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OneNOAA Science Seminars


September 2012OneNOAA Science Seminars: September 2012

A joint effort by several NOAA offices to provide the most complete summary of upcoming NOAA science seminars. For further information please contact

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Web page last updated: Wednesday, 03-Oct-2012 12:55:37 UTC

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September 4, 2012

Correction of Excessive Precipitation over Steep and High Mountains in a GCM

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Date and Time: September 04, 2012, 12:00 - 1:00 Eastern Time Zone [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: NOAA National Centers for Environmental Prediction Room 2155 (5830 University Research Court, College Park, MD 20740)
Speaker(s): Winston Chao (NASA/GSFC/GMAO)
OneNOAA Science Seminar Sponsor: NOAA NCEP/EMC
Abstract:

Excessive precipitation over steep and high mountains (EPSM) is a well-known problem in GCMs--including EMC's GFS--and mesoscale models. This problem impairs simulation and data assimilation products. The main cause of EPSM is a missing upward transport of heat out of the boundary layer due to the vertical circulations forced by the daytime upslope winds, which are forced by heated boundary layer on the subgrid-scale slopes. These upslope winds are associated with large subgrid-scale topographic variation, which is found over steep and high mountains. Without such subgrid-scale heat ventilation, the resolvable-scale upslope flow in the boundary layer generated by surface sensible heat flux along the mountain slopes is excessive. Such an excessive resolvable-scale upslope flow combined with the high moisture content in the boundary layer results in excessive moisture transport toward mountaintops, which in turn gives rise to EPSM. The solution to the EPSM problem is to parameterize the ventilation effects of the subgrid-scale heated-slope-induced vertical circulation (SHVC). The speaker has designed an SHVC parameterization scheme. Test results using the NASA Goddard Earth Observing System GCM version 5 (GEOS-5) have shown that the EPSM problem is largely solved.

A fundamental contribution of this work is its opening up a new area in the GCM modeling research--the SHVC parameterization. The paper corresponding to this talk has appeared in the May 2012 issue of the Journal of Atmospheric Sciences, p1547-1561.

Presentation Access: Download Presentation Slides (PPT)
Remote Access and Notes:

Go to Meeting https://www2.gotomeeting.com/join/757163850. Dial in Number: +1 (404) 891-0553. Access Code, Meeting ID: 757-163-850. Questions? Contact Michiko Masutani [ (301)763-8000 ext. 7551].

Visitor Information:

Unless otherwise specified, all non-NOAA visitors wanting to attend in person a seminar should contact in advance the contact person listed under "Remote Access and Notes" for specific information about obtaining building access.

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Thursday, August 16, 2012 8:16 AM / Last updated Friday, September 7, 2012 7:05 AM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are the most complete summary of upcoming NOAA science seminars; a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science across NOAA and our contituents. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] or join our RSS feed by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

OneNOAA Science Seminar Theme:
This is OneNOAA Science Seminar number: 1339

September 5, 2012

Impacts of Forests and Land Use On Chemistry-Climate Interactions

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Date and Time: September 05, 2012, 15:30-16:30 Mountain Time Zone [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: NOAA ESRL Chemical Sciences Division seminar room (2A305), David Skaggs Research Center, 325 Broadway, Boulder, CO
Speaker(s): Nadine Unger (School of Forestry and Environmental Studies, Yale University)
OneNOAA Science Seminar Sponsor: NOAA ESRL Chemical Sciences Division seminar
Abstract:

The short-lived climate forcers (SLCFs) ozone, methane and aerosol particulates and their indirect effects on cloud properties significantly impact regional and global climate but in complex ways involving both warming and cooling mechanisms. Selective reduction of the warming SLCFs is currently receiving attention as a way of mitigating near-term warming, reducing the rate of warming (important for adaptation of ecosystems) and simultaneously improving air quality. To date, the feedbacks from anthropogenic land cover change have not been considered in assessments of historical and future SLCFs. Lack of quantitative information of these changing interactions, which perturb emissions of reactive carbon from vegetation, deposition rates of pollution to ecosystems and the underlying surface albedo, represents a major uncertainty in the ability to assess the climate and air quality benefits of reductions in the SLCFs. Here, a global chemistry-climate model (NASA ModelE-Y) with a new interactive vegetation biophysics module that incorporates photosynthesis-dependent isoprenoid emissions is applied to quantify the effects of historical (1850 - 2005) cropland expansion on the SLCFs. The resultant biogenic organic aerosol direct radiative forcing entirely counteracts the biophysical (albedo) forcing (+0.16 versus -0.09 W/m2). The land cover change alone implies a 15% longer methane lifetime in 1850 than 2005 while overall net effects on ozone radiative forcing are small. The analyses are extended to integrate the effects of future anthropogenic land cover change into projected aggressive air pollution emission abatement scenarios.

Remote Access and Notes:

Remote access for this seminar TBD. For further information about this seminar please contact or . All Seminar attendees agree not to cite, quote, copy, or distribute material presented without the explicit written consent of the seminar presenter. Any opinions expressed in this seminar are those of the speaker alone and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of NOAA or ESRL CSD.

Visitor Information:

Unless otherwise specified, all non-NOAA visitors wanting to attend in person a seminar should contact in advance the contact person listed under "Remote Access and Notes" for specific information about obtaining building access.

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Thursday, August 30, 2012 7:04 AM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are the most complete summary of upcoming NOAA science seminars; a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science across NOAA and our contituents. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] or join our RSS feed by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

This is OneNOAA Science Seminar number: 1341

September 06, 2012

Department of Energy Water Power Program Resource Assessments and Wave and Tidal Technologies

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Date and Time: September 06, 2012, 12:00-12:30 Eastern Time Zone [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: NOAA SSMC-3 2nd Floor Library (1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD 20910)
Speaker(s): (Knauss Fellow, Policy and Technology Specialist, Wind and Water Power Program, Department of Energy)
OneNOAA Science Seminar Sponsor: 2012 Knauss Lecture Series
Abstract:

The Wind and Water Power Program is invested in comprehensive analysis of wind and water energy potential for future electricity production. In early 2012, the Water Power Program released reports that assess the total technically recoverable energy available in the nation's waves, tidal streams, and non-powered dams. The program plans to release additional program-funded assessments of ocean current and ocean thermal resources in addition to conventional and hydrokinetic terrestrial hydropower resources in 2012 and 2013. A variety of technologies are being developed to harness these ocean energy resources. Unlike wind power, where technology has largely settled on a single basic design, there are a variety of wave and tidal energy converter designs. For wave energy this includes attenuators, overtopping, oscillating water column, oscillating wave surge converter, and point absorbers. Tidal technologies include horizontal axis turbines, vertical axis turbines and oscillating hydrofoils.

Presentation Access: Download Presentation Slides
About the Speaker(s):

I attended the University of Arizona in Tucson, Arizona. During my time at the UofA I became passionately interested in physics and astronomy. After many days in the physics labs and many nights on the Arizona mountain tops observing variable stars and Titan (a moon of Saturn) at professional telescope observatories, I graduated magna cum laude with a B.S. in physics and astronomy in 2004. I then decided to turn my focus Earth-wards and enrolled in a PhD program in the Earth Sciences Department at the University of Minnesota - Twin Cities. There I honed my computer programming skills by developing a numerical model of Lake Superior, the largest of the Great Lakes. I modified a regional ocean model to simulate the current dynamics, ice cover formation and dynamics and phytoplankton-zooplankton-nutrient dynamics of the lake. My thesis focuses on recent climate trend impacts on Lake Superior, the biological drivers behind deep chlorophyll maximum formation and processing of river inputs of carbon within Lake Superior. My Knauss placement is with the Department of Energy's Wind and Water Power Program where I serve as a Policy and Technology Specialist for the Water Power team. With my technical background, I support the program's Marine and Hydrokinetic resource assessment activities and am a Technical Lead on wave energy modeling.

Remote Access and Notes:

For remote access via webinar, please fill out the registration form a few minutes before the meeting is scheduled to begin. The Meeting Number is 742656968; the Passcode is brownbag. For audio in the US and Canada, dial 866-833-7307. The participant passcode is 8986360. Contact (301-713-2600 ext. 115) or (301-713-2600 ext. 155) for further information.

Visitor Information:

Unless otherwise specified, all non-NOAA visitors wanting to attend in person a seminar should contact in advance the contact person listed under "Remote Access and Notes" for specific information about obtaining building access.

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Sunday, September 2, 2012 2:04 PM / last updated Friday, September 7, 2012 7:02 AM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are the most complete summary of upcoming NOAA science seminars; a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science across NOAA and our contituents. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] or join our RSS feed by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

This is OneNOAA Science Seminar number: 1349

Removing Market Barriers for Marine Renewable Energy

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Date and Time: September 06, 2012, 12:30-13:00 Eastern Time Zone [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: NOAA SSMC-3 2nd Floor Library (1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD 20910)
Speaker(s): (Knauss Fellow, Wind and Water Power Program, Department of Energy)
OneNOAA Science Seminar Sponsor: 2012 Knauss Lecture Series
Abstract:

Marine renewable energy holds great potential in both the U.S. and abroad as a source of non-carbon emitting renewable energy located near areas of high population load. Within the United States, a variety of marine renewable energy resources can be harnessed, and energy potential is great. However, to date, no offshore wind farms have been constructed in the U.S. and marine and hydrokinetic deployments have largely been at the pilot or demonstration scale. The Wind and Water Power Program's market acceleration and deployment programs focus on removing barriers to the advancement of marine renewable energy. One such barrier is the complex regulatory pathways involving multiple jurisdictions and statutory and regulatory authorities. For instance, deployment within a single leasing block may trigger numerous Federal statutes, State statutes, consideration of Tribal Usual and Accustomed Areas and rights, and a multitude of regulatory processes. Another barrier includes the uncertainty surrounding environmental impacts associated with marine renewables in the U.S. Finally, planning for multiple uses in our oceans and Great Lakes presents both a challenge and an opportunity for the marine renewable industry to site projects in a complex seascape. I will present some of DOE's recent work addressing these issues.

Presentation Access: Download Presentation Slides
About the Speaker(s):

I did my undergraduate studies in biology at Clark University in Worcester MA, where I nurtured my growing interests in marine ecology, earning my degree in 2006. After graduating, I embraced the field lifestyle and headed to Nantucket where I was investigating the distribution, life history and spawning cycles of bay scallops, and the implications for the local fishery. In the off-season I interned with the Maine State Legislature's Marine Resources Committee, getting my first real taste of the policy process. For a change of pace I headed out to the West Coast to Coos Bay, OR to work for ODFW on a pilot study on the distribution and abundance of bay clams in Coos Bay. After deciding I wanted to continue my education, I headed to Seattle to do my graduate studies at the University of Washington, earning a Master's of Marine Affairs in 2011. My research focused on the use of science in collaborative management of marine environments, analyzing case studies of marine management efforts throughout the U.S. I also worked on a local collaborative conservation initiative in Port Susan Bay, WA. My placement as a Knauss Fellow at the Department of Energy's Wind and Water Power Program enables me to apply my marine science and policy experience to advance the deployment of marine renewables in the U.S. I serve as an Environmental Science and Policy Specialist, working on the environmental impacts of marine renewable technologies, the regulatory pathways and siting issues, as well as representing the Wind and Water Power Program in the National Ocean Policy domain.

