National Oceanic and Atmospheric AdministrationNODC, National Oceanographic Data CenterDepartment of Commerce
NOAA Satellite and Information Service

OneNOAA Science Seminars


May 2012OneNOAA Science Seminars: May 2012

A joint effort by several NOAA offices to provide the most complete summary of upcoming NOAA science seminars. For further information please contact

[OneNOAA Seminar Partner's contacts]
Web page last updated: Tuesday, 04-Sep-2012 15:40:56 UTC

Note: To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can subscribe to our weekly e-mail, join our RSS feed, and/or access the seminars in google calendar:

rss feed Subscribe to RSS feed    [ What is RSS? - How do I use RSS? ]


May 01, 2012

Assessing the Quality and Impact of Surface Observations

Add This OneNOAA Science Seminar to your Google Calendar
Date and Time: May 01, 2012, 12:00-13:00 Eastern Time Zone [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: World Weather Building Room 707 (5200 Auth Road, Camp Springs, MD 20746)
Speaker(s): John Horel (University of Utah)
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NOAA National Centers for Environmental Prediction Environmental Modeling Center (EMC)
Abstract:

The heterogeneous nature of surface observing stations tends to lead to subjective decisions to use some observations and avoid others in data assimilation systems. We are attempting to improve the quality control of surface observations as well as determine their impact on high resolution (2.5 km) analyses of temperature, dewpoint, and wind. A combination of quality control procedures are being used including observation departures from the 2.5 km background fields used by the Real-Time Mesoscale Analysis and metrics obtained from the adjoint of a two-dimensional variational surface analysis over the contiguous United States. The relative impact of an observation tends to be controlled by its location through the interplay of the weather conditions observed there, the ability of the background field to diagnose the variability of those conditions, and the proximity of other nearby observations. Of lesser importance are the types of network from which the observations are obtained and the assumptions made regarding their observational errors. Differentiating objectively between high impact observations that result from low observation quality, observation representativeness errors, or accurate observed weather conditions not evident in the background field can be difficult.

Download Presentation:

http://www.emc.ncep.noaa.gov/seminars/presentations/2012/horel_ncep_may1.pptx

Remote Access and Notes:

Gotomeeting: https://www2.gotomeeting.com/join/287882130. Audio: Dial +1 (805) 309-0010; Access Code and meeting ID: 287-882-130. For further information please contact Michiko Masutani (301)763-8000 Ext. 7551, .

Visitor Information:

Unless otherwise specified, all non-NOAA visitors wanting to attend in person a seminar should contact in advance the contact person listed under "Remote Access and Notes" for specific information about obtaining building access.

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Friday, April 27, 2012 2:49 PM / Last updated Thursday, May 3, 2012 6:46 AM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are the most complete summary of upcoming NOAA science seminars; a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science across NOAA and our contituents. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

OneNOAA Science Seminar Number: 1241

May 02, 2012

Using the New Coastal and Marine Ecological Classification Standard (CMECS)

Add This OneNOAA Science Seminar to your Google Calendar
Date and Time: May 02, 2012, 14:00-15:00 Eastern Time Zone [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: Seminar available via webinar only (see Remote Access and Notes section below)
Speaker(s): (NOAA Coastal Services Center)
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NOAA Coastal Services Center
Abstract:

To manage resources on a regional basis, coastal professionals must integrate data from various sources collected with different methods. The Coastal and Marine Ecological Classification Standard (CMECS) provides a new national framework for incorporating data on all the major components of the landscape and seascape, collected by methods ranging from satellite imagery to grab samples. This webinar will introduce the structure of the CMECS system, describe how it can be used in the environment, and present examples of CMECS spatial data products. The webinar will also address ways that this national standard can be applied to coastal issues.

In this webinar participants will

  • Learn how their data can be brought into the CMECS framework
  • Understand how this new standard might affect their work
  • Receive tips on how to engage the CMECS team for support and collaboration
Remote Access and Notes:

Presentations are available remotely via a webinar. To register, visit http://noaacsc.adobeconnect.com/apr2012digcst/event/registration.html?preview=false. If you have previously registered with us, click here. This webinar will be recorded for on-demand playback. For further information about this seminar please contact Krista.McCraken@noaa.gov.

Visitor Information:

Unless otherwise specified, all non-NOAA visitors wanting to attend in person a seminar should contact in advance the contact person listed under "Remote Access and Notes" for specific information about obtaining building access.

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Wednesday, March 7, 2012 8:08 AM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are the most complete summary of upcoming NOAA science seminars; a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science across NOAA and our contituents. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] or join our RSS feed by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

OneNOAA Science Seminar Number: 1242

Evaluation of CMIP5 Model Experiments

Add This OneNOAA Science Seminar to your Google Calendar
Date and Time: May 02, 2012, 12:30-14:00 Eastern Time Zone [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: NOAA SSMC-3 12th floor Fishbowl (1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD, 20910). Remote attendance is encouraged
Speaker(s): (UC Irvine), (UCLA), (University of Arizona), (Princeton University), (NOAA ESRL)
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NOAA OAR CPO Modeling, Analysis, Predictions, and Projections program monthly webinar
Download Presentations:

The Two Types of ENSO in CMIP5 Models and Their Different Impacts on North America Winter Temperature

Precipitation issues in CMIP5 global warming and ENSO teleconnection simulations

Representation of the Intra-Americas Sea and North American Monsoon in CMIP5 Historical and RCP 4.5 Model Simulations

Global and regional drought from CMIP5: Evaluations of contemporary climate simulations and implications for future projections

Understanding the Causes of ENSO Asymmetry Using CMIP5 Runs

Download Webcast (MP4 format)

Remote Access and Notes:

Remote access Webex: https://cpomapp.webex.com/cpomapp/onstage/g.php?t=a&d=939251714 Password: 20910. Audio available only by teleconference: Teleconference Number: 1-866-710-6541; Participant Passcode: 5841149. For further information about this seminar please contact

Visitor Information:

Unless otherwise specified, all non-NOAA visitors wanting to attend in person a seminar should contact in advance the contact person listed under "Remote Access and Notes" for specific information about obtaining building access.

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Friday, March 9, 2012 1:11 PM / Last updated Wednesday, May 23, 2012 7:20 AM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are the most complete summary of upcoming NOAA science seminars; a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science across NOAA and our contituents. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

OneNOAA Science Seminar Number: 1243

Background Ozone over the United States in 1980-2010: Origin, Extremes and Long-Term Changes

Add This OneNOAA Science Seminar to your Google Calendar
Date and Time: May 02, 2012. 15:30-16:30 (Boulder, CO) Mountain Standard Time [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: NOAA ESRL Chemical Sciences Division seminar Room 2A305, David Skaggs Research Center (NOAA Building), 325 Broadway, Boulder, CO (Directions)
Speaker(s): (Princeton University & NOAA GFDL)
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NOAA ESRL Chemical Science Division seminar
Abstract:

Understanding the global sources of local ozone pollution is crucial for designing appropriate control policies to better protect public health and welfare. This talk will draw upon analysis of satellite and in situ measurements with a fully coupled global chemistry-climate model (GFDL AM3) to explore the role of naturally occurring stratospheric ozone intrusions, wildfires, and rising Asian anthropogenic emissions in driving extreme events, inter-annual variability, and long-term changes of tropospheric and surface ozone over the United States in the past 30 years. Leveraging a rich suite of measurements from the CalNex field campaign in spring 2010, we find that a high-resolution (~50x50 km2) version of the GFDL AM3 model captures the principle features of observed ozone, both at the surface and aloft. During several episodes of high surface ozone in spring 2010, transport of stratospheric ozone and Asian pollution to the surface can contribute 30-55 ppbv and 8-15 ppbv of ozone, respectively, in parts of California and the central western USA. These new findings imply substantial non-local influences on compromising attainment of U.S. National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS) for ground-level ozone. We further use ~200x200 km2 GFDL AM3 simulations for 1980-2010 and observational records to examine how typical conditions were in spring 2010. Preliminary analysis suggests that stratosphere-to-troposphere exchange dominates inter-annual variability of free tropospheric ozone over Pacific North America associated with ENSO (i.e.1983-1984, 1998-1999, and 2009-2010) and other factors. In spring, rising Asian emissions of ozone precursors primarily contribute to long-term increasing trend of ozone over the western USA. In summer, ozone produced from Siberia and North American boreal fire emissions is the major driver of inter-annual variability of background ozone over the northwest and northeastern U.S. (i.e. higher in 1998, 2002, 2003, 2004, and 2010). We expect that the associated variability should provide insights regarding potential responses to climate shifts as well as inform air quality planning and control strategies.

Seminar attendees agree not to cite, quote, copy, or distribute material presented without the explicit written consent of the seminar presenter. Any opinions expressed in this seminar are those of the speaker alone and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of NOAA or ESRL CSD.

Remote Access and Notes:

Remote access: Webinar registration: https://www2.gotomeeting.com/register/487631170 and view system requirements. Space is limited. Confirmation of registration includes information about joining the GoToMeeting. For further information about this seminar please contact [(303) 497-3599] or [(303) 497-5431].

Visitor Information:

Unless otherwise specified, all non-NOAA visitors wanting to attend in person a seminar should contact in advance the contact person listed under "Remote Access and Notes" for specific information about obtaining building access.

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Tuesday, April 17, 2012 8:32 AM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are the most complete summary of upcoming NOAA science seminars; a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science across NOAA and our contituents. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] or join our RSS feed by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

OneNOAA Science Seminar Number: 1244

Ciguatera Fish Poisoning - Truth of Dare?

Add This OneNOAA Science Seminar to your Google Calendar
Date and Time: May 02, 2012. 12:00-13:00 Eastern Time Zone [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: NOAA SSMC-4, Room 8150 (1305 East-West Hwy, Silver Spring, MD)
Speaker(s): (Supervisory Oceanographer, Center for Coastal Fisheries and Habitat Research)
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NOAA NOS and National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science
Abstract:

Ciguatera fish poisoning (CFP) has not had the attention or visibility of other harmful algal bloom (HAB) illnesses, yet CFP causes more human illnesses than all the other HABs combined. Benthic dinoflagellates in the genus Gambierdiscus are the organisms identified most closely with the production of ciguatoxins and the symptoms of CFP. Unfortunately, neither the tools nor the strategies for routine monitoring for CFP or Gambierdiscus abundance have been developed in the tropical areas where CFP is endemic. In part, this is because both the cells and ciguatoxins are difficult to detect and quantify. This seminar will explore new technologies that will support the development of monitoring protocols and allow the assignment of CFP risk to reef systems through integrated ecosystem research.

About The Speaker:

Pat Tester is an Oklahoma native with graduate degrees from School of Oceanography, Oregon State University. Her dissertation research was completed at the Duke University Marine Laboratory in Beaufort, NC where she joined the NOAA staff in 1979. Since 1987 her focus has been on the ecology and physiology of harmful algae and their effects on marine food webs. Her current research efforts are to facilitate monitoring and detection of HAB species and their toxins to reduce the risk to human health and marine resources. During her career, Pat has addressed Congress, where her testimony helped change the Small Business Administration's definition of disaster to include economic losses due to red tides. Her early work helped pioneer the use of remote sensing in HAB detection. She was recognized with NOAA's Technology Transfer Award in 2007, for her role in the development of a monoclonal ELISA (for domoic acid, a HAB toxin) and its transfer to private industry. She is also the recipient of the Phycological Society of America's Provasoli Award, the Tyge Christensen Prize from the International Phycological Society and DOC's Gold Medal Award. Pat served on two National Academy of Sciences panels and as president of the International Society for the Study of Harmful Algae from 2005-2008. She is an active member of the North Pacific Research Board's Science Panel and the Scientific Steering Committee of GOEHAB (IOC-SCOR). On May 1, 2012, Pat's career achievements will be honored by the NOAA Distinguished Career Award.

Remote Access and Notes:

Presentations are available remotely via a combination of phone (US only) & webcast. Note that remote access is limited to 50 connections on a first-come-first served basis, so we cannot guarantee participation. To participate remotely via phone and internet:

  1. Dial toll-free (U.S.) 1-877-708-1667. When prompted enter passcode 7028688 followed by the # sign. Please use your phone's mute button (*6 toggles on or off) during the presentation until you are ready to ask questions. The phone conference does not start until about five minutes before the seminar.
  2. To access the webex meeting, go the to the webcast site at http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?sigKey=mymeetings&i=744925156&p=&t=c. Enter meeting number 744925156 if needed; no passcode is required. Enter other required fields - First and last name. Check the box that that you have read the Privacy Policy, and click Proceed.

For further information about this seminar please contact , or if it is within 5 minutes of the seminar start, call the toll free number above and she will try to answer your questions.

Visitor Information:

Unless otherwise specified, all non-NOAA visitors wanting to attend in person a seminar should contact in advance the contact person listed under "Remote Access and Notes" for specific information about obtaining building access.

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Tuesday, April 24, 2012 4:33 PM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are the most complete summary of upcoming NOAA science seminars; a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science across NOAA and our contituents. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] or join our RSS feed by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

OneNOAA Science Seminar Number: 1245

Characterizing and Understanding Cloud Water and Radiation Budget Biases in CMIP3/CMIP5 GCMs, Contemporary GCMs and Reanalyses

Add This OneNOAA Science Seminar to your Google Calendar
Date and Time: May 02, 2012, 12:00-13:00 Eastern Time Zone [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: World Weather Building Room 707 (5200 Auth Road, Camp Springs, MD 20746)
Speaker(s): Jui-Lin (Frank) Li (California Institute of Technology)
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NOAA National Centers for Environmental Prediction Environmental Modeling Center (EMC)
Abstract:

We have utilized a considerable heritage of knowledge and experience (e.g., Li et al, 2007, 2008; Waliser et al., 2009) to perform a robust evaluation of the cloud ice water content (CIWC) and cloud ice water path (CIWP) from 20th century CMIP5 simulations and compare these results to the same analysis on CMIP3 (Li et al., 2012a). To account for observational uncertainty we use three different CloudSat+CALIPSO+MODIS retrieval schemes for tropospheric ice water content and two very different methods to remove the contribution from falling hydrometeors (i.e. Waliser et al. 2009 and Chen et al. 2011) so that a robust estimate for CIWC and CIWP - with quantified uncertainty - can be obtained for comparison to the GCMs. In addition, as an additional benchmarking measure, we include parallel evaluation of two reanalysis data sets (i.e. MERRA and ERA-Interim). For the same group of the models, we also conducted an observational based evaluation and analysis of TOA and surface radiation budgets (Li et al., 2012b) utilizing a number of contemporary satellite measurements for the TOA and surface (e.g. CERES-Aqua, CERES-Terra) and observationally/satellite-constrained model calculations for the surface (e.g. CERES product, CloudSat product).

