will be evaluated to determine its applicability in non-western offices. As part of the AHPS plan the methodology will be re-evaluated, finer resolution datasets incorporated, and use of a soil moisture component explored. The possibility of deriving FFG from the FFPI will also be examined. The FFPI has generated interest internationally as it currently can provide some level of information about the flash flood threat in areas void of a hydrologic network or that lack hydrologic modeling, much like remote areas of the southwest United States.
Notes: VideoTeleConferencing (VTC)/phone TBD. Please contact Renee Tatusko (Renee.Tatusko@noaa.gov) for further information about this seminar.


Making the connections with the human dimension of coral reef conservation in Puerto Rico: the CSCOR-Coral Reef Ecosystem Studies Program and the Caribbean Coral Reef Institute
Wednesday, July 26 2006 ; 1200-1300h ET (SSMC-4, room 8150, NOS seminar)
Speaker: Dr. Manuel Valdés Pizzini, Director Interdisciplinary Center for Coastal Studies (CIEL), University of Puerto Rico
Abstract: Sustainable and appropriate use of coastal resources and the conservation of coral reefs and associated ecosystems require a thorough understanding of the human component. CRES presents a coherent research program targeting coral reefs, the watershed and the physical oceanography of La Parguera in southern Puerto Rico. Our component focuses on the human factor: resource utilization, local and traditional ecological knowledge, policy issues, management systems and conservation strategies. CRES and CCRI provided the critical mass for the establishment of our interdisciplinary center (CIEL) devoted to research and outreach of the results of both programs. Our role is to make the appropriate connections among the components of both programs, optimize synergism with other NOAA programs (Fisheries, Regional Councils), link the results of social and oceanographic research, and contribute to the goal of developing a model for coral reef conservation that incorporates the public through education, outreach and participation and collaboration in management. CIEL is also making the connection with the Department of Natural and Environmental Resources with joint efforts in capacity building and collaboration in management plans for MPAs. This presentation documents the experience, tools, strategies and efforts of CIEL, as a product of the CRES program.
Presentation available by video, webcast, and phone: For video, dial the NOS bridge or contact nos.video.conference@noaa.gov for help. For phone, dial 866-541-1377, passcode 142625. For webcast: 1. Go to: http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?i=741804628&p=NCCOS1305&t=c 2. Enter the required fields. 3. Indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy. 4. Click on Proceed. 5. Dial into the phone so you can hear too! Meeting Number is 741804628, Passcode is NCCOS1305, Meeting Host is Science Seminar Host.


The EOS ClearingHOuse (ECHO): discovery and access to Earth Science data
Thursday, 27 July 2006 ; 1100-1200h ET (SSMC-3, Room 4817, NODC seminar)
Speaker: Keith Wichmann (NOAA Comprehensive Large Array-data Stewardship System CLASS)
Email: keith.wichmann@gst.com
Abstract: The EOS ClearingHOuse (ECHO) has been operational for over three years and continues to be actively developed iteratively. Currently, it contains over 60 million pieces of information spatially, temporally and textually indexed. Its goal is to provide users of Earth Science data a single consistent mechanism for discovering new datasets, finding specific granules that are applicable to their desired use and enabling access to that data once found as well as a mechanism to discover what services are available related to that data. Additionally, ECHO potentially relieves data providers from the requirement of providing a search and order interface that is up 24X7, allowing the data providers to concentrate on capturing, disseminating and providing stewardship for the data. ECHO also gives the enterprise a single place to address evolving search standards through the use of adapters. ECHO strives to achieve these goals while honoring the principles that the provider controls their metadata, that ECHO is an enabling system, and that all capabilities should be available through open APIs. This talk will discuss the architecture of ECHO (specifically the data and service registries) and its drivers.
About Keith Wichmann: Mr. Keith Wichmann has a BS and an MS in Computer Engineering (as well as all the courses towards a PhD) from Clemson University and has won several awards for his innovation during his career including a NASA Software of the Year nomination. Mr. Wichmann started his career in August of 1989 at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center as a participant in the NASA Graduate Fellowship Program. In 1994 Mr. Wichmann took a position as Software Engineer at Global Science & Technology, Inc and has since progressed to his present position as Principal System Engineer. During his career Mr. Wichmann has worked on many innovative projects and activities including CLASS, EOS Clearinghouse, MODIS Calibration Support Team, Regional Data Center, and Earth Science Technology Office.
Presentation available online: Keith_Wichmann_NODC_Seminar_072706.ppt
Notes: VideoTeleConferencing (VTC)/phone available upon request by contacting Cheryl Ingram (Cheryl.Ingram@noaa.gov) at least a day before the seminar. For questions about this seminar please contact Hernan Garcia.


August 2006

 

An Overview of Current Ocean Policy Issues
Friday, 18 August 2006 ; 1200-1300h ET (SSMC-4, Room 1W611)
Speaker: Gene Buck (Congressional Research Service)
Email: gbuck@crs.loc.gov
Abstract: An overview of current ocean policy issues, their status, and what the ocean community can do to promote solutions.
Notes: This meeting is sponsored jointly by the Ocean Policy committees of the IEEE Oceanic Engineering Society (OES) and the Marine Technology Society (MTS) but is open to all interested attendees. Further information can be obtained by contacting Mike Goldberg (Mike.Goldberg@noaa.gov).


Adventures on board the Aquarius, the underwater sea lab based off the coast of Florida in the Florida Keys Marine Sanctuary
Wednesday, 23 August 2006 ; 1200-1300h ET (SSMC-3, 2nd Floor, NOAA Central Library, NOAA Central Library seminar)
Speaker: Karen Kohanowich (NOAA's National Undersea Research Program)
Abstract: The AQUARIUS undersea laboratory, located 3 miles offshore from Key Largo in 65 feet of water, is the only operational undersea laboratory in the world. Last month, NOAA Undersea Research Program’s (NURP) Deputy Director, Karen Kohanowich, participated in the latest NEEMO (NASA Extreme Environment Mission Operation) mission in the AQUARIUS. Ms. Kohanowich will discuss the NEEMO mission, the capabilities of the AQUARIUS, and opportunities for the future of NOAA’s “Inner Space Station


Physical parameters effect on zooplankton diversity in Humboldt Bay and Internship experience at NOAA/NODC
Thursday, 24 August 2006 ; 1100-1200h ET (SSMC-3, Room 4817, NODC seminar)
Speaker: Tom Ryan (NODC)
Email: Thomas.Ryan@noaa.gov
Abstract: Tom Ryan is conducting a Summer internship at NODC. He completed his B.S. degree in Oceanography at Humboldt State University.
Notes: VideoTeleConferencing (VTC)/phone available upon request by contacting Cheryl Ingram (Cheryl.Ingram@noaa.gov) at least a day before the seminar. For questions about this seminar please contact Hernan Garcia.


September 2006

 

Urban climate variability and change: a remote sensing approach
Thursday, September 07, 2006; 1000-1100h ET (SSMC-3, Room 3404, ARL seminar)
Speaker: Bénédicte Dousset (National Research Council Associate, NOAA - Air Resources Laboratory)
Email: benedicte.dousset@noaa.gov
Abstract: Almost half of the world’s population live in cities, a fraction projected to reach two-thirds (over 5 billion) by 2025. Urbanization, through land use and cover changes, generates distinct micro climates and strongly contributes to greenhouse gas emissions. Our ability to predict urban climate variability and change, and to mitigate their impact depends on our understanding of the urban surface/atmosphere exchange of heat, gases, and momentum. These physical processes are difficult to monitor solely with in-situ instruments. Satellite borne instruments provide quantitative physical data at high spatial or temporal resolution. The observation of urban surface properties and temperature variability will be presented through urban experiments in North America and Europe. The implications of climate change on urban areas, and of extreme climate events such as the 2003 heat wave in Paris, will be discussed. Finally, the integration of urban remote sensing data into boundary layer models, and public health models will be addressed.


