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OneNOAA Science Seminars


April 2013OneNOAA Science Seminars: April 2013

A joint effort by several NOAA offices to provide the most complete summary of upcoming NOAA science seminars. For further information please contact

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Web page last updated: Thursday, 27-Jun-2013 11:00:10 UTC

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Note: All OneNOAA Science seminar attendees agree not to cite, quote, copy, or distribute material presented without the explicit written consent of the seminar presenters. The views and opinions expressed by the speakers of the OneNOAA Science seminars do not reflect any position of the Government or NOAA.


April 2, 2013

Urban Models: Development and Coupling to Meteorological Simulations

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Date and Time: April 2, 2013; 16:00-17:00h Central Time [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: National Weather Center Room 1313 (120 David L. Boren Blvd, Norman, OK 73072; Directions)
Speaker(s): Dr. Elie Bou-Zeid, Dept. of Civil & Environmental Engineering, Princeton University
OneNOAA Science Seminar Partner(s): OneNOAA Science Seminars, NWC Colloquium
Abstract:

Urbanization is the land-use modification with the largest impacts on local hydrology and climatology. It has significant implications for air quality and water sustainability in cities. The complexity of the involved physical processes and their interactions have so far been oversimplified, leading to considerable biases in model output when compared to observations. This talk will consider recent developments in urban model design, the validation of models using sensor networks and satellite observations, and coupling urban models to the Weather Research and Forecasting model system. Model applications to study effects of urban heat islands will be demonstrated.

Remote Access and Notes:

No remote access is available. For questions about this seminar please contact contact: , , and .

Note:All OneNOAA Science seminar attendees agree not to cite, quote, copy, or distribute material presented without the explicit written consent of the seminar presenters. The views and opinions expressed by the speakers of the OneNOAA Science seminars do not reflect any position of the Government or NOAA.

Visitor Information:

Unless otherwise specified, all non-NOAA visitors wanting to attend in person a seminar should contact in advance the contact person listed under "Remote Access and Notes" for specific information about obtaining building access.

Seminar Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Monday, April 1, 2013 8:12 AM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science and management information. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] or join our RSS feed by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

This is OneNOAA Science Seminar Number: 1735

April 3, 2013

Fish with Chips: Acoustic Transmitters Reveal How Far Coral Reef Fishes Really Move

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Date and Time: April 3, 2013; 12:00-13:00 Eastern Time [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: NOAA HQ SSMC-4 Room 8150 (1305 East-West Hwy, Silver Spring, MD 20910)
Speaker(s): , NOAA NOS
OneNOAA Science Seminar Partner(s): OneNOAA Science Seminar, NOS Science Seminar Series and NCCOS Biogeography Branch
Abstract:

The performance of marine protected areas (MPAs) for fisheries replenishment is dependent on the movement of animals within and across their boundaries. Using miniature implanted acoustic transmitters we provide data that challenge the site-attachment assumption for reef fish and require that we re-scale our perception of fish habitat for common Caribbean reef fish. Our data demonstrate frequent cross boundary movements between MPAs and unprotected areas, as well as connectivity between nearshore MPAs and offshore spawning aggregations in the U.S. Virgin Islands. We highlight a possible mismatch between MPA size and fish movement capability in the broader eastern Caribbean region.

About The Speaker:

Dr. Simon Pittman is a marine spatial ecologist working with NOAA's Biogeography Branch since 2004. His research is focused on interpreting ecological patterns and processes to support marine protected area management and marine spatial planning and the development of the emerging discipline of seascape ecology. Simon is a committee member of NOAA in the Caribbean and a Visiting Research Fellow at the Marine Institute, University of Plymouth, UK.

Remote Access and Notes:

Presentations are available remotely via a combination of phone (US only) & webcast. Note that remote access is limited to 50 connections on a first-come-first served basis, so we cannot guarantee participation. To participate remotely, you must connect via the phone and internet:

  1. Audio: Dial toll-free (U.S.) 1-877-708-1667. When prompted enter passcode 7028688#. Please use your phone's mute button (*6 toggles on or off) during the presentation until you are ready to ask questions. The phone conference does not start until about five minutes before the seminar.
  2. To access the webex meeting, go to the webcast site at http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?sigKey=mymeetings&i=744925156&p=&t=c. Enter meeting number 744925156 if needed; no passcode is required. Enter other required fields - First and last name.eck the box that that you have read the Privacy Policy, and click Proceed.

For questions about this seminar contact .

Note: All OneNOAA Science seminar attendees agree not to cite, quote, copy, or distribute material presented without the explicit written consent of the seminar presenters. The views and opinions expressed by the speakers of the OneNOAA Science seminars do not reflect any position of the Government or NOAA.

Visitor Information:

Unless otherwise specified, all non-NOAA visitors wanting to attend in person a seminar should contact in advance the contact person listed under "Remote Access and Notes" for specific information about obtaining building access.

Seminar Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Monday, March 25, 2013 9:59 AM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science and management information. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] or join our RSS feed by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

This is OneNOAA Science Seminar Number: 1719

Understanding Seasonal Time Scale Salinity Budget from Observations

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Date and Time: April 3, 2013; 12:00-13:00 Eastern Time [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: NOAA HQ SSMC-3 Room 4817 (1315 East-West Hwy, Silver Spring, MD 20910)
Speaker(s): , ESSIC/CICS, University of Maryland
OneNOAA Science Seminar Partner(s): OneNOAA Science Seminar, National Oceanographic Data Center
Abstract:

The role of salinity in global water cycle is of increasing interest. The salt budget, which quantifies the relation between freshwater fluxes into and out of a given region or body and the salt stored by the system, is one key to understanding the salinity distribution and its variability. Three major topics related to salinity budget are presented here. First, we investigated the seasonal mixed layer salinity budget in the northeast subarctic Pacific. In this region, the mixed layer salinity has a strong seasonal cycle, driven by seasonality in precipitation, evaporation, Ekman advection, and entrainment. Geostrophic advection effects show relatively little seasonal variability. The precipitation makes the largest contribution to the seasonal salinity budget, and the entrainment is especially important in autumn and winter. Second, the mixed layer salinity budget in the Southern Ocean was examined. The seasonal time scale salinity in the Southern Ocean was driven by seasonality in evaporation, precipitation, Ekman advection, entrainment, and sea ice. Over large areas, the geostrophic advection and diffusion show smaller contributions to the seasonal variation relative to other terms. Sea ice is found to make a significant contribution, growing in importance toward the ice edge. Third, the net freshwater flux (E-P) products are evaluated using the "ocean rain gauge" as the validating reference. For the annual mean spatial distribution, the combination of E-P from OAflux/TRMM has the best agreement with the E-P estimated from salinity according to their spatial pattern correlations and the RMSD. The zonal averaged analysis indicates that precipitation and/or evaporation products likely overestimate in their high value regions.

About The Speaker:

Dr. Li Ren received her PhD from the University of Washington, Seattle. She then obtained the postdoctoral training at the Florida State University. Currently, she works at ESSIC/CICS University of Maryland, College Park. Dr. Ren has contributed greatly to understanding the seasonal and decadal time scale salinity variations from observations. Recently, she has been involved in reconstructing the global historical precipitation and evaluating the satellite-based precipitation and evaporation products from the in-situ and satellite salinity observations.

Remote Access and Notes:

Presentations are available remotely via a combination of phone (US only) & webcast. Note that remote access is limited to 50 connections on a first-come-first served basis, so we cannot guarantee participation. To participate remotely, you must connect via the phone and internet:

  1. Audio: Toll free dial 877-725-4068 using a touch-tone phone. when prompted enter participant code 8634769 followed by a "#". Please use your phone's mute button (*6 toggles on or off) during the presentation until you are ready to ask questions. The phone conference does not start until about five minutes before the seminar.
  2. To access the webex meeting, go to the webcast site at http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?i=744868915&p=science&t=c. type in other required fields (i.e., your name, e-mail, organization; meeting number is 744868915; password is "science" -without quotation marks, password is case sensitive- ). Check the box that that you have read the Privacy Policy, and click Proceed.

For questions about this seminar contact .

Note: All OneNOAA Science seminar attendees agree not to cite, quote, copy, or distribute material presented without the explicit written consent of the seminar presenters. The views and opinions expressed by the speakers of the OneNOAA Science seminars do not reflect any position of the Government or NOAA.

Visitor Information:

Unless otherwise specified, all non-NOAA visitors wanting to attend in person a seminar should contact in advance the contact person listed under "Remote Access and Notes" for specific information about obtaining building access.

Seminar Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Thursday, March 28, 2013 11:29 AM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science and management information. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] or join our RSS feed by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

This is OneNOAA Science Seminar Number: 1730

Bounding The Role of Black Carbon in the Climate System: A Scientific Assessment

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Date and Time: April 3, 2013; 15:30-16:30 Mountain Time [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: NOAA ESRL CSD seminar room (2A305), David Skaggs Research Center (325 Broadway, Boulder, CO)
Speaker(s): David Fahey, NOAA ESRL CSD & CU CIRES
OneNOAA Science Seminar Partner(s): OneNOAA Science Seminar, ESRL CSD
Abstract:

Black carbon aerosol plays a complex role in our climate system. It is the primary absorbing aerosol in the atmosphere, influences cloud properties, and alters snow and ice albedo. The distribution and categories of black carbon emission sources are highly diverse. Large gaps and uncertainties exist in our ability to measure and model black carbon abundances and properties. "Bounding the role of black carbon in the climate system: A scientific assessment" is the title of a paper recently accepted by the Journal of Geophysical Research-Atmospheres. This assessment provides an evaluation of black-carbon climate forcing that is comprehensive in its inclusion of all known and relevant processes and that is quantitative in providing best estimates and uncertainties of the main forcing terms. An overview of this assessment effort and the principal results will be presented.

Remote Access and Notes:

Remote Access: Webinar Registration and view system requirements. Space is limited. Confirmation of registration includes information about joining the GoToMeeting

For questions about this seminar contact or .

Note: All OneNOAA Science seminar attendees agree not to cite, quote, copy, or distribute material presented without the explicit written consent of the seminar presenters. The views and opinions expressed by the speakers of the OneNOAA Science seminars do not reflect any position of the Government or NOAA.

Visitor Information:

Unless otherwise specified, all non-NOAA visitors wanting to attend in person a seminar should contact in advance the contact person listed under "Remote Access and Notes" for specific information about obtaining building access.

Seminar Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Monday, April 1, 2013 7:54 AM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science and management information. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] or join our RSS feed by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

This is OneNOAA Science Seminar Number: 1732

April 4, 2013

Environmental Variability in Acidification Stress, and Mechanisms for Biological Response

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Date and Time: April 4, 2013; 11:00-12:00 Pacific Time [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: NOAA NWFSC Auditorium (2725 Montlake Blvd. E., Seattle, WA 98112)
Speaker(s): Dr. Burke Hales, College of Earth, Ocean and Atmospheric Sciences, Oregon State University
OneNOAA Science Seminar Partner(s): OneNOAA Science Seminar, NWFSC Monster seminar JAM Spring
Abstract:

Ocean Acidification is both over and understated, and widely misunderstood. The forcing is limited to not only rising atmospheric CO2, but also includes climatic shifts in the marine environment exacerbating processes that naturally amplify ocean CO2 levels, including de-oxygenation. The suite of biological responses to elevated CO2 include increased respiration and photosynthesis, decreased motility and reproductivity, and decreased favorability for calcium carbonate shell formation. Interpretation of biological responses to OA is complicated by the fact that the easiest parameter to measure-- pH-- is at best an imperfect indicator of true carbonate-chemistry drivers that are difficult, if not impossible to measure directly, and, at worst, so confounded by the complications of measurement in the complex seawater solution as to be uninterpretable. Of these processes, only shell formation has convincingly and repeatedly been show to be affected at CO2 levels approaching those expected for the Y2100 atmosphere, and yet the mechanism behind this sensitivity has been elusive because negative effects are often observed when ambient-water chemistry is thermodynamically favorable for formation of the most common biominerals. Recent work at OSU has documented sensitivity of ambient-water carbonate chemistry in early larval oysters and mussels, in hatchery and laboratory conditions, even in water supersaturated with respect to aragonite, and found that this sensitivity is related to larval inability to isolate their calcifying fluid from ambient water chemistry. The very high early calcification rates that exceed inorganic precipitation kinetics by several orders of magnitude necessitate energetically costly processes to accelerate the precipitation rate, and these processes must be enhanced when ambient water chemistry provides smaller driving forces for shell formation. Larval bivalves thus have a narrow window for energetically efficient calcification in the first hours to days after hatching. Combinations of factors that reduce the duration of favorable conditions, and increase the frequency and intensity for unfavorable conditions, will reduce the opportunities for larvae to pass through this physiologically demanding bottleneck.