Remote Access and Notes:

For remote access via webinar, please fill out the registration form a few minutes before the meeting is scheduled to begin. The Meeting Number is 742656968; the Passcode is brownbag. For audio in the US and Canada, dial 866-833-7307. The participant passcode is 8986360. Contact (301-713-2600 ext. 115) or (301-713-2600 ext. 155) for further information.

Visitor Information:

Unless otherwise specified, all non-NOAA visitors wanting to attend in person a seminar should contact in advance the contact person listed under "Remote Access and Notes" for specific information about obtaining building access.

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Sunday, September 2, 2012 2:04 PM / Last updated Wednesday, September 5, 2012 10:19 AM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are the most complete summary of upcoming NOAA science seminars; a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science across NOAA and our contituents. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] or join our RSS feed by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

This is OneNOAA Science Seminar number: 1350

September 10, 2012

Ocean Salinities Reveal Strong Global Water Cycle Intensification 1950-2000

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Date and Time: September 10, 2012, 10:00 - 11:00 Eastern Time Zone [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: NOAA SSMC-3 4th Floor, Room 4817 (1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD 20910))
Speaker(s): (Program for Climate Model Diagnosis and Intercomparison, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory)
OneNOAA Science Seminar Sponsor: NOAA National Oceanographic Data Center
Abstract:

The global evaporation (E) and precipitation (P) surface fluxes set the spatial pattern of surface salinity in the ocean. Collectively, these E-P ocean surface fluxes comprise 75-85% of the climatological annual-mean global water cycle. Recent estimates of long-term salinity changes suggest that coherent changes have occurred during the 1950-2000 period throughout the global ocean. This presentation will discuss these observed changes, and by using data from the CMIP3 model suite, present new estimates suggesting a 4% change has occurred to the global water cycle (as expressed in E-P) over the corresponding period.

Remote Access and Notes:

Presentations are available remotely via a combination of phone (US only) & webcast. Remote access is limited to 50 connections on a first-come-first served basis. To participate remotely, you must connect via the phone and internet via webex as follows:

Online web access:

  • Click on http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?i=744868915&p=science&t=c
  • type in other required fields (i.e., your name, e-mail, organization; meeting number is 744868915; password is "science" -without quotation marks, password is case sensitive- )
  • indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy
  • click on Proceed and follow the instructions that appear on your screen.

Audio / conference call:

  • Toll free dial 877-725-4068 using a touch-tone phone
  • when prompted enter participant code 8634769 followed by a "#"
  • Please mute your phone during the presentation or toggle *6 otherwise it produces a sound feedback and we will disconnect everyone
  • Phone access limited to the first 50 callers only

For further information about this seminar please contact .

Visitor Information:

Unless otherwise specified, all non-NOAA visitors wanting to attend in person a seminar should contact in advance the contact person listed under "Remote Access and Notes" for specific information about obtaining building access.

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Wednesday, August 22, 2012 1:28 PM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are the most complete summary of upcoming NOAA science seminars; a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science across NOAA and our contituents. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] or join our RSS feed by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

This is OneNOAA Science Seminar number: 1342

Do Marine Species Follow Shifting Ocean Temperatures? Insights from Bottom Trawl Surveys in North America

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Date and Time: September 10, 2012, 11:00 - 12:00 Eastern Time Zone [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: NOAA SSMC-3 Room 12836 (1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD 20910)
Speaker(s): and David H. Smith (Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Princeton University)
OneNOAA Science Seminar Sponsor: NOAA NOAA Fisheries Service, Office of Science and Technology
Abstract:

Ocean and terrestrial environments are showing increasing trends in temperature associated with changes in the global climate system, but many questions remain about how changes in temperature affect marine species and marine ecosystems. Do marine species follow their thermal envelopes? Can marine species keep up? Which species are more likely to track changes in their environment? Our research uses the last few decades of bottom trawl surveys on the continental shelves of North America to test whether the direction and magnitude of range shifts among fishes and invertebrates are predictable from local climate and species traits. We find that local differences in climate trajectories can explain otherwise surprising differences in direction and magnitude of shift, but that on average, marine species lag behind their thermal envelopes. Life history traits explain additional variation among species, and range shifts appear to be somewhat predictable even from very simple models. These results begin to indicate which types of species will be winners and losers under climate change and how fisheries are likely to be altered by shifting ranges.

Download Presentation: Presentation Slides (15.7 MB)
Remote Access and Notes:

You have two options for remote access via a combination of phone (US only) & webcast. If you cannot get access to the seminar using option I (mymeetings) below because of too many pariticpants, then try option II (goto meetings). Remote access is limited on a first-come-first served basis. To participate remotely, you must connect via the phone and internet via webex as follows:

Option I

To join the online meeting (Now from mobile devices!):

To join the audio conference only:

  • Toll free dial 1-866-692-3158
  • when prompted enter participant code 4909130

Option II

To join via GoToWebinar (register to participate:

For further information about this seminar please contact .

Visitor Information:

Unless otherwise specified, all non-NOAA visitors wanting to attend in person a seminar should contact in advance the contact person listed under "Remote Access and Notes" for specific information about obtaining building access.

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Wednesday, September 5, 2012 10:10 AM / Last updated Monday, September 17, 2012 3:35 PM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are the most complete summary of upcoming NOAA science seminars; a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science across NOAA and our contituents. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] or join our RSS feed by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

This is OneNOAA Science Seminar number: 1351

September 11, 2012

CDIAC and Global Ocean CO2 Data Management

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Date and Time: September 11, 2012, 09:00 - 09:30 Eastern Time Zone [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: NOAA SSMC-3 4th Floor, Room 4817 (1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD 20910)
Speaker(s): (ORNL Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center)
OneNOAA Science Seminar Sponsor: NOAA National Oceanographic Data Center
Abstract:

The Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) provides data management support and long-term archival for the Global Ocean CO2 measurements from oceanographic cruises, VOS lines, Time Series and Moorings, Coastal platforms. CDIAC was established in 1982. Funded and managed by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Biological and Environmental Research, Climate Change Research Division. Science-oriented data center resulting in diverse data holdings critical to climatic change. Provides the full spectrum of data management services with data, analysis and information services.

About the Speaker:

Alexander Kozyr is an ocean data analyst for the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC) in the Environmental Sciences Division of ORNL. Prior to joining ORNL, Alex worked as the Oceanographic Group leader of the Sakhalin Administration of Hydrometeorological Service in Sakhalin Island, Russia. Kozyr received his MS in physical oceanography from the Admiral Makarov State Maritime Academy in St. Petersburg, Russia in 1979. He specialized in physical and chemical oceanography, marine meteorology and ecology, and hydrology of land.

Remote Access and Notes:

Presentations are available remotely via a combination of phone (US only) & webcast. Remote access is limited to 50 connections on a first-come-first served basis. To participate remotely, you must connect via the phone and internet via webex as follows:

Online web access:

  • Click on http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?i=744868915&p=science&t=c
  • type in other required fields (i.e., your name, e-mail, organization; meeting number is 744868915; password is "science" -without quotation marks, password is case sensitive- )
  • indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy
  • click on Proceed and follow the instructions that appear on your screen.

Audio / conference call:

  • Toll free dial 877-725-4068 using a touch-tone phone
  • when prompted enter participant code 8634769 followed by a "#"
  • Please mute your phone during the presentation or toggle *6 otherwise it produces a sound feedback and we will disconnect everyone
  • Phone access limited to the first 50 callers only

For further information about this seminar please contact .

Visitor Information:

Unless otherwise specified, all non-NOAA visitors wanting to attend in person a seminar should contact in advance the contact person listed under "Remote Access and Notes" for specific information about obtaining building access.

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Wednesday, August 22, 2012 1:28 PM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are the most complete summary of upcoming NOAA science seminars; a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science across NOAA and our contituents. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] or join our RSS feed by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

This is OneNOAA Science Seminar number: 1342

September 12, 2012

Predicting the Distribution of Mesophotic Corals Offshore of Maui, Hawaii

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Date and Time: September 12, 2012, 12:00 - 13:00 Eastern Time Zone [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: NOAA, SSMC-4, Room 8150 (1305 East-West Hwy, Silver Spring, MD 20910)
Speaker(s): , Geospatial Scientist, CSS-Dynamac/NOAA NCCOS CCMA , Marine Biologist, NOAA NCCOS CCMA
OneNOAA Science Seminar Sponsor: NOAA NOS Science Seminar Series and NCCOS/CCMA/Biogeography Branch
Abstract:

Scientists from NOAA/NCCOS Center for Coastal Monitoring and Assessment (CCMA), NOAA's Hawaiian Islands Humpback Whale National Marine Sanctuary (HIHWNMS), NOAA's Pacific Island Fisheries Science Center, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and University of Hawaii at Mānoa developed predictions of mesophotic hard coral distributions in the channels between Maui, Lanai and Molokai in the Main Hawaiian Islands (MHI). Mesophotic hard corals are light-dependent corals adapted to the low light conditions at approximately 30 to 150 m in depth. These ecosystems were the focus of this spatial modeling effort because they are being increasingly threatened by numerous anthropogenic stressors. Four separate maps of predicted habitat suitability were created using MaxEnt software for all mesophotic hard corals combined and for three specific genera of mesophotic corals. The overall performance was excellent for all four models with accuracies ranging from 73.1% to 86.1%. Warm, clear and consistent water conditions were the most important variables for predicting the distribution of mesophotic hard corals. Results from this study can be used for a number of management applications, including identifying large areas of high suitability by coral genus; delineating subzones within the sanctuary if special regulations are needed to protect these corals; and targeting and promoting research and educational activities about these important and rare habitats.

About the Speaker:

Bryan Costa joined the National Oceanic & Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science as a contractor in 2005. Matt Kendall joined NCCOS in 1999. Since joining NOAA, they have worked on a variety of projects, characterizing, monitoring and modeling the physical and biological processes of marine ecosystems in the coastal waters, territories and flag islands of the United States.

Remote Access and Notes:

Presentations are available remotely via a combination of phone (US only) & webcast. Note that remote access is limited to 50 connections on a first-come-first served basis, so we cannot guarantee participation.

To participate remotely, you must connect via the phone and internet:

  1. Dial toll-free (U.S.) 1-877-708-1667. When prompted enter passcode 7028688 followed by the # sign. Please use your phone's mute button (*6 toggles on or off) during the presentation until you are ready to ask questions. The phone conference does not start until about five minutes before the seminar.
  2. To access the webex meeting, go the to the webcast site at http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?sigKey=mymeetings&i=744925156&p=&t=c. Enter meeting number 744925156 if needed; no passcode is required. Enter other required fields - First and last name. Check the box that that you have read the Privacy Policy, and click Proceed. To access the sound of the presentation, you must dial in using the instructions in #1, above.

Questions? : Contact , or if it is within 5 minutes of the seminar start, call the toll free number above and she will try to answer your questions.

Visitor Information:

Unless otherwise specified, all non-NOAA visitors wanting to attend in person a seminar should contact in advance the contact person listed under "Remote Access and Notes" for specific information about obtaining building access.

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Monday, August 13, 2011 1:03 PM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are the most complete summary of upcoming NOAA science seminars; a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science across NOAA and our contituents. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] or join our RSS feed by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

This is OneNOAA Science Seminar number: 1335

One Person's Noise Another Person's Signal: Can COS Be Utilized as CO2 Tracer?