A Day in the Life of FEMA
Thursday, 14 September 2006 ; 1100-1200h ET (SSMC-3, Room 4817, NODC seminar)
Speaker: Linda Salyers (NOAA central library)
Email: Linda.Salyers@noaa.gov
Abstract: Linda Salyers will present personal perspectives as a FEMA volunteer. FEMA's continuing mission within the new department is to lead the effort to prepare the nation for all hazards and effectively manage federal response and recovery efforts following any national incident. FEMA also initiates proactive mitigation activities, trains first responders, and manages the National Flood Insurance Program and the U.S. Fire Administration.
Notes: VideoTeleConferencing (VTC)/phone available upon request by contacting Cheryl Ingram (Cheryl.Ingram@noaa.gov) at least a day before the seminar. For questions about this seminar please contact Hernan Garcia.


Coastal Change Analysis – Monitoring Changes in Our Nation’s Coastal Regions
Tuesday, 19 September 2006; 1200-1300h ET (SSMC-4, Room 8150, NOS seminar)
Speaker: Nate Herold (NOAA/NOS/Coastal Services Center)
Email: Nate.Herold@noaa.gov
Abstract: The NOAA Coastal Services Center has been developing a nationally standardized database of land cover and land cover change information for the coastal zone of the U.S. as part of its Coastal Change Analysis Program (C-CAP). C-CAP map products inventory coastal intertidal areas, wetlands, and adjacent uplands, with the goal of monitoring changes in these habitats on a one-to-five-year repeat cycle. These maps are developed from remotely sensed imagery and can be used to track changes in the landscape through time. This effort is conducted in coordination with state coastalresource management agencies, the Multi-Resolution Land Characteristics consortium, the U.S. Geological Survey, and other federal programs. This presentation will review the status of C-CAP’s national baseline, current and upcoming initiatives, and the program’s vision for future higher-resolution land cover mapping. For more information on the Coastal Change Analysis Program (C-CAP) visit www.csc.noaa.gov/landcover/
Notes: Presentation available by video, webcast, and phone. For video, dial the NOS bridge or contact nos.video.conference@noaa.gov for help. For phone, dial 866-541-1377, passcode 142625. For webcast: 1. Go to: http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?i=741804628&p=NCCOS1305&t=c
2. Enter the required fields. (Meeting Number: 741804628; Passcode: NCCOS1305; Meeting Host: Science Seminar Host) 3. Indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy. 4. Click on Proceed. 5. Dial into the phone so you can hear too!


Helping to BRIDGE the Gap between NOAA Science and K-12 Education
Wednesday, 20 September 2006 ; 1200-1300h ET (SSMC-3, 2nd Floor, NOAA Central Library, NOAA Central Library seminar)
Speaker: Lee Larkin and Vicki Clark of the Virginia Institute of Marine Science (VIMS)
Abstract: A discussion of their work in setting up an online database of NOAA education products.


NOAA's Strategic Priorities for FY 2009-2013
Thursday, 21 September 2006 ; 1100-1200h ET (SSMC-3, Room 4817, NODC seminar)
Speaker: Dr. Paul N. Doremus (Director of NOAA’s Strategic Planning Office)
Email: Paul.N.Doremus@noaa.gov
Abstract: TBA
Presentation available online: NOAA_Strategic_Priorities_NODCseminar_9_22_06.ppt
About the speaker: Additional information about Paul Doremus (http://www.spo.noaa.gov/paul_doremus.htm). Please contact Rose Dyson (Rose.Dyson@noaa.gov) for further information.
Notes: VideoTeleConferencing (VTC)/phone available upon request by contacting Cheryl Ingram (Cheryl.Ingram@noaa.gov ) at least a day before the seminar. For questions about this seminar please contact Hernan Garcia.


Designing the Kimbe Bay Marine Protected Area Network, Papua New Guinea: Lessons from the field
Wednesday, 27 September 2006; 1200-1300h ET (SSMC-4, Room 8150, NOS seminar)
Speaker: Dr. Alison Green (The Nature Conservancy)
Email: agreen@tnc.org
Abstract: Dr. Alison Green from The Nature Conservancy, as she shares insights and lessons from her work on designing and establishing a large-scale marine conservation project in Papua New Guinea: the Kimbe Bay Marine Protected Area Network. If you are aching to discover answers to the following questions, then this brown bag is for you!

* Where are you in this process of protecting such a large marine area?
* What tools and approaches have you found most useful?
* How do you balance biodiversity and social considerations?
* What limitations or challenges have you faced?
* What have you learned during this process?

Lots of beautiful pictures will be shared as well!
Notes: Presentation available by video, webcast, and phone. For video, dial the NOS bridge or contact nos.video.conference@noaa.gov for help. For phone, dial 866-541-1377, passcode 142625. For webcast: 1. Go to: http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?i=741804628&p=NCCOS1305&t=c
2. Enter the required fields. (Meeting Number: 741804628; Passcode: NCCOS1305; Meeting Host: Science Seminar Host) 3. Indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy. 4. Click on Proceed. 5. Dial into the phone so you can hear too!


Geospatial Resources for Hazards Management
Thursday, 28 September 2006; time 1200-1300h ET (SSMC-4, Room 8150, NOS seminar)
Speaker: Tara Miller & William Brooks (NOS/CSC)
Email: tara.miller@noaa.gov
Abstract: NOAA Coastal Services Center staff members will provide an overview of products that can aid emergency and coastal managers before, during, and after hurricanes. The Historical Hurricane Tracks Tool is an interactive mapping application for searching, displaying, and querying Atlantic Basin and East-Central Pacific Basin tropical cyclone data. A second product is a tutorial that guides users through procedures to access NOAA meteorological and hydrological data and to create maps that address storm-related hazards, including precipitation, inland flooding, winds, waves, and storm surge. An associated storm data resource guide delineates on-line resources for emergency and coastal managers. Finally, a variety of hazard assessment tools are available to help identify potential risks of a community to coastal hazards in order to develop and prioritize mitigation strategies.
Notes: Presentation available by video, webcast, and phone. For video, dial the NOS bridge or contact nos.video.conference@noaa.gov for help. For phone, dial 866-541-1377, passcode 142625. For webcast: 1. Go to: http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?i=741804628&p=NCCOS1305&t=c%20
2. Enter the required fields. (Meeting Number: 741804628; Passcode: NCCOS1305; Meeting Host: Science Seminar Host) 3. Indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy. 4. Click on Proceed. 5. Dial into the phone so you can hear too!


Protecting leatherback and hawksbill sea turtles in Melanesia
Friday, 29 September 2006; 1130–1230h ET (SSMC-4, Room 8150, NOS seminar)
Speaker: Paul Lokani (Melanesia Program Director, The Nature Conservancy)
Email: lok.tnc@global.net.pg
Abstract: Please join staff from The Nature Conservancy to learn about efforts - supported by NOAA and other partners - to protect sea turtle nesting beaches in Papua New Guinea and the Solomon Islands. Learn about community-based efforts in the Arnavon Islands Conservation Area (part of the Solomon Islands) to protect the nesting habitat of one of the world's largest remaining populations of the critically endangered hawksbill sea turtle. Other protection efforts, focused primarily in northern Papua New Guinea, include conducting annual aerial surveys of endangered leatherback turtles' nesting beaches; these turtles are the largest in the world, achieving lengths of up to 6.5 feet long, and weighing up to 2,000 pounds! The aerial surveys contribute to the community-espoused goal of developing an effective system of marine protected areas in Kimbe Bay.
Notes: Presentation available by video, webcast, and phone. For video, dial the NOS bridge or contact nos.video.conference@noaa.gov for help. For phone, dial 866-541-1377, passcode 142625. For webcast: 1. Go to: http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?i=741804628&p=NCCOS1305&t=c%20
2. Enter the required fields. (Meeting Number: 741804628; Passcode: NCCOS1305; Meeting Host: Science Seminar Host) 3. Indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy. 4. Click on Proceed. 5. Dial into the phone so you can hear too!