About The Speaker:

I received my BS (Chemical Engineering, 1988) and PhD degrees (Chemical Oceanography, 1995) from the University of Washington. I did a post-doc at the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory of Columbia University under the DoE Global Change Distinguished Fellowship program from 1995-1998. I started as an Assistant Professor in Chemical Oceanography at the College of Oceanic and Atmospheric Sciences, Oregon State University (OSU) in 1998. I am currently a Professor in Ocean Ecology and Biogeochemistry in the College of Earth, Ocean and Atmospheric Sciences at OSU. I have been an observational student of ocean carbon cycles the whole time, starting with CO2-driven dissolution of deep seafloor calcium-carbonate sediments, progressing to high-resolution study of surface ocean carbon and nutrient dynamics, then to carbon cycling at the ocean margins, and recently to study of the ocean acidification environment in coastal waters and its impact on calcium-carbonate producing clams, mussels, and oysters. I have spent a lot of time at sea (>500 days on a dozen different ships), and often build new sampling and measurement tools to carry out my work.

Remote Access and Notes:

Remote Access. To join go to https://nwfsc200.webex.com/nwfsc200/j.php?ED=193362347&UID=1367485292&RT=MiM0. This meeting does not require a password. Click "Join". For audio conference toll number (US/Canada): 650-479-3207 Access code: 801683361. For assistance: https://nwfsc200.webex.com/nwfsc200/mc. On the left navigation bar, click "Support", or contact: (206)860-3256. For information about this seminar contact: 206-860-3380.

Note: All OneNOAA Science seminar attendees agree not to cite, quote, copy, or distribute material presented without the explicit written consent of the seminar presenters. The views and opinions expressed by the speakers of the OneNOAA Science seminars do not reflect any position of the Government or NOAA.

Visitor Information:

Unless otherwise specified, all non-NOAA visitors wanting to attend in person a seminar should contact in advance the contact person listed under "Remote Access and Notes" for specific information about obtaining building access.

Seminar Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Tuesday, March 19, 2013 9:32 AM / Last updated Wednesday, April 3, 2013 10:43 AM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science and management information. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] or join our RSS feed by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

This is OneNOAA Science Seminar Number: 1709

Potable-Water Production and Shore Protection Using a Wave-Energy Conversion Technique

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Date and Time: April 4, 2013; 12:00-13:00 Eastern Time [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: NOAA HQ SSMC-3 2nd Floor Library (1315 East-West Hwy, Silver Spring, MD 20910)
Speaker(s): Michael E. McCormick and Robert C. Murtha, Murtech, Inc
OneNOAA Science Seminar Partner(s): OneNOAA Science Seminars, NOAA NODC Library
Abstract:

Two floating systems have been created for the diverse goals of the production of potable-water and the protection of shorelines. The basic ideas of leading to these systems is that products or services other than the production of electricity can effectively be supplied by exploiting the energy of ocean waves. The two systems discussed are designed to take advantage of the phenomenon of wave diffraction focusing. That is, by designing the floating systems to radiate waves that destructively interfere with the incident waves, wave energy is re-supplied to the zone of interference. As a result, the systems in question receive more wave energy than is in an incident wave crest having a width equal to the breadth of the body.

The system designed for potable-water production is an articulated hinged-barge system, called the Articulated Wave Energy Conversion System, or AWECS. The relative motions of the three barges comprising the system energize high-pressure water pumps positioned over the connecting hinges. These pumps supply the pressurized water to a reverse-osmosis (RO) desalination system. Research efforts leading to a prototype to be deployed this year include smallscale wave tank test and a nine year full-scale study of the articulated barge system. The 40-meter long prototype is designed to supply approximately 100,000 gallons-per-day in a near-shore wave climate having an average wave height of 1m and an average wave period of 6.5s. The deployment site is off the Delaware coast, north of the Indian River Inlet.

The shore protection system is called the Antenna Buoy (AB). The design is to take advantage of the diffraction focusing to attract wave energy. The wave energy incident upon the AB causes both axial and angular motions of the body. Because of the geometry, a significant portion of the captured energy is dissipated by viscous-pressure losses in the alternating wakes of the body. The primary geometric features causing the dissipation are vertical fins (radiating out from a vertical circular-cylindrical float) and a horizontal circular bottom plate. In full-scale tank tests, the body was found to reduce the transmission coefficient by up to 40%. Arrays of the AB will have three 2013 deployments in the Chesapeake Bay.

Remote Access and Notes:

For remote access via webinar (unless specified otherwise below), please fill out the registration form a few minutes before the meeting is scheduled to begin. The Meeting Number is 742656968; the Passcode is brownbag. For audio in the US and Canada, dial 866-833-7307. The participant passcode is 8986360. For further information about this seminar please contact

Note: All OneNOAA Science seminar attendees agree not to cite, quote, copy, or distribute material presented without the explicit written consent of the seminar presenters. The views and opinions expressed by the speakers of the OneNOAA Science seminars do not reflect any position of the Government or NOAA.

Visitor Information:

Unless otherwise specified, all non-NOAA visitors wanting to attend in person a seminar should contact in advance the contact person listed under "Remote Access and Notes" for specific information about obtaining building access.

Seminar Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Monday, April 1, 2013 9:15 AM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science and management information. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] or join our RSS feed by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

This is OneNOAA Science Seminar Number: 1739

April 5, 2013

Monitoring Daily Coral Photo-Efficiency and Effects of Heat Stress from Space: The Algorithm and the Multi-National Project to Develop it

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Date and Time: April 5, 2013; 14:00-15:00 Eastern Time [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: NOAA HQ SSMC-4 Room 11153 (1305 East-West Hwy, Silver Spring, MD 20910)
Speaker(s): , Director of NOAA Coral Reef Watch-ReefSense, Townsville, Australia
OneNOAA Science Seminar Partner(s): OneNOAA Science Seminar, NESDIS/STAR Coral Reef Watch
Abstract:

NOAA Coral Reef Watch's (CRW) global near-real-time coral bleaching operational monitoring product suite is extensively used by US and international resource managers, reef scientists, and the general public to monitor thermal stress and predict the onset, development, and severity of mass coral bleaching. However, its algorithms are based solely on satellite sea surface temperature (SST) observations. The new experimental Light Stress Damage (LSD) introduced here is the first product to combine satellite-derived light and SST data to monitor/predict coral stress that can lead to bleaching.

The LSD product provides a relative measure of the effect of combined light and thermal stress on the coral photo-system. The LSD product is underpinned by a series of physiological experiments that allowed the formulation of the relationships between the excessive excitation energy (EEE), relative potential quantum yield (Fv/Fm), change in SST, and differences in total daily photosynthetically active radiation (PAR).

The LSD algorithm is then able to be formulated as a simple function of SST and PAR and is expressed as an index that mimics the reef-scale relative Fv/Fm.

The University of Queensland, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Australian Institute of Marine Science, and Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority have been awarded a major grant under the Australian Research Council's (ARC) Industry Linkage Grant Program to develop the LSD algorithm further.

The aim is to fully develop the science that underpins the algorithm, investigate aspects of mortality, expand the algorithm to include other environmental stresses, develop a field verification methodology, and investigate the future validity of the algorithm.

About The Speaker:

Dr. William Skirving obtained his Ph.D. in environmental remote sensing from the School of Mathematical and Physical Sciences, James Cook University (JCU), Queensland, Australia. He was a lecturer in the Geography Department at JCU for 4 years, head of the Remote Sensing Unit at the Australian Institute of Marine Science for 15 years, and has been a senior scientist with the NOAA Coral Reef Watch program for the past 11 years. He has served on more than a dozen International and National remote sensing expert committees, and published over 50 international journal articles and book chapters. The majority of Dr. Skirving's research and product development over the past decade has been aimed at understanding, monitoring and predicting mass coral bleaching and related stresses. For example, Dr. Skirving was the lead scientist on a NOAA-led multi-national project that integrated hydrodynamic models with in situ and satellite data to predict likely sites of future coral bleaching in Palau. This was a joint project between NOAA, the Australian Institute of Marine Science (AIMS), and The Nature Conservancy (TNC) and had the aim of building bleaching resilience into a new Protected Areas Network that was being jointly designed by the Palau Government and TNC. Some of the findings of this project have recently been adapted to remote sensing data and used to derive MPA networks for the Bahamas. Dr. Skirving is currently the lead scientist on an international, NOAA-led project to derive a coral physiology-based algorithm for predicting aspects of coral health and in particular coral bleaching. This satellite algorithm uses a combination of light and temperature measurements and is aimed at providing information about the onset, severity and mortality resulting from a mass coral bleaching event.

Remote Access and Notes:
  1. Audio: Dial In Number: 866-836-3293. Participant Passcode: 459201.
  2. To access the webex meeting, go to the webcast site at http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?sigKey=mymeetings&i=441497235&p=OCRMCCD&t=c. Meeting Number: 441497235. Meeting Passcode: OCRMCCD

For questions about this seminar contact .

Note: All OneNOAA Science seminar attendees agree not to cite, quote, copy, or distribute material presented without the explicit written consent of the seminar presenters. The views and opinions expressed by the speakers of the OneNOAA Science seminars do not reflect any position of the Government or NOAA.

Visitor Information:

Unless otherwise specified, all non-NOAA visitors wanting to attend in person a seminar should contact in advance the contact person listed under "Remote Access and Notes" for specific information about obtaining building access.

Seminar Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Monday, March 25, 2013 9:59 AM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science and management information. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] or join our RSS feed by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

This is OneNOAA Science Seminar Number: 1720

The National Fish, Wildlife & Plants Climate Adaptation Strategy

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Date and Time: April 5, 2013; 12:00-13:00 Eastern Time [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: Webinar/Conference Call Access Only
Speaker(s): Roger Griffis, Climate Change Coordinator, NOAA Fisheries; and Laurie McGilvray, Chief, NOAA Estuarine Reserves Division
OneNOAA Science Seminar Partner(s): OneNOAA Science Seminar, Climate Program Office, NOAA Climate Adaptation Team
Abstract:

In partnership with State and Tribal agencies, the Obama Administration released the first nationwide strategy to help public and private decision makers address the impacts that climate change is having on natural resources and the people and economies that depend on them.The Climate Adaptation Strategy provides a roadmap of key steps needed over the next five years to reduce the current and expected impacts of climate change on our natural resources, which include: changing species distributions and migration patterns, the spread of wildlife diseases and invasive species, the inundation of coastal habitats with rising sea levels, changing productivity of our coastal oceans, and changes in freshwater availability.

Remote Access and Notes:

To access the meeting online, Click to Register. Immediately after submitting the registration form, you'll receive a confirmation email with a link to join the session. Feel free to pass this invitation along to others who could benefit from an overview of the Strategy. A recording of the session will be available on the National Weather Service Climate Services Division Seminar Webpage shortly after its conclusion.

For questions about this seminar contact .

Note: All OneNOAA Science seminar attendees agree not to cite, quote, copy, or distribute material presented without the explicit written consent of the seminar presenters. The views and opinions expressed by the speakers of the OneNOAA Science seminars do not reflect any position of the Government or NOAA.

Visitor Information:

Unless otherwise specified, all non-NOAA visitors wanting to attend in person a seminar should contact in advance the contact person listed under "Remote Access and Notes" for specific information about obtaining building access.

Seminar Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Monday, March 25, 2013 9:59 AM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science and management information. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] or join our RSS feed by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

This is OneNOAA Science Seminar Number: 1746

April 9, 2013

High Resolution and Regional Modeling

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Date and Time: April 09, 2013, 13:00 - 14:30 Eastern Time [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: NOAA HQ SSMC-3 12th Floor Fishbowl (1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD, 20910). Remote attendance is encouraged
Speaker(s): Lucas Harris (NOAA Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory); Jim Kinter (Center for Ocean-Land-Atmosphere Studies); Sarah Kapnick (Princeton University); Stefan Tulich (Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences)Jiming Jin (Utah State University)
OneNOAA Science Seminar Partner(s): OneNOAA Science Seminar, OAR CPO Modeling, Analysis, Predictions, and Projections
Abstract:

Jim Kinter -- Benefits and Challenges of High Spatial Resolution in Climate Models – The webinar will highlight recent results from several different numerical experiments conducted with climate models having both moderate and enhanced spatial resolution in either the atmospheric or the oceanic component. In particular, the presentation will summarize results of Project Athena, in which a single global atmospheric model was run through a series of identical protocols with different horizontal resolutions ranging from grids nominally used for climate simulation and prediction (~100 km) to grids typically used for global numerical weather prediction (16 km). Results that are particularly relevant to climate prediction on intra-seasonal to seasonal time scales and simulation of climate change will be highlighted. Both the benefits and the challenges of using high spatial resolution will be described.