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Date and Time: September 12, 2012, 15:30-16:30 Mountain Time Zone [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: NOAA ESRL Chemical Sciences Division seminar room (2A305), David Skaggs Research Center, 325 Broadway, Boulder, CO
Speaker(s): Dan Yakir (Weizmann Institute of Science, Israel)
OneNOAA Science Seminar Sponsor: NOAA ESRL Chemical Sciences Division seminar
Abstract:

Carbonyl sulfide (COS) is a major precursor of sulfur aerosols in the stratosphere. Its global budget, and the main sinks and sources have been extensively investigated by atmospheric chemists. In recent years, the large seasonal cycle in the atmospheric concentrations of COS, and its relationship to that in CO2, were evoked as indication of the potential use of COS as a tracer of CO2 fluxes into the land biosphere. This idea and the underlying processes will be introduced, and recent advances in developing the COS/CO2 approach will be outlined.

Remote Access and Notes:

Remote access for this seminar TBD. For further information about this seminar please contact or . All Seminar attendees agree not to cite, quote, copy, or distribute material presented without the explicit written consent of the seminar presenter. Any opinions expressed in this seminar are those of the speaker alone and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of NOAA or ESRL CSD.

Visitor Information:

Unless otherwise specified, all non-NOAA visitors wanting to attend in person a seminar should contact in advance the contact person listed under "Remote Access and Notes" for specific information about obtaining building access.

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Thursday, September 6, 2012 7:59 AM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are the most complete summary of upcoming NOAA science seminars; a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science across NOAA and our contituents. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] or join our RSS feed by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

This is OneNOAA Science Seminar number: 1353

Record Low Arctic Sea Ice Extent in 2012: An Exclamation Point on a Long-term Declining Trend

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Date and Time: September 12, 2012, 12:00-12:30 Eastern Time Zone [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: Webinar Access only
Speaker(s): Walt Meier (National Snow and Ice Data Center)
OneNOAA Science Seminar Sponsor: NOAA Climate Connection
Abstract:

TBD

Remote Access and Notes:

Remote access for this seminar https://www1.gotomeeting.com/register/151201944. For further information about this seminar please contact

Visitor Information:

Unless otherwise specified, all non-NOAA visitors wanting to attend in person a seminar should contact in advance the contact person listed under "Remote Access and Notes" for specific information about obtaining building access.

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Monday, September 10, 2012 12:35 PM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are the most complete summary of upcoming NOAA science seminars; a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science across NOAA and our contituents. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] or join our RSS feed by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

This is OneNOAA Science Seminar number: 1457

September 13, 2012

Celebrating the First Decade of the NASA/NOAA/DoD Joint Center for Satellite Data Assimilation

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Date and Time: September 13, 2012 14:00-15:00 Eastern Time Zone [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: Auditorium, NOAA Center for Weather and Climate Prediction (5830 University Research Court, College Park, MD 20740)
Speaker(s): (Director, NOAA National Centers for EnvironmentalPrediction)
OneNOAA Science Seminar Sponsor: NOAA JCSDA
Abstract:

A review of the history of the Joint Center for Satellite Data (JCSDA) is presented within the context of the ongoing successful transformation of the weather forecast process. Today, weather forecasts are becoming more accurate, with extreme weather events now predicted 4, 5, 6 and even 7+ days in advance in some cases. These improvements are driven in large part by improved numerical models, working off a global observing system, increasingly based on a wide range of satellite systems. The JCSDA represents a collaborative partnership among NASA, NOAA, Air Force and the Navy brought together to address the mission “to accelerate and improve the quantitative use of research and operational satellite data in weather, ocean, climate and environmental analysis and prediction models.” The accomplishments of the JCSDA along with the current challenges/opportunities will be discussed, with an emphasis placed on the ongoing efforts to accelerate the transition of the new research and operational observing capabilities (advanced microwave, hyperspectral infrared, GPSRO, GOES-R) into the operational numerical prediction system. The presentation will conclude with a summary of the current prioritized efforts required to insure the rapid assessment and operational implementation of the JPSS and GOES-R sensors and upcoming research satellite missions as these systems come on line in the latter half of this decade.

Download Presentation:
Remote Access and Notes:

Visitors attending today's seminar should be prepared to show photo id to the guard at the entrance gate. After parking in the garage, use the main entrance at the front of the building and immediately - prior to passing through security - turn right to the auditorium. Remote participation via webex (see below) is limited to the first 25 log-ons. Participants are urged to view in groups. If you are unable to access Webex, you can download the seminar slides from the JCSDA website http://www.jcsda.noaa.gov/JCSDASeminars.php

Video:

  1. Go to JCSDA Seminar and click on the seminar title
  2. Enter your name and email address
  3. Enter the meeting password: JCSDAseminars707
  4. Click "Join Now"
  5. Follow the instructions that appear on your screen
  6. For further information visit http://www.jcsda.noaa.gov/JCSDASeminars.php

Phone Access:

  • USA participants: 1-866-715-2479
  • Passcode: 9457557
  • International: 1-517-345-5260
  • For further information about this seminar please contact

Visitor Information:

Unless otherwise specified, all non-NOAA visitors wanting to attend in person a seminar should contact in advance the contact person listed under "Remote Access and Notes" for specific information about obtaining building access.

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Tuesday, August 28, 2012 10:46 AM / Last updated Friday, September 14, 2012 7:56 AM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are the most complete summary of upcoming NOAA science seminars; a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science across NOAA and our contituents. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] or join our RSS feed by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

This is OneNOAA Science Seminar number: 1348

Conservation Connections: A U.S.-Chilean Cooperative Effort for Better Understanding Humpback Whale Dynamics in Francisco Coloane Marine and Coastal Protected Area, Chile

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Date and Time: September 13, 2012, 12:00 - 13:00 Eastern Time Zone [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: NOAA, SSMC-4, Room 9153 (1305 East-West Hwy, Silver Spring, MD 20910)
Speaker(s): (Senior Science Advisor, National Park Service, Glacier Bay Field Station, Juneau, AK)
OneNOAA Science Seminar Sponsor: NOAA NOS Science Seminar Series and the NOS Office for International Programs
Abstract:

In 2011, Glacier Bay National Park, Alaska, signed a sister park agreement with Francisco Coloane Marine and Coastal Protected Area (FCMCPA), a new marine national park located in the Straits of Magellan, southern Chile. The agreement is part of a larger U.S.-Chile cooperative effort spanning multiple agencies (NPS, NOAA, Dept. of State) intended to strengthen natural resource conservation and protected-area management in both countries. The Glacier Bay-Francisco Coloane sister park partnership was developed based on similarities in biophysical characteristics: both marine parks are located in large archipelagos characterized by glacial fjords, upwelling, high levels of productivity, and community composition. The parks also have similar management issues. Glacier Bay represents a hotspot for humpback whale feeding aggregations in the North Pacific as well as a coveted destination for cruise ships where an average of more than 200 large cruise ships visit each summer. Likewise, FCMCPA represents a hotspot of humpback whale feeding aggregations in the Straits of Magellan, South Pacific, where more than 800 large ships pass each summer. Ship routes in both areas overlap significantly with high-use whale habitat. Population models, based on long-term photo mark-resight data -- collected since 1994 in Glacier Bay and since 2003 in FCMCPA -- have been developed to help identify potential impacts of shipping. The models demonstrate that due to differences in whale dynamics and shipping exposure, the possibility for impacts appears to be higher for the population in FCMCPA than in Glacier Bay. Nevertheless, uncertainty in habitat use and movements among areas by whales in FCMCPA remains a pressing information need. Although the two protected areas have striking similarities in resources and management issues, they contrast sharply in jurisdictional capacity requiring different management approaches. The cooperative efforts provide an opportunity for better conservation and management of whales and other resources in both parks.

About the Speaker:

Scott Gende has an MS in Fisheries from the University of Alaska Fairbanks and a Ph.D. in Fisheries from the University of Washington. He has worked in Alaska for 19 years and for the National Park Service since 2003 serving as a Senior Science Advisor to four coastal and marine parks. His research has focused on applied management questions, including a number of projects studying the impacts of cruise ship visitation to the resources in and near Glacier Bay and Wrangell-St.Elias National Parks. He recently served a 6-month detail in Punta Arenas, Chile, working with the Francisco Coloane Marine and Coastal Protected Area (FCMCPA) at the Ministry of Environment.

Remote Access and Notes:

Presentations are available remotely via a combination of phone (US only) & webcast. Note that remote access is limited to 50 connections on a first-come-first served basis, so we cannot guarantee participation.

To participate remotely, you must connect via the phone and internet:

  1. Dial toll-free (U.S.) 1-877-708-1667. When prompted enter passcode 7028688 followed by the # sign. Please use your phone's mute button (*6 toggles on or off) during the presentation until you are ready to ask questions. The phone conference does not start until about five minutes before the seminar.
  2. To access the webex meeting, go the to the webcast site at http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?sigKey=mymeetings&i=744925156&p=&t=c. Enter meeting number 744925156 if needed; no passcode is required. Enter other required fields - First and last name. Check the box that that you have read the Privacy Policy, and click Proceed. To access the sound of the presentation, you must dial in using the instructions in #1, above.

Questions? : Contact , or if it is within 5 minutes of the seminar start, call the toll free number above and she will try to answer your questions.

Visitor Information:

Unless otherwise specified, all non-NOAA visitors wanting to attend in person a seminar should contact in advance the contact person listed under "Remote Access and Notes" for specific information about obtaining building access.

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Friday, August 31, 2012 8:06 AM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are the most complete summary of upcoming NOAA science seminars; a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science across NOAA and our contituents. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] or join our RSS feed by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

This is OneNOAA Science Seminar number: 1349

Tests of Various Schemes for Representing Model Uncertainty in the GFS

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Date and Time: September 13, 2012, 10:00 - 11:00 Eastern Time Zone [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: NOAA National Centers for Environmental Prediction Room 2155 (5830 University Research Court, College Park, MD 20740)
Speaker(s): Jeff Whitaker (NESRL/PSD)
OneNOAA Science Seminar Sponsor: NOAA NCEP/EMC
Abstract:

Three different methods for treating model uncertainty in ensemble prediction have been tested in the GFS. They are stochastically-perturbed physics tendencies (SPPT, the operational ECMWF scheme), vorticity confinement (VC, a technique using in computer animation, but also being tested at UKMET) and stochastically-perturbed boundary layer humidity (SHUM). 20 member ensembles were run for the month of July 2012, with each of these schemes individually and all of them together. The results are compared to a control ensemble with no treatment of model uncertainty, and to the operational GEFS scheme (stochastic total-tendency perturbations, STTP). It is found that VC and STTP mainly increase spread in middle-latitudes, while STTP and SHUM are effective at increasing spread in the tropics. SPPT and SHUM are complementary, since SPPT modulates the physics tendencies where the physics is already active, while SHUM can activate or deactivate convection by perturbing the trigger function in the convection scheme. However, SHUM introduces a warm (dry) bias in the tropical upper (lower) troposphere. SPPT and SHUM have a significant impact on tropical cyclone track spread, while VC and STTP do not.

Download Presentation: Whitaker_20120913_stochphy.pdf
Remote Access and Notes:

Remote access via Go To meeting https://www2.gotomeeting.com/join/263202266. Phone access Dial +1 (786) 358-5419; Meeting ID and Access Code: 263-202-266. Questions? Contact Daryl Kleist ().

Visitor Information:

Unless otherwise specified, all non-NOAA visitors wanting to attend in person a seminar should contact in advance the contact person listed under "Remote Access and Notes" for specific information about obtaining building access.