The analysis and results show that in general the CMIP5 ensemble of models performs a bit better than CMIP3. For example, considering the Taylor Plot framework (see attached figures), the multi-model mean CIWP from CMIP5 is more than 50% closer to the reference value than the multi-model mean from CMIP3. One systematic bias across models appears to be from an overestimate of CIWP/CIWC in the extra-tropics and storm tracks. In addition, a persistent bias in most of the models and the multi-model mean is the overestimate of OLR and surface shortwave as well as underestimate reflected SW at TOA in the strongly convective region of the tropics. We suggest that at least part of this persistent bias stems from GCMs ignoring the effects of precipitating/convective core ice and liquid in their radiation calculations.

We perform a series of model sensitivity tests in order to examine the impacts of exclusion of the precipitating hydrometeors on atmospheric radiative fluxes and heating rates, as well as surface precipitation and/or dynamics using an offline radiative transfer model with CloudSat IWC and other satellite input data (Waliser et al., 2011) and with the ECMWF IFS (Li et al., 2012c). The offline sensitivity tests indicate that the systematic biases in the radiation budget are likely in part due to the exclusion of the precipitating components in the radiation calculations. The interactive tests with the ECMWF IFS also indicate there may be feedbacks from these impacts that might result in excessive of updraft velocity, convective intensity and convective precipitation over convective active regions.

Remote Access and Notes:

Gotomeeting: GoToMeeting: https://www2.gotomeeting.com/join/472345802. Audio: Dial +1 (213) 493-0622; Access Code and meeting ID: 472-345-802 . For further information please contact Michiko Masutani (301)763-8000 Ext. 7551,

Visitor Information:

Unless otherwise specified, all non-NOAA visitors wanting to attend in person a seminar should contact in advance the contact person listed under "Remote Access and Notes" for specific information about obtaining building access.

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Friday, April 27, 2012 2:49 PM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are the most complete summary of upcoming NOAA science seminars; a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science across NOAA and our contituents. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

OneNOAA Science Seminar Number: 1246

May 03, 2012

Transitioning from FGDC to ISO 101 and ISO Content and Organization: QandA for ISO Creation Methods

Add This OneNOAA Science Seminar to your Google Calendar
Date and Time: May 03, 2012, 13:00-14:00 Central Time Zone [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: Webinar access only
Speaker(s): (NCDDC)
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NOAA NCDDC
Abstract:

Module: QandA for ISO Creation Methods: Transforms, Stylesheets

NODC NCDDC is offering a series of ISO Metadata Training sessions in an online format. Each session will last approximately one hour starting at 1:00pm CST. Select (click) the module title to register for that session. Once registered you will receive an email confirming your registration with information you need to join the Webinar. Alternately, you may download the complete schedule as a PDF document to view the dates, times and hyperlinks to register for each session.

Remote Access and Notes:

(space limited) Gotomeeting Link to register for this webinar: https://www1.gotomeeting.com/register/976852529. Once registered you will receive an email confirming your registration with information you need to join the Webinar. For further information about this seminar please contact [(866) 732-2382]

Visitor Information:

Unless otherwise specified, all non-NOAA visitors wanting to attend in person a seminar should contact in advance the contact person listed under "Remote Access and Notes" for specific information about obtaining building access.

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Monday, April 2, 2012 . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are the most complete summary of upcoming NOAA science seminars; a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science across NOAA and our contituents. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] or join our RSS feed by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

OneNOAA Science Seminar Number: 1247

Density Dependence, The Theory of Harvesting, and the Practice of Stock Assessment: A Perspective On Steepness and Its Implications

Add This OneNOAA Science Seminar to your Google Calendar
Date and Time: May 03, 2012, 11:00-12:00 Pacific Time Zone [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: NOAA Northwest Fisheries Science Center (NWFSC) Auditorium (2725 Montlake Boulevard East, Seattle, WA 98112); Map to NWFSC
Speaker(s): Dr. Marc Mangel (Professor, Department of Applied Mathematics and Statistics, UC Santa Cruz)
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NOAA NWFSC Monster Seminar JAM
Abstract:

Density dependence, which in fisheries is usually understood as a nonlinear relationship between mature individuals (spawners) and the number or biomass of offspring produced (recruitment), is key for sustainable fisheries. I will first briefly review density dependence as it applies to fishery management and then introduce the concept of steepness, which is commonly defined as the fraction of unfished recruitment obtained when biomass is 20% of its unfished level. In order to provide a perspective on steepness, I will then discuss i) the statistical ecology of steepness (in both the 20th and 21st centuries), ii) the evolutionary ecology of steepness, and iii)the reproductive ecology of steepness (illustrated with bluefin tuna as a test case). I will then turn to the management implications of steepness and show that fixing steepness in the practice of stock assessment can have many unintended consequences, most of which are poorly appreciated. I will show that using three parameter stock-recruitment relationships (such as the Shepherd/Maynard Smith) rather than the standard two parameter ones due to Beverton & Holt and Ricker allows us a way forward.

Remote Access and Notes:

(Updated remote access) Webinar: Go to https://nwfsc200.webex.com/nwfsc200/j.php?ED=13502408&UID=40245523&RT=MiM0 (This meeting does not require a password.) Click "Join". Call-in: 1-650-479-3207 (Not a toll-free number); Access code: 856 489 473. For Assistance during the presentation go to https://nwfsc.webex.com/nwfsc/mc On the left navigation bar, click "Support". For questions about this seminar please contact Diane L. Tierney-Jamieson (206-860-3380; )

Visitor Information:

Unless otherwise specified, all non-NOAA visitors wanting to attend in person a seminar should contact in advance the contact person listed under "Remote Access and Notes" for specific information about obtaining building access.

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Wednesday, April 4, 2012 9:47 AM / Last updated Monday, May 7, 2012 7:54 AM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science and management information. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] or join our RSS feed by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

OneNOAA Science Seminar Number: 1248

Endangered Elkhorn Coral Population Dynamics and Predictions for Recovery

Add This OneNOAA Science Seminar to your Google Calendar
Date and Time: May 03, 2012, 12:00-12:30 Eastern Time Zone [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: NOAA SSMC-3, 2nd Floor, Library (1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD, 20910)
Speaker(s): (Office of Science and Technology, NMFS)
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NOAA National Sea Grant College Program Dean John A. Knauss Marine Policy Fellowship Seminars
Abstract:

Fossil data from multiple locations indicates that Atlantic elkhorn coral, Acropora palmata, formed shallow reefs throughout the Caribbean Sea since the Pleistocene. Beginning in the 1980s A. palmata has declined to a small fraction of its formerly vast extent throughout the region. In 2006, elkhorn coral was the first coral, along with its sister species, staghorn coral (Acropora cervicornis), to be included on the U.S. Endangered Species List. We used size-based matrix modeling to parameterize annual A. palmata population dynamics in Florida, over the course of one severe hurricane year (2005) and six calm years (2004, and 2006-2010), incorporating environmental stochasticity as inter-annual variability. We predicted that benthic cover would remain at current levels (4%) for the foreseeable future (until 2030) and beyond (until 2100), suggesting a lack of resilience following the 2005 hurricanes. Standard metrics for the quantification of number and size of individuals are essential to endangered species management. These usually straightforward tasks can be challenging for clonal, colonial organisms. Acropora palmata presents a particular challenge due to its plastic morphology and frequent fission. We quantified three-dimensional colony surface area (CSA), the most ecologically relevant measure of size, for 14 prototypically arborescent A. palmata colonies using three-dimensional digital imaging software. To relate CSA to simple field metrics, we compared log-likelihood values and determined that planar projection was the best predictor. The, tight, linear relationship between planar projection and CSA enables ecological rates, such as reef accretion and gamete production, to be calculated from field data. Finally, we expanded the matrix population model to compare population dynamics in several locations across the Caribbean. The general trend for Acropora palmata is further reductions in population size by 2030. The most striking difference we quantified was between Jamaica, where population size is projected to increase, and all other locations, where population size is projected to remain stable or decline. Density of a key herbivore, the sea urchin Diadema antillarum, was an order of magnitude greater in Jamaica than in any other location. These increases are occurring 30 years after a devastating die-off suggesting that herbivory by urchins may facilitate A. palmata recovery.

Download Presentation: Slides
About The Speaker:

In December 2011 Tali completed her doctorate in Marine Biology at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography, where she was an NSF Integrated Graduate Education and Research Trainee (IGERT Fellow). Her dissertation quantified the population dynamics of the threatened Caribbean elkhorn coral (Acropora palmata), was funded by NOAA's Coral Reef Conservation Program; and she was the sole invited speaker at the Acropora Recovery Team meeting in December 2009. Her population model is helping NOAA managers plan for the recovery of Caribbean shallow reefs by outplanting baby corals. During her Ph.D. program she researched river herring population dynamics during an internship with the Environmental Defense Fund, which she then presented at the Northeast Fish and Wildlife Conference. She has given additional talks on her doctoral work at the International Coral Reef Society Conference, the Ecological Society of America, and other smaller conferences. She earned her bachelors and masters degrees in conservation biology from the University of Pennsylvania, and worked for five years at the New York City Parks Department. At the Parks Department she wrote grants and coordinated monitoring and experimental science for habitat (wetland, forest, oyster reef) restorations, gaining $10M in grants and damages claims towards wetland and forest rehabilitation. These "boutique" restorations provided critical habitat along the eastern fly-zone for migratory birds, as well as high quality food resources for insects and mammals (including one beaver!). Equally as important, these projects educated city residents about the important ecosystem services that intact habitat provides.

Remote Access and Notes:

For remote access via webinar, please fill out the registration form a few minutes before the meeting is scheduled to begin. The Meeting Number is 742656968; the Passcode is brownbag. For audio in the US and Canada, dial 866-833-7307. The participant passcode is 8986360. For questions about this seminar contact (301-713-2600 ext. 115) or (301-713-2600 ext. 155).

For questions about the Knauss seminar series contact or .

Visitor Information:

Unless otherwise specified, all non-NOAA visitors wanting to attend in person a seminar should contact in advance the contact person listed under "Remote Access and Notes" for specific information about obtaining building access.

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Thursday, April 26, 2012 11:28 AM / Last updated Monday, May 7, 2012 7:57 AM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are the most complete summary of upcoming NOAA science seminars; a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science across NOAA and our contituents. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

OneNOAA Science Seminar Number: 1249

Impacts of Karenia brevis Harmful Algal Blooms on Piscivorous Birds in Sarasota Bay, Florida

Add This OneNOAA Science Seminar to your Google Calendar
Date and Time: May 03, 2012, 12:30-13:00 Eastern Time Zone [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: NOAA SSMC-3, 2nd Floor, Library (1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD, 20910)
Speaker(s): (Marine Mammal Health and Stranding Program, Office of Protected Resources, NMFS)
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NOAA National Sea Grant College Program Dean John A. Knauss Marine Policy Fellowship Seminars
Abstract:

Harmful algal blooms (HABs), especially those caused by the red tide organism, Karenia brevis, a dinoflagellate that produces brevetoxins, occur frequently along Florida's west coast, causing episodes of high mortality in fish, sea turtles, birds, bottlenose dolphins and manatees. Although K. brevis blooms are known to cause episodes of mass mortality among marine vertebrates, it is not known whether this disturbance results in significant declines in bird populations or changes in community structure. This study investigated the extent that brevetoxicosis contributed to morbidity and mortality in stranded sea birds and we investigated the impact K. brevis blooms had on the local abundance and habitat use of piscivorous birds in the Sarasota Bay estuary. Blood or fecal samples were collected from debilitated birds on admission to a rehabilitation hospital from 4 February 2005 through 28 November 2006. Dead birds were necropsied and tissues collected for histopathology. A competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) to detect brevetoxins was performed on all collected samples. For the field study, data were obtained by conducting boat-based seasonal surveys of birds, K. brevis cell counts, and water quality during red tide and non-red tide conditions. Summer and winter surveys were conducted in four habitats between 20 June 2006 and 2 September 2009. Periods of high K. brevis concentrations (>105 cell l-1) occurred during February to December 2005, summer 2006, and winter 2007. Testing of blood, biological fluids, and tissues for brevetoxin by ELISA found toxin present in 69% (n=95) of rehabilitating sea birds with the highest values reported in double-crested cormorants (Phalacrocorax auritus). Among sea birds that died or were euthanized the highest brevetoxin concentrations were found in bile, stomach contents, and liver. Most dead birds had no significant pathologic findings at necropsy, thereby supporting brevetoxin-related mortality. In the field over 34,000 bird observations were obtained involving over 20 different species. The most abundant bird species were double-crested cormorants, laughing gulls (Larus atricilla), and brown pelicans (Pelecanus occidentalis). Overall bird densities were lower during red tide conditions than they were during non-red tide conditions. In particular, the abundance of double-crested cormorants decreased in all habitats during red tide conditions. In contrast, brown pelicans and laughing gulls increased in abundance in certain habitats during red tide conditions and rebounded to lower abundances by 2008. It is probable that cormorants are consuming different prey than pelicans and gulls and may be exposed to a higher dose of toxin leading to increased morbidity and mortality and lower abundances during red tide events.

Download Presentation: Slides
About The Speaker:

Deborah Fauquier earned her bachelor of science degree in biology from San Francisco State University and her veterinary and master's degrees from the University of California-Davis. She is currently a Ph.D. candidate in Ocean Sciences at the University of California-Santa Cruz where she is studying the impacts of harmful algal blooms on sea birds in Florida. Before starting her Ph.D. program, Deborah was a veterinarian and a staff scientist at the Center for Marine Mammal and Sea Turtle Research at Mote Marine Laboratory in Sarasota, Florida. During her Ph.D. she also has worked part-time as an Associate Veterinarian at The Marine Mammal Center in Sausalito, California where she completed a veterinary internship in 2002. Her research interests include investigating the impacts of disease and environmental changes including harmful algal blooms on marine organisms.

Remote Access and Notes:

For remote access via webinar, please fill out the registration form a few minutes before the meeting is scheduled to begin. The Meeting Number is 742656968; the Passcode is brownbag. For audio in the US and Canada, dial 866-833-7307. The participant passcode is 8986360. For questions about this seminar contact (301-713-2600 ext. 115) or (301-713-2600 ext. 155).