October 2006

 

On the seasonal cycle of dissolved inorganic nutrients in the surface ocean
Tuesday, 03 October 2006 ; 1100-1200h ET (SSMC-3, Room 4817, NODC seminar)
Speaker: Hernan Garcia (NODC)
Email: Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov
Abstract: I will remark on the seasonal distribution of dissolved inorganic nutrients (phosphate, nitrate, and silicate) in the near-surface waters of the world ocean. The analysis is based on 1-degree gridded fields from the recent release of the World Ocean Atlas 2005.
Notes: VideoTeleConferencing (VTC)/phone available upon request by contacting Cheryl Ingram (Cheryl.Ingram@noaa.gov ) at least a day before the seminar. For questions about this seminar please contact Hernan Garcia.


Tools for Ecosystem-Based Management in Coastal and Marine Environments
Wednesday, 04 October 2006; 1200-1300h ET (SSMC-4, Room 8150, NOS seminar)
Speaker: Dr. Sarah Carr (Program Coordinator, Ecosystem-Based Management Tools Program, NatureServe)
Email: Sarah_Carr@natureserve.org
Abstract: Human activities on land and in the ocean are changing coastal and marine ecosystems and threatening their ability to provide important benefits to society, such as healthy and abundant seafood, clean beaches, and protection from storms and flooding. Ecosystem-Based Management (EBM) is an innovative management approach to address these challenges. It considers all ecosystem components, including humans and the environment, rather than managing one issue or resource in isolation. With support from the David and Lucile Packard Foundation, NatureServe’s EBM Tools Program is developing a knowledge base of EBM tools. EBM tools are software tools or highly-documented processes that can help coastal and marine decision makers collect, visualize, and analyze information and engage stakeholders in visioning and decision making processes. For example, existing EBM tools can: 1) predict ecosystem response to natural disturbances in watersheds and the marine environment; 2) select optimal areas for conservation or restoration; 3) help managers and stakeholders visualize the impact of development and resource-use scenarios on an ecosystem; 4) collect local knowledge about a resource; and 5) facilitate stakeholder voting on management alternatives. NatureServe is also coordinating a network of critical EBM tool developers, practitioners, and training providers (including NOAA) to develop EBM tools and support their use in EBM implementation in coastal and marine environments. The goals of the EBM Tools Network are to: 1) increase information about, access to, and honest evaluation of EBM tools; 2) outline information flow through typical EBM processes and determine the tool functionality necessary for EBM; 3) identify gaps in tool functionality and promote the development of tools to fill needs; 4) develop guidelines for EBM tool engineering to promote sustainable and interoperable tools; 5) develop best practices for effectively and appropriately using tools to implement EBM coastal and marine environments; 6) build capacity for effectively and appropriately using tools by provide training for EBM implementers, particularly key domestic and international technical service and training providers, 7) work with willing tool developers to develop suites of interoperable tools for EBM implementation; 8) provide support for EBM tool use in field EBM implementation projects. This talk will provide an overview of the state of EBM tools and on-going and upcoming EBM Tools Network activities.
Notes: Presentation available by video, webcast, and phone. For video, dial the NOS bridge or contact nos.video.conference@noaa.gov for help. For phone, dial 866-541-1377, passcode 142625. For webcast: 1. Go to: http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?i=741804628&p=NCCOS1305&t=c ; 2. Enter the required fields. (Meeting Number: 741804628; Passcode: NCCOS1305; Meeting Host: Science Seminar Host) ; 3. Indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy ; 4. Click on Proceed ; 5. Dial into the phone so you can hear too!


An overview of coastal zone problems in the European Union, based on the European Environment Agency report "The Changing Faces of Europe's Coastal Areas", published 3 July 2006
Thursday, 05 October 2006; 13:30 – 14:30 ET (SSMC-4, Room 8150, NOS seminar)
Speaker: Dr. Andrus Meiner (Project Manager Regional Assessments and Geospatial Data Biodiversity, Spatial analysis and Scenarios (BSS) European Environment Agency (http://eea.europa.eu)
Abstract: The Changing Faces of Europe's Coastal Areas" was completed in July 2006. This report provides information on the state of the environment in the coastal areas of Europe, and provides evidence of the need for a more integrated, long-term approach. Since 1995, concern about the state of Europe's coastline has led to a number of EU initiatives, which build on the concept of integrated coastal zone management (ICZM). ICZM attempts to balance the needs of development with protection of the very resources that sustain coastal economies. It also takes into account the public's concern about the deteriorating environmental, socio-economic and cultural state of the European coastline.
Notes: Presentation available by video, webcast, and phone. For video, dial the NOS bridge or contact nos.video.conference@noaa.gov for help. For phone, dial 866-541-1377, passcode 142625. For webcast: 1. Go to: http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?i=741804628&p=NCCOS1305&t=c
2. Enter the required fields. (Meeting Number: 741804628; Passcode: NCCOS1305; Meeting Host: Science Seminar Host) 3. Indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy. 4. Click on Proceed. 5. Dial into the phone so you can hear too!


The Martin Waldseemuller Map
Thursday, 12 October 2006 ; 1200-1300h ET (SSMC-3, 2nd Floor, NOAA Central Library, NOAA Central Library seminar)
Speaker: John Hessler (U.S. Library of Congress)
Abstract: John Hessler will talk about the Martin Waldseemuller Map. Acquired by the Library of Congress in 2003, "Waldseemuller's map supported Amerigo Vespucci's revolutionary concept of the New World as a separate continent, which, until then, was unknown to the Europeans. It was the first map, printed or manuscript, to depict the lands of a separate Western Hemisphere and with the Pacific as a separate ocean. The map reflected a huge leap forward in knowledge, recognizing the newly found American land mass and forever changing mankind's understanding and perception of the world itself."
Notes: See http://www.lib.noaa.gov/docs/news/news.html


A Reef Manager’s Guide to Coral Bleaching: Adapting reef management in a changing climate
Thursday, 12 October 2006; 13:00 – 14:30 ET (SSMC-3, Room 4527 [Large Conference Room], NOS seminar)
Speakers: Dr. Paul Marshall (Climate Change Response Programme), Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority (GBRMPA); Heidi Schuttenberg, James Cook University, Australia (formerly with NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program); Andrew Skeat, Executive Director, GBRMPA; Billy Causey, SE Regional Director NOAA National Marine Sanctuary Program; and Dr. Mark Eakin, NOAA Coral Reef Watch NESDIS Center for Satellite Applications and Research
Email: paulma@gbrmpa.gov.au, heidi.schuttenberg@jcu.edu.au, a.skeat@gbrmpa.gov.au, Billy.Causey@noaa.gov, Mark.Eakin@noaa.gov
Abstract: Mass coral bleaching events have increased in frequency and severity over the past two decades associated with unusually high sea surface temperatures. These events have produced wide-spread coral mortality and significant impacts to coral reefs and the communities that depend on them. What can local reef managers do to address coral bleaching? The new report “A Reef Manager’s Guide to Coral Bleaching” concludes that reef managers have a critical role to play in maximizing the resilience of reefs to coral bleaching. The Guide provides information on the causes and consequences of coral bleaching, and management strategies to help local reef managers reduce this threat to coral reef ecosystems. This seminar includes examples of responses to coral bleaching in the Great Barrier Reef and Florida Keys. Produced by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), the Australian Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority (GBRMPA), and the International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN), the Guide includes contributions from over 50 coral reef experts from 30 organizations.
For more information and copies of the Guide see http://www.coralreef.noaa.gov/.
Notes: Presentation available by webcast and phone. For phone, dial 866-541-1377, passcode 142625. For webcast: 1. Go to: http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?i=741804628&p=NCCOS1305&t=c 2. Enter the required fields. (Meeting Number: 741804628; Passcode: NCCOS1305; Meeting Host: Science Seminar Host) 3. Indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy. 4. Click on Proceed. 5. Dial into the phone so you can hear too!