Jiming Jim -- Simulations of Lake Processes and Their Effects on Precipitation using a Coupled WRF-Lake Model -- A one-dimensional physically-based lake model was coupled with the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model to improve lake-effect precipitation simulations for the Great Lakes region. This coupling work provides WRF with a capability for dynamic simulations of lake-atmosphere interactions. Initial simulations with the WRF-Lake model show that the seasonal cycle of lake surface temperature (LST) was greatly exaggerated especially for the deep lakes such as Lake Superior. It is found that the exaggerated LST seasonal cycle results from insufficiently simulated turbulent mixing in the lake. A series of sensitivity tests with the WRF-Lake model were performed to optimize the eddy diffusivity that controls water mixing in the lake scheme and is a function of surface wind and roughness length. The coupled model is able to realistically reproduce the LST seasonal cycle with the optimized eddy diffusivity. In addition, we performed multi-year simulations at 10 km resolution for the period of 2003-2008 forced with 32 km resolution North American Regional Reanalysis data to validate the coupled model. The results reveal that the simulated LSTs are in very good agreement with surface buoy observations and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer satellite data. The realistic LST simulations also generate more accurate lake-effect precipitation when compared with that produced by the release version (3.2) of WRF without a lake scheme.

Sarah Kapnick -- The Importance of Resolution for Modeling Global Snow -- A new high-resolution global climate model GFDL-CM2.5 and its low resolution counterpart, GFDL-CM2.1, are used to explore snow variability in the present climate and as a result of doubling atmospheric CO2. In the present climate, increasing resolution leads to the improved representation of snow in complex orographic regions and the seasonality of Northern Hemisphere snow covered area. In response to CO2 doubling in both models, global snowfall increases in the high-to-mid latitudes and decreases in the mid-to-low latitudes. However, in mid-to-low latitudes, GFDL-CM2.5 is unique in that its high resolution allows it to resolve complex mountain systems, leading to a change in sign in snowfall projections over high mountains in comparison to its predecessor.

Lucas Harris -- Two-way nested-grid climate simulations in the GFDL High Resolution Atmosphere Model -- Regional climate simulations typically use limited-area models driven by the output from a lower-resolution global model. The limited-area model may not be numerically consistent with the global model, the data may only be available at temporally-coarse intervals, and the limited-area model cannot feed back onto the coarse grid. We present a two-way nested grid version of the GFDL High Resolution Atmosphere Model (HiRAM) and demonstrate enhanced-resolution climate simulations for North America and the Maritime Continent. Two resolutions are presented: a c90 (approximately 1 degree) global grid with a factor-of-three nest, and a c192 (0.5 degree) global grid with a factor-of-two nest. We find that the nested grid does not adversely affect the global climate compared to a single-grid model. In the nested grid region topography is better resolved and orographic precipitation is better represented with more detail. Some model precipitation biases are also alleviated in the nested region, although others are unchanged.

Stefan Tulich -- Using hindcasts to improve depiction of the MJO in next-generation climate models -- Through advances in computing power, it is now practical to perform decadal climate simulations at horizontal grid spacings in the range 20-50 km, which is roughly a factor of five smaller than in previous years. Despite these advances, however, global models still suffer from a number of glaring deficiencies, including poor depiction of tropical wave variability, especially with regards to the MJO. In this presentation, a strategy will be described for addressing this issue, which involves using several different global models to perform 30-day hindcasts of the MJO. These include conventional high-resolution models, as well as a lower-resolution model with a superparameterization for convection. Results show that all of the models are generally able to capture some semblance of the MJO's eastward-propagating signals, especially during the earlier stages of the simulations. In the case of the superparameterized model, however, there is little evidence for improving model performance through increases in horizontal resolution. Rather, it appears that the largest gains can be made through subtle changes to the vertical diffusion of moisture at low levels. A similar type of result seems to carry over to at least one of the conventional high-resolution models.

Remote Access and Notes:

Remote access https://cpomapp.webex.com/cpomapp/onstage/g.php?t=a&d=620082992. The passcode is 20910. Audio/Phone access: Call-in information will pop up once attendees log in to the WebEx. Webex and the teleconference line can accommodate only 100 attendees on a first-come, first-served basis. Please try to share a connection with colleagues at your institution to preserve space for others. For questions about this seminar please contact .

Note: All OneNOAA Science seminar attendees agree not to cite, quote, copy, or distribute material presented without the explicit written consent of the seminar presenters. The views and opinions expressed by the speakers of the OneNOAA Science seminars do not reflect any position of the Government or NOAA.

Visitor Information:

Unless otherwise specified, all non-NOAA visitors wanting to attend in person a seminar should contact in advance the contact person listed under "Remote Access and Notes" for specific information about obtaining building access.

Seminar Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Friday, March 1, 2013 12:51 PM / Last updated Monday, April 8, 2013 11:54 AM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are the most complete summary of upcoming NOAA science seminars; a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science across NOAA and our contituents. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] or join our RSS feed by

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This is OneNOAA Science Seminar number: 1691

The Effects of Dissolved Organic Matter on Karenia Brevis Growth and Toxin Production

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Date and Time: April 09, 2013, 12:00 - 13:00 Eastern Time [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: NOAA HQ SSMC-3 Room 5836 (1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD, 20910)
Speaker(s): (FAMU-ECSC), Holly Brown-Owens (FAMU), S. Morton (NOAA)
OneNOAA Science Seminar Partner(s): OneNOAA Science Seminar, NOAA Cooperative Science Centers, Educational Partnership Program
Abstract:

The frequency, duration, and severity of harmful algal bloom (HAB) events have increased dramatically since the 1990s with half the documented red tides occurring within the last decade. Nutrient loading has been identified as one of the primary causative agents responsible for these HAB outbreaks with most of the focus on inorganic nutrient inputs. To date, however, there has been little research on the potential contribution of organic nutrient loading on observed HAB trends. Two sets of time series incubation studies were carried out to evaluate the effect of DOM quality and supply on K. brevis abundance and toxin production: a natural 13C uptake tracer study using two isotopically distinct DOM amendments, and a dose-response study using sewage DOM. Increased K. brevis abundance and toxin production was observed in both the sewage and peat moss DOM amendments with toxin production approximately 50% greater in DOM amended vs. control (inorganic nutrients only) cultures. Maximum growth rates were observed in sewage DOM amended incubations. K. brevis cell 13C signatures in sewage and peat moss DOM amendments became depleted over time relative to controls indicating DOM assimilation by K. brevis and/or their cell surface associated bacteria. A positive correlation between toxin production and DOM concentration was observed in dose-response incubations with significantly greater toxin production at higher DOM concentrations. Collectively these results demonstrate that DOM uptake by K. brevis cultures significantly impacts its growth and toxin production and suggests that DOM supply to coastal systems should be considered when evaluating the potential toxicity associated with HAB outbreaks. This research is based upon work supported by the Educational Partnership Program, Office of Education, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, U.S. Department of Commerce, under Agreement Nos. NA06OAR4801164 and NA11SEC4810001.

About The Speaker:

Jennifer Cherrier, Assoc. Prof., Florida A&M University & NOAA Environmental Science Cooperative Center Co-PI: 850-561-2134, jennifer.cherrier@famu.edu. Jennifer's research is both basic and applied, primarily focusing on the transformations and fate of carbon and nitrogen in aquatic systems and those factors that regulate microbial cycling and flux of these elements particularly as it relates to the global carbon budget. Her research approach traces carbon and nitrogen flow by coupling nutrient concentration measurements together with measurements of stable isotope and natural radiocarbon abundances. Examples of basic research she and her students are currently engaged in include 1) tracing oil intrusion into marine ecosystems; 2) tracing carbon outwelling from coastal marshes; and 3) determining the effects of DOM on HAB growth and toxin production. Her applied research focuses on evaluating anthropogenic impacts on ecosystem services, particularly as it pertains to water resource sustainability, and identifying methods to offset these effects. She is currently leading a team of natural, applied and socioeconomic scientists to carry out environmental and economic assessments of an onsite ecosystem service-based approach for managing coastal contaminant loading. Jennifer was recently selected as a 2013 Leopold Leadership Fellow. She is one of 20 researchers from across North America to receive this honor. The Leopold Leadership Program provides Fellows with skills and approaches for communicating and working with NGOs, businesses, government and communities to integrate science into decision making.

Remote Access and Notes:

Remote access https://sas.elluminate.com/m.jnlp?sid=845&password=M.C45E4BEE13522B1EF0CCFD172FFAD8. For questions about this seminar please contact .

Note: All OneNOAA Science seminar attendees agree not to cite, quote, copy, or distribute material presented without the explicit written consent of the seminar presenters. The views and opinions expressed by the speakers of the OneNOAA Science seminars do not reflect any position of the Government or NOAA.

Visitor Information:

Unless otherwise specified, all non-NOAA visitors wanting to attend in person a seminar should contact in advance the contact person listed under "Remote Access and Notes" for specific information about obtaining building access.

Seminar Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Wednesday, April 3, 2013 1:08 PM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are the most complete summary of upcoming NOAA science seminars; a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science across NOAA and our contituents. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] or join our RSS feed by

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This is OneNOAA Science Seminar number: 1740

Extinction Risk in the Marine Realm: The Global Marine Species Assessment and the Gulf of Mexico after the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill

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Date and Time: April 9, 2013; 12:00-13:00 Eastern Time [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: NOAA HQ SSMC-3 2nd Floor Library (1315 East-West Hwy, Silver Spring, MD 20910)
Speaker(s): Roger McManus, IUCN SSC Senior Counsel; and Kent Carpenter, Old Dominion University
OneNOAA Science Seminar Partner(s): OneNOAA Science Seminars, NOAA NODC Library
Abstract:

Dr. Kent Carpenter and Roger McManus will review the IUCN Global Marine Species Assessment progress in conducting a review of 20,000 marine species under the standards of the IUCN Red List, with particular focus on the assessments conducted and planned for the Gulf of Mexico in response to the Deepwater Horizon oil spill. They will summarize current efforts to provide tools for examining extinction risk and conservation status of marine species based on existing and potential threats. This project is a partnership with the Harte Institute for Gulf of Mexico Studies at Texas A&M University -Corpus Christi. These tools are based on species data accumulated for the Red List assessments, including distributional data and spatial planning capacity, data on experts in Gulf species, and information on past and current recovery and conservation plans.

Remote Access and Notes:

For remote access via webinar (unless specified otherwise below), please fill out the registration form a few minutes before the meeting is scheduled to begin. The Meeting Number is 742656968; the Passcode is brownbag. For audio in the US and Canada, dial 866-833-7307. The participant passcode is 8986360. For further information about this seminar please contact

Note: All OneNOAA Science seminar attendees agree not to cite, quote, copy, or distribute material presented without the explicit written consent of the seminar presenters. The views and opinions expressed by the speakers of the OneNOAA Science seminars do not reflect any position of the Government or NOAA.

Visitor Information:

Unless otherwise specified, all non-NOAA visitors wanting to attend in person a seminar should contact in advance the contact person listed under "Remote Access and Notes" for specific information about obtaining building access.

Seminar Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Wednesday, April 3, 2013 3:05 PM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science and management information. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] or join our RSS feed by

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This is OneNOAA Science Seminar Number: 1742

Remote Sensing and Machine Learning: Identifying Global Dust Sources and the Atmospheric Abundance of Particulates over the last decade; Applications to Human health

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Date and Time: April 09, 2013, 12:00 - 13:00 Eastern Time [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: NOAA HQ SSMC-3 Room 4817 (1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD, 20910)
Speaker(s): , Associate Professor, University of Texas at Dallas, William B. Hanson Center for Space Science
OneNOAA Science Seminar Partner(s): OneNOAA Science Seminar, NOAA Western Region Collaboration Team (NOAA West)
Abstract:

This seminar will report findings of a study on the identification of dust sources using machine learning and multi-spectral satellite data to objectively provide an unsupervised multi-variate and non-linear classification of surface types. In this study, a large variety of dust source types are identified, each with its own spectral signature. The study also provides a framework for having dynamic rather than static dust source maps. The major contribution of this study is addressing the difficulty in locating and identifying individual global dust sources at high resolution (on scales of 1-10 km).

The health impacts of particulate matter (PM) with a diameter of 2.5 microns or less (PM2.5) depend on abundance. Various networks of ground-based sensors routinely measure the abundance of PM2.5. However, the spatial coverage is sparse (and in some countries non-existent) because of the costs involved in operating a sensor network. The talk will also describe how remote sensing and machine learning has been used to provide the first ever daily, global estimates of PM2.5 available for more than a decade 2000-present.

About The Speaker:

Dr. Lary's field of expertise includes data assimilation and computational and information systems to facilitate Earth System Science discovery and decision support applications. Machine learning is a broad category of very useful tools that enable learning from data to perform classifications and/or empirical multivariate, non-linear, non-parametric regression. Some approaches are even capable of simultaneously dealing with hundreds even thousands of input variables.