For questions about the Knauss seminar series contact or .

Visitor Information:

Unless otherwise specified, all non-NOAA visitors wanting to attend in person a seminar should contact in advance the contact person listed under "Remote Access and Notes" for specific information about obtaining building access.

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Thursday, April 26, 2012 11:28 AM / Last updated Monday, May 7, 2012 7:57 AM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are the most complete summary of upcoming NOAA science seminars; a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science across NOAA and our contituents. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

OneNOAA Science Seminar Number: 1250

May 04, 2012

Sea Grant's Army of Volunteers: Taking on Turtles and Other Hurdles

Add This OneNOAA Science Seminar to your Google Calendar
Date and Time: May 04, 2012, 12:00-13:00 Eastern Time Zone [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: NOAA SSMC-3, 2nd Floor, Library (1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD, 20910)
Speaker(s): Logan Respess (Associate Director of the Texas Sea Grant College Program)
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NOAA National Sea Grant
Abstract:

Hurricane recovery, endangered species, harmful algal blooms, invasive species, habitat degradation - there is no shortage of critical issues facing our nation's coasts. The sheer scope of these issues far surpasses NOAA Sea Grant's capacity to respond to them with its human capital alone, so we developed and trained a corps of master volunteers to help. Individually, these dedicated people could achieve small successes, but as a group they have provided far-reaching education, outreach and service projects. Join us in learning about the extraordinary impacts these master volunteers provide and how NOAA Sea Grant "raises me to the power of we!"

Remote Access:

For remote access via webinar, please fill out the registration form a few minutes before the meeting is scheduled to begin. The Meeting Number is 742656968; the Passcode is brownbag. For audio in the US and Canada, dial 866-833-7307. The participant passcode is 8986360. For questions about this seminar contact (301-713-2600 ext. 115) or (301-713-2600 ext. 155).

Visitor Information:

Unless otherwise specified, all non-NOAA visitors wanting to attend in person a seminar should contact in advance the contact person listed under "Remote Access and Notes" for specific information about obtaining building access.

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Friday, April 27, 2012 1:13 PM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are the most complete summary of upcoming NOAA science seminars; a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science across NOAA and our contituents. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

OneNOAA Science Seminar Number: 1251

May 08, 2012

Assessment of Rainstorm Climate Risk and Rainstorm-Induced Agricultural Disaster Risk in East-Central China

Add This OneNOAA Science Seminar to your Google Calendar
Date and Time: May 08, 2012, 11:00-12:00 Eastern Time Zone [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: NOAA World Weather Building Room 707 (5200 Auth Road, Camp Springs, MD 20746)
Speaker(s): Zhiguo Huo (Chinese Academy of Meteorological Sciences)
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NOAA NCEP Environmental Modeling Center (EMC) Seminar
Abstract:

The east-central China is a major agricultural region with dense population and developed economy. The region is also with abundant precipitation which causes severe flood damage each year. Daily precipitation data from 292 meteorological stations in east-central China for the period from 1961 to 2008 and annual crop affected area, disaster area and plant area of 17 provinces between 1971-2009 were used to construct rainstorm climatic index and its risk assessment model, then, the maps of rainstorm climatic risk and its geographic distribution in east-central China are compiled. The results show the assessment of disaster grade coincides with actual disaster situation. In time scale, the rainstorm climatic index matches well with relative disaster index; the correlation coefficient between the rainstorm climatic index and the agricultural relative disaster index for each of the provinces except Guangdong (0.5) is more than 0.6. The rainstorm climatic index and relative disaster index are high in the south areas and low in North China. The distribution of rainstorm climatic risk and relative disaster risk are not exactly the same, which means the areas with high-value of rainstorm climate risk may not be the areas with the severe disaster. The reasons may be the different ability of disaster prevention and mitigation.

Remote Access and Notes:

Remote access https://www2.gotomeeting.com/join/164664274. Phone Access: Dial +1 (267) 507-0003; Access Code and Meeting ID: 164-664-274 For questions about this seminar contact

Visitor Information:

Unless otherwise specified, all non-NOAA visitors wanting to attend in person a seminar should contact in advance the contact person listed under "Remote Access and Notes" for specific information about obtaining building access.

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Thursday, May 3, 2012 6:55 AM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are the most complete summary of upcoming NOAA science seminars; a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science across NOAA and our contituents. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] or join our RSS feed by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

OneNOAA Science Seminar Number: 1252

Estimation of Linear Observation Impact and Its Applications

Add This OneNOAA Science Seminar to your Google Calendar
Date and Time: May 08, 2012, 12:30-13:30 Eastern Time Zone [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: NOAA World Weather Building Room 707 (5200 Auth Road, Camp Springs, MD 20746)
Speaker(s): Toshiyuki Ishibashi (Meteorological Research Institute, Tsukuba, Japan)
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NOAA NCEP Environmental Modeling Center (EMC) Seminar
Abstract:

In data assimilation systems (DASs), the effect of each assimilated observation dataset on an analysis field is one of the main factors in determining analysis and succeeding forecast accuracy. We call the effect the linear observation impact, which is fully determined by the Kalman gain. However, the Kalman gain is never constructed explicitly in variational DASs. Therefore, the estimation of the linear observation impact is a difficult problem. In this study, we analyze linear observation impacts using two methods, the adjoint-based method (Baker and Daley 2000, Langland and Baker 2004, and Errico 2007) and the tangent linear approximation based method (Ishibashi 2011).

First, the adjoint-based method is implemented to the JMA global 4D-Var DAS. One-month long experiments of the observation impact estimation (using a dry total energy norm and 15 or 27 hour forecasts) show that almost all observation data contribute forecast error reduction in average, and this result is consistent with those of past OSEs in JMA. However, the experiments show that the impact of a total satellite radiance data is about the same magnitude as that of radio sonde data. This result implies that there is still many room for improvement of the forecast accuracy by improving usage of the radiance data, since, in previous studies in other NWP centers shows larger impacts from radiances (Cardinali 2009). We also find impacts of water vapor channel radiances increase in case of using a norm including humidity energy, and the method can detect wrong observation data which are given artificially deflated (too small) observation error settings.

Second, we construct the tangent linear approximation based method. The method estimates the linear observation impacts as a partial analysis increment vector that is generated by each observation dataset. The method enables us to see how the Kalman gain transforms information of observations into analysis increments.

In the seminar, applications of these methods for a design of an optimal observation system and an optimization of covariance matrix (Daescu 2008, Daescu and Todling 2010) will also be discussed.

Download Presentation: http://www.emc.ncep.noaa.gov/seminars/presentations/2012/Ishibashi_MAY2012_submit.pptx (Power Point)
Remote Access and Notes:

Remote access https://www2.gotomeeting.com/join/164664274. Phone Access: Dial +1 (267) 507-0003; Access Code and Meeting ID: 164-664-274 For questions about this seminar contact Sid-Ahmed Boukabara ()

Visitor Information:

Unless otherwise specified, all non-NOAA visitors wanting to attend in person a seminar should contact in advance the contact person listed under "Remote Access and Notes" for specific information about obtaining building access.

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Friday, April 20, 2012 8:43 AM / Last updated Wednesday, May 9, 2012 8:45 AM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are the most complete summary of upcoming NOAA science seminars; a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science across NOAA and our contituents. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] or join our RSS feed by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

OneNOAA Science Seminar Number: 1253

May 09, 2012

InVEST (in Our Oceans): A Tool to Map, Measure and Value Nature's Benefits

Add This OneNOAA Science Seminar to your Google Calendar
Date and Time: May 09, 2012, 12:00-13:00 Eastern Time Zone [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: NOAA SSMC-4, Room 8150 (1305 East-West Hwy, Silver Spring, MD)
Speaker(s): (Geographer for the Natural Capital Project)
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NOAA NOS Science Seminar Series, Stanford University and the World Wildlife Fund
Abstract:

InVEST is a family of models developed by the Natural Capital Project to map, measure and value changes to multiple ecosystem services in the future. By assessing risk to habitat and water quality under different scenarios of human use, marine InVEST can help trace the provision of services people rely on including fisheries, tourism and recreation, aesthetic views, coastal protection from inundations and storms and renewable energy generation.

Gregg Verutes will present work on behalf of the entire Natural Capital Project (NatCap) marine team including introduction of key partners, stories, and lessons learned from various demonstration sites. He will walk through the scenario development process for the coastal zone of Belize and how NatCap is connecting their freshwater and terrestrial models with the marine in and around Puget Sound, Galveston and Chesapeake Bays. Gregg will also share early results from climate change adaptation work in Monterey Bay and analysis of tradeoffs between fisheries and renewable energy harvest in New England. The talk will conclude with an intro to an interactive mapping exercise that has been used to teach students, young scientists and professionals about ecosystem services and tradeoffs.

About the Speaker:

Gregg Verutes is a GIS specialist working with an interdisciplinary team to develop the marine InVEST tools, a set of models for quantifying the services provided by coastal and marine ecosystems. His work focuses primarily on the application of these models in Vancouver Island BC, coastal Belize and various sites throughout the United States. He also has experience as a GIS instructor and cartographer having previously worked for National Geographic and the World Wildlife Fund's Conservation Science Program. Gregg received his M.S. from the Department of Geography at the San Diego State University and his B.S. in Policy Analysis and Management from Cornell University.

Remote Access and Notes:

Presentations are available remotely for free via a combination of phone (US &territories) & webcast. Remote access is limited to 50 connections on a first-come-first served basis. To participate remotely via phone and internet:

  • For the audio part of the presentation, Dial toll-free (U.S.) 1-877-708-1667. When prompted enter passcode 7028688 and the # sign. Please use your phone's mute button (*6 toggles on or off) during the presentation until you are ready to ask questions. The phone conference does not start until about five minutes before the seminar.
  • For the visual part of the presentation, you can access the web meeting by going to: http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?sigKey=mymeetings&i=744925156&p=&t=c. Enter meeting number 744925156 if needed; no passcode is required. Enter other required fields - First and last name, org. Check the box that that you have read the Privacy Policy, and click Proceed.

For questions about this seminar contact Tracy Gill () at least 45 minutes before the seminar, or if it is within 5 minutes of the seminar start, call the toll free number above.

Visitor Information:

Unless otherwise specified, all non-NOAA visitors wanting to attend in person a seminar should contact in advance the contact person listed under "Remote Access and Notes" for specific information about obtaining building access.

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Wednesday, March 7, 2012 5:36 PM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are the most complete summary of upcoming NOAA science seminars; a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science across NOAA and our contituents. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] or join our RSS feed by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

OneNOAA Science Seminar Number: 1254

Framing Climate Change: Recent Research Trends on Communication Strategies and Public Opinion

Add This OneNOAA Science Seminar to your Google Calendar
Date and Time: May 09, 2012, 12:00-13:00 Eastern Daylight Time [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: WebEx Event, remote access only (see Remote Access and Notes section below)
Speaker(s): (The Ohio State University)
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: Ohio Sea Grant
Abstract:

Climate change has become a hot-button issue in mainstream American politics, and people are divided over its causes, impacts, and solutions. This webinar will offer an overview of how the public views the issue of climate change, several explanations for these differences in perception, and possible approaches for bridging the gaps through innovative communication strategies. This webinar will provide information about:

  • Public opinion trends about climate change and public policy
  • Different explanations for divisions in public opinion about climate change
  • What the latest communication research tells us about best climate change communication practices, and about developing a public consensus about this issue
About The Speaker:

Erik C. Nisbet is an assistant professor of communication and political science at Ohio State University. His research interests center on how unconscious biases and selective media consumption can influence public opinion about science and environmental policy.

Erik has published peer-reviewed articles in a number of academic journals, such as the Journal of Communication and Communication Research. He is currently one of the principal investigators on the Co-Evolution of Upstream Human Behavior and Downstream Ecosystem Services in a Changing Climate grant funded by the National Science Foundation. Erik holds a Ph.D. in communication from the School of Agricultural & Life Sciences at Cornell University.

Remote Access and Notes:

To receive remote access information, you must register at http://changingclimate.osu.edu/ before the start of the webinar. Registration is free, and log-in information will be sent to the email address you provide during registration. Please contact , Ohio Sea Grant Assistant Director, with questions.

Visitor Information:

Unless otherwise specified, all non-NOAA visitors wanting to attend in person a seminar should contact in advance the contact person listed under "Remote Access and Notes" for specific information about obtaining building access.

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Tuesday, March 20, 2012 2:10 PM / Last updated Tuesday, May 1, 2012 7:29 AM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are the most complete summary of upcoming NOAA science seminars; a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science across NOAA and our contituents. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] or join our RSS feed by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

OneNOAA Science Seminar Number: 1255

Some Recent QBO Results

Add This OneNOAA Science Seminar to your Google Calendar
Date and Time: May 09, 2012. 15:30-16:30 (Boulder, CO) Mountain Standard Time [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: NOAA ESRL Chemical Sciences Division seminar Room 2A305, David Skaggs Research Center (NOAA Building), 325 Broadway, Boulder, CO (Directions)
Speaker(s): Marv Geller (Stony Brook University)
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NOAA ESRL Chemical Science Division seminar
Abstract:

Our recent efforts at self-generating a realistic QBO in GISS climate models are discussed, as is some recent work that suggests a significant role for the QBO in modulating tropical deep convection. Finally, some recent results on ENSO influences on the QBO will be discussed. This includes a brief summary of recent results by M. Taguchi (2010, JGR, doi:10.1029/2010JD014325), where he showed that the QBO has larger amplitude and longer period during La Niña periods. We have followed that up in a recent paper (Yuan et al., 2012, submitted), which shows that the QBO modulations of tropical tropopause temperatures are substantially larger during La Niña periods. This is likely to be an important consideration for dehydration of air entering the stratosphere.

ALL Seminar attendees agree not to cite, quote, copy, or distribute material presented without the explicit written consent of the seminar presenter. Any opinions expressed in this seminar are those of the speaker alone and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of NOAA or ESRL CSD.

Remote Access and Notes:

Remote access: Webinar registration: https://www2.gotomeeting.com/register/217059618 and view system requirements. Space is limited. Confirmation of registration includes information about joining the GoToMeeting. For further information about this seminar please contact [(303) 497-3599] or [(303) 497-5431].

Visitor Information:

Unless otherwise specified, all non-NOAA visitors wanting to attend in person a seminar should contact in advance the contact person listed under "Remote Access and Notes" for specific information about obtaining building access.