Towards integrating GEOSS
Monday, 16 October 2006 ; 1100-1200h ET (SSMC-3, Room 4817, NODC seminar)
Speaker: Helen Wood (NOAA GEOSS Integration Manager & Senior Advisor)
Email: Helen.Wood@noaa.gov
Abstract: TBA
About the speaker: Please contact Paula Newbaker (301-713-1146; Paula.Newbaker@noaa.gov) for further information about Helen Wood.
Notes: VideoTeleConferencing (VTC)/phone available upon request by contacting Cheryl Ingram (Cheryl.Ingram@noaa.gov) at least a day before the seminar. For questions about this seminar please contact Hernan Garcia.


An integrated system for the acquisition of Oceanographic Variables at INIDEP
Tuesday, 24 October 2006 ; 1100-1200h ET (SSMC-3, Room 2503, NOAA Library Small Conference Room, NODC seminar)
Speaker: Raul Guerrero (Fisheries Research and Development National Institute, Argentina)
Email: raul.guerrero@inidep.edu.ar
Abstract: TBA
About the speaker: Raul Guerrero is a Physical Oceanographer from Fisheries Research and Development National Institute (INIDEP), Mar del Plata, Argentina. Raul will work with NODC/OCL from October 22 through November 5. Please contact Ricardo Locarnini (Ricardo.Locarnini@noaa.gov) for further information.
Notes: VideoTeleConferencing (VTC)/phone not available at this time. For questions about this seminar please contact Hernan Garcia.


New Technology to Trap and Treat Heavy Metal Pollution in the Anacostia
Wednesday, 25 October 2006; 1200-1300h ET (SSMC-4, Room 8150, NOS seminar)
Speaker: Dr. Jeffrey Melton (University of New Hampshire)
Email: jeffrey.melton@unh.edu
Abstract: Home to many national treasures, Washington D.C. also hosts the Anacostia River, one of the nation’s most polluted rivers. In the sediments lining the bottom of this urban waterway, you will find many of the “usual suspects” associated with industrial waste and metro runoff, including heavy metals such as lead, zinc, cadmium, copper, and chromium. Can reactive capping play a role in cleaning up this pollution? A technology demonstration near the old Capitol Hill pump house is exploring that very question. This presentation focuses on one of the innovative technologies under evaluation—apatite, a phosphate mineral that binds heavy metals in sediment, and prevents them from migrating into the water column. Long used to treat landfills contaminated with heavy metals, the application of apatite to marine sediments is something new. Apatite minerals have several properties that make them attractive as reactive sediment caps. Depending on the source, they are similar in appearance to silica sand, thus easy to deploy using available to technology. The heavy metals and phosphate minerals form complexes that are stable over a wide range of pH and redox potential—once bound, heavy metals remain sequestered from the environment. Lab studies at the University of New Hampshire (UNH) confirmed this potential and showed that permeable apatite-based reactive barrier caps effectively reduce the mobility of heavy metals in contaminated sediment, particularly Pb, Zn, Cu and Cd. Now that effectiveness is being put to the test in the field. Design of the apatite cap for the Anacostia River study followed procedures developed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. A two-layer cap composed of apatite and clean sand was deployed over a 24 m by 30.5 meter area in early April, 2004. Monitoring to date has shown that the cap is mechanically stable and that no metals have broken through. Advanced pore water sampling is underway to determine how the metals are behaving with in the cap system. New lead-contaminated sediment deposits have formed on top of the cap, emphasizing the need for source control to complement remediation.
***
Apatite reactive cap development and demonstration have been possible through interagency partnership. Funding from the Cooperative Institute for Coastal and Estuarine Environmental Technology (CICEET), a partnership of NOAA and the University of New Hampshire, supported bench scale studies, and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is funding the demonstration project in the Anacostia. To augment this initiative, CICEET has provided additional funding for advanced monitoring of the technology.
Notes: Presentation available by video, webcast, and phone. For video, dial the NOS bridge or contact nos.video.conference@noaa.gov for help. For phone, dial 866-541-1377, passcode 142625. For webcast: 1. Go to: http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?i=741804628&p=NCCOS1305&t=c ; 2. Enter the required fields. (Meeting Number: 741804628; Passcode: NCCOS1305; Meeting Host: Science Seminar Host) ; 3. Indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy ; 4. Click on Proceed ; 5. Dial into the phone so you can hear too!


Whatever happened to Terrestrial Magnetism?
Wednesday 25 October 2006; 1200-1300h ET (SSMC-3, 2nd Floor, NOAA Central Library, NOAA Central Library seminar)
Speaker: Greg Good (historian of geophysics and geomagnetism at West Virginia University; Associate Editor, Geology and Geophysics journal)
Abstract: In 1900, researchers interested in Earth's magnetism generally proclaimed all facets of magnetic phenomena to be within their purview. Most researchers, including those at the Coast Survey and its successor agencies, called themselves 'magneticians' first and physicists or geologists second. From the time of the second superintendent of the Coast Survey, AD Bache, until the mid-20th century, Earth's magnetism was a major focus of Survey activity. After WW II, specialization both in the agency and outside it increased. Distinct magnetic research areas appeared: geodynamo theory and the study of the core-mantle boundary; palaeomagnetism and its growing connection to geology; and the magnetism of near space, among others. The earlier unity dissolved and Terrestrial Magnetism fragmented. The US government redistributed the activities of the old Coast Survey among ESSA, NOAA, the US Geological Survey, NASA, and other new players. Fragmentation — both institutional and conceptual — produced a loss of community and of memory. The 200th anniversary of the founding of the Coast Survey is an appropriate time to reflect on these large scale and complex changes. Abstract
Notes: See http://www.lib.noaa.gov/docs/news/news.html


November 2006

 

The oceanographic regimes on the Southwestern Atlantic Continental Shelf
Wednesday, 1 November 2006 ; 1300-1400h ET (SSMC-3, Room 4817, NODC seminar)
Speaker: Raul Guerrero (Fisheries Research and Development National Institute, Argentina)
Email: raul.guerrero@inidep.edu.ar
Abstract: TBA
About the speaker: Raul Guerrero is a Physical Oceanographer from Fisheries Research and Development National Institute (INIDEP), Mar del Plata, Argentina. Raul will work with NODC/OCL from October 22 through November 5. Please contact Ricardo Locarnini (Ricardo.Locarnini@noaa.gov) for further information.
Notes: VideoTeleConferencing (VTC)/phone available upon request by contacting Cheryl Ingram (Cheryl.Ingram@noaa.gov) at least a day before the seminar. For questions about this seminar please contact Hernan Garcia.


Offshore aquaculture: managing ocean space as a resource
Wednesday, 8 November 2006; 1200-1300h ET (SSMC-3, Room 13836, NOAA Fisheries Office of Policy Seminar)
Speaker: Porter Hoagland (WHOI)
Abstract: TBD
Presentation available on-line: Hoagland (2006) [ocean space as a resource].pdf
About the speaker: http://www.whoi.edu/mpcweb/staff/hoagland.html
Notes: NOAA Fisheries Office of Policy 3-month series of policy seminars to showcase policy development and analysis techniques (see Good Policy Guide.pdf). Please contact Jason Didden (Jason.Didden@noaa.gov or 713-9070 ext 116) for audio/video link information or Cheryl Alexander (Cheryl.Alexander@noaa.gov; (301) 713-2251 ext 103).