Remote Access and Notes:

Presentations are available remotely via a combination of phone (US only) & webcast. Note that remote access is limited to 50 connections on a first-come-first served basis, so we cannot guarantee participation. To participate remotely, you must connect via the phone and internet:

  1. Audio: Toll free dial 877-725-4068 using a touch-tone phone. when prompted enter participant code 8634769 followed by a "#". Please use your phone's mute button (*6 toggles on or off) during the presentation until you are ready to ask questions. The phone conference does not start until about five minutes before the seminar.
  2. To access the webex meeting, go to the webcast site at http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?i=744868915&p=science&t=c. type in other required fields (i.e., your name, e-mail, organization; meeting number is 744868915; password is "science" -without quotation marks, password is case sensitive- ). Check the box that that you have read the Privacy Policy, and click Proceed.

For questions about this seminar contact and .

Note: All OneNOAA Science seminar attendees agree not to cite, quote, copy, or distribute material presented without the explicit written consent of the seminar presenters. The views and opinions expressed by the speakers of the OneNOAA Science seminars do not reflect any position of the Government or NOAA.

Visitor Information:

Unless otherwise specified, all non-NOAA visitors wanting to attend in person a seminar should contact in advance the contact person listed under "Remote Access and Notes" for specific information about obtaining building access.

Seminar Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Wednesday, April 3, 2013 1:08 PM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are the most complete summary of upcoming NOAA science seminars; a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science across NOAA and our contituents. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] or join our RSS feed by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

This is OneNOAA Science Seminar number: 1749

April 10, 2013

From Design to Action: Key Elements and Innovations for Effective Marine Protected Area Network Implementation

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Date and Time: April 10, 2013; 12:00-13:00 Eastern Time [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: NOAA HQ SSMC-4 Room 8150 (1305 East-West Hwy, Silver Spring, MD 20910)
Speaker(s): and , Blue Earth Consultants, LLC
OneNOAA Science Seminar Partner(s): OneNOAA Science Seminar, NOS Science Seminar Series
Abstract:

Blue Earth Consultants conducted a study examining 10 exemplary cases of MPA network and large MPA implementation. Through this research, we explored innovations and identified five key elements that must be in place for MPA implementation to be successful and effective: 1) legal framework, 2) strong management plan that includes a plan for adaptive management, 3) operational capacity, 4) social capital, and 5) long-term financial sustainability. This webinar shares highlights from the study and offers insights into the five key elements. We also present how these elements can be used to strengthen MPA network implementation in California and share lessons that can be applied to other MPA networks in the United States and internationally.

About The Speaker:

Dr. Tegan Hoffmann is the Founder and Principal of Blue Earth Consultants. She leads the team of eight professionals and oversees all client projects. With more than fifteen years of professional experience, she works across sectors to create and implement institutions, programs, and projects that realize significant returns for the environment and social welfare. Her strengths lie in her ability to draw connections, create synergies, and conceive cutting-edge solutions. Dr. Hoffmann holds a Master's and Ph.D. in Geography and a Bachelor of Science in Conservation Resource Studies from the University of California Berkeley.

Sara Lowell is the Senior Associate Project Manager at Blue Earth Consultants and has over ten years professional experience in marine science and management. Her primary expertise is in coastal and ocean management and policy, sustainable tourism, science integration, fundraising, and protected areas. Ms. Lowell specializes in strategic and business planning, fundraising and long-term financing design and implementation, feasibility assessments, organizational and institutional design, and science integration and uptake. Ms. Lowell holds a Master's in Marine Affairs from the School of Marine Affairs at the University of Washington, and double Bachelor of Arts degrees in Environmental Studies and Latin American History from University of California, Santa Cruz.

Remote Access and Notes:

Presentations are available remotely via a combination of phone (US only) & webcast. Note that remote access is limited to 50 connections on a first-come-first served basis, so we cannot guarantee participation. To participate remotely, you must connect via the phone and internet:

  1. Audio: Dial toll-free (U.S.) 1-877-708-1667. When prompted enter passcode 7028688#. Please use your phone's mute button (*6 toggles on or off) during the presentation until you are ready to ask questions. The phone conference does not start until about five minutes before the seminar.
  2. To access the webex meeting, go to the webcast site at http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?sigKey=mymeetings&i=744925156&p=&t=c. Enter meeting number 744925156 if needed; no passcode is required. Enter other required fields - First and last name.eck the box that that you have read the Privacy Policy, and click Proceed.

For questions about this seminar contact .

Note: All OneNOAA Science seminar attendees agree not to cite, quote, copy, or distribute material presented without the explicit written consent of the seminar presenters. The views and opinions expressed by the speakers of the OneNOAA Science seminars do not reflect any position of the Government or NOAA.

Visitor Information:

Unless otherwise specified, all non-NOAA visitors wanting to attend in person a seminar should contact in advance the contact person listed under "Remote Access and Notes" for specific information about obtaining building access.

Seminar Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Monday, March 25, 2013 9:59 AM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science and management information. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] or join our RSS feed by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

This is OneNOAA Science Seminar Number: 1721

Update on the Developments of Aerosol and Gas Chemistry Processes Inlined Within the NMMB Multiscale Model at the Barcelona Supercomputing Center

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Date and Time: April 10, 2013; 12:00-13:00 Eastern Time [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: NOAA NCWCP Room 2155 (5830 University Research Court, College Park,MD 20740)
Speaker(s): Oriol Jorba, Earth Sciences Department of the Barcelona Supercomputing Center, Spain
OneNOAA Science Seminar Partner(s): OneNOAA Science Seminars, National Centers for Environmental Prediction Environmental Modeling Center seminar
Abstract:

The Earth Sciences Department of the Barcelona Supercomputing Center (BSC) is working on the development of a new chemical weather forecasting system based on the NCEP/NMMB multiscale meteorological model. In collaboration with the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NOAA/NCEP/EMC), the NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies (NASA/GISS), and the University of California Irvine (UCI), the group is implementing aerosol and gas chemistry inlined within the NMMB model. The new modeling system, namely NMMB/BSC Chemical Transport Model (NMMB/BSC-CTM), is a powerful tool for research in physico-chemical processes occurring in the atmosphere and their interactions.

This talk will overview the status of development of the system, the efforts done on the evaluation of the different modules, and its application as a research forecast and on model intercomparison initiatives. NMMB/BSC-CTM is providing mineral dust forecasts with its regional configuration for the Northern Africa-Middle East-Europe (NA-ME-E) Node of the Sand and Dust Strom Warning Advisory and Assessment System (SDS-WAS) of the World Meteorological Organization (WMO). Complementing the mineral dust processes, a multi-component aerosol module is under development. Results on the evaluation of different sea-salt emission schemes will be shown. Furthermore, gas and aerosol chemistry is under evaluation at both global and regional scales. In this sense, the NMMB/BSC-CTM is contributing to the AQMEII-Phase2 initiative on on-line air quality model intercomparison. Preliminary results of the system applied over the AQMEII-2 European domain will be discussed.

Remote Access and Notes:

Online access via gotomeeting at https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/364586205. Phone access: DDial +1 (213) 493-0014; Access Code and Meeting ID : 364-586-205. For additional information about this seminar pleasec contact

Note: All OneNOAA Science seminar attendees agree not to cite, quote, copy, or distribute material presented without the explicit written consent of the seminar presenters. The views and opinions expressed by the speakers of the OneNOAA Science seminars do not reflect any position of the Government or NOAA.

Visitor Information:

Unless otherwise specified, all non-NOAA visitors wanting to attend in person a seminar should contact in advance the contact person listed under "Remote Access and Notes" for specific information about obtaining building access.

Seminar Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Monday, April 1, 2013 8:26 . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science and management information. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] or join our RSS feed by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

This is OneNOAA Science Seminar Number: 1736

Multiphase Organic Photochemistry in the Atmosphere

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Date and Time: April 10, 2013; 15:30-16:30 Mountain Time [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: NOAA ESRL CSD seminar room (2A305), David Skaggs Research Center (325 Broadway, Boulder, CO)
Speaker(s): Anne Monod, Aix-Marseille University, Laboratoire de Chimie de l'Environnement, CNRS, Marseille, France
OneNOAA Science Seminar Partner(s): OneNOAA Science Seminar, ESRL CSD
Abstract:

Transport of reactive air masses to humid and/or wet areas is highly frequent in the atmosphere, making the study of aqueous phase processing particularly relevant. Although a limited number of studies have investigated the impact of liquid water on atmospheric (photo)chemical processes, recent results show the importance of such an approach to retrieve ambient observations. However, the complexity of such an approach induces high uncertainties, due to the necessity to investigate multiphase photochemistry, and due to the lack of a detailed understanding of the photochemistry occurring within the condensed phase. This presentation will give an overview of our past and recent laboratory studies on bulk aqueous phase photochemical reactivity of organic species, and its potential efficient impacts on i) atmospheric life-times of soluble organic species, ii) organic acid formation, iii) OH to HO2 radicals conversion, iv) oligomer formation and vi) SOA formation. It will present our recent development of a structure-activity-relationship (SAR) on OH-oxidation of organic species in the aqueous-phase. The last part of the presentation will report on very recent results from our ongoing national CUMULUS project that investigates integrated multiphase experiments of isoprene photooxidation during cloud condensation-evaporation cycles performed in the CESAM smog chamber.

Remote Access and Notes:

Remote Access: Webinar Registration and view system requirements. Space is limited. Confirmation of registration includes information about joining the GoToMeeting

For questions about this seminar contact or .

Note: All OneNOAA Science seminar attendees agree not to cite, quote, copy, or distribute material presented without the explicit written consent of the seminar presenters. The views and opinions expressed by the speakers of the OneNOAA Science seminars do not reflect any position of the Government or NOAA.

Visitor Information:

Unless otherwise specified, all non-NOAA visitors wanting to attend in person a seminar should contact in advance the contact person listed under "Remote Access and Notes" for specific information about obtaining building access.

Seminar Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Monday, April 1, 2013 8:02 AM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science and management information. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] or join our RSS feed by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

This is OneNOAA Science Seminar Number: 1734

The Use of Coral Physiology to Combine Satellite SST and Insolation to Track Daily Coral Health

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Date and Time: April 10, 2013; 13:15-14:00 Eastern Time [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: NOAA CWCP 4th Floor, Large Conference Room 4552-4553 (5830 University Research Ct., College Park, MD 20740)
Speaker(s): Dr. William Skirving, SOCD / MECB / CRW
OneNOAA Science Seminar Partner(s): OneNOAA Science Seminar, STAR Seminars
Abstract:

NOAA Coral Reef Watch's (CRW) global near-real-time coral bleaching operational monitoring product suite is extensively used by US and international resource managers,reef scientists, and the general public to monitor thermal stress and predict the onset, development, and severity of mass coral bleaching. However, its algorithms are based solely on satellite sea surface temperature (SST) observations. The new experimental Light Stress Damage (LSD) introduced here is the first product to combine satellite-derived light and SST data to monitor/predict coral stress that can lead to bleaching.

The LSD product provides a relative measure of the effect of combined light and thermal stress on the coral photo-system. The LSD product is underpinned by a series of physiological experiments that allowed the formulation of the relationships between the excessive excitation energy (EEE), relative potential quantum yield (Fv/Fm), change in SST, and differences in total daily photosynthetically active radiation (PAR).

The LSD algorithm is then able to be formulated as a simple function of SST and PAR and is expressed as an index that mimics the reef-scale relative Fv/Fm.

The University of Queensland, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Australian Institute of Marine Science, and Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority have been awarded a major grant under the Australian Research Council's (ARC) Industry Linkage Grant Program to develop the LSD algorithm further.

The aim is to fully develop the science that underpins the algorithm, investigate aspects of mortality, expand the algorithm to include other environmental stresses, develop a field verification methodology, and investigate the future validity of the algorithm.

Remote Access and Notes:

Audio: U.S. participants: 866-832-9297; International participants: 203-566-7610; Passcode: 6070416. For questions about this seminar contact or .

Note: All OneNOAA Science seminar attendees agree not to cite, quote, copy, or distribute material presented without the explicit written consent of the seminar presenters. The views and opinions expressed by the speakers of the OneNOAA Science seminars do not reflect any position of the Government or NOAA.

Visitor Information:

Unless otherwise specified, all non-NOAA visitors wanting to attend in person a seminar should contact in advance the contact person listed under "Remote Access and Notes" for specific information about obtaining building access.

Seminar Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Monday, April 1, 2013 8:43 AM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science and management information. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] or join our RSS feed by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

This is OneNOAA Science Seminar Number: 1737

The Environmental Sample Processor: A Novel Biosensor to Inform Early Warning and Ecological Forecasting of Pathogens and Their Toxins

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Date and Time: April 10, 2013; 15:00-16:00 Eastern Time [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: NOAA NWFSC (2725 Montlake Blvd. E, Seattle, WA)
Speaker(s): Stephanie Moore, Ph. D., NOAA Associate
OneNOAA Science Seminar Partner(s): OneNOAA Science Seminar, NMFS Aquaculture Science Webinar Series
Abstract:

Cultured marine shellfish and finfish are vulnerable to naturally occurring pathogens that produce toxins. These toxins can accumulate in seafood or cause direct injury. Proactive management of these pathogens requires improved sampling collection and analysis. Time lags and travel distances associated with current monitoring can limit sampling frequency. Because a population of microorganisms can achieve explosive numbers within a couple of days, a weekly (or longer) sampling frequency could entirely miss a "bloom" event. The Environmental Sample Processor (ESP) is a real-time, autonomous, quantitative, in situ sampling and analysis unit that can address all of these barriers. The ESP employs DNA-based technology to detect microorganisms in water samples and relays data by telemetry. The ESP is a powerful early warning instrument for informing proactive resource management, and can provide critical observations to initiate, validate, and improve models for ecological forecasting of pathogens and their toxins. The first-ever deployment of an ESP in the Pacific Northwest occurred in summer 2012. Results and lessons learned from this deployment, as well as future directions, will be presented.