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Friday, April 27, 2012 4:55 PM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are the most complete summary of upcoming NOAA science seminars; a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science across NOAA and our contituents. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] or join our RSS feed by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

OneNOAA Science Seminar Number: 1256

Biosecurity Under Uncertainty: The Influence of Information Availability and Quality on Expert Decision-Making for Risk Outcomes

Add This OneNOAA Science Seminar to your Google Calendar
Date and Time: May 09, 2012, 10:30-11:30 Eastern Standard Zone [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: NOAA . NOAA Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory, Lake Superior Hall (4840 South State Road, Ann Arbor, MI)
Speaker(s): Dr. Alisha Dahlstrom (CILER Postdoctoral Fellow Department of Biological Sciences, Wayne State University)
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NOAA CILER
Abstract:

Alongside climate change and habitat loss, aquatic nonindigenous species (ANS) introductions comprise a large and increasing contribution of the anthropogenic threat to environmental, economic, sociocultural and human health values worldwide. Biosecurity agencies aim to prevent and manage introductions using various tools, including risk assessment. Risk assessment can prioritize threats, but is frequently compromised by uncertainty, often due to information availability, quality and interpretation. Many risk assessment processes lack consistent and transparent treatment of uncertainty, particularly when biosecurity objectives warrant a precautionary approach. Understanding and providing solutions to these challenges were the focus of my doctoral work, the general outcomes of which are presented in this seminar.

Results indicate that the scarcity of ANS impact information constitutes a primary source of uncertainty. When faced with knowledge gaps and other forms of uncertainty, experts tended to assume and assign lower consequence via a "hindsight approach" (assume no impact without sufficient information), which stands opposite to precaution. To mitigate the effects of uncertainty, experts supported the use of alternative information sources, including non-empirical evidence. In practice, the provision of information and group discussion generally increased the consequence estimate, thus suggesting methods that allow functional and, if desired, precautionary consequence assessments despite high uncertainty. In situations of expected "low" certainty, when information is available, outcomes indicated that an extremely high proportion of statistical analyses of impact had insufficient power to detect an impact, leading to "false certainty" of no impact. This bias toward "missing" impacts, again opposite to precaution, may further prevent appropriate management action. I conclude with a proposed framework that provides guidance for biosecurity-related research and management using a pre-determined acceptable level of risk (ALOR).

Remote Access and Notes:

Remote access via webinar: https://www2.gotomeeting.com/register/529291898. For further information about this seminar please contact

Visitor Information:

Unless otherwise specified, all non-NOAA visitors wanting to attend in person a seminar should contact in advance the contact person listed under "Remote Access and Notes" for specific information about obtaining building access.

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Tuesday, May 1, 2012 1:20 PM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are the most complete summary of upcoming NOAA science seminars; a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science across NOAA and our contituents. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] or join our RSS feed by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

OneNOAA Science Seminar Number: 1257

May 10, 2012

Transitioning from FGDC to ISO 101 and ISO Content and Organization: Validation

Add This OneNOAA Science Seminar to your Google Calendar
Date and Time: May 10, 2012, 13:00-14:00 Central Time Zone [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: Webinar access only
Speaker(s): (NCDDC)
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NOAA NCDDC
Abstract:

Module: QandA for Validation: Schemas, Schematrons

NODC NCDDC is offering a series of ISO Metadata Training sessions in an online format. Each session will last approximately one hour starting at 1:00pm CST. Select (click) the module title to register for that session. Once registered you will receive an email confirming your registration with information you need to join the Webinar. Alternately, you may download the complete schedule as a PDF document to view the dates, times and hyperlinks to register for each session.

Remote Access and Notes:

(space limited) Gotomeeting Link to register for this webinar: https://www1.gotomeeting.com/register/277141481. Once registered you will receive an email confirming your registration with information you need to join the Webinar. For further information about this seminar please contact [(866) 732-2382]

Visitor Information:

Unless otherwise specified, all non-NOAA visitors wanting to attend in person a seminar should contact in advance the contact person listed under "Remote Access and Notes" for specific information about obtaining building access.

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Monday, April 2, 2012 . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are the most complete summary of upcoming NOAA science seminars; a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science across NOAA and our contituents. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] or join our RSS feed by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

OneNOAA Science Seminar Number: 1258

Nature of, by, and for the People?

Add This OneNOAA Science Seminar to your Google Calendar
Date and Time: May 10, 2012, 11:00-12:00 Pacific Time Zone [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: NOAA Northwest Fisheries Science Center (NWFSC) Auditorium (2725 Montlake Boulevard East, Seattle, WA 98112); Map to NWFSC
Speaker(s): Dr. Mary Ruckelshaus (Managing Director, Natural Capital Project)
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NOAA NWFSC Monster Seminar JAM
Abstract:

TBD

View WebEx recording of the seminar:

WebEx recording (1 hour 1 min)

Remote Access and Notes:

(Updated remote access) Webinar: Go to https://nwfsc200.webex.com/nwfsc200/j.php?ED=13502408&UID=40245523&RT=MiM0 (This meeting does not require a password.) Click "Join". Call-in: 1-650-479-3207 (Not a toll-free number); Access code: 856 489 473. For Assistance during the presentation go to https://nwfsc.webex.com/nwfsc/mc On the left navigation bar, click "Support". For questions about this seminar please contact Diane L. Tierney-Jamieson (206-860-3380; )

Visitor Information:

Unless otherwise specified, all non-NOAA visitors wanting to attend in person a seminar should contact in advance the contact person listed under "Remote Access and Notes" for specific information about obtaining building access.

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Wednesday, April 4, 2012 9:47 AM / Last updated Friday, May 11, 2012 7:58 AM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science and management information. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] or join our RSS feed by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

OneNOAA Science Seminar Number: 1259

Early results from the Barnegat Bay Sea Nettle Barrier Pilot Project

Add This OneNOAA Science Seminar to your Google Calendar
Date and Time: May 10, 2012, 11:00-12:00 Eastern Time Zone [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: NOAA, NMFS, NEFSC, James J. Howard Marine Sciences Laboratory Conference Room. The Conference Room is located on the first floor of Office Building 74 (74 Magruder Road, Sandy Hook, New Jersey, Directions)
Speaker(s): Jim Vasslides, Jennifer Barny, Nina Sassano (Barnegat Bay Partnership, Ocean County College, Toms River, NJ)
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NOAA James J. Howard Marine Sciences Laboratory seminar series
Abstract:

In recent years, Atlantic sea nettle (Chrysaora quinquecirrha) populations have been increasing in Barnegat Bay. Because little is known on how to reduce populations, we developed a project to test the effectiveness of a barrier net in protecting bathers from these stinging jellyfish. Two beaches were chosen for this pilot program: Windward Beach on the Metedeconk River in Brick, NJ, and Brooklyn Avenue Beach on Barnegat Bay in Lavallette, NJ. From June through September of 2011, a 1 ½-inch (38mm) square mesh gillnet was deployed twice a week at each beach, with the intent of preventing nettles from entering the beaches' bathing areas. Once a week, we pulled a 50-foot bag seine both inside and outside the barrier at each beach to test the barrier's efficacy at excluding nettles from the bathing areas. Peak jellyfish abundance occurred in the first two weeks of August, and coincided with the optimal water temperature range (26-30°C) established by researchers in the nearby Chesapeake Bay. However, we found peak abundance did not match the optimal salinity range established by previous research. In both Brick and Lavallette, peak abundance occurred when salinity was above the 16 psu threshold established in Chesapeake studies. Our results show a bell diameter distribution of 8-120mm, with a mean of 34.6mm in Brick and 44.5mm in Lavallette, and a mode of 30mm in Brick and 39mm in Lavallette. In general, the barrier was successful at excluding 59.9% of the jellyfish from the swim area in Brick, and 54.6% from the swim area in Lavallette. These seemingly wide ranges are likely a result of the different gillnet deployment methods utilized, as well as deteriorating barrier net conditions due to blue crabs. These preliminary results indicate that barrier nets may be useful at some bathing beaches in the Barnegat Bay with additional refinement of mesh size and other net properties.

About The Speaker:

Jim Vasslides is the Program Scientist at the Barnegat Bay Partnership, a designated National Estuary Program working to improve the health of the Barnegat Bay, a nationally significant estuary. Jim received a BS in Natural Resource Management, an MS in Ecology and Evolution from Rutgers University, and is currently pursuing a doctoral degree. His current research interests focus on understanding the effects of increasing urbanization within the Barnegat Bay watershed, including the apparent proliferation of stinging sea nettles, impediments to diadromous species movements, and modeling the impacts of various management strategies on higher trophic level biota.

Remote Access and Notes:

This seminar was originally scheduled for April 12, 2012

To join the meeting online:

  1. Go to https://nmfs-st.webex.com/nmfs-st/j.php?ED=162114557&UID=0
  2. Enter your name and email address.
  3. Enter the meeting password: (This meeting does not require a password)
  4. Click "Join"

To join the teleconference audio:

  1. Dial: 1-866-658-9153
  2. Enter the passcode: 3373926

For further information about this seminar including remote access please contact or

Visitor Information:

Unless otherwise specified, all non-NOAA visitors wanting to attend in person a seminar should contact in advance the contact person listed under "Remote Access and Notes" for specific information about obtaining building access.

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Friday, March 16, 2012 9:08 AM / Last updated Friday, April 6, 2012 10:50 AM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are the most complete summary of upcoming NOAA science seminars; a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science across NOAA and our contituents. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

OneNOAA Science Seminar Number: 1260

May 14, 2012

Stakeholder Use of Riverine Probabilistic Forecasts

Add This OneNOAA Science Seminar to your Google Calendar
Date and Time: May 14, 2012, 11:00-12:30 Eastern Time Zone [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: NOAA SSMC-2, Room 8246 (1325 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD, 20910)
Speaker(s): Jan Verkade (Deltares, Delft, The Netherlands) and Edwin Welles (Deltares USA)
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NOAA NWS Office of Hydrologic Development
Abstract:

This seminar will present one of the studies from Flood Control 2015 programme, a Dutch government funded research and operational forecasting project. Our study focuses on how to make probability forecasts useable. The first stage of the project consisted of a case study with a water board in the Netherlands who have little experience with probability forecasts. The second stage focused on experienced users in the Central US. With the help of the NCRFC Service Coordination Hydrologist, Steve Buan, we interviewed forecast users in the Twin Cities area all of whom regularly used the NCRFC long lead probability forecasts.

From the first two stages of this project, we were able to draw some preliminary conclusions including:

  • though the added "probability dimension" complicates visualisation of probability forecasts; and
  • though "information overload" is a real issue that may be compounded by including estimates of predictive uncertainty.
  • many people do not find probability forecasts all that hard to understand.

Future work will include another set of case studies and experiments, in both The Netherlands and abroad. For more information, please visit http://publicwiki.deltares.nl/display/%7Everkade/Probabilistic+forecast+use+study.

About the Speaker:

Edwin Welles is an hydrologist with Deltares USA. He participated in the CHPS implementation and is currently supporting the NWS use of CHPS. He is a former employee of the NWS offices OHD and OS&T.

Jan Verkade is a hydrologist with a keen interest in the real-time flood prediction problem. He is currently working on a doctoral research project concerning predictive hydrological uncertainty: what is the probability of flooding in the near future? what are the benefits of expressing predictions in terms of probability? how do we evaluate probability forecasts? how can predictive uncertainty be effectively used? In addition, Jan has worked on a number of projects concerning the implementation of predictive hydrological uncertainty in forecasting systems in Australia, the Netherlands and Sudan. Also, Jan is a member of the River Forecasting Team of the Dutch Ministry of Infrastructure and the Environment.

Remote Access and Notes:

GotoMeeting: https://www1.gotomeeting.com/register/831140001. For further information contact .

Visitor Information:

Unless otherwise specified, all non-NOAA visitors wanting to attend in person a seminar should contact in advance the contact person listed under "Remote Access and Notes" for specific information about obtaining building access.

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Monday, May 7, 2012 8:50 AM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are the most complete summary of upcoming NOAA science seminars; a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science across NOAA and our contituents. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

OneNOAA Science Seminar Number: 1277

May 15, 2012

Snow Falling On Yellow-Cedars

Add This OneNOAA Science Seminar to your Google Calendar
Date and Time: May 15, 2012, 10:00-11:00 Alaska Local Time (14:00-15:00 Eastern Time Zone) [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: ACCAP office, second floor of the Denali Building, 3352 College Rd., Fairbanks, Alaska
Speaker(s): Paul Hennon(1), Dave D'Amore(1), Paul Schaberg(2), Colin Shanley(3), Dustin Wittwer(4), Lauren Oakes(5), Colin Beier(6) [(1) USFS, Pacific Northwest Research Station, Juneau, AK; (2) USFS, Northern Research Station, Burlington, VT; (3) The Nature Conservancy, Juneau, AK; (4) USFS, Alaska Region, Juneau, AK; (5) Stanford University, Stanford, CA; (6) State University of New York, Syracuse, NY]
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NOAA ACCAP monthly climate webinar
Abstract:

Some ecosystems such as those in the arctic or deserts are driven by extreme climates, and these areas may be particularly sensitive to deleterious effects of climate change. However, the moderate temperate climates of the North Pacific Coast are experiencing a critical shift in the form of precipitation with more rain and less snow as winter temperatures warm beyond the freezing threshold. Yellow-cedar decline in coastal Alaska and British Columbia serves as an example of how this shift of a reduction in snow interacts with landscape features and the specific vulnerability of a species to cause widespread tree death. This webinar will feature scientists describing how they untangled climate and ecological characteristics of yellow-cedar to solve the mystery of the dying yellow-cedar forests. This new knowledge then became the foundation for a strategy to adapt the long-term conservation and management to ensure the viability of this valuable tree.

Download Presentation: Summary Slides
Remote Access and Notes:

Pre-registration is strongly encouraged. To register please fill out the web-form at: http://ine.uaf.edu/accap/teleconference.htm#register, or contact: Brook Gamble, Assistant Coordinator and Outreach Specialist, (907) 474-7812, . Please let us know if you intend to come in person. You are welcome to join us in our Fairbanks conference room. The ACCAP office is located on the second floor of the Denali Building, 3352 College Rd., Fairbanks.