Estimated Fishery Value of a Constructed Marsh Galveston Bay, Texas
Thursday, 9 November 2006; 1200-1300h ET (SSMC-3, Room 13836, OHC Seminar)
Speaker: Phil Caldwell (SEFSC-Galveston Lab; NRAP position in the NMFS Office of Habitat Conservation)
Email: Phil.Caldwell@noaa.gov
Abstract: The Beneficial Uses Group (BUG) is one of several subcommittees formed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers’ Interagency Coordination Team to address environmental issues associated with the Houston-Galveston Navigation Channels, expansion project Galveston Bay, Texas. The BUG was given the specific goal of identifying environmentally and economically responsible ways to utilize the material dredged from the Houston Ship Channel expansion project. Historically dredge material was situated back into the bay in a manner termed “open-bay” disposal, a method less than environmentally ideal. A Demonstration Marsh was created on Atkinson Island, Galveston Bay, Texas to show that valuable wetlands could be constructed using material from the widening and deepening of the Houston Ship Channel. To analyze the fishery value of constructed and restored estuarine marshes The Fishery Ecology Branch of the NMFS, SEFSC, Galveston Laboratory has developed an approach that estimates the nursery value of different Galveston Bay wetland systems for fishery species such as penaeid shrimps and blue crabs. This approach involves a landscape-scale analysis of land water patterns in wetlands combined with spatial models of the fine-scale (1-25 m) density distributions of nekton on the marsh surface. The land-water patterns are determined using aerial photography and a Geographic Information System to estimate the amount of water within wetlands and the amount of marsh edge habitat. Nonlinear regression models have been developed (for brown shrimp Farfantepenaeus aztecus, white shrimp Litopenaeus setiferus, and blue crabs Callinectes sapidus) to describe a general decline in density from a peak just within the vegetation at the marsh edge. By combining these models with estimated densities for nekton species in vegetated marsh edge habitat, we can develop density surfaces for different areas within the marsh at a 1-m pixel resolution. A standing crop of nekton population size can then be estimated for a marsh complex by summing these data.


Web-cast seminars: Ocean Acidification
13-14 November 2006; (see Notes below for details about the web-cast)
Speakers: Scott Doney (WHOI, USA), Richard A Feely (NOAA PMEL, USA), Richard Matear (CSIRO, Australia), Peter Neill (WOB, USA), Carol Turley (Plymouth Marine Laboratory, UK), and Liz Murphy (Event facilitator, Australia)
Abstract: On November 13th-14th, 2006, The World Ocean Observatory will present an online, interactive web-cast on Ocean Acidification. This is a unique opportunity for students, educators and interested individuals to participate in the first demonstration of an ongoing series of global online events to explore ocean issues. Those who attend this 45 minute event hosted in Australia will participate in a real-time interactive presentations and discussions with leading scientists around the world. The basic chemistry of our oceans is changing as they absorb carbon dioxide released into the atmosphere by human activities. This decrease in the ocean's pH and the resulting increase in acidity is called ocean acidification. Present evidence suggests that dramatic changes in the marine environment over the next 100-200 years can be avoided only with early and deep reductions in carbon dioxide emissions. We invite you to join us for our first event broadcast on Monday, November 13th, 2006 at 5:30pm Eastern Standard Time. We have approximately 100 spaces available, please respond as soon as possible to ensure your place in the forum. Please reply to info@thew2o.net if you are interested in attending this online event. Log-in details will be provided. The World Ocean Observatory (w2o) is a central place of exchange for global information, education and public discourse about the ocean. It serves as an independent forum and focus for ocean affairs. Its intent is to communicate the full spectrum of ocean issues - climate, conservation, biology and ecology, fresh water, food, energy, commerce and transportation, public health, finance, governance, recreation and culture - to citizens worldwide as a realization that the sea connects all things. Please join us as we launch Ocean Acidification, the first of our exciting Online Events. Thank you, The World Ocean Observatory.
Notes: System Specifications: The webcast software used in this online event is Centra (see http://www.thew2o-events.net/ or http://www.thew2o-events.net/docs/oa-setup.pdf). Currently Centra will only operate on PC computers however it will be available to download onto Mac computers from Dec 2006. For this online webcast you will therefore need a PC computer. Time: The webcast will be hosted from Adelaide in Australia Monday 13 Nov, 2006 at 22.30.00 UTC or GMT time. UTC-time is Coordinated Universal Time. GMT is Greenwich Mean Time. Check your local time in relation to UTC / GMT time as for some it will be Mon 13 Nov and for others Tues 14 Nov. Presenters will be in the following locations: Adelaide, Australia Tues 14 Nov 9.00am; Hobart, Australia Tues 14 Nov 9.30am; Seattle, USA Mon 13 Nov 2.30pm; New York, USA Mon 13 Nov 5.30pm; Boston, USA Mon 13 Nov 5.30pm; London, UK Mon 13 Nov 10.30pm; Check your specific time zone at http://www.timeanddate.com/worldclock/. The World Ocean Observatory has designed a media rich website on Ocean Acidification as an introduction to this important ocean issue. It provides an excellent overview of ocean acidification, explores its impact and implications on us and our world, and makes the connections to key ideas and concepts students need to know and understand. This webcast will also be archived on the website for participants unable to access the event in real-time. http://www.thew2o-events.net/.


Advancing the Standard of Practice: Stormwater BMP Testing and Cold Climate Performance
Tuesday, 14 November 2006; 12:00 – 13:00 ET (SSMC-4, Room #8150, NOS seminar)
Speaker: Dr. Robert Roseen (Director of the University of New Hampshire Stormwater Center)
Email: rroseen@cisunix.unh.edu
Abstract: Under Phase II of the Clean Water Act, communities with populations of 100,000 or less are required to develop stormwater programs to improve water quality and reduce runoff volume. To create these programs, there is no lack of stormwater treatments from which to choose. The challenge decision makers face is planning an approach that will do the best job of protecting local water quality, is within their budgets, and will meet regulatory requirements. Until recently, information needed to make these decisions has not been readily available, particularly for emerging technologies. In 2004, the University of New Hampshire Stormwater Center was created to help address this critical need. Its mission is to protect water resources by helping land use decision makers develop effective stormwater management programs. The Center is supported by the UNH/NOAA Cooperative Institute for Coastal & Estuarine Environmental Technology (CICEET). The heart of the Center’s research is a field facility, adjacent to a nine-acre commuter parking lot. The only test bed of its kind in the nation, the site is designed so that different stormwater treatments can be evaluated side-by-side, under strictly controlled conditions. Researchers study a range of issues related to the design and performance of stormwater treatments, including water quality impact, storm volume reduction, cost, maintenance, and operations. The results of these analyses are made available through an actively involving outreach program that includes technology demonstrations, workshops, and training exercises.This talk will present research findings from a suite of thirteen stormwater treatment strategies, evaluated for water quality performance and storm volume reduction between 2004 and 2006. The treatments included conventional structural BMPs, such as swales and retention ponds, Low Impact Development (LID) designs such as a treatment wetland and filtration and infiltration devices, and manufactured BMPs such as hydrodynamic separators. Researchers tested the stormwater treatments in parallel, with a single influent source providing uniform loading. The treatments were uniformly sized to target a water quality volume of 1 inch, or a rainfall-runoff depth equivalent to 90 percent of the annual volume of rainfall. This parallel and uniform configuration allowed for normalized performance evaluation; treatments of the same scale received runoff from events of the same duration, intensity, peak flow, volume, antecedent dry period, and watershed loading. Winter monitoring included both rainfall runoff data and diurnal melt events.The analysis revealed distinctive trends. For example, in contrast to misperceptions regarding cold climate performance of LIDs. these treatments exhibited high contaminant removal efficiencies of 80-99%. In contrast, conventional structural BMPs performed poorly for many measures, the notable exception being the retention pond’s treatment of TSS (Total Suspended Solids). Manufactured systems tended to vary widely and were dependent upon the design, contaminant of interest, and season.
Notes: Presentation are typically available by video, webcast, and phone. For video, contact nos.video.conference@noaa.gov. Please allow adequate time for testing of connections (24 hours or more) if you do not regularly connect with NOS. For phone, dial 866-541-1377, passcode 142625. For webcast: 1. Go to the My Meetings website. 2. Enter the required fields. (Meeting Number: 741804628; Passcode: NCCOS1305; Meeting Host: Science Seminar Host) 3. Indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy. 4. Click on Proceed. 5. Dial into the phone so you can hear too!


