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The Ocean Archive System searches our original datasets as they were submitted to us, not individual points or profiles. If you want to search and retrieve ocean profiles in a common format, or objectively analyzed fields, your better option may be to use one of our project applications. See: Access Data

OAS insttype Detail for Glider

insttypes_id:163
Codeset:
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Term:Glider
Description:It's a type of autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV), making high spatial resolution sections repeatedly, and autonomously.
Definition:An underwater glider is a type of autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) that uses small changes in its buoyancy in conjunction with wings to convert vertical motion to horizontal, and thereby propel itself forward with very low power consumption. Gliders typically take measurements such as temperature, conductivity (to calculate salinity), currents, chlorophyll fluorescence, optical backscatter, bottom depth, and (occasionally) acoustic backscatter. They navigate with the help of periodic surface GPS fixes, pressure sensors, tilt sensors, and magnetic compasses. Gliders can be built to withstand various depths and pressures.

Long range underwater gliders have recently become operational technology for oceanography. Their most promising role for ocean climate observations is to make high spatial resolution sections repeatedly, autonomously, and at very low cost compared to conventional methods involving ships or moorings. While they provide profiles, as ARGO floats do, the time and location of glider observations is remotely controllable. Gliders can collect repeat observations on a prescribed spatial grid tailored provide a description of how the ocean evolves in space and time on relevant scales. They provide a means for monitoring boundary currents, of particular importance to ocean climate.
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Deprecated:false
Metadata version:0
Keydate:2010-07-14 23:51:49+00
Editdate:2010-07-14 23:51:49+00