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Monday, September 10, 2012 7:18 AM / Last updated Friday, September 14, 2012 8:03 AM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are the most complete summary of upcoming NOAA science seminars; a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science across NOAA and our contituents. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] or join our RSS feed by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

This is OneNOAA Science Seminar number: 1347

September 17, 2012

Using Experiments and Models to Address The Response of An Estuarine Food Web to Ocean Acidification

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Date and Time: September 17, 2012, 12:00 - 13:00 Eastern Time Zone [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: NOAA SSMC-3 4th Floor, Room 4817 (1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD 20910)
Speaker(s): (Research Ecologist, Northwest Fisheries Science Center)
OneNOAA Science Seminar Sponsor: NOAA Ocean Acidification Program
Abstract:

Puget Sound is a fjordal estuary in Washington State where the changes in seawater pH due to ocean acidification are added on top of pH conditions that are already naturally low and highly dynamic. Natural variation in pH in this estuary is caused by factors such as upwelling and phytoplankton blooms. We study how Puget Sound species respond to ocean acidification, focusing on those that strongly influence the food web or are commercially important. We use locally collected ocean carbonate data, including some collected in the microhabitats in which our study organisms live, to create CO2 conditions in laboratory experiments that are relevant to current and future environments. These conditions are rarely similar to atmospheric carbon dioxide conditions and incorporate variability in carbonate chemistry. We will present results on how forage fish, squid, crabs and other species respond to high and variable CO2 conditions. Our results emphasize that species besides calcifiers respond to changes in carbonate chemistry and that not all species respond to elevated CO2 conditions in a negative manner. We use results from our laboratory studies and other published works to create ocean acidification scenarios in food web models. We will discuss the results of some of these scenarios, emphasizing changes in ecosystem services and indirect effects on species that do not respond directly to predicted changes pH.

About the Speaker:

Shallin Busch is interested in how environmental change influences animal physiology, populations, and communities. Her current research focuses on how ocean acidification and climate change may impact North Pacific ecosystems. Working with other members of the NOAA Northwest Fisheries Science Center (NWFSC) ocean acidification group, she helped develop a state-of-the-art laboratory at the NWFSC for studying the impacts of ocean acidification, hypoxia, and temperature change on coastal marine organisms. Shallin uses this laboratory facility to conduct experiments on species of economic, ecologic, or conservation concern. Shallin incorporates data from her laboratory work and other published data into ecological models to explore how the impacts of ocean acidification and climate change on susceptible species cascade through food webs via trophic interactions. By integrating results from organismal to ecosystem levels, Shallin aims to generate data relevant to management of species and communities in a changing environment.

Shallin has been a research ecologist for NWFSC since 2010. She was a National Research Council postdoctoral fellow at the NWFSC from 2007-2010, focusing on population viability and habitat models for salmonid species listed under the Endangered Species Act. Shallin received a doctorate in Zoology from the University of Washington in 2006 and an undergraduate degree in Ecology and Evolutionary Biology from Princeton University in 1998. Prior to graduate school, she worked for the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute.

Most recent publication: McElhany, P. and D. S. Busch. In press. An ecoregion perspective on ocean acidification: implications for species-response experiments. Marine Biology.

Shallin Busch

Remote Access and Notes:

Presentations are available remotely via a combination of phone (US only) & webcast. Remote access is limited to 50 connections on a first-come-first served basis. To participate remotely, you must connect via the phone and internet via webex as follows:

Online web access:

  • Click on http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?i=744868915&p=science&t=c
  • type in other required fields (i.e., your name, e-mail, organization; meeting number is 744868915; password is "science" -without quotation marks, password is case sensitive- )
  • indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy
  • click on Proceed and follow the instructions that appear on your screen.

Audio / conference call:

  • Toll free dial 877-725-4068 using a touch-tone phone
  • when prompted enter participant code 8634769 followed by a "#"
  • Please mute your phone during the presentation or toggle *6 otherwise it produces a sound feedback and we will disconnect everyone
  • Phone access limited to the first 50 callers only

For further information about this seminar please contact .

Visitor Information:

Unless otherwise specified, all non-NOAA visitors wanting to attend in person a seminar should contact in advance the contact person listed under "Remote Access and Notes" for specific information about obtaining building access.

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Thursday, September 6, 2012 7:34 AM / Last updated Wednesday, September 12, 2012 3:21 PM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are the most complete summary of upcoming NOAA science seminars; a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science across NOAA and our contituents. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] or join our RSS feed by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

This is OneNOAA Science Seminar number: 1354

Introducing the Great Lakes Water Level Dashboard

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Date and Time: September 17, 2012, 12:00-13:00 Eastern Time Zone [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: NOAA Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory, Michigan-Huron Room, 4840 South State Road, Ann Arbor, MI
Speaker(s): Dr. Drew Gronewold (Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory)
OneNOAA Science Seminar Sponsor: NOAA Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory
Abstract:

There is a growing need among regional and international water resources research and management communities for clear dissemination of North American Laurentian Great Lakes water level data in a framework that facilitates analysis of, and comparison between, data sets and forecasts from different sources and across different time scales. To address this need, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory (GLERL) has developed a web-based tool, the “Great Lakes Water Level Dashboard”. The Dashboard was developed in a flash-based environment and includes several key features including a scalable time axis, and the option to display (or hide) time series information for each of the Great Lakes, as well as individual data sets and model output for each lake. This interactive approach helps users not only understand how the dynamics of Great Lakes water levels relate to human health and resource management decisions, but also how different sources of data and forecasts may affect perceptions of uncertainty and variability.

Remote Access and Notes:

Remote access for this seminar https://www1.gotomeeting.com/register/283340856. For further information about this seminar please contact

Visitor Information:

Unless otherwise specified, all non-NOAA visitors wanting to attend in person a seminar should contact in advance the contact person listed under "Remote Access and Notes" for specific information about obtaining building access.

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Monday, September 10, 2012 12:35 PM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are the most complete summary of upcoming NOAA science seminars; a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science across NOAA and our contituents. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] or join our RSS feed by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

This is OneNOAA Science Seminar number: 1458

Coastal Blue Carbon Briefing by Restore America's Estuaries

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Date and Time: September 17, 2012, 12:00-13:00 Eastern Time Zone [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: NOAA SSMC-3 2nd Floor Library (1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD 20910)
Speaker(s): Steve Emmett-Mattox (Senior Director for Strategic Planning and Programs, Restore America's Estuaries)
OneNOAA Science Seminar Sponsor: NOAA NODC Central Library
Abstract:

Coastal Blue Carbon refers to the concept that coastal marine ecosystems such as sea grass, salt marsh, and mangroves are significant carbon stores and contribute to ongoing reductions of atmospheric carbon through sequestration. There are opportunities through market and policy mechanisms to utilize coastal blue carbon as a tool for simultaneously achieving estuary restoration/protection goals and climate mitigation/adaptation goals. Restore America's Estuaries has been at the forefront of advancing coastal blue carbon policies and tools in the U.S. and will provide information about the potential carbon values of these coastal wetland systems and progress toward linking wetlands carbon with restoration and protection.

Abou The Speaker:

Steve Emmett-Mattox has been with Restore America's Estuaries (RAE) since 2000 – as Program Director, Development Director, Vice President and Strategic Programs Lead. He currently leads new initiatives for RAE, including strategic efforts in the areas of estuary economics and the connections between coastal habitat restoration and climate change impacts, mitigation and adaptation. Steve has more than twenty years of experience in environmental protection and conservation, leading program efforts for the Environmental Law Institute, the Institute for Conservation Leadership, and Rails-to-Trails Conservancy. Steve got his start in the conservation community as an intern with the National Wildlife Federation. He has a Masters degree in Environmental Ethics from the University of North Texas. He enjoys yoga, trail running, gardening, and spending time with his family in Niwot, Colorado, where he serves on the Board of his son's school.

Remote Access and Notes:

For remote access via webinar, please fill out the registration form a few minutes before the meeting is scheduled to begin. The Meeting Number is 742656968; the Passcode is brownbag. For audio in the US and Canada, dial 866-833-7307. The participant passcode is 8986360. Contact (301-713-2600 ext. 115) or (301-713-2600 ext. 155) for further information.

Visitor Information:

Unless otherwise specified, all non-NOAA visitors wanting to attend in person a seminar should contact in advance the contact person listed under "Remote Access and Notes" for specific information about obtaining building access.

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Tuesday, September 11, 2012 1:17 PM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are the most complete summary of upcoming NOAA science seminars; a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science across NOAA and our contituents. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] or join our RSS feed by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

This is OneNOAA Science Seminar number: 1449

September 19, 2012

Building Capacity to Measure, Analyze, and Evaluate Government Performance

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Date and Time: September 19, 2012 at 12:00-13:00 Eastern Time Zone [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: NOAA Central Library, 2nd Floor, SSMC-3 (1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD 20910)
Speaker(s): Kathy Newcomer (George Washington University)
OneNOAA Science Seminar Sponsor: NOAA Coastal Services Center
Abstract:

Dr. Newcomer will discuss the need to view program evaluation and performance measurement not as separate functions but as a synergistic whole. This holistic view of performance management can increase the benefits from application of professional evaluation skills and standards to performance measurement practice, and can increase the capacity for evaluation that leads to organizational learning. She will discuss a number of steps that organizations can take to both enhance learning and improve performance through evaluation.

About the Speaker:

Kathryn Newcomer is the Director of the Trachtenberg School of Public Policy and Public Administration at the George Washington University where she teaches public and nonprofit program evaluation, research design and applied statistics. She is a non-residential Fellow in Governance Studies at the Brookings Institution, and an elected member of the Board of Directors of the American Evaluation Association (2012-2015). She is a Fellow of the National Academy of Public Administration, and currently serves on the Comptroller General's Educators' Advisory Panel. She routinely conducts research and training for federal and local government agencies and nonprofit organizations on performance measurement and program evaluation, and has designed and conducted evaluations for several U.S. federal agencies and dozens of nonprofit organizations. She has published five books including The Handbook of Practical Program Evaluation (1994, 2nd edition 2004, 3rd edition 2010) and Transformational Leadership: Leading Change in Public and Nonprofit Agencies, (June 2008), and a volume of New Directions for Public Program Evaluation, Using Performance Measurement to Improve Public and Nonprofit Programs (1997).

Remote Access and Notes:

For remote access via webinar, please fill out the registration form a few minutes before the meeting is scheduled to begin. The Meeting Number is 742656968; the Passcode is brownbag. For audio in the US and Canada, dial 866-833-7307. The participant passcode is 8986360. Contact (301-713-2600 ext. 115) or (301-713-2600 ext. 155) for further information.

Visitor Information:

Unless otherwise specified, all non-NOAA visitors wanting to attend in person a seminar should contact in advance the contact person listed under "Remote Access and Notes" for specific information about obtaining building access.