Getting Performance Accountability Expectations Right to Unleash the Performance-Driving Power of Goals and Measures
Wednesday, 15 November 2006; 1200-1300h ET (SSMC-3, Room 13836, NOAA Fisheries Office of Policy Seminar)
Speaker: Shelley Metzenbaum (UMD school of public policy; Director of the environmental compliance consortium)
Abstract: NOAA Fisheries Service Office of Policy is sponsoring a series of policy seminars over the next three months to showcase policy development and analysis techniques as applied to marine and other natural resource issues. The series is designed to highlight current policy methods, techniques and practices. The lunchtime seminars are being complemented by a /"Guide to the Preparation of Good Policy"/ written by the Policy Office staff. Dr. Metzenbaum will be presenting on the importance of expectation-setting when using accountability measures.
About the speaker: Shelley Metzenbaum: Visiting Professor, UMD School of Public Policy; Exec. Dir. of the Environmental Compliance Consortium. Formerly EPA Associate Administrator for Regional Operations and State/Local Relations, Undersecretary of the Massachusetts Executive Office of
Environmental Affairs, and Director of Capital Budgeting for the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. See http://www.publicpolicy.umd.edu/facstaff/faculty/metzenbaum.html
Notes: NOAA Fisheries Office of Policy 3-month series of policy seminars to showcase policy development and analysis techniques (see Good Policy Guide.pdf). Please contact Jason Didden (Jason.Didden@noaa.gov or 713-9070 ext 116) audio/video link information or Cheryl Alexander (Cheryl.Alexander@noaa.gov; (301) 713-2251 ext 103).


Riding the World’s Biggest Wave: Stories of the Survival and Recovery of People and the Marine Environment from the 2004 Indian Ocean Tsunami
Thursday, 16 November 2006; 1200-1300h ET (SSMC-3, 2nd Floor, NOAA Central Library, NOAA Central Library seminar)
Speaker: Dwayne Meadows (Fishery Management Specialist, National Marine Fisheries Service, Office of Protected Resources)
Abstract: At the time of the 2004 tsunami Dwayne was a coral reef ecologist at the National Marine Fisheries Services’ Pacific Islands Fishery Science Center in Hawaii. After a three day SCUBA diving vacation trip, he stayed the night in Khao Lak, Thailand; the worst hit part of Thailand where 80% of the 10,000 deaths occurred. At the time of the tsunami he was in a bungalow 50 feet from the ocean. Our group of 1000 survivors was cut off from assistance for over one day. This presentation is the story of the survival and recovery of many heroic and inspirational people during those horrible those days. It is also the story of how the NOAA and professional medical and ecosystem restoration training he had was able to be used to aid the survivors and the country. After the tsunami Dwayne returned twice to Thailand to advise and assist in the process of marine debris removal from around sensitive coral reefs throughout Thailand, something he had experience with working for NOAA in the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands. Dwayne will also discuss work he assisted in to restore hard and soft corals in some marine parks.
Notes: See http://www.lib.noaa.gov/docs/news/news.html


Alternative energy projects and the increased trend to install wind, tidal, current, and wave energy facilities in rivers, coastal waters, and on the continental shelf
Monday, 20 November 2006; 1200-1300h ET (SSMC-3, 15th Floor, Room 15836)
Speaker: Thomas Bigford (NMFS Office of Habitat Conservation)
Context: Thomas Bigford will discuss alternative energy projects and the increasing trend to install wind, tidal, current, and wave energy facilities in rivers, coastal waters, and on the continental shelf. Specifically, Tom will discuss the potential effects those facilities might have on trust resources, their habitats, competing uses, and interested stakeholders.


What Americans Really Think About Climate Change: Attitude Formation and Change in Response to a Raging Scientific Controversy
Wednesday, 29 November 2006; 1200-1300h ET (SSMC-3, 2nd Floor, NOAA Central Library, NOAA Central Library seminar)
Speaker: Jon A. Krosnick (Professor in Humanities and Social Sciences, Stanford University)
Abstract: During the past decade, many scientific experts have been frustrated by the American public's apparent indifference to climate change and the threats it may pose. Just a few weeks ago, a headline on newspapers across the country proclaimed: "Scientists and the American Public Disagree Sharply Over Global Warming." Is it really true? Do Americans really not yet accept the opinions of scientific experts on climate change? In this presentation, Professor Jon Krosnick will present findings from a series of national surveys that he has designed and conducted since 1996, tracking what Americans do and do not believe on this issue and what they do and do not want to have done about it. The survey results are surprising in many ways.
Notes: See http://www.lib.noaa.gov/docs/news/news.html


Using Decision Analysis to generate alternatives, evaluate alternatives, and reprioritize spending
Thursday, 30 November 2006; 1200-1300h ET (SSMC-3, Room 13836, NOAA Fisheries Office of Policy Seminar)
Speaker: Ernest Forman (GWU Business- Decision Sciences)
Abstract: Dr. Forman will speak on the usefulness of Decision Analysis techniques, especially as applied for: A) generating novel policy alternatives, B) modeling to produce a "best choice" that wouldn't be considered a best choice based on "conventional wisdom," and C) reprioritizing expenditures by a management entity.
About the speaker: Ernest Forman is a Professor of Decision Sciences at George Washington University's School of Business. Dr. Forman has a Masters in Management Science from Johns Hopkins University and a Ph.D. in Operations Research from George Washington University. He has extensive experience with executive decision making methodologies, resource allocation, project portfolio management, operations management and statistics. Dr. Forman holds four U.S. Patents related to decision making and is co-founder of Expert Choice Inc. Applications include a wide range of government and business decisions involving tradeoffs among conflicting objectives of government policy, allocation of R&D funds, cost/benefit analysis, employee evaluation, setting corporate priorities, group decision making, conflict resolution and strategic planning. Dr. Forman has served as a consultant for IBM, MERCK, General Motors, Ford, AOL, NIST, Boeing, GAO, IRS, NASA, CIA, DoD, state, and local governments (http://mdm.gwu.edu/forman/bio.htm).
Presentation available on-line: Forman talkNov_30_06.ppt
Notes: NOAA Fisheries Office of Policy 3-month series of policy seminars to showcase policy development and analysis techniques (see Good Policy Guide.pdf). Please contact Jason Didden (Jason.Didden@noaa.gov or 713-9070 ext 116) for audio/video link information or Cheryl Alexander (Cheryl.Alexander@noaa.gov; (301) 713-2251 ext 103). Call-in information for this seminar: NOV-30-2006 (Thursday); CALL TIME: 12:00 PM EASTERN TIME; DURATION: 1 hr; LEADER: MR MONTY HOGGARD; USA Toll Free Number: 888-677-1828; PASSCODE: POLICY ONE


December 2006

 

Evaluating Oyster Restoration Alternatives in Chesapeake Bay
Wednesday, 06 December 2006; 1200-1300h ET (SSMC-3, Room 6836, NOAA Fisheries Office of Policy Seminar)
Speaker: Doug Lipton (UMD Resource economics; Maryland Sea Grant)
Abstract: Dr. Lipton will be discussing a framework for analyzing benefits, costs and risks resulting from oyster restoration (native and non-native).
About the speaker: Dr. Lipton earned his Ph.D. in Resource Economics from UMD in 1989. He has published extensively on regional marine resource economic issues and is the Coordinator of the Maryland Sea Grant Extension Program. See http://www.arec.umd.edu/dlipton/ for details and publications.
Notes: NOAA Fisheries Office of Policy 3-month series of policy seminars to showcase policy development and analysis techniques (see Good Policy Guide.pdf). Please contact Jason Didden (Jason.Didden@noaa.gov or 713-9070 ext 116) audio/video link information or Cheryl Alexander (Cheryl.Alexander@noaa.gov; (301) 713-2251 ext 103).