About The Speaker:

Stephanie Moore is a project scientist with the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research and NOAA's Northwest Fisheries Science Center in Seattle. Her primary research focus is creating new frameworks and methodologies to better understand and manage outbreaks of harmful algal blooms that threaten seafood safety, public health, and the economic values of fisheries. Stephanie obtained her PhD from the University of New South Wales, Australia, and completed her post-doctoral training at the University of Washington's Climate Impacts Group and the School of Oceanography.

Remote Access and Notes:
  • Register at https://www3.gotomeeting.com/register/121949230. Space is limited. After registering you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining and a unique link to the Webinar.
  • For audio, use your computer speakers or dial in: +1 (415) 363-0079. Access Code: 760-566-323

For questions about this seminar contact .

Note: All OneNOAA Science seminar attendees agree not to cite, quote, copy, or distribute material presented without the explicit written consent of the seminar presenters. The views and opinions expressed by the speakers of the OneNOAA Science seminars do not reflect any position of the Government or NOAA.

Visitor Information:

Unless otherwise specified, all non-NOAA visitors wanting to attend in person a seminar should contact in advance the contact person listed under "Remote Access and Notes" for specific information about obtaining building access.

Seminar Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Wednesday, April 3, 2013 1:33 PM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science and management information. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] or join our RSS feed by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

This is OneNOAA Science Seminar Number: 1741

April 11, 2013

WWII Offshore: Monitor National Marine Sanctuary's Battle of the Atlantic Expedition

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Date and Time: April 11, 2013; 13:00-14:00 Eastern Time [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: Remote Access Only
Speaker(s): (Maritime Archaeologist, Office of National Marine Sanctuaries, Monitor National Marine Sanctuary)
OneNOAA Science Seminar Partner(s): OneNOAA Science Seminar, National Marine Protected Area Center
Abstract:

The Battle of the Atlantic has been called the longest, largest and most complex naval battle in history, running throughout World War II and extending across the Atlantic to U.S. shores. The Battle of the Atlantic Expedition is a multiyear maritime archaeology project to survey and document historically significant shipwrecks lost off the coast of North Carolina. Find out more about the field of maritime archaeology, innovative archaeological survey technologies, and Monitor National Marine Sanctuary's efforts to raise awareness and appreciation of these nonrenewable cultural resources.

Remote Access and Notes:
  • For the visual part of the presentation, you can access the web meeting by going to: https://www1.gotomeeting.com/register/567879617. Enter required fields. Check the box that that you have read the Privacy Policy, and click Proceed.
  • For the audio part of the presentation, you can listen through your computer (audio or headsets), or dial the phone number provided when you register for the webinar. Please use your phone's mute button (*6 toggles on or off) during the presentation until you are ready to ask questions.
  • For information about this seminar please contact:

Note: All OneNOAA Science seminar attendees agree not to cite, quote, copy, or distribute material presented without the explicit written consent of the seminar presenters. The views and opinions expressed by the speakers of the OneNOAA Science seminars do not reflect any position of the Government or NOAA.

Visitor Information:

Unless otherwise specified, all non-NOAA visitors wanting to attend in person a seminar should contact in advance the contact person listed under "Remote Access and Notes" for specific information about obtaining building access.

Seminar Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Friday, February 15, 2013 8:02 AM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science and management information. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] or join our RSS feed by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

This is OneNOAA Science Seminar Number: 1697

Transgenerational Genetic Mark Recapture: A New Tool in the Toolbox for Estimating Salmonid Abundance?

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Date and Time: April 11, 2013; 11:00-12:00 Pacific Time [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: NOAA NWFSC Auditorium (2725 Montlake Blvd. E., Seattle, WA 98112)
Speaker(s): Dr. Todd R. Seamons, Research Scientist, Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife
OneNOAA Science Seminar Partner(s): OneNOAA Science Seminar>, NWFSC Monster JAM seminars
Abstract:

Parentage-based tagging is currently being developed for tracking hatchery populations, where all spawned fish can easily be sampled and genotyped. In naturally spawning populations, where sampling parents is often difficult, parentage-based tagging has been introduced as a method for use in mark-recapture models of population abundance. However, this transgenerational genetic mark recapture (GMR) method has not been widely applied nor critically evaluated. We recently undertook projects using transgenerational genetic mark recapture to estimate naturally spawning Chinook abundance in several Puget Sound rivers, and are also critically evaluating the method using simulated data. Simulations show that under a variety of conditions, the GMR method produces unbiased, precise estimates of breeding population abundance when sample sizes are adequate and standard closed population Lincoln-Petersen mark-recapture model assumptions are met. Some common characteristics of salmonid biology and life history may make implementation difficult for some species, and some management activities may, if undetected, cause significant biases in abundance estimates. I will describe the method, illustrating using one of our Puget Sound Chinook projects as an example. I will discuss some of the challenges we have encountered in attempting to implement the method for Puget Sound Chinook, and I will discuss the potential general applicability of this method to other systems and species.

Remote Access and Notes:

Remote Access. To join go to https://nwfsc200.webex.com/nwfsc200/j.php?ED=193362347&UID=1367485292&RT=MiM0. This meeting does not require a password. Click "Join". For audio conference toll number (US/Canada): 650-479-3207 Access code: 801683361. For assistance: https://nwfsc200.webex.com/nwfsc200/mc. On the left navigation bar, click "Support", or contact: (206)860-3256. For information about this seminar contact: 206-860-3380.

Note: All OneNOAA Science seminar attendees agree not to cite, quote, copy, or distribute material presented without the explicit written consent of the seminar presenters. The views and opinions expressed by the speakers of the OneNOAA Science seminars do not reflect any position of the Government or NOAA.

Visitor Information:

Unless otherwise specified, all non-NOAA visitors wanting to attend in person a seminar should contact in advance the contact person listed under "Remote Access and Notes" for specific information about obtaining building access.

Seminar Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Tuesday, March 19, 2013 9:32 AM / Last updated Tuesday, March 26, 2013 7:58 AM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science and management information. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] or join our RSS feed by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

This is OneNOAA Science Seminar Number: 1710

"Beach Lovers" and "Greens": A Worldwide Empirical Analysis of Coastal Tourism

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Date and Time: April 11, 2013; 12:00-13:00 Eastern Time [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: NOAA HQ SSMC-3 2nd Floor Library (1315 East-West Hwy, Silver Spring, MD 20910)
Speaker(s): Dr. Laura Onofri
OneNOAA Science Seminar Partner(s): OneNOAA Science Seminars, NOAA NODC Library
Abstract:

In this presentation, Dr. Laura Onofri will begin by discussing how markets work, and how environmental economists analyze non-market issues. Then, Dr. Onofri will present the results of her work on coastal tourism, published recently with Dr. Paulo Nunes in Ecological Economics. In this study, the authors examine issues of coastal tourism, and describe their worldwide analysis of domestic and international coastal tourism flows. After building a worldwide dataset including natural and economic coastal environments, the authors design an integrated-model that estimates the demand for coastal destinations. Dr. Onofri will share with us the results of this analysis, which show that there are two differentiated touristic demand segments, denoting different preferences for coastal tourism. She will then discuss these results from a tourism and conservation policy perspective.

Remote Access and Notes:

For remote access via webinar (unless specified otherwise below), please fill out the registration form a few minutes before the meeting is scheduled to begin. The Meeting Number is 742656968; the Passcode is brownbag. For audio in the US and Canada, dial 866-833-7307. The participant passcode is 8986360. For further information about this seminar please contact

Note: All OneNOAA Science seminar attendees agree not to cite, quote, copy, or distribute material presented without the explicit written consent of the seminar presenters. The views and opinions expressed by the speakers of the OneNOAA Science seminars do not reflect any position of the Government or NOAA.

Visitor Information:

Unless otherwise specified, all non-NOAA visitors wanting to attend in person a seminar should contact in advance the contact person listed under "Remote Access and Notes" for specific information about obtaining building access.

Seminar Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Wednesday, April 3, 2013 3:05 PM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science and management information. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] or join our RSS feed by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

This is OneNOAA Science Seminar Number: 1744

April 16, 2013

Communicating Climate in a Time of Rapid Change

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Date and Time: April 16, 2013; 12:00-12:30 Eastern Time [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: Online Access Only
Speaker(s): Tom Bowman
OneNOAA Science Seminar Partner(s): OneNOAA Science Seminars, NOAA Climate Connection and the National Weather Service Climate Services Division
Abstract:

With public opinion polls showing that a majority of Americans now accept the reality of climate change, the barriers to constructive engagement shift from questions about the reality to questions about risk and searches for hope. How will climate change affect us? What can we do about it? Communicators and educators will have to shift gears in order to keep up with fast-moving trends in the climate system and public opinion. Understanding how non-experts hear and process information about climate risks can reveal new opportunities to be more effective. Climate communications expert Tom Bowman will discuss influences on people's levels of concern and how trusted sources of science information can respond to help create a "climate smart" public.

Remote Access and Notes:

Webinar Registration and view system requirements: https://www1.gotomeeting.com/register/134697577. Immediately after you submit the registration form, you'll receive an email with a link to connect to the session. During the Webinar, you can receive audio directly through your computer speakers for free, or dial in to the number displayed when you sign in (long-distance charges may apply). For questions about this seminar contact or .

Note: All OneNOAA Science seminar attendees agree not to cite, quote, copy, or distribute material presented without the explicit written consent of the seminar presenters. The views and opinions expressed by the speakers of the OneNOAA Science seminars do not reflect any position of the Government or NOAA.

Visitor Information:

Unless otherwise specified, all non-NOAA visitors wanting to attend in person a seminar should contact in advance the contact person listed under "Remote Access and Notes" for specific information about obtaining building access.

Seminar Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Tuesday, March 19, 2013 2:38 PM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science and management information. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] or join our RSS feed by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

This is OneNOAA Science Seminar Number: 1720

Downscaled Snow Projections for Alaska

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Date and Time: April 16, 2013; 10:00-11:00 Alaska Time [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: Online Access Only
Speaker(s): Stephanie McAfee, Alaska Climate Science Center
OneNOAA Science Seminar Partner(s): OneNOAA Science Seminar, Alaska Center for Climate Assessment & Policy
Abstract:

Decision makers around the world are increasingly looking for localized projections of climate change for their particular region. This webinar will include a discussion of a new set of downscaled snow projections available for the state of Alaska, as well as an explanation of how downscaled climate data are created, including strengths and weaknesses. Three major themes related to the Alaska downscaled snow projections will be covered: 1) How will the late-winter precipitation regime change in southwestern Alaska? 2) Will summer snow events still occur on the North Slope? and 3) How vulnerable is snow in southeastern Alaska?

Remote Access and Notes:

To hear the audio presentation during a webinar:

  1. With a regular telephone dial: 1- (877) 594-8353
  2. When prompted, enter the Participant passcode: 83847342

To view the presentation during a webinar:

  1. Point your web browser to: http://infiniteconferencing.com/Events/accap/
  2. Enter Participant Code 83847342
  3. Enter the rest of the requested information (The name and organization you enter will be seen by other participants, but your contact information will remain confidential)
  4. Click the blue "log-in" button

For questions about this seminar contact Brook Gamble, ACCAP Outreach and Education Specialist, (907) 474-7812, accap@uaf.edu or (907) 474-7878.

Note: All OneNOAA Science seminar attendees agree not to cite, quote, copy, or distribute material presented without the explicit written consent of the seminar presenters. The views and opinions expressed by the speakers of the OneNOAA Science seminars do not reflect any position of the Government or NOAA.

Visitor Information:

Unless otherwise specified, all non-NOAA visitors wanting to attend in person a seminar should contact in advance the contact person listed under "Remote Access and Notes" for specific information about obtaining building access.

Seminar Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Friday, February 8, 2013 8:40 AM / last updated Tuesday, March 5, 2013 1:34 PM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science and management information. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] or join our RSS feed by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

This is OneNOAA Science Seminar Number: 1690

NCDC Monthly Climate Report

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Date and Time: April 16, 2013; 13:00-13:45 Eastern Time [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: Webinar/Conference Call Access Only
Speaker(s): NOAA climate and weather experts
OneNOAA Science Seminar Partner(s): OneNOAA Science Seminars, NCDC Monthly Climate Update
Abstract:

NOAA's National Climatic Data Center (NCDC) scientists review key findings and highlights from NOAA's U.S. and global climate reports for the month of March.