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Monday, August 13, 2011 7:03 AM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are the most complete summary of upcoming NOAA science seminars; a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science across NOAA and our contituents. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] or join our RSS feed by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

This is OneNOAA Science Seminar number: 1333

Environment Monitoring with Remote Sensing: Getting the Big Picture for Less

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Date and Time: September 19, 2012, 12:00 - 13:00 Eastern Time Zone [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: NOAA, SSMC-4, Room 8150 (1305 East-West Hwy, Silver Spring, MD 20910)
Speaker(s): (NCCOS Center for Coastal Monitoring And Assessment, Coastal Ocean Assessments, Status, and Trends (COAST) Branch)
OneNOAA Science Seminar Sponsor: NOAA NOS and NCCOS
Abstract:

In today's hard economic times, it is difficult to obtain funding to monitor and assess environmental changes. Remote sensing can often provide an economically feasible alternative to conventional means. I will provide examples of recent remote sensing applications in an effort to initiate a discussion of how remote sensing might benefit your work. Examples will include: "Analysis of the 2008-2009 Sea Turtle Unusual Mortality using Sea Surface Temperature and Hydrodynamic Modeling"; "Oceanographic Characterization of the Olympic Coast National Marine Sanctuary"; "Retrieving High Resolution Data from MODIS"; and "Establishing Linkages Between Weather Patterns and Water Quality Responses".

About the Speaker:

Varis Ransi has been working for the NOAA/NOS National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science since 2002. He has been involved in many aspects of remote sensing, from sensor calibration and atmospheric correction (so the data are what they should be) and application of the data, to solving oceanographic problems. Before coming to NOAA, he worked on remote sensing activities at the USGS in St. Petersburg, Florida, and Michigan Technological University. He earned his Ph.D. in Oceanography and Coastal Sciences from Louisiana State University in 1996.

Remote Access and Notes:

Presentations are available remotely via a combination of phone (US only) & webcast. Note that remote access is limited to 50 connections on a first-come-first served basis, so we cannot guarantee participation.

To participate remotely, you must connect via the phone and internet:

  1. Dial toll-free (U.S.) 1-877-708-1667. When prompted enter passcode 7028688 followed by the # sign. Please use your phone's mute button (*6 toggles on or off) during the presentation until you are ready to ask questions. The phone conference does not start until about five minutes before the seminar.
  2. To access the webex meeting, go the to the webcast site at http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?sigKey=mymeetings&i=744925156&p=&t=c. Enter meeting number 744925156 if needed; no passcode is required. Enter other required fields - First and last name. Check the box that that you have read the Privacy Policy, and click Proceed. To access the sound of the presentation, you must dial in using the instructions in #1, above.

Questions? : Contact , or if it is within 5 minutes of the seminar start, call the toll free number above and she will try to answer your questions.

OneNOAA Science Seminar Theme:
Visitor Information:

Unless otherwise specified, all non-NOAA visitors wanting to attend in person a seminar should contact in advance the contact person listed under "Remote Access and Notes" for specific information about obtaining building access.

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Wednesday, August 29, 2012 9:21 AM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are the most complete summary of upcoming NOAA science seminars; a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science across NOAA and our contituents. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] or join our RSS feed by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

This is OneNOAA Science Seminar number: 1335

The Interannual Variability of the Tropical Atmosphere

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Date and Time: September 19, 2012, 15:30-16:30 Mountain Time Zone [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: NOAA ESRL Chemical Sciences Division seminar room (2A305), David Skaggs Research Center (325 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80305)
Speaker(s): Calvin Liang (NASA JPL)
OneNOAA Science Seminar Sponsor: NOAA ESRL Chemical Sciences Division seminar
Abstract:

The primary tropical interannual modes of variability are the El Nino Southern Oscillation and quasibiennial oscillation (QBO). We find through satellite remote sensing soundings of temperature and water vapor, from the A-Train constellation of satellites, that the ENSO and QBO jointly impact the tropical tropopause layer (TTL) temperature and water vapor distribution. Although the QBO is a zonally symmetric phenomenon, the ENSO breaks that symmetry via the migration of convection between the tropical western Pacific (TWP) and the tropical central Pacific (TCP). Furthermore, we find that the joint impacts depend on the relative phase of the ENSO and QBO with TWP (TCP) experiencing enhanced (reduced) anomalies when these modes are in phase. When the ENSO and QBO fall out of phase the anomaly enhancement (reduction) migrates to the TCP (TWP). Our results indicate that processes in the TCP may have a pronounced impact on the zonal mean TTL water vapor distribution when the ENSO and QBO are out of phase.

Furthermore we quantify the ENSO and QBO interannual impacts on the tropical cloud distribution as seen by CloudSat and CALIPSO. The results show the distinct impact of ENSO induced SST anomalies on the migration of convection. However, we also find that ENSO impacts all the prominent tropical cloud types with their anomalies following water vapor from the boundary layer up to ~13-14 km, and temperature at higher altitudes. Another robust feature is the eastward tilt signature of Kelvin waves on the cloud distribution in the TWP, consistent with the eastward tilt of temperature anomalies in the same region in the TTL. This lends credence to the hypothesis that cloud amount is primarily determined by temperature variance in the TTL. A statistically significant QBO signal in cloud amount is also observed.

Remote Access and Notes:

Remote access for this seminar: Webinar Registration and view system requirements. Space is limited. Confirmation of registration includes information about joining the GoToMeeting®. . For further information about this seminar please contact or . All Seminar attendees agree not to cite, quote, copy, or distribute material presented without the explicit written consent of the seminar presenter. Any opinions expressed in this seminar are those of the speaker alone and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of NOAA or ESRL CSD.

OneNOAA Science Seminar Theme:
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Unless otherwise specified, all non-NOAA visitors wanting to attend in person a seminar should contact in advance the contact person listed under "Remote Access and Notes" for specific information about obtaining building access.

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Tuesday, September 18, 2012 7:08 AM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are the most complete summary of upcoming NOAA science seminars; a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science across NOAA and our contituents. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] or join our RSS feed by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

This is OneNOAA Science Seminar number: 1556

Global Flood Detection using Satellite Rainfall Data and a Hydrologic Model

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Date and Time: September 19, 2012, 11:00-12:00 Eastern Time Zone [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: NOAA SSMC-2, Room 8246 (1325 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD, 20910)
Speaker(s): (Senior Research Scientist at the Earth System Science Interdisciplinary Center of the University of Maryland)
OneNOAA Science Seminar Sponsor: NOAA NWS Office of Hydrologic Development
Abstract:

A real-time experimental system, the Global Flood Monitoring System (GFMS) produces quasi-global flood estimates with updates every three hours. Images and output data are available for use by the community (http://oas.gsfc.nasa.gov/globalflood/). The current flood detection and intensity estimates are made using satellite precipitation information from the TRMM Multi-satellite Precipitation Analysis [TMPA]) as input into the hydrological model that calculates water depth and streamflow at each grid (at 0.125  latitude-longitude) over the tropics and mid-latitudes. Flood detection and intensity estimates are based on water depth thresholds calculated from a 13-year retrospective run using the satellite rainfall and model. Examination of individual cases in real-time or retrospectively often indicates skill in detecting the occurrence of a flood event and a reasonable evolution of water depth (at the scale of the calculation) and downstream movement of high water levels. A recently published study evaluating calculated flood occurrence from the GFMS against a global flood event database is reviewed. The statistics indicate that flood detection results improve with longer duration (> 3 days) floods and that the statistics are impacted by the presence of large dams, which are not accounted for in the model calculations. Overall, for longer floods in basins without large dams, the Probability of Detection (POD) of floods is ~ 0.7, while the False Alarm Rate (FAR) is ~ 0.6. Limitations in the flood calculations that are related to the satellite rainfall estimates include space and time resolution limitations and underestimation of shallow orographic and monsoon system rainfall. Recent cases from 2012, mainly over Asia and Africa, are discussed as examples of the utility of the output information and the importance of accurate rainfall input.

However, there is still much room for improvement of this type of system through improving the satellite rainfall estimates and using more sophisticated hydrology models and routing calculations. Current work on improvements to the hydrological model center on coupling a hierarchical Dominant River Tracing-based Routing (DRTR) model with the Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) Model to provide the GFMS more accuracy in flood calculation and the flexibility allowing for routing calculations at various spatial resolutions, particularly for high-resolution results where needed.

These calculations, even in their current form, can provide information useful to U.S. and international agencies in understanding the location, intensity, timeline and impact on populations of these hazard events.

About The Speaker:

Dr. Adler is a Senior Research Scientist, Earth System Science Interdisciplinary Center (ESSIC) at the University of Maryland, College Park. He received his B.S. and M.S. from The Pennsylvania State University in 1965 and 1967 and his Ph.D. from Colorado State University in 1974. He has received the NASA Goddard William Nordberg Award for Earth Science in 2007, the NASA Outstanding Leadership Medal in 2002 and the NASA Exceptional Scientific Achievement Medal way back in 1989. He is also a Fellow of the American Meteorological Society. Dr. Adler's research focuses on the analysis of precipitation observations from space on global and regional scales using Tropical Rainfall Measurement Mission (TRMM) data along with data from other satellites. He served as the TRMM Project Scientist from 2000-2007. He studies precipitation variations in relation to phenomena such as El Nino/Southern Oscillation (ENSO), volcanoes and tropical cyclones, as well as longer, inter-decadal changes. He also currently heads the Global Precipitation Climatology Project (GPCP) of the World Climate Research Program (WCRP) and GEWEX. He is one of the developers of the TRMM Multi-satellite Precipitation Analysis (TMPA), providing a 3-hr resolution quasi-global rainfall analysis that his group is applying to analyze precipitation extremes, floods and landslides on a global scale. Dr. Adler has published over 100 papers in scientific journals on these topics.

OneNOAA Science Seminar Theme:
Remote Access and Notes:

Remote access for this seminar: https://www1.gotomeeting.com/join/242991552. Conference Call: 1-888-520-2183, Passcode: 156556. For further information about this seminar please contact

Visitor Information:

Unless otherwise specified, all non-NOAA visitors wanting to attend in person a seminar should contact in advance the contact person listed under "Remote Access and Notes" for specific information about obtaining building access.

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Tuesday, September 18, 2012 7:08 AM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are the most complete summary of upcoming NOAA science seminars; a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science across NOAA and our contituents. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] or join our RSS feed by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

This is OneNOAA Science Seminar number: 1557

September 20, 2012

Past Interglacial Sea Levels: Lessons For The Future

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Date and Time: September 20, 2012, 16:00 - 17:00 Eastern Time Zone [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: Webinar Access Only
Speaker(s): (Research Geologist, U.S. Geological Survey)
OneNOAA Science Seminar Sponsor: NOAA NOS Office of National Marine Sanctuaries West Coast Region
Abstract:

Concern has increased that in a warming world, there could be significant loss of polar ice sheets (Greenland and the West Antarctic ice sheet). To understand the possible rates, magnitude and impacts of future sea level rise, it is very useful to examine past warm periods (interglacial periods, such as the present). Particularly helpful is understanding the sea level history of past interglacials that are known to have been warmer than the present interglacial. Two of the most important such periods are the last interglacial (LIG), which occurred about 130,000 to 115,000 years ago and an earlier interglacial that occurred about 400,000 years ago. Based on studies along tectonically stable coastlines, the LIG sea level was probably at least 6 meters higher than present and may have been as much as 8 meters higher than present. Sea level history during the older, 400,000-year-old interglacial is less well understood, but sea level could have been as high as the LIG or possibly as much as 20 meters higher than present. During both interglacials, it appears that there was loss of much of the Greenland ice sheet and probably complete loss of the West Antarctic ice sheet. A sea level rise of 6 to 8 meters in the future would have significant impacts on humans, animals and plants worldwide.