How to Participate / Log-In to the Alaska Climate Webinar:

  • Point your web browser to: http://infiniteconferencing.com/Events/accap/
  • Enter Participant Code 83847342
  • Enter the rest of the requested information (The name and organization you enter will be seen by other participants, but your contact information will remain confidential
  • Click the blue "log-in" button

Audio / conference call:

  • With a regular telephone dial: 1- (877) 594-8353
  • When prompted, enter the Participant passcode: 83847342.Please mute your phone during the presentation. The audio is very sensitive and your external conversations and typing can be heard by other participants.

For support during a call, press *0 on your phone and a conferencing coordinator will assist you. For further information please contact Brook Gamble, Assistant Coordinator and Outreach Specialist, (907) 474-7812,

Visitor Information:

Unless otherwise specified, all non-NOAA visitors wanting to attend in person a seminar should contact in advance the contact person listed under "Remote Access and Notes" for specific information about obtaining building access.

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Monday, April 16, 2012 8:48 AM / Last updated Tuesday, May 15, 2012 7:54 AM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are the most complete summary of upcoming NOAA science seminars; a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science across NOAA and our contituents. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

OneNOAA Science Seminar Number: 1261

NOAA 2012 Environmental Data Management Conference (May 15-17, 2012)

Add Event to your Google Calendar:
Date and Time: Tuesday, May 15, 2012 9:00 AM - Thursday, May 17, 2012 12:30 PM (Eastern Time) [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: The Marriott Inn & Conference Center at UMD (3501 University Blvd, East Hyattsville, Maryland 20783)
Speaker(s): Multiple Speakers
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NOAA
Abstract:

This conference will advance environmental data management at NOAA by highlighting progress in specific elements of the data life cycle and fostering discussions and networking to address key environmental data management issues facing NOAA today. For additional information and to register: http://www.regonline.com/builder/site/Default.aspx?EventID=989043 (Registration for this conference is free)

Goals and Outcomes

  • Inform the implementation of Procedural Directives for specific life-cycle components per NOAA Administrative Order 212-15
  • Promote cross-NOAA collaboration in environmental data management
  • Provide an opportunity for broader community interactions by fostering Communities of Practice
  • Identify and document best practices in environmental data management
  • Identify current capabilities that can be leveraged across NOAA
  • Assess how well NOAA is doing in its key environmental data management functions
  • Promote and socialize the concept of data management as a core NOAA business practice

Conference Program

Wednesday May 16: Biological and Chemical Data Management Session (Chairs: and (NESDIS))

  • 09:00-09:05h. Speaker: (NESDIS): Welcome; Session remarks
  • 09:05-09:20h. Speaker: (NMFS); Title: Data Download Tool for the NOAA Coral Reef Ecosystem Division's (CRED) biological data
  • 09:20-09:35h. Speaker: (US IOOS); et al.; Title: U.S. Integrated Ocean Observing System (U.S. IOOS): Improving Biological Observing Data Integration and Dissemination
  • 09:35-09:50h. Speaker: (BCO-DMO, WHOI); Title: Integrating data: A case study from the US GLOBEC and US JGOFS programs
  • 09:50-10:05h. Speaker: (NMFS); Title: The COPEPOD Project
  • 10:05-10:20h. Speaker: (NOS); Title: Consideration/lessons learned from the National Status and Trends Program as it relates to integrating biological and chemical data
  • 10:20-10:35h. Speaker: et al (NESDIS); Title: Scientific Stewardship and Integration of Ocean Acidification Data
  • 10:35-10:50h. Speaker: (NMFS); Title: NMFS Enterprise Data Management (EDM): NOAA Fisheries' enterprise-wide approach for managing data
  • 10:50-11:05h. Speaker: (NMFS); Title: Data needs for Integrated Ecosystem Assessments: an end-to-end modeling perspective
Remote Access and Notes:

Remote attendance for selected sessions: Some sessions of the 2012 NOAA EDM Conference will be available for remote attendance. Remote attendance has a video and an audio component. Remote access information https://www.nosc.noaa.gov/edmcon/remote.html. For additional information and to register: http://www.regonline.com/builder/site/Default.aspx?EventID=989043 (Registration for this conference is free). For further information please don't hesitate to contact the EDMC Executive Secretariat: (301) 713-7174 or (301) 713-7164. Conference Program

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Monday, April 30, 2012 9:08 AM / Last updated Tuesday, May 15, 2012 7:47 AM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are the most complete summary of upcoming NOAA science seminars; a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science across NOAA and our contituents. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

OneNOAA Science Seminar Number: 1262

May 16, 2012

The Assimilation of Surface Sensitive Microwave Observations Over Land: Recent Results and Open Issues

Add This OneNOAA Science Seminar to your Google Calendar
Date and Time: May 16, 2012, 14:00-15:00h Eastern Time Zone [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: NOAA World Weather Building Room 707 (5200 Auth Road, Camp Springs, MD 20746; Directions from Google).
Speaker(s): (MeteoFrance)
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NOAA Joint Center for Satellite Data Assimilation (JCSDA)
Abstract:

One of the many scientific challenges in the field of numerical weather prediction is to extract useful information on the atmospheric boundary layer using observations from remote sensing microwave instruments such as AMSU-A, AMSU-B/MHS or SSMIS. These data contribute increasingly to improve short to medium range forecasts, but also to improve re-analyses. Better use of these data often requires appropriate representation of the surface in the models, in both emissivity and temperature. This is achieved over sea, and satellite data have a tremendous impact on the atmospheric analyses over oceans. Over land, the surface emissivity is highly variable and may cause biases in the forward model if its temporal and spatial variability are not well taken into account. In such a situation, the model cannot produce realistic simulations of observations sensitive to the surface and may reject useful observations, including those not sensitive to the surface. This case concerns in particular the land and sea ice surfaces for which the surface emissivity is particularly challenging to model. During the seminar, some of the work carried out at Meteo-France for a better description of the emissivity of land and sea ice surfaces will be summerized. The methodology used for estimating the emissivity in the model and its impact on the performance of the radiative transfer model will be presented. The impact of a proper modeling of the land and sea ice emissivity, in terms of forecast skill and quality of analyses, will be discussed.

Download Presentation: Summary Slides (~3.99 MB)
Remote Access and Notes:

Video:

  1. Go to JCSDA Seminar and click on the seminar title
  2. Enter your name and email address
  3. Enter the meeting password: JCSDAseminars707
  4. Click "Join Now"
  5. Follow the instructions that appear on your screen
  6. For further information visit http://www.jcsda.noaa.gov/JCSDASeminars.php

Phone Access:

  • USA participants: 1-866-715-2479
  • Passcode: 9457557
  • Enter the meeting password: JCSDAseminar2010
  • International: 1-517-345-5260
  • For further information about this seminar please contact

Visitor Information:

Unless otherwise specified, all non-NOAA visitors wanting to attend in person a seminar should contact in advance the contact person listed under "Remote Access and Notes" for specific information about obtaining building access.

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Monday, March 5, 2012 9:06 AM / Last updated Tuesday, May 15, 2012 7:50 AM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are the most complete summary of upcoming NOAA science seminars; a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science across NOAA and our contituents. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] or join our RSS feed by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

OneNOAA Science Seminar Number: 1263

Update on the 82 Corals Status Review

Add This OneNOAA Science Seminar to your Google Calendar
Date and Time: May 16, 2012, 12:00-13:00 Eastern Time Zone [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: NOAA SSMC-4 Room 8150 (1305 East-West Hwy, Silver Spring, MD).
Speaker(s): (ESA Coral Coordinator, Protected Resources Division, Southeast Regional Office)
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NOAA NOS Science Seminar Series and Office of NOAA Fisheries
Abstract:

This presentation will provide an update on the progress of the status review of 82 species of corals under the Endangered Species Act. Due to the complexity of this review we have added a new step of public engagement prior to making our 12-month finding on whether any of the species warrant listing. The new process and information gathered to date will be discussed.

About the Speaker:

Jennifer received a BA in Biology with a Concentration in Marine Science from Boston University. During that time, she volunteered at the Smithsonian Institution National Zoological Park designing exhibits for the Amazonia Science Gallery. She received an MS in Biological Oceanography from the University of South Florida. Concurrent with her master's program she worked as an environmental consultant for a small firm in St. Petersburg, FL, focusing on field investigation of marine habitats in support of regulated activities. She began working for NOAA Fisheries Service's Southeast Regional Office in 2003 as the Protected Resources Division Species of Concern Coordinator. In 2005, she transitioned to her current position as the ESA-listed corals coordinator.

Remote Access and Notes:

Presentations are available remotely via a combination of phone (US only) & webcast. Note that remote access is limited to 50 connections on a first-come-first served basis, so we cannot guarantee participation. To participate remotely via phone and internet:

  1. To access the webex meeting, go the to the webcast site at http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?sigKey=mymeetings&i=744925156&p=&t=c Enter meeting number 744925156 if needed; no passcode is required. Enter other required fields - First and last name. Check the box that that you have read the Privacy Policy, and click Proceed.
  2. Dial toll-free (U.S.) 1-877-708-1667. When prompted enter passcode 7028688 followed by the # sign. Please use your phone's mute button (*6 toggles on or off) during the presentation until you are ready to ask questions. The phone conference does not start until about five minutes before the seminar.

For further information about this seminar please contact , or if it is within 5 minutes of the seminar start, call the toll free number above and she will try to answer your questions.

Visitor Information:

Unless otherwise specified, all non-NOAA visitors wanting to attend in person a seminar should contact in advance the contact person listed under "Remote Access and Notes" for specific information about obtaining building access.

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Wednesday, May 9, 2012 9:00 AM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are the most complete summary of upcoming NOAA science seminars; a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science across NOAA and our contituents. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] or join our RSS feed by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

OneNOAA Science Seminar Number: 1282

Test Space-Based Radar Calibration of GOES Precipitation Estimates and the Potential Impacts on Streamflow Forecasting - Preliminary Results

Add This OneNOAA Science Seminar to your Google Calendar
Date and Time: May 16, 2012, 10:00-11:00 Eastern Time Zone [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: NOAA SSMC-2 Room 8246 (1325 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD, 20910).
Speaker(s): Bob Kuligowski (NESDIS-STAR), Yu Zhang (NWS/OHD), Haksu Lee (NWS/OHD)
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NOAA NWS Office of Hydrologic Development
Abstract:

The Tropical Rainfall Measurement Mission (TRMM) satellite has made critical contribution to the rainfall estimates over the tropics, but its values for operational hydrologic prediction have yet to be systematically assessed. NOAA NESDIS-STAR and OHD carried out a set of experiment to examine the potential enhancement in the accuracy of Satellite Precipitation Estimates (SPE) from the Self-calibrating Multivariate Precipitation Retrieval algorithm through the ingest of TRMM data, and to evaluate the efficacy of SCaMPR QPEs with and without TRMM ingests as a forcing input for hydrologic prediction. The study was divided into three phases: i) augmentation of SCaMPR framework to incorporate TRMM data; ii) evaluation the accuracy of SCaMPR QPEs before and after TRMM ingest both on a grid basis and on a watershed average basis; and iii) hydrologic experiment wherein the SCaMPR QPEs and ground sensor-based products were used to drive the operational hydrologic model. Our investigations concluded that a) TRMM ingest brought substantial improvements in the SCaMPR QPE, mainly by suppressing the positive bias; b) SCaMPR QPEs could outperform gauge-only QPEs at the hourly scale when gauge density drops under 1.1 gauge per 10000 km2; and c) with bias correction, gauge-only analysis still outperform SCaMPR QPEs in simulating flood events, though the latter, especially with TRMM ingest, can be competitive for a number of watersheds.

Remote Access and Notes:

GotoMeeting: https://www1.gotomeeting.com/join/459429184. Teleconference: (267) 507-0013, Access Code: 459-429-184 (attendance is limited to the first 25 callers). For further information about this seminar please contact at 301-713-0640 x183 or at x131 if you have any questions. If you have problems during the seminar please call 301-713-1658

Visitor Information:

Unless otherwise specified, all non-NOAA visitors wanting to attend in person a seminar should contact in advance the contact person listed under "Remote Access and Notes" for specific information about obtaining building access.

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Friday, May 11, 2012 12:18 PM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are the most complete summary of upcoming NOAA science seminars; a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science across NOAA and our contituents. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] or join our RSS feed by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

OneNOAA Science Seminar Number: 1285

May 17, 2012

Transitioning from FGDC to ISO 101 and ISO Content and Organization: QandA for Validation

Add This OneNOAA Science Seminar to your Google Calendar
Date and Time: May 17, 2012, 13:00-14:00 Central Time Zone [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: Webinar access only
Speaker(s): (NCDDC)
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NOAA NCDDC
Abstract:

Module: Validation: Schemas, Schematrons

NODC NCDDC is offering a series of ISO Metadata Training sessions in an online format. Each session will last approximately one hour starting at 1:00pm CST. Select (click) the module title to register for that session. Once registered you will receive an email confirming your registration with information you need to join the Webinar. Alternately, you may download the complete schedule as a PDF document to view the dates, times and hyperlinks to register for each session.

Remote Access and Notes:

(space limited) Gotomeeting Link to register for this webinar: https://www1.gotomeeting.com/register/860414937. Once registered you will receive an email confirming your registration with information you need to join the Webinar. For further information about this seminar please contact [(866) 732-2382]

Visitor Information:

Unless otherwise specified, all non-NOAA visitors wanting to attend in person a seminar should contact in advance the contact person listed under "Remote Access and Notes" for specific information about obtaining building access.

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Monday, April 2, 2012 . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are the most complete summary of upcoming NOAA science seminars; a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science across NOAA and our contituents. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] or join our RSS feed by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

OneNOAA Science Seminar Number: 1264

Resource Rents, Inframarginal Rents and the Transition to Property Rights in a Common Pool Resource

Add This OneNOAA Science Seminar to your Google Calendar
Date and Time: May 17, 2012, 11:00-12:00 Pacific Time Zone [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: NOAA Northwest Fisheries Science Center (NWFSC) Auditorium (2725 Montlake Boulevard East, Seattle, WA 98112); Map to NWFSC
Speaker(s): Dr. Chris Costello (Professor, Bren School of Environmental Science & Management, UC Santa Barbara)
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NOAA NWFSC Monster Seminar JAM
Abstract:

TBD

Download Webex Recording of the Seminar:

WebEx recording (1 hour 14 mins)

Remote Access and Notes:

(Updated remote access) Webinar: Go to https://nwfsc200.webex.com/nwfsc200/j.php?ED=13502408&UID=40245523&RT=MiM0 (This meeting does not require a password.) Click "Join". Call-in: 1-650-479-3207 (Not a toll-free number); Access code: 856 489 473. For Assistance during the presentation go to https://nwfsc.webex.com/nwfsc/mc On the left navigation bar, click "Support". For questions about this seminar please contact Diane L. Tierney-Jamieson (206-860-3380; )

Visitor Information:

Unless otherwise specified, all non-NOAA visitors wanting to attend in person a seminar should contact in advance the contact person listed under "Remote Access and Notes" for specific information about obtaining building access.