Climate Change: Beyond Uncertainty
Friday, 08 December 2006; 1200-1300h ET (SSMC-3, 2nd Floor, NOAA Central Library seminar)
Speaker: Dr. John Kermond (NOAA's Climate Program Office)
Abstract: This talk will focus on what we really know, on what we really do not know, and the significance of both with respect to global climate change. (If time permits, some of the digital imagery taken while on board a Russian ice breaker this summer in the Arctic will be shown).
Notes: This traditional Library Holiday Seminar will also feature giveaways, quizzes, coffee, and refreshments. See http://www.lib.noaa.gov/docs/news/news.html


Services Evolution: Evolving the National Weather Service Concept of Operations
Wednesday, 13 December 2006; 1130-1230h ET (NOAA Auditorium)
Speaker: Brigadier General D.L. Johnson, U.S. Air Force (Ret.), Assistant Administrator for Weather Services and Director, NOAA National Weather Service
Abstract: Our Nation’s needs for weather, water, and climate information are evolving. The post-9/11, post-Hurricane Katrina environment requires robust climate and environmental/health services and public awareness efforts to prepare for and respond to manmade and natural disasters. The NOAA National Weather Service (NWS) of the future must provide greater value by being a flexible and efficient service organization that gives local forecast offices the freedom to focus on high-impact events, collaborates with other NOAA components and external partners, increases IMET-type support for events beyond fire weather, and maximizes the value of new science and technology. The NWS is in the process of prototyping three Services Evolution Initiatives that will position the agency for the future and may lead to fundamental changes in the way the agency operates. Join General Johnson in this brown bag session to learn about the exciting period of discovery the agency is currently undertaking.
Notes: See http://www.lib.noaa.gov/docs/news/news.html


MPA Entry Fees
Thursday, 14 December 2006; 1200-1300h ET (SSMC-3, Room 13836, NOAA Fisheries Office of Policy Seminar)
Speaker: Dr. Steven Thur (NOS Damage Assessment)
Abstract: Economic values associated with MPAs and the coral reef resources they protect are rarely considered in decision-making and policy development. This study fills this information gap by examining scuba divers’ willingness to pay for access to quality recreational sites in the Bonaire Marine Park.
About the speaker: Dr. Thur earned his Ph.D. in Marine Studies (Policy) from the Univ. of Delaware and currently works as an economist for NOS’s Office of Response and Restoration.
Notes: NOAA Fisheries Office of Policy 3-month series of policy seminars to showcase policy development and analysis techniques (see Good Policy Guide.pdf). Please contact Jason Didden (Jason.Didden@noaa.gov or 713-9070 ext 116) audio/video link information or Cheryl Alexander (Cheryl.Alexander@noaa.gov; (301) 713-2251 ext 103).


WWF's Smart Gear International Competition
Thursday, 14 December 2006; 1200-1300h ET (SSMC-3, 2nd Floor, NOAA Central Library seminar)
Speaker: Kimberly Davis and Mike Osmond (World Wildlife Fund)
Abstract: WWF 's International Smart Gear Competition , created in 2004, brings together the fishing industry, research institutes, universities, and government, to inspire and reward practical, innovative fishing gear designs that reduce bycatch -the accidental catch and related deaths of sea turtles, birds, marine mammals, cetaceans and nontarget fish species in fishing gear such as longlines and nets. This most pressing threat to marine life needs a wide-ranging, multidisciplinary response, and WWF believes the Smart Gear competition will help catalyze that response by encouraging creative thinkers everywhere to share their ideas. Applicants are asked to submit their ideas for modified fishing gears and procedures that increase selectivity for target fish species and reduce bycatch for other species. The competition is open to eligible entrants from any background and a diverse group responded in the first year, including gear technologists, fishermen, engineers, chemists, and inventors. More than 50 entries were received from 16 countries during the first year of the competition. These entries were judged by an international panel made up of gear technologists, fisheries experts, representatives of the seafood industry, fishermen, scientists, researchers and conservationists. The competition awards a $25,000 first prize and two $5,000 runner-up prizes for the best ideas.
Notes: See http://www.lib.noaa.gov/docs/news/news.html


Ecosystem Approaches to Management: Evolution not Revolution
Friday, 15 December 2006; 1200-1300h ET (SSMC-3, Room 10836, NMFS Office of International Affairs)
Speaker: Dr. Steve Murawski (Director of Scientific Programs and Chief Science Advisor, NOAA Fisheries)
Abstract: It is sometimes perceived that ecosystem approaches to management require a wholesale shift in perspective. Dr. Murawski will discuss how given NOAA's current perspective, we are really dealing with an evolution from current practices rather than a revolution.
About the speaker: Dr. Murawski is responsible for about 30 laboratories, eight offshore research vessels, and 1,400 staff throughout the United States. Dr. Murawski was previously the Director of the Office of Science and Technology. Prior to coming to NOAA Fisheries headquarters, he served as Chief Stock Assessment Scientist for the Northeast Fisheries Science Center in Woods Hole, Massachusetts (1990–2004). His research background is in fisheries biology and stock assessment. He received his Ph.D. from the University of Massachusetts–Amherst and has published in the Canadian Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences, Marine Ecology Progress Series, Bulletin of Marine Science, and Ecological Applications.
Notes: NMFS Office of International Affairs is sponsoring this Brown Bag Lunch Series. Please RSVP to Liz English for background materials (Liz.English@noaa.gov, 713-2276).


Socio-Economic Analysis of the Marine Resources of Vieques Island, Puerto Rico
Monday, 18 December 2006; 12:30 – 13:30 ET (SSMC-4, Room #8150, NOS seminar)
Speaker: Mr. Manoj Shivlani (Manager of the Center for Independent Experts at Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science, University of Miami)
Email: mshivlani@rsmas.miami.edu
Abstract: Mr. Shivlani will discuss his recently completed Vieques socio-economic field research where he conducted extensive community surveys of all sectors of Vieques marine resource stakeholders. He gathered detailed information about their views on marine resource quality, marine resource protection, their willingness to support the adoption of a marine protected area, as well as their views of tourism gentrification.
Notes: Presentations are typically available by video, webcast, and phone. For video, contact nos.video.conference@noaa.gov. Please allow adequate time for testing of connections (24 hours or more) if you do not regularly connect with NOS. For phone, dial 866-541-1377, passcode 142625. For webcast: 1. Go to the My Meetings website. 2. Enter the required fields. (Meeting Number: 741804628; Passcode: NCCOS1305; Meeting Host: Science Seminar Host) 3. Indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy. 4. Click on Proceed. 5. Dial into the phone so you can hear too!


From Ridge to Reef: WWF's conservation strategy in the Mesoamerican Reef
Tuesday, 19 December 2006; 12:00 – 13:00 ET (SSMC-4, Room #8150, NOS seminar)
Speaker: Gina De Ferrari, Mesoamerican Reef Team Leader, World Wildlife Fund
Email: gina.deferrari@wwfus.org
Abstract: The Mesoamerican Reef Ecoregion, extending nearly 1000 kilometers from the northern tip of the Yucatan Peninsula in Mexico, along the coasts of Belize and Guatemala, to the Bay Islands of Honduras, is considered a jewel of the Caribbean, unique in the western hemisphere not only for its size but also because of its diverse reefs and exuberant corals. Gina De Ferrari will give a brownbag presentation on WWF’s conservation strategy in the ecoregion, which includes working with the agricultural sector to reduce toxic effluents that are reaching the reefs, working with the fisheries communities whose livelihoods depend on the reefs, and promoting an effective network of marine protected areas.
Notes: Presentations are typically available by video, webcast, and phone. For video, contact nos.video.conference@noaa.gov. Please allow adequate time for testing of connections (24 hours or more) if you do not regularly connect with NOS.
For phone, dial 866-541-1377, passcode 142625. For webcast: 1. Go to the My Meetings website. 2. Enter the required fields. (Meeting Number: 741804628; Passcode: NCCOS1305; Meeting Host: Science Seminar Host) 3. Indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy. 4. Click on Proceed. 5. Dial into the phone so you can hear too!