About the Speaker:

Daniel Muhs studies geomorphology, soils and Quaternary stratigraphy to reconstruct paleoclimates over the past two and a half million years of geologic time. His main study areas are in the central and western USA (Mississippi Valley, Great Plains, Rocky Mountains, desert Southwest, Pacific Coast and Alaska), but he has also worked in the Caribbean, Spain and Israel. His main interests are in origin and paleoclimatic significance of dune fields, stratigraphy and paleopedology of loess, effects of long-range-transported dust on soils, the atmosphere, oceans and ecosystems, and sea level history.

Remote Access and Notes:

This presentation is available online via webcast. To participate you must register by following this link at https://www1.gotomeeting.com/register/557262817. After registering you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the Webinar. An archived recording of this webinar will be available here within a few days of the presentation: http://www.oceanalaska.org/education/multimedia-webinars.htm

For all questions about this seminar please contact

OneNOAA Science Seminar Theme:
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Unless otherwise specified, all non-NOAA visitors wanting to attend in person a seminar should contact in advance the contact person listed under "Remote Access and Notes" for specific information about obtaining building access.

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Friday, August 24, 2012 1:51 PM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are the most complete summary of upcoming NOAA science seminars; a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science across NOAA and our contituents. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] or join our RSS feed by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

This is OneNOAA Science Seminar number: 1346

Structure of the Eye and Eyewall of Hurricane Hugo (1989): How We Improved HWRF

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Date and Time: September 20, 2012, 15:00-16:00 Eastern Time Zone [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: Webinar access only
Speaker(s): (Director, Hurricane Research Division) and (Director, Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory)
OneNOAA Science Seminar Sponsor: NOAA OAR Communications Office
Abstract:

TBD

Remote Access and Notes:

For remote access register at https://www2.gotomeeting.com/register/351831362. Once registered, you will receive an email confirming your registration with information you need to join the webinar. For further information about this seminar please contact (301) 734-1097

OneNOAA Science Seminar Theme:
Visitor Information:

Unless otherwise specified, all non-NOAA visitors wanting to attend in person a seminar should contact in advance the contact person listed under "Remote Access and Notes" for specific information about obtaining building access.

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Wednesday, August 29, 2012 8:56 AM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are the most complete summary of upcoming NOAA science seminars; a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science across NOAA and our contituents. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] or join our RSS feed by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

This is OneNOAA Science Seminar number: 1348

NOAA Monthly Climate Webinar Updates

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Date and Time: September 20, 2012, 11:00 - 12:00 Eastern Time Zone (times may vary) [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: Webinar Access Only
Speaker(s): NOAA climate and weather experts
OneNOAA Science Seminar Sponsor: NOAA NCDC Monthly Climate Updates
Abstract:

NOAA climate and weather experts review key findings from NOAA's U.S. and global climate reports for the previous month, provide a temperature and precipation outlook for the next three months, and discuss the U.S. hazards outlook for the next two weeks.

Remote Access and Notes:

The NOAA Monthly Climate Updates occur on the third Thursday of each month at 11:00 AM Eastern Time. Information on how to join the webinar are announced in advance through the NOAA Communications & External Affairs - Media Advisories.

  1. To Join the Webinar, copy or paste the following link to a browser: https://ncdcevents.webex.com
  2. Click on the "Monthly CPC/NCDC Climate Update"
  3. In the "Join Event Now" box on the right, enter your first name, last name, e-mail address, and the event password, which is the three-letter abbreviation for the month and the four-digit year. For example, the password in August 2012 was "Aug2012". Click "Join Now".
  4. To hear the audio or to join the teleconference only, the call-in toll number for the US/Canada is:+1-408-600-3600, Access code: 991 886 510

About one hour before the webinar, a PDF of the presentation will be posted to: http://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/sotc/briefings

OneNOAA Science Seminar Theme:
Visitor Information:

Unless otherwise specified, all non-NOAA visitors wanting to attend in person a seminar should contact in advance the contact person listed under "Remote Access and Notes" for specific information about obtaining building access.

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Wednesday, September 12, 2012 . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are the most complete summary of upcoming NOAA science seminars; a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science across NOAA and our contituents. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] or join our RSS feed by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

This is OneNOAA Science Seminar number: 1452

Diversity of the Microbes Associated with Lophelia pertusa, a Cold-Water Coral

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Date and Time: September 20, 2012 at 12:00-12:30 Eastern Time Zone [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: NOAA Central Library, 2nd Floor, SSMC-3 (1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD 20910)
Speaker(s): (NOAA Sea Grant Knauss Fellow, Communications Office, Office of Oceanic & Atmospheric Research, NOAA)
OneNOAA Science Seminar Sponsor: NOAA Sea Grant Knauss
OneNOAA Science Seminar Theme:
Abstract:

Cold-water corals such as Lophelia pertusa are centers of biodiversity in the deep sea, providing habitat for hundreds of marine species and acting as nurseries for commercially important fish. Because these corals lack the symbiotic algae typical of many shallow-water corals, it is hypothesized that the microbial community associated with the coral may play an important role in nutrient cycling. A combination of culture work and molecular methods were used to examine these microbes, which include bacteria, archaea, fungi and other microeukaryotes. Samples of the coral were collected throughout the Gulf of Mexico and western Atlantic at depth via submersible and remotely-operated vehicles (ROVs). The diversity of microbes was investigated with a variety of methods, including culturing, 16S PCR, and metagenomics. The combination of abroad suite of methods ensured a more comprehensive view of the total diversity of the coral-associated microbes, which were found to include fungi, viral-like sequences, and dominated by the bacterial phyla Firmicutes, Alphaproteobacteria,and Gammaproteobacteria.

About the Speaker:

Julie Galkiewicz received her B.Sc. from the College of William and Mary in Williamsburg, VA, and was able to work at the Virginia Institute of Marine Science for several summers. She began graduate studies at the University of South Florida College of Marine Science, working in a marine microbiology lab at the USGS in St. Petersburg, FL. Julie was able to participate in two research cruises to collect samples, including two dives on the Johnson-Sea-Link submersible. Julie graduated with her Ph.D. in 2011.

Remote Access and Notes:

For remote access via webinar, please fill out the registration form a few minutes before the meeting is scheduled to begin. The Meeting Number is 742656968; the Passcode is brownbag. For audio in the US and Canada, dial 866-833-7307. The participant passcode is 8986360. Contact (301-713-2600 ext. 115) or (301-713-2600 ext. 155) for further information.

Visitor Information:

Unless otherwise specified, all non-NOAA visitors wanting to attend in person a seminar should contact in advance the contact person listed under "Remote Access and Notes" for specific information about obtaining building access.

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Monday, September 17, 2012 8:42 AM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are the most complete summary of upcoming NOAA science seminars; a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science across NOAA and our contituents. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] or join our RSS feed by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

This is OneNOAA Science Seminar number: 1553

Evaluating Vessel Traffic in the US High Arctic: Patterns From Current and Historic Vessel Position Data

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Date and Time: September 20, 2012 at 12:30-13:00 Eastern Time Zone [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: NOAA Central Library, 2nd Floor, SSMC-3 (1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD 20910)
Speaker(s): (NOAA Sea Grant Knauss Fellow, Committee on Marine Transportation Systems)
OneNOAA Science Seminar Sponsor: NOAA Sea Grant Knauss
OneNOAA Science Seminar Theme:
Abstract:

Although the U.S. is an Arctic nation, there is little historic data on the number of vessels transiting the North Slope. Thus, it is very difficult to determine where infrastructure development and support is most needed in order to prioritize projects. Additionally, there is little data available on the diversity of vessels in the high Arctic.

In order to better understand what infrastructure is needed to best support ongoing activities in the Arctic it is necessary to determine what types of vessels are using the Arctic. Current and established uses of the North Slope include seismic exploration, commercial vessels for supply delivery, Coast Guard vessels and ice breakers for support of transiting vessels.

The data presented provide a snapshot into vessel presence in the Arctic and indications of traffic patterns. By combining historic vessel sighting data from NOAA's National Marine Mammal Lab aerial surveys, recent AIS ship position data, and Satellite ice coverage data, it is possible to resolve emerging vessel use patterns in the Arctic based on ice retreat cycles and start to plan for a future where the complexity of activities occurring in such harsh conditions requires a new type of physical and informational infrastructure.

About the Speaker:

Dr. Alyson Azzara joined the Committee on the Marine Transportation System as a NOAA Knauss Marine Policy Fellow for 2012. Dr. Azzara brings environmental expertise as an advisor to the director. Her main field of expertise is bioacoustics and marine mammal communication and behavior. Dr. Azzara recently completed her Ph.D. in marine biology at Texas A&M University at Galveston, where her research focused on the interaction between noise from large vessels and sperm whale communication in the Gulf of Mexico. She also reviewed Federal and international framework for the regulation of noise from vessels and potential directions for future management. Her M.S. in oceanography, also from Texas A&M University, focused on the analysis of acoustic data collected as part of the Sperm Whale Seismic Study and investigated the relationship between sperm whale dive patterns, the deep scattering layer, and their associations with various oceanographic features such as currents and eddies. Prior to completing her Ph.D., Dr. Azzara worked as a contractor for marine mammal research and participated in 16 deep sea research cruises, spending a combined total of one year at sea. In cooperation with NOAA, the U.S. Navy, and several universities and industrial partners, these projects were carried out in the North and Equatorial Pacific as well as in the Gulf of Mexico.

Remote Access and Notes:

For remote access via webinar, please fill out the registration form a few minutes before the meeting is scheduled to begin. The Meeting Number is 742656968; the Passcode is brownbag. For audio in the US and Canada, dial 866-833-7307. The participant passcode is 8986360. Contact (301-713-2600 ext. 115) or (301-713-2600 ext. 155) for further information.

Visitor Information:

Unless otherwise specified, all non-NOAA visitors wanting to attend in person a seminar should contact in advance the contact person listed under "Remote Access and Notes" for specific information about obtaining building access.

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Monday, September 17, 2012 8:42 AM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are the most complete summary of upcoming NOAA science seminars; a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science across NOAA and our contituents. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] or join our RSS feed by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

This is OneNOAA Science Seminar number: 1554

September 25, 2012

Good Trap, Bad Trap: Derelict Fish Traps around St. Thomas and St. John USVI

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Date and Time: September 25, 2012, 12:00 - 13:00 Eastern Time Zone [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: NOAA, SSMC-4, Room 9153 (1305 East-West Hwy, Silver Spring, MD 20910)
Speaker(s): (Marine Biologist, NOS/NCCOS/CCMA Biogeography Branch)
OneNOAA Science Seminar Sponsor: NOAA NOS Science Seminar Series and NCCOS/CCMA/Biogeography Branch
OneNOAA Science Seminar Theme:
Abstract:

Commercial fishing is a valuable resource for St. John and St. Thomas and has been the lifeline for generations of fishermen. The loss of traps is an economic hardship for the fishermen and derelict traps pose impacts such as ghostfishing, habitat damage and navigational concerns. Also, information about commercial fishing effort (number of traps and specific locations) had never been characterized at this scale for St. John and St. Thomas. Prior to this research, derelict fish traps (DFTs) were not a management concern, but a concern for the local fishermen. Our objective was to better understand the causes and impacts of DFTs to inform the local resource managers.

About the Speaker:

Randy Clark has been a NOAA researcher since 1998 with primary interests in the associations between marine and estuarine fishes and their habitats. He has conducted research projects on the Pacific and Atlantic coasts of the US, the Gulf of Mexico and the U.S. Virgin Islands and Puerto Rico. Randy is currently stationed at Stennis Space Center, MS, to focus on Gulf of Mexico research activities. Randy earned a B.S. in Marine Biology and an M.S. in Wildlife and Fisheries Management from Texas A&M University at Galveston.