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Wednesday, April 4, 2012 9:47 AM / Last updated Tuesday, May 29, 2012 8:21 AM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science and management information. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] or join our RSS feed by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

OneNOAA Science Seminar Number: 1265

Physiological and Growth Response of a Polar Diatom to Shifts in Iron and Irradiance: Implications for Biogeochemical Cycles

Add This OneNOAA Science Seminar to your Google Calendar
Date and Time: May 17, 2012, 12:00-12:30 Eastern Time Zone [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: NOAA SSMC-3, 2nd Floor, Library (1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD, 20910)
Speaker(s): (OAR, Ocean Acidification Program)
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NOAA National Sea Grant College Program Dean John A. Knauss Marine Policy Fellowship Seminars
Abstract:

The Ross Sea, one of the most productive Southern Ocean regions, accounts for a substantial proportion of global primary production and is responsible for up to one fourth of the C02 export in this ocean. Both primary and export production in this region are thought to be mediated by the interaction of light and iron (Fe) bio-availability. Future climate change may produce significant changes in the mixing-irradiance regime, and in the supply of macro- and micro-nutrients, in the highly productive waters of the Antarctic continental shelf. In this context, there is a pressing need to understand the responses of the major groups of Antarctic phytoplankton to such environmental changes. The diatom Fragilariopsis cylindrus is a prolific species on the Antarctic shelf, inhabiting both sea-ice (low irradiance) and open-water (high irradiance) regimes. Laboratory culture experiments were performed to examine the growth and physiology of this diatom under nutrient-replete conditions at irradiances of 5-500 µE m-2 s-1, on both acute and long term timescales. These allowed the sub-optimal, optimal, and supra-optimal irradiance for growth (5, 100, and 500 µE m-2 s-1, respectively) to be assessed for this species, under which growth at varying Fe concentrations (0 - 1000nM Fe-EDTA) could then be examined. Cell number, biovolume, photosynthetic efficiency (Fv/Fm) and effective absorption cross section of PSII (sPSII), photosynthetic and photoprotective pigments, reactive oxygen species (ROS), and intracellular particulate dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSPP) were measured in these experiments. The results indicated that F. cylindrus maintained relatively high growth rates (µ= 0.1-0.4) over a wide range of irradiance levels under nutrient replete conditions, probably using various physiological mechanisms including xanthophyll cycling and decreasing effective absorption cross section at higher irradiance. These mechanisms were also employed during iron manipulation experiments at the various irradiances, accompanied by an approximate 25% decrease in growth rate (µ) values. DMSPP levels (up to 60 mM) may also be serving as an antioxidant free-radical scavenging pool under both iron and light stress, thereby preventing oxidative damage, within the photosynthetic apparatus. DMSP is readily converted to dimethyl sulfide (DMS) which serves as cloud condensation nuclei, contributing to the climate feedback loop. These higher than previously recorded intracellular DMSPP concentrations, in addition to the ability of F. cylindrus to grow at higher irradiances could have implications for regional carbon and sulfur cycles.

Download Presentation: Summary Slides
About The Speaker:

Jenn Bennett was born in Boston, VA near the Blue Ridge Mountains and found her love for the ocean during summers spent on the coast of Maine. To further explore this passion she attended University of California Santa Cruz, and graduated with a B.S. with honors in Marine Biology. While there she partook in an independent study looking at the various clades of zooxanthellae associated with coral hosts on the Great Barrier Reef. Jenn spent her post-undergraduate days in a variety of occupations including environmental education, snow board instructing, and construction managing, to name a few. She was inspired return to graduate shoool, after travelling abroad and seeing the lack of scientific knowledge and policy with regards to coastal ecosystems. She graduated from College of Charleston with a M.S. in marine biology, where she examined the effects of iron and light on the growth and physiology of a Polar diatom, Fragilariopsis cylindrus. She is currently a Knauss marine policy fellow in NOAA's Ocean Acidification program where she continues to explore the interaction of science and policy and anthropogenic impacts on marine ecosystems.

Remote Access:

For remote access via webinar, please fill out the registration form a few minutes before the meeting is scheduled to begin. The Meeting Number is 742656968; the Passcode is brownbag. For audio in the US and Canada, dial 866-833-7307. The participant passcode is 8986360. For questions about this seminar contact (301-713-2600 ext. 115) or (301-713-2600 ext. 155).

For questions about the Knauss seminar series contact or .

Visitor Information:

Unless otherwise specified, all non-NOAA visitors wanting to attend in person a seminar should contact in advance the contact person listed under "Remote Access and Notes" for specific information about obtaining building access.

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Friday, May 11, 2012 10:01 AM / Last updated Thursday, May 17, 2012 9:27 AM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are the most complete summary of upcoming NOAA science seminars; a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science across NOAA and our contituents. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

OneNOAA Science Seminar Number: 1249

Managing and Modeling Fisheries at Small Spatial Scales: A Case Study Using Giant Clams

Add This OneNOAA Science Seminar to your Google Calendar
Date and Time: May 17, 2012, 12:30-13:00 Eastern Time Zone [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: NOAA SSMC-3, 2nd Floor, Library (1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD, 20910)
Speaker(s): (OAR/ Office of the Assistant Administrator)
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NOAA National Sea Grant College Program Dean John A. Knauss Marine Policy Fellowship Seminars
Abstract:

Many marine populations are managed at small spatial scales (tens to hundreds of kms), as in the example of small-scale fisheries. A major difficulty in managing and modeling marine populations at small spatial scales is the unknown amount of self-recruitment occurring: larvae that settle within a small spatial area may have come from local adults (self-recruitment), or may be offspring of adults outside of the small spatial area (external recruitment). Without knowing where larvae are coming from, it is difficult to model patterns in population abundance. I modified an ecological population model (Integral Projection Model, IPM) to account for uncertainty in self-recruitment at small spatial scales, and used that model to determine that a small-scale fishery for giant clams in French Polynesia is sustainable at the present rate of fishing. I also determined a method for setting a minimum size limit that maximizes harvest while sustaining population abundance, despite uncertainty in self-recruitment. I generalized this method beyond giant clams to organisms with a variety of different life history characteristics. Overall, size limits can optimize (or nearly optimize) harvest in small-scale fisheries, and populations can be modeled and managed at small spatial scales in the face of uncertainty regarding the amount of self-recruitment.

Download Presentation: Summary Slides
About The Speaker:

Annie Yau is a 2012 Knauss Sea Grant Fellow in the Office of the Assistant Administrator of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research (OAR) in the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). She is primarily responsible for staffing Craig McLean, the Deputy Assistant Administrator of Programs and Administration, on his duties as manager of daily operations and administration of NOAA's research enterprise. She serves as team lead for NOAA's efforts toward the Priority Objective "Coordinate and Support" of the National Ocean Policy Implementation Plan, and staffs the Assistant Administrator (Dr. Robert Detrick) and Deputy Assistant Administrator on National Ocean Policy issues for their roles on the Ocean Science and Technology Interagency Policy Committee, the Interagency-Working Group on Ocean Partnerships of the National Oceanographic Partnership Program, and the NOAA Oceans and Coastal Council. She serves as the Fisheries specialist on the Scientific Publications Synthesis Team that briefs the NOAA Administrator on the most recent publications by NOAA scientists. She also supported Mr. McLean in his previous role as Acting Assistant Administrator of NOAA OAR.

Annie earned a Ph.D. in Environmental Science and Management from the Bren School at the University of California, Santa Barbara in 2011, and a B.S. in Marine Biology from the University of California, Los Angeles, in 2004 where she graduated Summa Cum Laude. For her dissertation, she modified an ecological population model to account for uncertainty in self-recruitment of marine populations at small spatial scales, and used that model to determine that a small-scale fishery for giant clams in French Polynesia is sustainable at the present rate of fishing. She also developed a general method for setting a minimum size limit that maximizes harvest while sustaining population abundance, despite uncertainty in self-recruitment. In addition, she successfully obtained funding from the National Science Foundation to conduct laboratory studies on the photophysiology of symbiotic algae within giant clams.

She has authored, co-authored, and is preparing scientific publications on a variety of topics including the use of ecological population models to model harvested populations, methods for modeling marine populations in the face of uncertainty regarding self-recruitment, the vulnerability of countries to changes in their coral reef fisheries, best education practices for environmental education, and the photophysiology of symbiotic marine algae.

Annie is passionate about the oceans and is an environmentalist at heart. She strives to apply science in solving environmental problems and to improve the role of science in society. She has evaluated the sustainability of several fisheries for the Seafood Watch Program of the Monterey Bay Aquarium, coordinated an environmental outreach and education program, and volunteered for an effort to stop overfishing in a village in Costa Rica. These opportunities and her former role as a university instructor have provided extensive experience communicating science to technical and non-technical audiences. She has also received formal training in science communication, public participation in decision-making, conflict resolution, risk communication, negotiation, eco-informatics, and public data sharing. In her free time she enjoys surfing, swimming, and outrigger canoeing.

Remote Access:

For remote access via webinar, please fill out the registration form a few minutes before the meeting is scheduled to begin. The Meeting Number is 742656968; the Passcode is brownbag. For audio in the US and Canada, dial 866-833-7307. The participant passcode is 8986360. For questions about this seminar contact (301-713-2600 ext. 115) or (301-713-2600 ext. 155).

For questions about the Knauss seminar series contact or .

Visitor Information:

Unless otherwise specified, all non-NOAA visitors wanting to attend in person a seminar should contact in advance the contact person listed under "Remote Access and Notes" for specific information about obtaining building access.

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Friday, May 11, 2012 10:01 AM / Last updated Thursday, May 17, 2012 9:27 AM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are the most complete summary of upcoming NOAA science seminars; a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science across NOAA and our contituents. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

OneNOAA Science Seminar Number: 1250

May 23, 2012

Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species: Marine Species Preparations for the Next Conference of the Parties

Add This OneNOAA Science Seminar to your Google Calendar
Date and Time: May 23, 2012, 12:00-13:00 Eastern Time Zone [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: NOAA SSMC-4, Room 8150 (1305 East-West Hwy, Silver Spring, MD 20910)
Speaker(s): (NOAA Fisheries Office of Protected Resources)
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NOAA NOS Science Seminar Series and NOAA Fisheries Office of Protected Resources
Abstract:

The Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES) is an international agreement between governments that aims to ensure that international trade in specimens of wild animals and plants does not threaten their survival. Species receive three levels of protection for trade depending on which appendix they are listed in. The United States' process for proposing additions to the list of protected species includes a number of steps involving experts and the public. We are currently preparing for the 16th Conference of the Parties (COP) which will occur in March 2013. I will discuss CITES itself, progress to date on developing U.S. proposals and positions for COP 16, and ways experts and the public can become involved.

About The Speaker:

Dwayne Meadows is an endangered species biologist for NOAA Fisheries. He is the national coordinator of the Species of Concern proactive conservation program and also works on Endangered Species Act listing actions and CITES science support. He has Bachelor's and Ph.D. degrees in marine zoology with research backgrounds in coral reef fish, sea turtle, marine mammal and invertebrate conservation behavioral ecology. Prior to joining the Endangered Species Program Dr. Meadows spent eight years in academia, was Director of Research and Marine Science for an NGO in Hawaii, and worked on marine debris and coral reef monitoring for NOAA Fisheries' Coral Reef Ecosystem Division.

Remote Access and Notes:

Presentations are available remotely via a combination of phone (US only) & webcast. Note that remote access is limited to 50 connections on a first-come-first served basis, so we cannot guarantee participation. To participate remotely via phone and internet:

Dial toll-free (U.S.) 1-877-708-1667. When prompted enter passcode 7028688 followed by the # sign. Please use your phone's mute button (*6 toggles on or off) during the presentation until you are ready to ask questions. The phone conference does not start until about five minutes before the seminar.

To access the webex meeting, go the to the webcast site at http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?sigKey=mymeetings&i=744925156&p=&t=c. Enter meeting number 744925156 if needed; no passcode is required. Enter other required fields - First and last name. Check the box that that you have read the Privacy Policy, and click Proceed.

For further information about this seminar please contact ), or if it is within 5 minutes of the seminar start, call the toll free number above and she will try to answer your questions.

Visitor Information:

Unless otherwise specified, all non-NOAA visitors wanting to attend in person a seminar should contact in advance the contact person listed under "Remote Access and Notes" for specific information about obtaining building access.

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Tuesday, April 10, 2012 . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are the most complete summary of upcoming NOAA science seminars; a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science across NOAA and our contituents. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] or join our RSS feed by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

OneNOAA Science Seminar Number: 1266

Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) Associated With Oil and Natural Gas Operations in Colorado and Utah: Regional Characteristics and Potential Atmospheric Impacts

Add This OneNOAA Science Seminar to your Google Calendar
Date and Time: May 23, 2012. 15:30-16:30 (Boulder, CO) Mountain Standard Time [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: NOAA ESRL Chemical Sciences Division seminar Room 2A305, David Skaggs Research Center (NOAA Building), 325 Broadway, Boulder, CO (Directions)
Speaker(s): (NOAA ESRL CSD & CU CIRES)
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NOAA ESRL Chemical Science Division seminar
Abstract:

In the United States, Colorado and Utah rank 5th and 9th, respectively, in the production of natural gas, and 10th and 11th, respectively, for domestic crude oil production. Raw natural gas surfacing at a completed wellhead is a mixture of approximately 75 mole percent methane (C1) while the remaining fraction is mostly composed of ethane (C2), propane (C3), and higher hydrocarbons (C4-C6+) that are subsequently distilled. An extensive set of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and other trace gases were measured in the ambient air near two highly active areas of oil and natural gas production in Colorado's Denver-Julesburg Basin and Utah's Uintah Basin. The Colorado study took place in February-March 2011 at the NOAA Boulder Atmospheric Observatory (BAO) in southwestern Weld County as part of the Nitrogen, Aerosol Composition, and Halogens on a Tall Tower (NACHTT) experiment. The Utah study took place in January-February 2012 in northeastern Utah as part of the Uintah Basin Winter Ozone Study (UBWOS). Both of these data sets are characterized by 1) highly elevated hydrocarbon mixing ratios and 2) very strong correlations amongst the alkanes and several aromatics indicating a common source for all of these compounds. For example, the median mixing ratios for propane were 16 and 31 ppbv during the Colorado and Utah studies, respectively, which is substantially greater than median urban values that range between 1-5 ppbv. The VOC measurements from these two studies will be compared to previous experiments in Pasadena, CA and other sites in Colorado's northern Front Range to show that the chemical signature associated with oil and natural gas operations is very distinctive and can be clearly differentiated from urban VOC emission sources that are dominated by vehicular exhaust. We will compare the regional characteristics of the Colorado and Utah data sets in order to assess the potential atmospheric impacts of VOC emissions from the oil and gas sector, such as the photochemical production of ozone.