Remote Access and Notes:

The NOAA/NCDC Monthly Climate Update webinars for NOAA employees and partners occur on the third Tuesday of each month at 1:00 PM Eastern Time. Information on future webinar are announced in advance through the NCDC WebEx page at: https://ncdcevents.webex.com. For questions about this seminar contact or .

  1. To Join the Webinar, copy or paste the following link to a browser: https://ncdcevents.webex.com
  2. Click on the "Monthly Climate Monitoring Webinar" link
  3. In the "Join Event Now" box on the right, enter your first name, last name, e-mail address, and the event password, which is “Welcome123!” Click "Join Now".
  4. To hear the audio or to join the teleconference only, the call-in toll number for the US/Canada is: 1-650-479-3207, Access code:992 334 020

Note: All OneNOAA Science seminar attendees agree not to cite, quote, copy, or distribute material presented without the explicit written consent of the seminar presenters. The views and opinions expressed by the speakers of the OneNOAA Science seminars do not reflect any position of the Government or NOAA.

Visitor Information:

Unless otherwise specified, all non-NOAA visitors wanting to attend in person a seminar should contact in advance the contact person listed under "Remote Access and Notes" for specific information about obtaining building access.

Seminar Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Thursday, April 11, 2013 10:07 AM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science and management information. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] or join our RSS feed by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

This is OneNOAA Science Seminar Number: 1752

Communities-Based Fisheries Management in Liberia

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Date and Time: April 16, 2013; 12:00-13:00 Eastern Time [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: NOAA HQ SSMC-3 2nd Floor Library (1315 East-West Hwy, Silver Spring, MD 20910)
Speaker(s): Patrick Sayon, World Bank West Africa Regional Fisheries Program, Coordinator for the Community Sciences Program in Liberia
OneNOAA Science Seminar Partner(s): OneNOAA Science Seminars, NOAA NODC Library
Abstract:

Liberia Community Sciences Program was designed and launched in 2009 with support from the World Bank. The Community Sciences program is designed to build capacity of Liberian artisanal fisher communities to monitor and better manage their local coastal and inshore marine resources. As both a resources management and an environment conservation tool, Community Sciences directly supports an ongoing policy shift in fisheries management in West Africa to a "rights based" approach. This policy shift assigns rights over exploitation of inshore marine resources to fisher communities, and largely devolves responsibility for the health and sustainability of those resources to those communities.

Remote Access and Notes:

For remote access via webinar (unless specified otherwise below), please fill out the registration form a few minutes before the meeting is scheduled to begin. The Meeting Number is 742656968; the Passcode is brownbag. For audio in the US and Canada, dial 866-833-7307. The participant passcode is 8986360. For further information about this seminar please contact

Note: All OneNOAA Science seminar attendees agree not to cite, quote, copy, or distribute material presented without the explicit written consent of the seminar presenters. The views and opinions expressed by the speakers of the OneNOAA Science seminars do not reflect any position of the Government or NOAA.

Visitor Information:

Unless otherwise specified, all non-NOAA visitors wanting to attend in person a seminar should contact in advance the contact person listed under "Remote Access and Notes" for specific information about obtaining building access.

Seminar Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Monday, April 15, 2013 8:35 AM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science and management information. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] or join our RSS feed by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

This is OneNOAA Science Seminar Number: 1756

April 17, 2013

Is Sea Level Rise Accelerating? Somewhere a Hockey Stick

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Date and Time: April 17, 2013; 12:00-13:00 Eastern Time [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: NOAA HQ SSMC-4 Room 8150 (1305 East-West Hwy, Silver Spring, MD 20910)
Speaker(s): Dr. John Boon, Virginia Institute of Marine Science
OneNOAA Science Seminar Partner(s): OneNOAA Science Seminar, NOS Science Seminar Series, and the Center for Operational Oceanographic Products and Services (CO-OPS)
Abstract:

Acceleration may be occurring along parts of the U.S.-Canadian Atlantic coast through dynamic adjustments in sea level due to a possible slow-down in the meridional overturning circulation (MOC). A linear-quadratic regression model applied to seasonally-adjusted monthly mean sea level (mmsl) observations at U.S. and Canadian east coast tide stations offers positive evidence of recent acceleration after using an empirical technique, serial trend analysis, to find periods when acceleration is constant or approximately so. Applied to long-term data at eight tide stations from Norfolk, VA, to Halifax, Nova Scotia, the technique identified a pronounced linear rate increase (constant acceleration) common to all eight stations beginning in median year 1987 and continuing through median year 1994 using serial trends derived from fixed length (36 year) series. A similar analysis at four tide stations from Charleston, SC, to Key West, FL, showed neither acceleration nor deceleration. Guided by this information, linear-quadratic regression was applied at 23 U.S. and Canadian Atlantic coast tide stations with complete or near-complete mmsl records over 1969-2011. Analysis of variance F-tests subsequently found the quadratic term contribution to be significant at one station (Kiptopeke, VA) at the 95 percent level of confidence and 15 additional stations from Sewells Point, VA to Halifax, NS at the 99 percent level of confidence. Quadratic contribution to regression was non-significant at St. John's, NL as well as at five tide stations from Wilmington, NC to Key West, FL.

About The Speaker:

Dr. Boon is a professor emeritus at the Virginia Institute of Marine Science (VIMS) and School of Marine Science, College of William and Mary. He is the author of a book on tides, storm tides and sea level trends and is presently pursuing research on regional sea level rise at "Hot Spots" on the U.S. east coast. For the past five years he has served as a consultant for the NOAA CO-OPS Ocean Systems Test and Evaluation Program and is the developer of the VIMS Tidewatch system for extratidal water level forecasts in lower Chesapeake Bay (www.vims.edu/tidewatch).

Remote Access and Notes:

Presentations are available remotely via a combination of phone (US only) & webcast. Note that remote access is limited to 50 connections on a first-come-first served basis, so we cannot guarantee participation. To participate remotely, you must connect via the phone and internet:

  1. Audio: Dial toll-free (U.S.) 1-877-708-1667. When prompted enter passcode 7028688#. Please use your phone's mute button (*6 toggles on or off) during the presentation until you are ready to ask questions. The phone conference does not start until about five minutes before the seminar.
  2. To access the webex meeting, go to the webcast site at http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?sigKey=mymeetings&i=744925156&p=&t=c. Enter meeting number 744925156 if needed; no passcode is required. Enter other required fields - First and last name.eck the box that that you have read the Privacy Policy, and click Proceed.

For questions about this seminar contact .

Note: All OneNOAA Science seminar attendees agree not to cite, quote, copy, or distribute material presented without the explicit written consent of the seminar presenters. The views and opinions expressed by the speakers of the OneNOAA Science seminars do not reflect any position of the Government or NOAA.

Visitor Information:

Unless otherwise specified, all non-NOAA visitors wanting to attend in person a seminar should contact in advance the contact person listed under "Remote Access and Notes" for specific information about obtaining building access.

Seminar Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Friday, March 1, 2013 . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science and management information. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] or join our RSS feed by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

This is OneNOAA Science Seminar Number: 1696

April 18, 2013

Changes Over Time in the Size and Age of Chinook Salmon Caught in Lower Columbia River Fisheries

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Date and Time: April 18, 2013; 11:00-12:00 Pacific Time [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: NOAA NWFSC Auditorium (2725 Montlake Blvd. E., Seattle, WA 98112)
Speaker(s): Kathryn E. Kostow, Technical Analyst, Fisheries/Stock Assessments, Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife
OneNOAA Science Seminar Partner(s): OneNOAA Science Seminar, NWFSC Monster JAM seminars
Abstract:

Broad-scale decreases in the size and age of Pacific salmon (Oncorhynchus spp.) over time are well documented. Several theories attempt to explain this dynamic, including exploitation by fisheries that selectively remove larger, older-maturing individuals; changes or variation in the ocean environment that affect ocean productivity which in turn may affect salmon growth and maturation rates; variable fish abundance in the North Pacific that influence density-dependence effects on salmon growth and maturation; hatchery programs that promote smaller, younger-maturing fish; and loss of historic production areas that produced larger, older fish. Changes in the size and age of Chinook salmon (O. tshawytscha) caught in lower Columbia River terminal fisheries have not previously been reviewed to determine whether these populations follow the general regional trends observed elsewhere. Although industrial European fisheries have occurred on the Columbia River since the mid 1800s, systematic data on length, weight and age of Chinook salmon are only available since the 1960s. By the 1960s, many events that might influence fish size and age had already occurred. Our analysis indicates that the size and age of Columbia River Chinook salmon caught in river fisheries significantly increased from the 1960s to the 1990s, contrary to trends reported elsewhere, but then declined from the 1990s to the 2000s. By the 2000s, fish that were age 4 and older were smaller at age than ever seen previously, even though older age classes were still more frequent than they were in the 1960s. The declining trend from the 1990s to the 2000s was particularly steep for spring-run Chinook salmon which are currently the smallest and youngest ever recorded. Some of the variation over time is likely due to changes in the structure of the fisheries itself that affect the way it samples the populations. However, biological changes are also indicated that lend some support to theories about the effects on size and age of fishing pressure, hatchery influence, variation in the physical environment and density-dependent growth rates. The dynamics of size and age variation in Columbia River Chinook salmon are complex most likely because multiple influences are having confounding effects.

Remote Access and Notes:

Remote Access. To join go to https://nwfsc200.webex.com/nwfsc200/j.php?ED=193362347&UID=1367485292&RT=MiM0. This meeting does not require a password. Click "Join". For audio conference toll number (US/Canada): 650-479-3207 Access code: 801 683 361. For assistance: https://nwfsc200.webex.com/nwfsc200/mc. On the left navigation bar, click "Support", or contact: (206)860-3256. For information about this seminar contact: 206-860-3380.

Note: All OneNOAA Science seminar attendees agree not to cite, quote, copy, or distribute material presented without the explicit written consent of the seminar presenters. The views and opinions expressed by the speakers of the OneNOAA Science seminars do not reflect any position of the Government or NOAA.

Visitor Information:

Unless otherwise specified, all non-NOAA visitors wanting to attend in person a seminar should contact in advance the contact person listed under "Remote Access and Notes" for specific information about obtaining building access.

Seminar Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Tuesday, March 19, 2013 9:32 AM / Last updated Tuesday, March 26, 2013 7:58 AM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science and management information. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] or join our RSS feed by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

This is OneNOAA Science Seminar Number: 1710

Fish Sex! How, Where, and When They Do It (and When They Don't Have To)

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Date and Time: April 18, 2013; 12:00-12:30 Eastern Time [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: NOAA HQ SSMC-3 2nd Floor Library (1315 East-West Hwy, Silver Spring, MD 20910)
Speaker(s): , Sea Grant Knauss Fellow, NOAA Office of International Affairs
OneNOAA Science Seminar Partner(s): OneNOAA Science Seminars, NOAA NODC Library, and 2013 Sea Grant Knauss Fellows Brown Bag Seminar Series
Abstract:

There are well over 30 thousand species of fishes, living in water (most of the time) from desert springs and alpine lakes to deep ocean trenches, and while they all share that fundamental drive to reproduce, their methods are as varied as the habitats in which they live. With so many species to study, it's no wonder that we have learned that fishes have tried it all. If you can think of a way to reproduce, a fish has probably tried it. In fact, after a review of fish sex, I'm sure you'll agree that mammals (including humans) are downright un-creative! Sex change, hermaphroditism, multiple paternity, group spawning, sneak spawning, parthenogenesis, automictic parthenogenesis, gynogenesis, and hybridogenesis are just some of the amazing sexual "ideas" that other vertebrates (and some pop culture or science fiction writers) got from fishes.

Remote Access and Notes:

For remote access via webinar (unless specified otherwise below), please fill out the registration form a few minutes before the meeting is scheduled to begin. The Meeting Number is 742656968; the Passcode is brownbag. For audio in the US and Canada, dial 866-833-7307. The participant passcode is 8986360. For further information about this seminar please contact

Note: All OneNOAA Science seminar attendees agree not to cite, quote, copy, or distribute material presented without the explicit written consent of the seminar presenters. The views and opinions expressed by the speakers of the OneNOAA Science seminars do not reflect any position of the Government or NOAA.

Visitor Information:

Unless otherwise specified, all non-NOAA visitors wanting to attend in person a seminar should contact in advance the contact person listed under "Remote Access and Notes" for specific information about obtaining building access.