Remote Access and Notes:

Presentations are available remotely via a combination of phone (US only) & webcast. Note that remote access is limited to 50 connections on a first-come-first served basis, so we cannot guarantee participation.

To participate remotely, you must connect via the phone and internet:

  1. Dial toll-free (U.S.) 1-877-708-1667. When prompted enter passcode 7028688 followed by the # sign. Please use your phone's mute button (*6 toggles on or off) during the presentation until you are ready to ask questions. The phone conference does not start until about five minutes before the seminar.
  2. To access the webex meeting, go the to the webcast site at http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?sigKey=mymeetings&i=744925156&p=&t=c. Enter meeting number 744925156 if needed; no passcode is required. Enter other required fields - First and last name. Check the box that that you have read the Privacy Policy, and click Proceed. To access the sound of the presentation, you must dial in using the instructions in #1, above.

Questions? : Contact , or if it is within 5 minutes of the seminar start, call the toll free number above and she will try to answer your questions.

Visitor Information:

Unless otherwise specified, all non-NOAA visitors wanting to attend in person a seminar should contact in advance the contact person listed under "Remote Access and Notes" for specific information about obtaining building access.

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Friday, August 24, 2012 1:51 PM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are the most complete summary of upcoming NOAA science seminars; a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science across NOAA and our contituents. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] or join our RSS feed by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

This is OneNOAA Science Seminar number: 1347

Collaborating with Friends: Creating Intranet Sites with Google Sites

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Date and Time: September 25, 2012, 12:30 - 13:30 Eastern Time Zone [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: NOAA, SSMC-4, Room 1W611, first floor conference room (1305 East-West Hwy, Silver Spring, MD 20910)
Speaker(s): (National Ocean Service)
OneNOAA Science Seminar Sponsor: NOAA NOS Science Seminar Series and and the NOAA Web Committee
Abstract:

NOAA has a new tool for sharing information across program offices and line offices. Google's cloud-based Sites technology allows you to build Web sites that can be shared with a project group or with all of NOAA, without any specialized software or complex training. During the presentation, a new site will be built from scratch, using just a Web browser.

About the Speaker:

Lawrence Charters is the National Ocean Service representative to the NOAA Web Committee, and serves as the NOS Webmaster.

Lawrence wrote the Web server software used for the first National Ocean Service Web site. Written in Microsoft BASIC, the server ran on an Apple Macintosh SE/30. It was perfect for the Web circa 1993: gray pages with black text and blue links, with daily visits running into the tens. Google Sites are much faster, easier, and more colorful.

Remote Access and Notes:

Presentations are available remotely via a combination of phone (US only) & webcast. Note that remote access is limited to 50 connections on a first-come-first served basis, so we cannot guarantee participation.

To participate remotely, you must connect via the phone and internet:

  1. Dial toll-free (U.S.) 1-877-385-1826. When prompted enter passcode 7028688 followed by the # sign. Please use your phone's mute button (*6 toggles on or off) during the presentation until you are ready to ask questions. The phone conference does not start until about five minutes before the seminar.
  2. To access the webex meeting, go the to the webcast site at http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?sigKey=mymeetings&i=448202287&p=&t=c. Enter meeting number 448202287 if needed; no passcode is required for this. . Enter other required fields - First and last name. Check the box that that you have read the Privacy Policy, and click Proceed. To access the sound of the presentation, you must dial in using the instructions in #1, above.

Questions? : Contact , or if it is within 5 minutes of the seminar start, call the toll free number above and she will try to answer your questions.

Visitor Information:

Unless otherwise specified, all non-NOAA visitors wanting to attend in person a seminar should contact in advance the contact person listed under "Remote Access and Notes" for specific information about obtaining building access.

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Friday, September 7, 2012 1:12 PM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are the most complete summary of upcoming NOAA science seminars; a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science across NOAA and our contituents. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] or join our RSS feed by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

This is OneNOAA Science Seminar number: 1359

Discussing Sea Surface Temperature Climatology

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Date and Time: September 25, 2012, 12:00 - 13:00 Eastern Time Zone [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: NOAA National Centers for Environmental Prediction Room 2155 (5830 University Research Court, College Park, MD 20740)
Speaker(s): (Physical Scientist, NCEP/EMC Marine Modeling and Analysis Branch)
OneNOAA Science Seminar Sponsor: NOAA NCEP/EMC
OneNOAA Science Seminar Theme:
Abstract:

I have begun developing a sea surface temperature (SST) climatology from 30 years of OIv2 quarter degree no-AMSR analysis. I'll present for discussion my answers to the following questions: What is climatology? How long a period is needed to establish it? What resolution is needed for SST analysis? Does it vary in space? Beyond the first moment, what are the statistics of the 2nd, 3rd, and 4th moments of SST? What do they tell us? and take some time to illustrate the application of information theory.

Remote Access and Notes:

Remote access via Go To meeting https://www2.gotomeeting.com/join/362340218. Dial +1 (510) 201-0301; Meeting ID and Access Code: 362-340-218. Questions? Contact Bob Grumbine ().

Visitor Information:

Unless otherwise specified, all non-NOAA visitors wanting to attend in person a seminar should contact in advance the contact person listed under "Remote Access and Notes" for specific information about obtaining building access.

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Monday, September 10, 2012 1:21 PM / Last updated Wednesday, September 12, 2012 10:58 AM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are the most complete summary of upcoming NOAA science seminars; a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science across NOAA and our contituents. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] or join our RSS feed by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

This is OneNOAA Science Seminar number: 1459

Fuzzy Logic Based Model For Operational Flash Flood Forecasting

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Date and Time: September 25, 2012, 14:00 - 15:00 Eastern Time Zone [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: NOAA SSMC-2, Room 8246 (1325 East-West Hwy, Silver Spring, MD 20910)
Speaker(s): Petr Janál and Lucie Březková (Czech Hydrometeorological Institute, Brno, Czech Republic)
OneNOAA Science Seminar Sponsor: NOAA NWS Office of Hydrologic Development (OHD)
OneNOAA Science Seminar Theme:
Abstract:

Flash flood forecasting requires a special approach because of the character of torrential rainfall. Storms are very difficult to forecast in space and time. Hydrologic models designed for flash flood prediction have to be able to work with very uncertain input data. Moreover, the models have to be capable of evaluating the level of danger in as short a time as possible because of the highly dynamic character of the modeled process. One method to mitigate the influence of uncertainty is using fuzzy logic and/or other artificial intelligence methods. The fuzzy logic model was developed and modified into a form usable in operational hydrology and a simulation of its operational application was run using this model. The fuzzy model is now being tested in real time operations at some locations in the Czech Republic.

Remote Access and Notes:

Remote access via Go To meeting https://www1.gotomeeting.com/join/559493993. Teleconference: (866) 804-8142, passcode 2937055. Questions? Contact .

Visitor Information:

Unless otherwise specified, all non-NOAA visitors wanting to attend in person a seminar should contact in advance the contact person listed under "Remote Access and Notes" for specific information about obtaining building access.

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Friday, September 14, 2012 10:03 AM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are the most complete summary of upcoming NOAA science seminars; a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science across NOAA and our contituents. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] or join our RSS feed by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

This is OneNOAA Science Seminar number: 1462

Evaluation of Reanalysis Products

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Date and Time: September 25, 2012, 13:00 - 14:00 Eastern Time Zone [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: NOAA SSMC-3 12th Floor Fishbowl (1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD, 20910). Remote attendance is encouraged
Speaker(s): Edmund Chang, Michela Biasutti, Ron Lindsay
OneNOAA Science Seminar Sponsor: NOAA OAR CPO Modeling, Analysis, Predictions, and Projections program monthly seminar series
OneNOAA Science Seminar Theme:
Abstract:

TBD

Remote Access and Notes:
  1. Web access: https://cpomapp.webex.com/cpomapp/onstage/g.php?t=a&d=626751723. Enter your name and e-mail address, and click "Join Now". If necessary, enter the event passcode: 20910.
  2. Phone access:: Call-in information will be provided after you log in to the webex event

For questions about this seminar please contact .

Visitor Information:

Unless otherwise specified, all non-NOAA visitors wanting to attend in person a seminar should contact in advance the contact person listed under "Remote Access and Notes" for specific information about obtaining building access.

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Monday, September 17, 2012 8:27 AM / Last updated Tuesday, September 18, 2012 6:54 AM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are the most complete summary of upcoming NOAA science seminars; a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science across NOAA and our contituents. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] or join our RSS feed by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

This is OneNOAA Science Seminar number: 1552

September 26, 2012

Understanding The Short- and Long-Term Variations in Stratospheric Water Vapor

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Date and Time: September 26, 2012, 15:30-16:30 Mountain Time Zone [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: NOAA ESRL Chemical Sciences Division seminar room (2A305), David Skaggs Research Center (325 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80305)
Speaker(s): Andrew Dessler (Texas A&M)
OneNOAA Science Seminar Sponsor: NOAA ESRL Chemical Sciences Division seminar
OneNOAA Science Seminar Theme:
Abstract:

The regulation of stratospheric water vapor is a classic problem in atmospheric sciences, with important implications for both climate and stratospheric ozone chemistry. We present here simulations of stratospheric water vapor using a Lagrangian forward-trajectory model of the stratosphere covering the period 1987-2011. Analysis of the model suggests that variations in stratospheric water vapor over the last few decades are controlled by three factors: decadal variations in the Brewer-Dobson circulation, the QBO, and volcanic eruptions. We also see evidence for increases in the amount of water vapor entering the stratosphere, and implications for the next century will be discussed.

Remote Access and Notes:

Remote access for this seminar: Webinar Registration and view system requirements. Space is limited. Confirmation of registration includes information about joining the GoToMeeting®. . For further information about this seminar please contact or . All Seminar attendees agree not to cite, quote, copy, or distribute material presented without the explicit written consent of the seminar presenter. Any opinions expressed in this seminar are those of the speaker alone and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of NOAA or ESRL CSD.

Visitor Information:

Unless otherwise specified, all non-NOAA visitors wanting to attend in person a seminar should contact in advance the contact person listed under "Remote Access and Notes" for specific information about obtaining building access.

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Thursday, September 6, 2012 7:59 AM / Last updated Tuesday, September 18, 2012 7:11 AM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are the most complete summary of upcoming NOAA science seminars; a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science across NOAA and our contituents. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] or join our RSS feed by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

This is OneNOAA Science Seminar number: 1354

"Integrated Environmental Services" (IES) - A Weather Ready Nation Pilot Project (Tampa Bay Area Weather Forecast Office)

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Date and Time: September 26, 2012, 10:30-11:30 Eastern Time Zone [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: NOAA campus, SSMC-2, Room 2358 (1325 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD, 20910)
Speaker(s): (Emergency Response Meteorologist Team Leader, NWS' Weather Forecast Office Tampa Bay Area)
OneNOAA Science Seminar Sponsor: NOAA NWS Office of Science and Technology (OS&T) and Office of Climate, Water, & Weather Services (OCWWS)
OneNOAA Science Seminar Theme:
Abstract:

NOAA's National Weather Service has improved its ability to support the Tampa Bay community and its ecologically valuable environments before, during and after severe weather and other disasters. As part of its Weather Ready Nation initiative, the National Weather Service has launched this project to provide enhanced decision and ecosystem support services to help protect residents and visitors to the Tampa Bay area.