Seminar attendees agree not to cite, quote, copy, or distribute material presented without the explicit written consent of the seminar presenter. Any opinions expressed in this seminar are those of the speaker alone and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of NOAA or ESRL CSD.

Remote Access and Notes:

Remote access: https://www2.gotomeeting.com/register/487528146 and view system requirements. Space is limited. Confirmation of registration includes information about joining the GoToMeeting. For further information about this seminar please contact [(303) 497-3599] or [(303) 497-5431].

Visitor Information:

Unless otherwise specified, all non-NOAA visitors wanting to attend in person a seminar should contact in advance the contact person listed under "Remote Access and Notes" for specific information about obtaining building access.

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Thursday, April 12, 2012 8:02 AM / Last updated Wednesday, May 9, 2012 8:49 AM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are the most complete summary of upcoming NOAA science seminars; a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science across NOAA and our contituents. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] or join our RSS feed by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

OneNOAA Science Seminar Number: 1267

The Role of Observations in Climate Science

Add This OneNOAA Science Seminar to your Google Calendar
Date and Time: May 23, 2012, 13:00-14:00 Eastern Time Zone [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: NOAA SSMC-2, Room 14316 (1325 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD, 20910)
Speaker(s): [Director, Cooperative Institute for Climate and Satellites (CICS) at the Earth System Science Interdisciplinary Center (ESSIC) of the University of Maryland]
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NOAA NWS OCWWS
Abstract:

Climate is challenging to define, and maybe even more difficult to observe. In fact, to some degree the term "climate observation" is meaningless - we observe properties of the climate system, including the atmosphere, the oceans, and other components of the climate system on short time scales and from those observations construct metrics of "climate". This conundrum leads to considerable confusion and consternation - witness all the discussion of the extraordinary weather of March 2012. The extreme warm daily temperatures observed in the US and Canada during that month were weather: they resulted from a hugely atypical circulation pattern that persisted for a large part of the month. Of course, that persistent circulation is part of the climate, too, and certainly the monthly and seasonal temperature anomalies, which were among the largest we've seen, should be considered "climate" as opposed to weather. However, they certainly aren't the entire story - North America is a small part of the globe, and the global mean surface temperature anomaly for March 2012 was actually rather modest compared to the past decade. In order to really understand how climate varies and changes, we must identify data sets that permit us to depict and understand the relevant physics. This presentation will explain how climate scientists try to do this, show some examples, and justify the need for more focus on integrating observations.

About The Speaker:

Dr. Arkin is Director of the Cooperative Institute for Climate and Satellites (CICS) at the Earth System Science Interdisciplinary Center (ESSIC) of the University of Maryland, where he also serves as Deputy Director and Senior Research Scientist. He conducts research into the observation and analysis of precipitation and other aspects of the hydrological cycle of the global climate system in addition to his administrative duties. His B.S. in mathematics and M.S. and Ph.D. in meteorology are from the University of Maryland. Dr. Arkin has published 68 refereed papers that have been cited more than 6200 times in scientific journals, 25 atlases and chapters in books, and has had more than 130 non-refereed publications. He has served as a member of many national and international scientific panels, and has presented invited papers at more than 100 workshops and scientific meetings.

Remote Access and Notes:

Gotomeetings https://www1.gotomeeting.com/register/856719928. After registering you will receive a confirmation e-mail containing information about joining the Webinar. For further information about this seminar please contact and

Visitor Information:

Unless otherwise specified, all non-NOAA visitors wanting to attend in person a seminar should contact in advance the contact person listed under "Remote Access and Notes" for specific information about obtaining building access.

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Monday, May 7, 2012 9:41 AM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are the most complete summary of upcoming NOAA science seminars; a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science across NOAA and our contituents. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] or join our RSS feed by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

OneNOAA Science Seminar Number: 1278

Michigan Rivers Before European Settlement

Add This OneNOAA Science Seminar to your Google Calendar
Date and Time: May 23, 2012, 10:30-11:30 Eastern Standard Zone [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: NOAA Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory, Lake Superior Hall (4840 South State Road, Ann Arbor, MI)
Speaker(s): Dr. James Selegean (Civil/Environmental Engineering Department, Wayne State University)
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NOAA CILER
Abstract:

Many of the rivers that are familiar to Michiganders would have been unrecognizable 200 years ago. Urban rivers such as the Clinton, Rouge and Huron have lost their forest cover and have been largely paved. Dams, levees and concrete channels have further added to their alteration. Similarly, agricultural watersheds, such as the St. Joseph, Grand and Saginaw, have experienced a nearly complete conversion to agronomy.

This seminar will provide insight into what the rivers in Michigan were like before European settlement. This insight is gained by drawing on a diverse collection of data sources, including the journals of the early explorers, historic government maps, documents, surveys, paintings and postcards. Quantitative insight was obtained through the application of a numerical model to simulate sediment and water yield under both pre- and post-European settlement conditions.

Remote Access and Notes:

Remote access via webinar: https://www2.gotomeeting.com/register/602088522. For further information about this seminar please contact

Visitor Information:

Unless otherwise specified, all non-NOAA visitors wanting to attend in person a seminar should contact in advance the contact person listed under "Remote Access and Notes" for specific information about obtaining building access.

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Thursday, May 17, 2012 2:25 PM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are the most complete summary of upcoming NOAA science seminars; a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science across NOAA and our contituents. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] or join our RSS feed by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

OneNOAA Science Seminar Number: 1257

May 24, 2012

Transitioning from FGDC to ISO 101 and ISO Content and Organization: Advanced ISO Topics

Add This OneNOAA Science Seminar to your Google Calendar
Date and Time: May 24, 2012, 13:00-14:00 Central Time Zone [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: Webinar access only
Speaker(s): (NCDDC)
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NOAA NCDDC
Abstract:

Module: Advanced ISO Topics: special problems, hierarchical metadata

NODC NCDDC is offering a series of ISO Metadata Training sessions in an online format. Each session will last approximately one hour starting at 1:00pm CST. Select (click) the module title to register for that session. Once registered you will receive an email confirming your registration with information you need to join the Webinar. Alternately, you may download the complete schedule as a PDF document to view the dates, times and hyperlinks to register for each session.

Remote Access and Notes:

(space limited) Gotomeeting Link to register for this webinar: https://www1.gotomeeting.com/register/230005289. Once registered you will receive an email confirming your registration with information you need to join the Webinar. For further information about this seminar please contact [(866) 732-2382]

Visitor Information:

Unless otherwise specified, all non-NOAA visitors wanting to attend in person a seminar should contact in advance the contact person listed under "Remote Access and Notes" for specific information about obtaining building access.

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Monday, April 2, 2012 . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are the most complete summary of upcoming NOAA science seminars; a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science across NOAA and our contituents. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] or join our RSS feed by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

OneNOAA Science Seminar Number: 1268

Linking Swimming Performance to Population Processes in Coastal Fishes

Add This OneNOAA Science Seminar to your Google Calendar
Date and Time: May 24, 2012, 11:00-12:00 Pacific Time Zone [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: NOAA Northwest Fisheries Science Center (NWFSC) Auditorium (2725 Montlake Boulevard East, Seattle, WA 98112); Map to NWFSC
Speaker(s): Dr. Todd Anderson (Professor & Director, Coastal and Marine Institute, San Diego State University)
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NOAA NWFSC Monster Seminar JAM
Abstract:

TBD

Download Webex Recording of the Seminar:

WebEx recording (56 mins)

About The Speaker:

Dr. Anderson has been a professor at San Diego State University since 1999 and has been the Director of SDSU's Coastal and Marine Institute since 2008. Prior to these appointments, Dr. Anderson spent time at Oregon State as research associate, Western Washington University as a lecturer and the University of Washington as a postdoctoral fellow. He received his Ph.D. from the University of California, Santa Barbara, M.A. from Moss Landing Marine Laboratories, and B.S. from California State University, Fresno. Dr. Anderson has spent much of his career investigating mechanisms responsible for the regulation of marine fish populations, including density-dependent mortality, the functional responses of predators and the mediating effects habitat has on these processes. Recent research has focused on the growth and swimming performance of larval fishes and the influence of these traits on population processes such as predation risk.

Remote Access and Notes:

(Updated remote access) Webinar: Go to https://nwfsc200.webex.com/nwfsc200/j.php?ED=13502408&UID=40245523&RT=MiM0 (This meeting does not require a password.) Click "Join". Call-in: 1-650-479-3207 (Not a toll-free number); Access code: 856 489 473. For Assistance during the presentation go to https://nwfsc.webex.com/nwfsc/mc On the left navigation bar, click "Support". For questions about this seminar please contact Diane L. Tierney-Jamieson (206-860-3380; )

Visitor Information:

Unless otherwise specified, all non-NOAA visitors wanting to attend in person a seminar should contact in advance the contact person listed under "Remote Access and Notes" for specific information about obtaining building access.

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Wednesday, April 4, 2012 9:47 AM / Last updated Tuesday, May 29, 2012 8:23 AM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science and management information. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] or join our RSS feed by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

OneNOAA Science Seminar Number: 1269

Aerosol Entrainment and Boundary Layer CCN: Transport and Teleconnections in the Free Troposphere

Add This OneNOAA Science Seminar to your Google Calendar
Date and Time: May 24, 2012. 15:30-16:30 (Boulder, CO) Mountain Standard Time [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: NOAA ESRL Chemical Sciences Division seminar Room 2A305, David Skaggs Research Center (NOAA Building), 325 Broadway, Boulder, CO (Directions)
Speaker(s): Antony Clarke (School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology, University of Hawaii)
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NOAA ESRL Chemical Science Division seminar
Abstract:

The long range transport of anthropogenic aerosol over global scales is well recognized and evident from satellite remote sensing and diverse airborne experiments. Less appreciated is the fact that this lofted aerosol gradually subsides back toward the inversion where it becomes entrained into the marine boundary layer (MBL). This is common in large scale subsidence regions often present over the remote ocean where aerosol MBL concentrations can be low. Long range transport of aerosol "rivers" in the FT and followed by entrainment can provides teleconnections between active aerosol source regions and clouds in remote marine regions > 10,000 km distant. Data from various airborne experiments over the Pacific will be used to demonstrate this transport and entrainment of combustion-derived aerosol effective as CCN in MBL clouds. These include transport from Asia to the region of California stratus, from the Amazon to the central Equatorial Pacific and from both Australasia/South America to the extensive stratus decks over Southeast Pacific.

Seminar attendees agree not to cite, quote, copy, or distribute material presented without the explicit written consent of the seminar presenter. Any opinions expressed in this seminar are those of the speaker alone and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of NOAA or ESRL CSD.

Remote Access and Notes:

Remote access TBD. For further information about this seminar please contact [(303) 497-3599] or [(303) 497-5431].

Visitor Information:

Unless otherwise specified, all non-NOAA visitors wanting to attend in person a seminar should contact in advance the contact person listed under "Remote Access and Notes" for specific information about obtaining building access.

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Monday, May 14, 2012 8:29 AM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are the most complete summary of upcoming NOAA science seminars; a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science across NOAA and our contituents. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] or join our RSS feed by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

OneNOAA Science Seminar Number: 1288

Ocean-related Commitments at the Rio+20 Conference

Add This OneNOAA Science Seminar to your Google Calendar
Date and Time: May 24, 2012, 12:00-12:30 Eastern Time Zone [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: NOAA SSMC-3, 2nd Floor, Library (1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD, 20910)
Speaker(s): Dr. Susan Lieberman (Director of International Policy at the Pew Environment Group)
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NOAA NODC Library and NOAA International Affairs Council Working Group on the Law of the Sea Convention
Abstract:

In June 2012, governments will meet in Rio de Janeiro to commemorate the 20th anniversary of the 1992 Rio Conference (Rio+20). For this historic meeting, States have committed to secure renewed political commitment for sustainable development, assessing progress to date and remaining gaps in the implementation of the outcomes of major summits on sustainable development and addressing new and emerging challenges. As a result of advocacy by non-governmental organizations and some governments, the ocean is now one of the top Rio+20 priorities, and there are intense negotiations underway. Ms. Lieberman's talk will explore ocean-related commitments at previous global summits (Rio in 1992, Johannesburg in 2002), the gaps in implementation, and the potential for meaningful outcomes in Rio. The talk will also discuss efforts underway to address the conservation of high seas biodiversity and sustainable fisheries.

About The Speaker:

Dr Lieberman has worked in international biodiversity conservation for more than 24 years. She has been the Director of International Policy at the Pew Environment Group since August 2009. The International Policy Project leads an integrated program across treaties, regional fisheries management organizations (RFMOs) and other intergovernmental organizations, including the United Nations, to deliver on the global conservation goals of the Pew Environment Group. Those goals are particularly focused on marine conservation, and include campaigns on: sharks; tunas; illegal, unregulated, and unreported (IUU) fishing; deep sea fishing; and marine protected areas, among others.

Download Presentation:

Summary Slides

Remote Access:

For remote access via webinar, please fill out the registration form a few minutes before the meeting is scheduled to begin. The Meeting Number is 742656968; the Passcode is brownbag. For audio in the US and Canada, dial 866-833-7307. The participant passcode is 8986360. For questions about this seminar contact (301-713-2600 ext. 115) or (301-713-2600 ext. 155).

Visitor Information:

Unless otherwise specified, all non-NOAA visitors wanting to attend in person a seminar should contact in advance the contact person listed under "Remote Access and Notes" for specific information about obtaining building access.