Seminar Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Monday, April 8, 2013 11:36 AM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science and management information. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] or join our RSS feed by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

This is OneNOAA Science Seminar Number: 1748

The Optimal Size of a Marine Protected Area (MPA): A BIOECONOMIC MODEL Integrated with "SASI" SYSTEM, Case of Eastern Indonesia

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Date and Time: April 18, 2013; 12:30-13:00 Eastern Time [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: NOAA HQ SSMC-3 2nd Floor Library (1315 East-West Hwy, Silver Spring, MD 20910)
Speaker(s): , Sea Grant Knauss Fellow, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
OneNOAA Science Seminar Partner(s): OneNOAA Science Seminars, NOAA NODC Library, and 2013 Sea Grant Knauss Fellows Brown Bag Seminar Series
Abstract:

MPA is a promising tool for fisheries management and conservation goal. At the same time, traditional marine tenures have existed centuries around the globe. This paper tries to take a closer look on the integration of modern fisheries management measures such as MPA and traditional system such as "Sasi" found in Eastern part of Indonesia. The bio-economic model determines the optimal size of an MPA incorporating both its economic and ecological benefits. We apply the framework to the sea cucumber fishery. The optimal MPA size to be 37.77 % of the total area and the combination of "Sasi" and MPA results in the highest economic returns compared to "Sasi (old traditional marine tenure in Molucca)" only and open access management systems. An important policy implication is that fishery management should consider a combination tool such as "Sasi" and MPA. Since the "Sasi" tradition is fading away in Indonesia, our finding could be important in supporting its revitalization.

About The Speaker:

Umi Muawanah is a 2013 Sea Grant Knauss Marine Policy Fellow working at the Division of Fish and Wildlife Service in The Department of Interior. As a fellow, she is involved in several different projects such as National Fish Passage Program and National Fish and Habitat Partnerships. She brings economic tools and expertise into her position to better evaluate these project's impacts on the community and society. Prior to coming to the United States to pursue her graduate studies at the University of Rhode Island and the University of Connecticut, she worked at the Ministry of Marine Affairs and Fisheries in Indonesia. She received her PhD from the University of Connecticut in January 2013. Her research interest includes fisheries management institution and management, community-based Marine Protected Areas, and Aquaculture economics.

Remote Access and Notes:

For remote access via webinar (unless specified otherwise below), please fill out the registration form a few minutes before the meeting is scheduled to begin. The Meeting Number is 742656968; the Passcode is brownbag. For audio in the US and Canada, dial 866-833-7307. The participant passcode is 8986360. For further information about this seminar please contact

Note: All OneNOAA Science seminar attendees agree not to cite, quote, copy, or distribute material presented without the explicit written consent of the seminar presenters. The views and opinions expressed by the speakers of the OneNOAA Science seminars do not reflect any position of the Government or NOAA.

Visitor Information:

Unless otherwise specified, all non-NOAA visitors wanting to attend in person a seminar should contact in advance the contact person listed under "Remote Access and Notes" for specific information about obtaining building access.

Seminar Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Monday, April 8, 2013 11:36 AM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science and management information. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] or join our RSS feed by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

This is OneNOAA Science Seminar Number: 1749

Tracking Marine Biota on Japanese Tsunami Debris: The Initial Stages of the Invasion Process

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Date and Time: April 18, 2013; 16:00-17:00 Eastern Time [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: Online access only
Speaker(s): , Oregon State University, Department of Fish and Wildlife
OneNOAA Science Seminar Partner(s): OneNOAA Science Seminar, West Coast Region National Marine Sanctuaries
Abstract:

The tsunami that struck the coast of Japan on March 11, 2011 interacted with a highly urbanized and industrialized setting. This delivered a field of debris with an unknown number of docks, vessels, buoys and other items potentially covered by animal and plant communities to the Pacific Ocean. A striking example of this debris field is the large floating dock from Misawa, Japan, that arrived on the beach in central Oregon in early June 2012 with a diverse community of marine life. It is very difficult to predict the magnitude or impact of the biota arriving with marine debris, but a narrow opportunity exists to test critical questions in invasion theory and ecology by documenting biota associated with the debris.

About The Speaker:

Jessica Miller is interested in the ecology and evolution of life history diversity in fishes and the development and maintenance of that diversity. Her research has focused on larval dispersal and transport, population connectivity and structure, and the use of estuaries by larval and juvenile marine and anadromous fishes. She combines techniques including otolith microchemistry, genetic, and time-series analyses, to provide novel information on these topics. She is interested in continuing to use diverse methods to address basic questions in fish ecology, while also providing information critical for management and conservation efforts. She was among the very first scientists to examine the huge dock that washed ashore in June of 2012.

Remote Access and Notes:

Remote Access. To join go to https://www1.gotomeeting.com/register/844794841. After registering you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the Webinar. An archived recording of this webinar will be available here within a few days of the presentation: http://www.oceanalaska.org/education/multimedia-webinars.htm. For information about this seminar contact:

Note: All OneNOAA Science seminar attendees agree not to cite, quote, copy, or distribute material presented without the explicit written consent of the seminar presenters. The views and opinions expressed by the speakers of the OneNOAA Science seminars do not reflect any position of the Government or NOAA.

Visitor Information:

Unless otherwise specified, all non-NOAA visitors wanting to attend in person a seminar should contact in advance the contact person listed under "Remote Access and Notes" for specific information about obtaining building access.

Seminar Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Monday, April 8, 2013 2:13 PM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science and management information. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] or join our RSS feed by

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This is OneNOAA Science Seminar Number: 1750

April 19, 2013

Data Assimilation Progress and Plans at ECMWF

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Date and Time: April 19, 2013; 14:00-15:00 Eastern Time [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: NOAA CWCP Conference Center (5830 University Research Court, College Park, MD 20740)
Speaker(s): Lars Isaksen, ECMWF
OneNOAA Science Seminar Partner(s): OneNOAA Science Seminar, JCSDA Seminars
Abstract:

The operational 4-Dimensional Variational (4DVAR) data assimilation system at the European Centre for Medium-range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) has recently been extended to a hybrid system, where flow-dependent background error variances are provided by an Ensemble of 4DVAR Data Assimilations (EDA). The EDA has also been used to compute new climatological background error covariances. With the next upgrade, in June 2013, the EDA will be extended from 10 to 25 members and used for on-line estimation of wavelet based background error covariances. All these background error related upgrades result in significant analysis and forecast improvements. The following operational upgrade, planned for the end of 2013, will extend the 4DVAR analysis window from 12 hours to 24 hours, run twice daily. The analysis resolution will also be increased. The seminar will present results of these recent upgrades and discuss the related challenges, like the accuracy of tangent-linear approximation and scalability of 4DVAR. The seminar will also cover recent progress in land surface analysis. A new soil moisture analysis and new snow analysis have been implemented recently. Work is on-going to assimilate ASCAT and SMOS soil moisture satellite data, in addition to comprehensive hydrological validation activities. Other important activities like refactoring of software, improved handling of large volumes of observations, advanced diagnostics and improved observation error characterization will be covered briefly.

Remote Access and Notes:

Video

  1. Go to JCSDA Seminars and click on the seminar title
  2. Enter your name and email address
  3. Enter the meeting password: JCSDAseminars707
  4. Click "Join Now".
  5. Follow the instructions that appear on your screen.

Audio: USA participants: 1-866-715-2479, Passcode: 9457557. International: 1-517-345-5260

For information about this seminar contact: .

Note: All OneNOAA Science seminar attendees agree not to cite, quote, copy, or distribute material presented without the explicit written consent of the seminar presenters. The views and opinions expressed by the speakers of the OneNOAA Science seminars do not reflect any position of the Government or NOAA.

Visitor Information:

Unless otherwise specified, all non-NOAA visitors wanting to attend in person a seminar should contact in advance the contact person listed under "Remote Access and Notes" for specific information about obtaining building access.

Seminar Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Monday, April 1, 2013 8:43 AM / Last updated Monday, April 15, 2013 9:00 AM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science and management information. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] or join our RSS feed by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

This is OneNOAA Science Seminar Number: 1737

April 23, 2013

Great Lakes Economies and Ecosystems: Will Extreme Low Water Levels Leave Them High and Dry?

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Date and Time: April 23, 2013; 12:00-13:00 Eastern Time [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: NOAA SCentral Library, SSMC-3, 2nd Floor
Speaker(s): Steve Gill, NOAA COOPs; and Drew Gronewold, NOAA GLERL
OneNOAA Science Seminar Partner(s): OneNOAA Science Seminar, NODC, Library>
Abstract:

Record low water levels were at NOAA's National Ocean Service (NOS) Center for Oceanographic Products and Services (CO-OPS) monitoring stations throughout the upper Great Lakes starting in December of 2012. Given the range of Great Lakes water level measurements, the fact that Lake Michigan-Huron reached "all-time" lows has significant implications for the region. Impacts include excessive receding of coastlines, reduced navigability of shipping channels, and diminished hydroelectric power capacity. NOAA CO-OPS, in partnership with NOAA's Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory (GLERL), are part of a regional collaboration of federal agencies focusing on understanding Great Lakes water level dynamics. NOAA's monitoring infrastructure, including the CO-OPS monitoring stations, and modeling capabilities provide critical support of that collaboration.

Remote Access and Notes:

Remote Access. To join go to http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?sigKey=mymeetings&i=742656968&=brownbag&t=c. For audio portion of the seminar, please dial 1-866-833-7307; passcode is 8986360. For information about this seminar contact:

Note: All OneNOAA Science seminar attendees agree not to cite, quote, copy, or distribute material presented without the explicit written consent of the seminar presenters. The views and opinions expressed by the speakers of the OneNOAA Science seminars do not reflect any position of the Government or NOAA.

Visitor Information:

Unless otherwise specified, all non-NOAA visitors wanting to attend in person a seminar should contact in advance the contact person listed under "Remote Access and Notes" for specific information about obtaining building access.

Seminar Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Monday, April 22, 2013 9:36 AM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science and management information. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] or join our RSS feed by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

April 25, 2013

The Spatial Economics Toolbox for Fisheries (FishSET): A New Tool to Improve Fisheries Management

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Date and Time: April 25, 2013; 11:00-12:00 Pacific Time [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: NOAA NWFSC Auditorium (2725 Montlake Blvd. E., Seattle, WA 98112)
Speaker(s): Dr. Alan Haynie, Economist, Affiliate Assistant Professor (U. of Washington), Alaska Fisheries Science Center, National Marine Fisheries Service
OneNOAA Science Seminar Partner(s): OneNOAA Science Seminar, NWFSC Monster JAM seminars
Abstract:

Since the 1980s, fisheries economists have modeled the factors that influence fishers spatial and participation choices to better understand the trade-offs of fishing in different locations. This knowledge can improve predictions of how fishers will respond to the creation of marine reserves, to changes in market or environmental conditions, or to management actions such as the implementation of catch share programs.

Remote Access and Notes:

Remote Access. To join go to https://nwfsc200.webex.com/nwfsc200/j.php?ED=193362347&UID=1367485292&RT=MiM0. This meeting does not require a password. Click "Join". For audio conference toll number (US/Canada): 650-479-3207 Access code: 801 683 361. For assistance: https://nwfsc200.webex.com/nwfsc200/mc. On the left navigation bar, click "Support", or contact: (206)860-3256. For information about this seminar contact: 206-860-3380.

Note: All OneNOAA Science seminar attendees agree not to cite, quote, copy, or distribute material presented without the explicit written consent of the seminar presenters. The views and opinions expressed by the speakers of the OneNOAA Science seminars do not reflect any position of the Government or NOAA.

Visitor Information:

Unless otherwise specified, all non-NOAA visitors wanting to attend in person a seminar should contact in advance the contact person listed under "Remote Access and Notes" for specific information about obtaining building access.

Seminar Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Tuesday, March 19, 2013 9:32 AM / Last updated Tuesday, March 26, 2013 7:58 AM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science and management information. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] or join our RSS feed by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

This is OneNOAA Science Seminar Number: 1711

NOAA EPP ECSC-Gulf of Mexico Oil Spills: A Historical and Spatial Perspective

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Date and Time: April 25, 2013; 12:00-13:00 Eastern Time [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: NOAA HQ, SSMC3, Medium Conference Room 10817
Speaker(s): John W. Tunnell, Jr.(NOAA EPP ECSC Co-PI, Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi, Harte Research Institute for Gulf of Mexico Studies
OneNOAA Science Seminar Partner(s): OneNOAA Science Seminar, NOAA EPP Cooperative Science Center Seminar
Abstract:

The Gulf of Mexico is the ninth largest body of water on Earth, and it is considered to be one of the most ecologically and economically productive. NOAA considers the Gulf to be 1 of 64 Large Marine Ecosystems in the world, and it is surrounded by three countries: the United States, Mexico, and Cuba. Considered by some to be a sea of contrasts with seemingly incompatible economic drivers (oil and gas, shipping, harbors) along with high biodiversity (over 15,400 species) and diverse habitats (coral reefs, salt marshes, mangroves, and more). This is not to say there are not problems and clashes between these economies and ecologies, as there are some significant ones, but understanding the historical and spatial aspects of anthropogenic oil spills and natural seeps, can help at least explain some of the resilience of the Gulf of Mexico ecosystem. During the decade of the 1990s, 82% of hydrocarbon input into coastal and offshore areas of the Gulf was from natural seeps, and when only offshore sources are considered, 95% of inputs came from natural seeps. With over 1000 estimated natural seeps releasing almost 50 million gallons per year, the natural bioremediation ability of the Gulf may exceed all other water bodies on Earth and give the Gulf its great resilience. Comparisons with the Ixtoc I oil spill in the southern Gulf of Mexico 30 years prior to the recent Deepwater Horizon spill reveal some great similarities, but also some important and distinctive differences. The use of dispersants at depth and a new deepwater spill model are new to science, and widespread research is revealing new information about deepwater impacts. Ten years of on-going and future spill research, as well as planned Gulf restoration are “silver linings” to the most recent spill. This seminar is provided in the 2013 NOAA Educational Partnership Cooperative Science Center Seminar Series.