Remote Access and Notes:

Register for the webinar here: https://www1.gotomeeting.com/register/377231392. After registering you will receive a confirmation e-mail containing information about joining the Webinar. Please contact at 301-713-3391 x137 or at 301-713-1858 x171 if you have any questions. Additional information about NWS' Weather-Ready Nation initiative can be found at: http://www.nws.noaa.gov/com/weatherreadynation/

Visitor Information:

Unless otherwise specified, all non-NOAA visitors wanting to attend in person a seminar should contact in advance the contact person listed under "Remote Access and Notes" for specific information about obtaining building access.

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Friday, September 14, 2012 7:07 AM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are the most complete summary of upcoming NOAA science seminars; a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science across NOAA and our contituents. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] or join our RSS feed by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

This is OneNOAA Science Seminar number: 1454

Climate Change and Potential Impacts on Bristol Bay Sockeye Salmon Populations

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Date and Time: September 26, 2012, 10:00-11:00 Alaska Time Zone [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: Webinar Access Only
Speaker(s): Rebecca Aicher (Science and Technology Policy Fellow for the American Association for the Advancement of Science hosted by the U.S. EPA); and Jason Todd and Joe Ebersole (Office of Research and Development, U.S. EPA)
OneNOAA Science Seminar Sponsor: NOAA ACCAP Alaska Climate Webinars
OneNOAA Science Seminar Theme:
Abstract:

Scientific research has shown that climate change has already caused detectable changes to ecosystems throughout Alaska. As warming is predicted to continue, it is likely to lead to changes in marine and freshwater aquatic ecosystems and impact salmon populations in Bristol Bay, Alaska. In order to better predict how salmon will respond to climate change in both freshwater and marine ecosystems, it is crucial to evaluate the current knowledge of how the salmon and ecosystem are responding and identify key gaps in knowledge. This webinar will describe a conceptual model that is used to synthesize results from over 150 peer-reviewed journal articles to describe current trends in salmon populations, responses to climate change, predicted responses to climate change, and research needs in Alaska.

Remote Access and Notes:

The audio portion of the call is through a free phone line, while the presentation is viewed through your computer. We do not offer sound through the computer at this time.

To hear the audio presentation during a webinar:

  1. With a regular telephone dial: 1- (877) 594-8353
  2. When prompted, enter the Participant passcode: 83847342

To view the presentation during a webinar:

  1. Point your web browser to: http://infiniteconferencing.com/Events/accap/
  2. Enter Participant Code 83847342.
  3. Enter the rest of the requested information (The name and organization you enter will be seen by other participants, but your contact information will remain confidential)
  4. Click the blue "log-in" button
  5. For support during a call, press *0 on your phone and a conferencing coordinator will assist you

Please contact Brook Gamble, ACCAP Outreach and Education Specialist, (907) 474-7812, or at (907) 474-7878

Visitor Information:

Unless otherwise specified, all non-NOAA visitors wanting to attend in person a seminar should contact in advance the contact person listed under "Remote Access and Notes" for specific information about obtaining building access.

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Monday, September 17, 2012 9:09 AM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are the most complete summary of upcoming NOAA science seminars; a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science across NOAA and our contituents. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] or join our RSS feed by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

This is OneNOAA Science Seminar number: 1555

Using Underwater Video for Assessing Abundance and Behavior of Black Sea Bass and Seafloor Habitats

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Date and Time: September 26, 2012 at 12:00-13:00 Eastern Time Zone [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: NOAA Central Library, 2nd Floor, SSMC-3 (1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD 20910)
Speaker(s): (NOAA EPP Living Marine Resources Cooperative Science Center)
OneNOAA Science Seminar Sponsor: NOAA 2012 NOAA EPP Cooperative Science Center Seminar Series
OneNOAA Science Seminar Theme:
Abstract:

Trawl surveys have been used to assess marine resources for many years, but they cannot be used in areas of heterogeneous habitats such as reefs and rock outcrops. Black sea bass (BSB) are common inhabitants of such areas on the continental shelf, and for this reason NOAA trawl surveys cannot adequately assess their abundance. We are developing new methods for in-situ assessment of BSB, their behavior, and habitats using video. In 2011, video surveys were conducted using modified commercial traps with multiple video cameras attached. Sampling consisted of two one-hour sets with bait (squid) and two without bait on 11 days at six sites off coast of Ocean City, MD. Fish were counted in video frames sampled at 30 sec intervals and the mean number per frame was calculated and compared between sets. Fish were more abundant at sites with heterogeneous habitats, and more fish were seen at baited than at unbaited traps. Proportions of approaching fish that were caught in traps were similar in the ocean (1.4%) and in the large mesocosm tank (3.1%) at the NMFS Sandy Hook Lab. In 2012 we used a stand-alone video camera platform at two sites, and sampled fish simultaneously with timed rod-and-reel fishing. Preliminary data indicates that R&R surveys can detect significant differences in abundance even with only 60% of the data analyzed. Future studies will compare video counts of fish to commercial trap catches. Surveys of seafloor habitats using a towed video camera sled are being conducted preliminary to leasing of offshore sites for windpower generation; these show that heterogeneous habitat is a small portion of overall seafloor which mostly consists of sand and sand-shell regions.

Work supported by NOAA Office of Education, Educational partnership Program Awards # NA06OAR4810163; NA11SEC4810002; and camera sled studies were supported with funding from MD-DNR with BOEM.

Download Presentation: Presentation Slides
Remote Access and Notes:

For remote access via webinar, please fill out the registration form a few minutes before the meeting is scheduled to begin. The Meeting Number is 742656968; the Passcode is brownbag. For audio in the US and Canada, dial 866-833-7307. The participant passcode is 8986360. Contact (301-713-2600 ext. 115) or (301-713-2600 ext. 155) for further information.

Visitor Information:

Unless otherwise specified, all non-NOAA visitors wanting to attend in person a seminar should contact in advance the contact person listed under "Remote Access and Notes" for specific information about obtaining building access.

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Saturday, September 22, 2012 10:08 AM / Last updated Friday, September 28, 2012 11:19 AM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are the most complete summary of upcoming NOAA science seminars; a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science across NOAA and our contituents. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] or join our RSS feed by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

This is OneNOAA Science Seminar number: 1562

September 27, 2012

Anticipating Environmental Changes and Frontloading the Science to Guide Natural Resource Policy: A Leadership Call to Scientists

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Date and Time: September 27, 2012, 11:00-12:00 Pacific Time Zone [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: NOAA Northwest Fisheries Science Center Auditorium (2725 Montlake Blvd. E., Seattle, WA 98112-2097; Directions)
Speaker(s): Dr. Usha Varanasi (School of Aquatic & Fishery Sciences & Chemistry Department, University of Washington)
OneNOAA Science Seminar Sponsor: NOAA 2012 Fall Quarter NWFSC Weekly Monster Seminar JAM series
OneNOAA Science Seminar Theme:
Abstract:

With unprecedented technological and communication advances and scientific breakthroughs, data are instantaneously available to policy makers and the public alike. Nonetheless, there is a decline in our ability to use science-generated baseline information to plan -- to assess future threats and opportunities, to prepare for highly likely events, and to guide natural resource management and policy. Our environmental laws and mandates rely on the use of best available science to shape management decisions that protects the health and viability of marine organisms and restores degraded ecosystems. However, scientific inquiry is an ongoing process that evolves with time, often has a specialized or narrow focus, requires peer-review to substantiate its findings, and actually can lead to a paradigm shift that can affect prior management decisions. Accordingly, it is imperative that scientists take the lead and responsibility to anticipate inevitable or avoidable alteration of our ecosystems and provide the timely frontloading of science. This is necessary not only to raise awareness and provide early warnings of environmental disasters as well as chronic decline or alteration in natural ecosystems, but actually to provide a way to incorporate science into best management practices to temper threats and protect fragile ecosystems. I will discuss a few examples that illustrate the challenges of frontloading of science in anticipation of environmental crisis or chronic degradation, and its enormous value to science-policy partnerships required for effective natural resource management.

About The Speaker:

Usha Varanasi is an affiliate professor at the School of Aquatic and Fishery Science and the Chemistry Department of the University of Washington. She recently retired as director of the National Marine Fisheries Service Northwest Fisheries Science Center. Dr. Varanasi's management resulted in new research programs that address current and future science and management needs, including the recovery of West Coast salmon and the marine groundfish. Dr. Varanasi has served on many expert committees and scientific boards and has published over 150 articles in scientific journals, as well as edited two books.

Dr. Varanasi is a member of the Washington State Academy of Sciences and a Distinguished Scholar in Residence at the University of Washington's College of the Environment. Dr. Varanasi earned a Ph.D. in organic chemistry from the University of Washington, an M.S. from the California Institute of Technology, and a B.SC. from Bombay University.

RELEVANT PUBLICATIONS

  • Varanasi, U. 2012. Frontloading the Science in Anticipation of Environmental Disasters Fisheries. Vol. 37 (5): 233-235
  • Varanasi, U., J. Stein, and T. Hom. 2011. Bridging Science and Policy: Challenges and Successes in Puget Sound. In: Extended Abstracts, 2011 Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference Proceedings. Online--[www.salishseaconference.org/presentations_d3.php]
Remote Access and Notes: Webinar

To join the online meeting, go to: https://nwfsc200.webex.com/nwfsc200/j.php?ED=185359232&UID=1306685462&RT=MiM0

This meeting does not require a password. Click "Join". To join the audio conference only call-in toll number (US/Canada): 1-650-479-3207, Access code: 809 655 671. For assistance go to https://nwfsc200.webex.com/nwfsc200/mc. On the left navigation bar, click "Support". You can contact me at: nwfsc.helpdesk@noaa.gov (206)860-3256.

For further information about this seminar please contact Diane Tierney

Visitor Information:

Unless otherwise specified, all non-NOAA visitors wanting to attend in person a seminar should contact in advance the contact person listed under "Remote Access and Notes" for specific information about obtaining building access.

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Saturday, September 22, 2012 10:57 AM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are the most complete summary of upcoming NOAA science seminars; a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science across NOAA and our contituents. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] or join our RSS feed by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

This is OneNOAA Science Seminar number: 1564

OneNOAA Science Seminars Subscription Information

i-access to our OneNOAA science seminar announcements:

  1. Join our weekly e-mail seminar announcement [nominally, email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list]. You can subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminars moderated email list by sending an email message to: with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body (don't include the quotes) or visit https://list.woc.noaa.gov/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/onenoaascienceseminars and fill in your email address (see also how to suscribe).
  2. Online OneNOAA web access: http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/ (Web page maintained by )
  3. Archive of previous OneNOAA science discussion seminars (by calendar year): [2010] [2009] [2008] [2007] [2006] [2005] [2004].
  4. Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar RSS feed.
  5. Interested in becoming a OneNOAA science seminar partner?
  6. When available, all seminars can be accessed remotely by anyone on a first-come-first serve basis.
  7. Note: All seminars subject to title, location, date, and time changes without notice. Please check the OneNOAA seminar web page for the latest seminar updates. Unless otherwised indicated, seminars are open to the public. The contents of the OneNOAA Science Seminars web page do not reflect any position of the Federeal Government or NOAA. References to trade names or commercial entities do not imply endorsement of any kind. Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer]. The information provided by the OneNOAA Science Seminars is for broad information purposes only. See privacy policy [NOAA Privacy policy]

 

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