Can the Ocean be fit into a box?
Thursday, 21 December 2006 ; 1100-1200h ET (SSMC-3, Room 4817, NODC seminar)
Speaker: Chandrasekher Narayanan (NODC)
Email: Chandrasekher.Narayanan@noaa.gov
Abstract: Five different two year simulations of the Atlantic ocean with varying degree of vertical resolutions are compared to evaluate the sensitivity of the simulations to the choice of density targets using the HYCOM model. The density targets for the base run (highest vertical resolution) was chosen such that the targets are able to capture the seasonality of vertical normal modes for different regions. The simulations were compared with respect to changes in deep water masses over a period of a year of model simulations as well as circulation pattern differences during the same. The results show strong sensitivity to the vertical resolution.
Notes: VideoTeleConferencing (VTC)/phone available upon request by contacting Cheryl Ingram (Cheryl.Ingram@noaa.gov ) at least a day before the seminar. For questions about this seminar please contact Hernan Garcia.



Concept: The "OneNOAA" science seminar series are an opportunity to share and promote constructive discussion of the work conducted at NOAA, and elsewhere with colleagues and guests speakers in an informal setting.


OneNOAA Science Seminar Partner's contacts


NESDIS / National Oceanographic Data Center
(NODC) seminars:
Location: Unless otherwise indicated, NODC seminars are held in conference Room 4817 (SSMC-3, 4th Floor; 1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD 20910). NESDIS Seminars: Check locations. Information/questions? Please contact Hernan Garcia (301-713-3290 Ext 184). Notes: For VideoTeleConferencing (VTC) access: contact Cheryl.Ingram@noaa.gov (301-713-3284 x155) at least a day before the seminar. For Webcast access: 1) go to http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?i=442112424&p=NODC4817&t=c); 2) type in other required fields (i.e., your name, e-mail, organization); 3) indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy; 4) click on Proceed. For phone access: toll free dial 866-743-9902 using a touch-tone phone; when prompted enter participant code 4689608 followed by a "#".

National Ocean Service (NOS) seminars:
Location:  Unless otherwise indicated, seminars are typically held in the NOS conference Room# 8150 (SSMC-4, 8th Floor)
Information/questions? Please contact Felix A. Martinez (301-713-3338 x153) NOS/NCCOS/Center for Sponsored Coastal Ocean Research. Notes: Presentations are available remotely via a combination of phone & webcast. Please be aware that remote access is limited to 50 connections on a first-come-first served basis, so we cannot guarantee participation. To participate remotely you must: 1) Dial 866-541-1377, and then wait for instructions. When prompted enter passcode 142625 followed by the # sign. Please use your phone’s mute button (or toggle *6) during the presentation until you are ready to ask questions. 2) Go to the webcast site at https://www.mymeetings.com/emeet/join/index.jsp?customHeader=mymeetings 3) Enter meeting number 449707376 and passcode NOS8150. 4) Enter other required fields. 5) Indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy and click Proceed.

National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) seminars:
Location:
  Check announcements
Information/questions? Please contact Gloria Thompson (301 713-2239)

Fisheries Service, Office of Habitat Conservation seminars:
Location: Check announcements
Information/questions? For more information or to suggest a speaker, contact Julie Nygard (Julie.Nygard@noaa.gov ) or Perry Gayaldo (Perry.Gayaldo@noaa.gov)

Air Resources Laboratory seminars:
Location: Check announcements
Information/questions? Please contact  Betty Wells (Betty.Wells@noaa.gov)

National Weather Service - Office of Hydrologic Development
Location:  Check announcements
Information/questions? For more information or to suggest a speaker, contact Pedro.Restrepo@noaa.gov

National Weather Service - Science and Technology Seminars
Location:  Check announcements
Information/questions? For more information or to suggest a speaker, contact Bob Glahn at (301-713-1768 ; Harry.Glahn@noaa.gov)

National Marine Fisheries Service Office of Policy Seminars
Location:  Check announcements
Information/questions? For more information or to suggest a speaker, please contact Anne.Isham@noaa.gov (301) 713-9070 ext 116).

NOAA Chesapeake Bay Office (NCBO): NCBO focuses multiple NOAA capabilities on Chesapeake Bay restoration through science, service, and stewardship of the Bay ecosystem.
Location:  Check announcements
Information/questions? For more information or to suggest a speaker, please contact Kim.Couranz@noaa.gov (410) 267-5673.

NOAA Central Library:
Location: All NOAA central library brown bag seminars (unless otherwise noted) are held from 1200-1300h ET in SSMC-3, 2nd Floor (main floor), 1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring. Information/Questions? Contact Mary Lou Cumberpatch (301-713-2600 Ext.129; Mary.Lou.Cumberpatch@noaa.gov) or Albert (Skip) Theberge (301-713-2600 Ext. 115; Albert.E.Theberge.Jr@noaa.gov). Subscribe to the RSS NOAA Central Library brown bag seminars.

NOAA NMFS Office of Protected Resources (OPR) seminars
Location:  Check announcements
Information/questions? For Webex access and further information please contact Jaclyn Taylor [(301) 713-2322 ext 118]

Office of Ocean Exploration
Location: Check announcements
Information/questions? For questions please contact: Reginald.Beach@noaa.gov, Margot.Bohan@noaa.gov, and/or Nicolas.Alvarado@noaa.gov.

NOAA’s National Climatic Data Center
Location: Check announcements
Information/questions? For questions please contact Sharon LeDuc (828-271-4848)

Joint Center for Satellite Data Assimilation (JCSDA) Seminars:
Location: Unless noted otherwise, all seminars take place at World Weather Building Science Center, 5200 Auth Road, Camp Springs, MD 20746.
Seminar web?: http://www.jcsda.noaa.gov/JCSDASeminars.php
Information/questions? For questions please contact Ada Armstrong (301-763-8172 x188) and George Ohring (301-763-8154 x352)

Center for Satellite Applications and Research (STAR) Seminars:
Location: Unless noted otherwise, all seminars take place at Center for Satellite Applications and Research, World Weather Building, Science Center, Room 707, 5200 Auth Road,
Camp Springs, MD 20746.
Seminar web?: http://www.orbit.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/seminars.php
Information/questions? For questions please contact Lori K. Brown (301-361-0637).

National/Naval Ice Center (NATICE) Seminars
Location: Unless noted otherwise, all seminars take place at NOAA Satellite Operations Facility (NSOF), 4251 Suitland Road, Washington, D.C. 20395.
Information/questions? Please contact Pablo Clemente-Colón

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Seminar Locations (unless otherwise indicated)

NOAA Silver Spring Campus

  • SSMC-1 (Silver Spring Metro Center, Building 1): 1335 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD, 20910, USA.
  • SSMC-2 (Silver Spring Metro Center, Building 2): 1325 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD, 20910, USA.
  • SSMC-3 (Silver Spring Metro Center, Building 3): 1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD, 20910, USA.
  • SSMC-4 (Silver Spring Metro Center, Building 4): 1305 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD, 20910, USA.
  • SSMC-5 (NOAA Science Center/Auditorium): 1301 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD, 20910, USA.

NOAA Camp Springs Campus

  • World Weather Building, Science Center, Room 707, 5200 Auth Road, Camp Springs, MD 20746, USA.

NOAA Satellite Operations Facility (NSOF)

  • NOAA Satellite Operations Facility (NSOF), 4251 Suitland Road, Washington, D.C. 20395.

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Sample Seminar Format

 

Title:


Date/Location:
 
Speaker(s):
 
E-mail(s):
 
Abstract:
 
Remote Access & Notes:
 
About the speaker(s):
 
Download Presentation(s):
 
Seminar Added:
OneNOAA Science Seminar added

 


4. A PDF version of this announcement, suitable for copying and posting, is available [Download OneNOAASeminars_DDMM2008.pdf]

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