About The Speaker:

John W. ("Wes") Tunnell, Jr. is Associate Director and Endowed Chair of Biodiversity and Conservation Science at the Harte Research Institute for Gulf of Mexico Studies, and Regents Professor, Fulbright Scholar, and Professor of Biology in the Department of Life Sciences, College of Science and Engineering, Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi (TAMUCC). He is also the Lead-PI from TAMUCC for the NOAA Environmental Cooperative Science Center, headquartered at Florida A&M University. He earned his Ph.D. from Texas A&M University (1974) in Biology. Dr. Tunnell began his career at TAMUCC in 1974, where his teaching and research broadly focused on marine biology and ecology. His primary research interests lie in coral reef ecology in Mexico, mollusks (seashells) of Texas and Mexico, oil spill impacts in the marine environment, and most recently, biodiversity of the Gulf of Mexico. Dr. Tunnell advised numerous MS and Ph.D. students during his career, published numerous papers and technical reports, as well as five books, and he is currently the editor of two book series for Texas A&M University Press. He has also received numerous honors and awards, including: Fellow Texas Academy of Sciences (1981); Fulbright Scholar Award to Mexico (1985-86); Regent’s Professor (1998); Alumni Distinguished Professor Award (2003); Gulf Guardian Award (2006 and 2008); Fellow National in the Explorer’s Club (2007); TAMU-CC Excellence in Scholarly Activity Award (2007), and Harvey Weil Professional Conservationist of the Year Award (2011). (Contact information: 361.825.2055 or wes.tunnell@tamucc.edu)

Remote Access and Notes:

Remote Access. To join go to https://sas.elluminate.com/m.jnlp?sid=845&password=M.0F303C5709DC93BAEAD31D9383E7F1. For information about this seminar contact: .

Note: All OneNOAA Science seminar attendees agree not to cite, quote, copy, or distribute material presented without the explicit written consent of the seminar presenters. The views and opinions expressed by the speakers of the OneNOAA Science seminars do not reflect any position of the Government or NOAA.

Visitor Information:

Unless otherwise specified, all non-NOAA visitors wanting to attend in person a seminar should contact in advance the contact person listed under "Remote Access and Notes" for specific information about obtaining building access.

Seminar Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Tuesday, April 23, 2013 7:40 AM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science and management information. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] or join our RSS feed by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

April 29, 2013

Improve Program Results by Linking Planning and Performance: Part 1 - Primer

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Date and Time: April 29, 2013; 12:00-13:00 Eastern Time [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: NOAA HQ Central Library, SSMC-3, 2nd Floor
Speaker(s): Liz Davenport, Senior Program Analyst, National Ocean Service, Management and Budget
OneNOAA Science Seminar Partner(s): OneNOAA Science Seminar, NODC, Library
Abstract:

Have you been asked recently how your program achieved evidence of progress related to NOAA's Next Generation Strategic Plan (NGSP) for FY 2011 and FY 2012? Did you identify noteworthy achievements and remaining challenges? Have you examined performance measures and milestones and other performance data and assessed their effectiveness in validating the evidence of progress?

Between now and February 2014, NOAA will amend the NGSP as required by GPRA MA for all Federal agencies. Knowing what you, your program, office, and leadership envision as "success" and how that advances priorities for NGSP Goal and Enterprise Objectives is critically important, particularly right now. This training (Part 1 and Part 2) can help you focus limited program and administrative resources for more meaningful results. Where are changes needed to improve strategy, budget, and/or performance? Are there ways to better focus limited program and performance management resources for more meaningful results? Part 1 is the foundation for Part 2, a primer followed by a toolkit, that together give you key principles and tools aligned with DOC/NOAA and OMB/Congressional requirements but adaptable to changing circumstances, the new norm. Between the summary slides and detailed appendices, these tools will stimulate thinking and may help detect what can be improved.

Remote Access and Notes:

Remote Access. To join go to http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?sigKey=mymeetings&i=742656968&=brownbag&t=c. For audio portion of the seminar, please dial 1-866-833-7307; passcode is 8986360. For information about this seminar contact:

Note: All OneNOAA Science seminar attendees agree not to cite, quote, copy, or distribute material presented without the explicit written consent of the seminar presenters. The views and opinions expressed by the speakers of the OneNOAA Science seminars do not reflect any position of the Government or NOAA.

Visitor Information:

Unless otherwise specified, all non-NOAA visitors wanting to attend in person a seminar should contact in advance the contact person listed under "Remote Access and Notes" for specific information about obtaining building access.

Seminar Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Monday, April 22, 2013 9:36 AM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science and management information. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] or join our RSS feed by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

April 30, 2013

The 'New' Drought Risk Atlas from the National Drought Mitigation Center

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Date and Time: April 30, 2013; 13:00-14:00 Eastern Time [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: NOAA HQ SSMC-2 (1325 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD, 20910), Room 14316
Speaker(s): , National Drought Mitigation Center (NDMC)
OneNOAA Science Seminar Partner(s): OneNOAA Science Seminar, NWS Climate Services Seminar Series
Abstract:

During this Webinar, the development of the Drought Risk Atlas (DRA) will be covered along with the methodology of how the DRA was constructed, what is contained within the tool, and what questions it can be used to answer. A short demonstration of the tool is also planned to be done within the talk.

About The Speaker:

Brian Fuchs is a Climatologist for the National Drought Mitigation Center (NDMC), http://www.drought.unl.edu, which is housed within the School of Natural Resources (SNR) at the University of Nebraska in Lincoln (UNL). A native Nebraskan, Brian grew up in Columbus, and received a B.S. in Meteorology/Climatology in 1997 from the University of Nebraska and an M.S. in Geosciences, with an emphasis in Climatology, in 2000 from the University of Nebraska. He joined SNR in May of 2000, working as a Climatologist for the High Plains Regional Climate Center. He started working with the NDMC in December 2005. His job functions are quite broad, but are focused mainly on drought-related issues and research projects. The drought-related work concentrates on research involving mitigation, risk assessment, monitoring, impacts, and reporting of drought. Brian works on the applied research projects for the center as well as authoring the United States Drought Monitor, http://www.droughtmonitor.unl.edu, and the North American Drought Monitor. This work helps a diverse group of industries from agriculture, energy, tourism, and transportation, as well as social and environmental concerns, to better understand impacts related to drought.

Remote Access and Notes:

Reserve your Webinar seat now https://www1.gotomeeting.com/register/858664976. After registering you will receive an e-mail confirming your registration and containing information about joining the Webinar. For information about this seminar contact: .

Note: All OneNOAA Science seminar attendees agree not to cite, quote, copy, or distribute material presented without the explicit written consent of the seminar presenters. The views and opinions expressed by the speakers of the OneNOAA Science seminars do not reflect any position of the Government or NOAA.

Visitor Information:

Unless otherwise specified, all non-NOAA visitors wanting to attend in person a seminar should contact in advance the contact person listed under "Remote Access and Notes" for specific information about obtaining building access.

Seminar Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Monday, April 15, 2013 8:23 AM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science and management information. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] or join our RSS feed by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

This is OneNOAA Science Seminar Number: 1755

Ocean Fertilization, Marine Geoengineering and the London Convention/London Protocol

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Date and Time: April 30, 2013; 12:00-13:00 Eastern Time [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: NOAA HQ SSMC-3 Library (1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD, 20910)
Speaker(s): Richard Mannix, International Section of NOAA's Office of General Counsel and Allison Reed, NOAA Office of International Affairs.
OneNOAA Science Seminar Partner(s): OneNOAA Science Seminar, NODC, Library
Abstract:

Richard Mannix from the International Section of NOAA's Office of General Counsel and Allison Reed from NOAA’s Office of International Affairs will provide an update on efforts within the international community to authorize and regulate legitimate scientific research into the use of ocean fertilization techniques as a climate mitigation measure. Their focus will be on recent developments at the London Convention and London Protocol and the movement there toward creation of mechanisms for the assessment and regulation of specific proposals to undertake, at a minimum, more advanced research in these techniques. Ms. Reed and Mr. Mannix will also discuss a growing interest among some of the Parties to the London Convention and Protocol to go a step further and to develop a broader regime to regulate other "marine geoengineering" activities as well. In addition, they will touch upon the recent unauthorized attempt to fertilize the ocean off the coast of British Columbia and the reaction of the international community to that effort. Ms. Reed will provide an overview of the process, discuss the position the U.S. has taken, and describe the progress which has been made by the Contracting Parties. Mr. Mannix will set the subject within the context of international law and discuss the relationship between the London Convention/Protocol and customary international law, as chiefly codified in the Law of the Sea Convention, and he will highlight some ethical and governance concerns.

Remote Access and Notes:

Remote access http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?sigKey=mymeetings&i=742656968&=brownbag&t=c. For information about this seminar contact: .

Note: All OneNOAA Science seminar attendees agree not to cite, quote, copy, or distribute material presented without the explicit written consent of the seminar presenters. The views and opinions expressed by the speakers of the OneNOAA Science seminars do not reflect any position of the Government or NOAA.

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Unless otherwise specified, all non-NOAA visitors wanting to attend in person a seminar should contact in advance the contact person listed under "Remote Access and Notes" for specific information about obtaining building access.

Seminar Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Wednesday, April 24, 2013 8:57 AM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science and management information. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] or join our RSS feed by

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A Downburst Study of the 29-30 June 2012 North American Derecho

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Date and Time: April 30, 2013; 10:00-11:00 Eastern Time [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: Conference Room 2554-2555, NCWCP, 5830 University Research Ct., College Park, MD
Speaker(s): Colleen Wilson (Student, Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences Department, University of Maryland, College Park) and Ken Pryor (Meteorologist, STAR/SMCD/OPDB)
OneNOAA Science Seminar Partner(s): OneNOAA Science Seminar, NESDIS STAR
Abstract:

During the afternoon of 29 June 2012, a complex of strong thunderstorms developed over Illinois and Indiana and then tracked southeastward over the Ohio Valley and central Appalachian Mountains by evening. As the convective storm complex moved over and east of the Appalachian Mountains at a forward speed of 45 to 50 knots, the leading storm line re-intensified and eventually produced widespread significant severe winds (> 65 knots) over northern Virginia and the Washington, DC metropolitan area, and finally over southern New Jersey as the mesoscale convective system (MCS) reached the Atlantic coast. This extraordinary derecho-producing convective system (DCS) event ultimately resulted in nearly a thousand severe wind reports from northern Illinois to the Atlantic Coast. This study will employ Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites (GOES)-13 Rapid Scan Operations (RSO) water vapor (WV)-thermal infrared (IR) channel brightness temperature difference (BTD) imagery, level-II NEXRAD imagery, and Rapid Refresh (RAP) model-derived microburst prediction algorithm output, including the Microburst Windspeed Potential Index (MWPI) and vertical theta-e difference (Δθe), to demonstrate the development and evolution of severe DCS-generated winds. Severe downburst events from the time of initiation over northern Indiana to the time that the DCS moved over the Atlantic coast have been identified and documented. The comparison of NEXRAD imagery to Storm Prediction Center (SPC) high wind reports will emphasize the role of downburst clusters in the observation of regions of enhanced severe winds, especially over the Washington, DC-Baltimore, MD metropolitan areas. The combination of satellite, radar, and numerical model resources, visualized by McIDAS-V software, will describe the evolution of this DCS and will serve as an example of how to use this data in forecasting meso- to micro-scale severe wind events (i.e. downbursts, microbursts) embedded in larger-scale derechos.

Remote Access and Notes:

Remote access: Dial-In Information: U.S. participants: 866-832-9297; International participants: 203-566-7610; Passcode: 6070416. For information about this seminar contact: .

Note: All OneNOAA Science seminar attendees agree not to cite, quote, copy, or distribute material presented without the explicit written consent of the seminar presenters. The views and opinions expressed by the speakers of the OneNOAA Science seminars do not reflect any position of the Government or NOAA.

Visitor Information:

Unless otherwise specified, all non-NOAA visitors wanting to attend in person a seminar should contact in advance the contact person listed under "Remote Access and Notes" for specific information about obtaining building access.

Seminar Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Monday, April 29, 2013 8:38 AM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science and management information. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] or join our RSS feed by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

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