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Thursday, May 17, 2012 9:27 AM / last updated Thursday, May 24, 2012 2:41 PM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are the most complete summary of upcoming NOAA science seminars; a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science across NOAA and our contituents. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

OneNOAA Science Seminar Number: 1289

May 29, 2012

Processing Large Data Streams Using Massive Online Collaboration

Add This OneNOAA Science Seminar to your Google Calendar
Date and Time: May 29, 2012, 12:00-13:00 Eastern Time Zone [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: NOAA SSMC-3, 2nd Floor, Library (1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD, 20910)
Speaker(s): (NMFS Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center)
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NOAA NODC Library
Abstract:

NOAA's use of advanced sampling technologies has been increasing. While these advanced technologies promise to greatly enhance our ability to collect data, they present a variety of challenges given the shear volume of data they produce. On a recent two week survey mission by the Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center to American Samoa, an Autonomous Underwater Vehicle produced 52,000 benthic images and 42 and half hours of video footage. On the same mission, stationary remote camera stations recorded over 90 hours of video footage. Towed-Diver surveys routinely produce close 100,000 benthic images per year. How do we handle these data streams? Currently we make do by processing only a small subset of the available data or by allowing for long lag times between data collection and data processing. Work on computer algorithms that can automate certain portions of data processing is ongoing, but the human brain is still far superior for pattern recognition and processing visual data. Massive Online Collaboration, where image data is served to many independent volunteer human analysts through the internet, may be an answer. Massive online collaboration has already been used to digitize books, process Hubble deep field imagery as well as images from the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter, to transcribe weather logs from WW1 Royal Navy ships, as well as to process video data to understand the distribution of marine species and to increase our understanding of deep-sea ecosystems and how they change in response to human disturbance. If properly implemented, this tool can fulfill two key NOAA objectives: processing increasingly large optical data streams in a rapid and cost effective manner and education and outreach by involving the public in the processing of scientific information.

Remote Access:

For remote access via webinar, please fill out the registration form a few minutes before the meeting is scheduled to begin. The Meeting Number is 742656968; the Passcode is brownbag. For audio in the US and Canada, dial 866-833-7307. The participant passcode is 8986360. For questions about this seminar contact (301-713-2600 ext. 115) or (301-713-2600 ext. 155).

Visitor Information:

Unless otherwise specified, all non-NOAA visitors wanting to attend in person a seminar should contact in advance the contact person listed under "Remote Access and Notes" for specific information about obtaining building access.

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Monday, May 14, 2012 8:02 AM / Last updated Tuesday, May 29, 2012 12:24 PM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are the most complete summary of upcoming NOAA science seminars; a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science across NOAA and our contituents. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

OneNOAA Science Seminar Number: 1286

May 30, 2012

Acoustic Tracking and Characterization of Tornadoes

Add This OneNOAA Science Seminar to your Google Calendar
Date and Time: May 30, 2012, 12:00-13:00 Eastern Time Zone [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: NOAA SSMC-4 Room 8150 (1305 East-West Hwy, Silver Spring, MD).
Speaker(s): , PhD, PE, NOS/CO-OPS
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NOAA NOS Science Seminar Series and the NOS Center for Operational Oceanographic Products and Services (CO-OPS)
Abstract:

It has been known for years that tornadoes are powerful emitters of acoustic energy. Previous NOAA research demonstrated the ability to detect supercells associated with tornadic activity using sub-audible acoustics (infrasound) over distances of hundreds of kilometers, although a precise connection to vortex activity and acoustic generation mechanisms could not be made. Under recent NOAA funding a deadly outbreak of severe tornadoes in Oklahoma during the spring of 2011 was monitored with a new generation of infrasound sensors developed at the National Center for Physical Acoustics. Analysis of the data provides solid evidence that tornadoes and the associated vortex turbulence aloft can be detected and tracked using infrasound. Higher frequency analysis (enabled by the new sensors) finds a quantitative link between the acoustic spectral energy and dominant turbulence-eddy length scales, suggesting a method to remotely monitor the dynamics and strength of the storm.

About the Speaker:

Dr. Joseph Park recently joined the Engineering Development Branch of CO-OPS after working as a Senior Scientist at the National Center for Physical Acoustics. Dr. Park's background includes oceanographic deployments and analysis for the U.S. Navy, ocean & electrical engineering for private industry, academia, as well as Federal and regional government agencies.

Remote Access and Notes:

Presentations are available remotely via a combination of phone (US only) & webcast. Note that remote access is limited to 50 connections on a first-come-first served basis, so we cannot guarantee participation. To participate remotely via phone and internet:

  1. To access the webex meeting, go the to the webcast site at http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?sigKey=mymeetings&i=744925156&p=&t=c Enter meeting number 744925156 if needed; no passcode is required. Enter other required fields - First and last name. Check the box that that you have read the Privacy Policy, and click Proceed.
  2. Dial toll-free (U.S.) 1-877-708-1667. When prompted enter passcode 7028688 followed by the # sign. Please use your phone's mute button (*6 toggles on or off) during the presentation until you are ready to ask questions. The phone conference does not start until about five minutes before the seminar.

For further information about this seminar please contact , or if it is within 5 minutes of the seminar start, call the toll free number above and she will try to answer your questions.

Visitor Information:

Unless otherwise specified, all non-NOAA visitors wanting to attend in person a seminar should contact in advance the contact person listed under "Remote Access and Notes" for specific information about obtaining building access.

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Monday, May 7, 2012 4:34 PM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are the most complete summary of upcoming NOAA science seminars; a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science across NOAA and our contituents. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] or join our RSS feed by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

OneNOAA Science Seminar Number: 1280

Exploring the "Background" Variability of Stratospheric Aerosol Observed by Ground Based Lidar

Add This OneNOAA Science Seminar to your Google Calendar
Date and Time: May 30, 2012. 15:30-16:30 (Boulder, CO) Mountain Standard Time [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: NOAA ESRL Chemical Sciences Division seminar Room 2A305, David Skaggs Research Center (NOAA Building), 325 Broadway, Boulder, CO (Directions)
Speaker(s): Ryan Neely (University of Colorado CIRES/ATOC & NOAA ESRL)
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NOAA ESRL Chemical Science Division seminar
Abstract:

The current quiescent volcanic period, from 2000 to 2010, has provided a unique opportunity to observe the background state of stratospheric aerosols. Observations of aerosol backscatter from Rayleigh/Mie lidars located in Lauder, New Zealand, Mauna Loa, Hawaii and Boulder, Colorado during this period are explored with an emphasis on understanding the decadal trends in the stratospheric aerosol layer. This analysis shows an increasing trend in the backscatter cross-section over the last decade at all three sites that is modulated by a strong seasonal cycle with a winter maximum. To further understand the differing roles of transport, chemical and microphysical processes of the aerosol layer, the results of the lidar data analysis are compared to output from the Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model coupled to the Community Aerosol and Radiation Model for Atmospheres that has been structured to include sulfate aerosols and meteoritic dust and various emission scenarios, including anthropogenic emissions and moderate volcanic injections observed from 2000 to 2010. This seminar will focus on modeling results that suggest the observed trends are largely due to volcanic injections but anthropogenic emissions may still have some impact. I will discuss how the fusion of modeling and lidar backscatter retrieval analysis led to improvements in retrievals of stratospheric aerosols made by current Rayleigh/Mie lidars.

Seminar attendees agree not to cite, quote, copy, or distribute material presented without the explicit written consent of the seminar presenter. Any opinions expressed in this seminar are those of the speaker alone and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of NOAA or ESRL CSD.

Remote Access and Notes:

Remote access https://www2.gotomeeting.com/register/348202994 and view system requirements. Space is limited. Confirmation of registration includes information about joining the GoToMeeting. For further information about this seminar please contact [(303) 497-3599] or [(303) 497-5431].

Visitor Information:

Unless otherwise specified, all non-NOAA visitors wanting to attend in person a seminar should contact in advance the contact person listed under "Remote Access and Notes" for specific information about obtaining building access.

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Thursday, May 17, 2012 10:02 AM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are the most complete summary of upcoming NOAA science seminars; a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science across NOAA and our contituents. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] or join our RSS feed by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

OneNOAA Science Seminar Number: 1290

May 31, 2012

Transitioning from FGDC to ISO 101 and ISO Content and Organization: QandA for Advanced ISO Topics

Add This OneNOAA Science Seminar to your Google Calendar
Date and Time: May 31, 2012, 13:00-14:00 Central Time Zone [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: Webinar access only
Speaker(s): (NCDDC)
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NOAA NCDDC
Abstract:

Module: QandA for Advanced ISO Topics: special problems, hierarchical metadata

NODC NCDDC is offering a series of ISO Metadata Training sessions in an online format. Each session will last approximately one hour starting at 1:00pm CST. Select (click) the module title to register for that session. Once registered you will receive an email confirming your registration with information you need to join the Webinar. Alternately, you may download the complete schedule as a PDF document to view the dates, times and hyperlinks to register for each session.

Remote Access and Notes:

(space limited) Gotomeeting Link to register for this webinar: https://www1.gotomeeting.com/register/827322856. Once registered you will receive an email confirming your registration with information you need to join the Webinar. For further information about this seminar please contact [(866) 732-2382]

Visitor Information:

Unless otherwise specified, all non-NOAA visitors wanting to attend in person a seminar should contact in advance the contact person listed under "Remote Access and Notes" for specific information about obtaining building access.

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Monday, April 2, 2012 . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are the most complete summary of upcoming NOAA science seminars; a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science across NOAA and our contituents. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] or join our RSS feed by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

OneNOAA Science Seminar Number: 1270

Reference Points and the Ecosystem Approach: New Concepts for Old Tools and Old Tools for New Concepts

Add This OneNOAA Science Seminar to your Google Calendar
Date and Time: May 31, 2012, 11:00-12:00 Pacific Time Zone [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: NOAA Northwest Fisheries Science Center (NWFSC) Auditorium (2725 Montlake Boulevard East, Seattle, WA 98112); Map to NWFSC
Speaker(s): Dr. Jake Rice (Senior National Advisor, Ecosystem Sciences Branch, Canada DFO)
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NOAA NWFSC Monster Seminar JAM
Abstract:

TBD

About The Speaker:

Dr. Jake Rice is the Director of Advice and Assessment for the Canadian Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO-MPO), heading the DFO Canadian Science Advisory Secretariat (CSAS). In this role he coordinates all its science peer review and advisory processes and meetings, for the application of scientific research to government decision-making on aquatic resource conservation, sustainable use, and maintenance of environmental quality. Although focused primarily on fisheries issues through the 1990s, through this decade CSAS has become active in review and provision of advice on ecosystem assessments, ecosystem approaches to management, species-at-risk assessments and recovery plans, threat assessments for invasive species and biotechnology, and marine ecosystem effects of activities such as seismic exploration and aquaculture. Previously Dr. Rice held various positions in DFO regional laboratories and academic posts at universities in Canada, the US, and Europe.

Dr. Rice received his B. Sc. in Biology from Cornell University in 1970, and his doctorate in Ornithology from the University of Toronto in 1975. His recent research has centered on theoretical, bio-statistical, and modelling approaches to evaluating ecosystem effects of human activities in the sea, making an ecosystem approach to integrated management operational, and on making scientific advisory processes inclusive of more types of knowledge. Dr. Rice has chaired a number of international science workings, including serving as Chair of the Consultative Committee and Chief Scientist of ICES, and as a member of the NOAA Science Advisory Board. He has over 100 publications in the scientific literature, as well as authoring a large number of working group reports and chapters on guidelines and practices for publications of DFO and international agencies.

Remote Access and Notes:

(Updated remote access) Webinar: Go to https://nwfsc200.webex.com/nwfsc200/j.php?ED=13502408&UID=40245523&RT=MiM0 (This meeting does not require a password.) Click "Join". Call-in: 1-650-479-3207 (Not a toll-free number); Access code: 856 489 473. For Assistance during the presentation go to https://nwfsc.webex.com/nwfsc/mc On the left navigation bar, click "Support". For questions about this seminar please contact Diane L. Tierney-Jamieson (206-860-3380; )

Visitor Information:

Unless otherwise specified, all non-NOAA visitors wanting to attend in person a seminar should contact in advance the contact person listed under "Remote Access and Notes" for specific information about obtaining building access.

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Wednesday, April 4, 2012 9:47 AM / Last updated Monday, April 23, 2012 4:24 PM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science and management information. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] or join our RSS feed by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

OneNOAA Science Seminar Number: 1271

An Evolving Legacy: Delaware's Coastal Zone Act

Add This OneNOAA Science Seminar to your Google Calendar
Date and Time: May 31, 2012, 11:30-13:00 Eastern Time Zone [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: NOAA SSMC-4 Conference Center, 1W611 (1305 East-West Hwy, Silver Spring, MD).
Speaker(s): (Senior Communications Specialist, NOS/OCRM)
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NOAA NOAA/NOS Office of Ocean and Coastal Resource Management
Abstract:

Join OCRM in our continuing celebration of the Coastal Zone Management Act (CZMA) 40th Anniversary. We are presenting a brown bag screening of the 2011 PBS documentary, "An Evolving Legacy: Delaware's Coastal Zone Act", by filmmaker Michael Oates. This 50 minute film focuses on the evolution and political struggle to create the country's first coastal land use law, championed by then Governor Russell W. Peterson, that was passed in Delaware in 1971, one year before the passing of the national CZMA. This Act also created a legislative mechanism to deal with the challenges of balancing coastal development with habitat preservation. The battle to pass this visionary legislation transformed local environmental awareness into sweeping statewide action, challenging other states and the nation to do the same.

Before Peterson's death last February at the age of 94, Oates interviewed the former governor, who recounted the dramatic struggle to craft and pass this visionary legislation. In addition to reporting Peterson's story, the film explores the 40-year history of the Coastal Zone Act, and presents the ongoing challenges all Delawareans face in the struggle to balance the desire for industrial development with a love for unspoiled natural habitats.

Following the film there will be a brief Q and A/discussion.

About the Speaker:

Lou Cafiero, joined NOAA's OCRM as senior communicator in December 2011 after running his own communications company in northern New Jersey. Prior to this he managed communications and marketing for the National Marine Sanctuary Foundation and worked directly for NOAA's Office of National Marine Sanctuaries as national media director. He has years of corporate and government experience in media relations, strategic communications planning, social media, crisis communications and website content development, and more.

Remote Access and Notes:

Web and phone access is not available for this presentation. For further information about this seminar please contact or 301-563-1182

Visitor Information:

Unless otherwise specified, all non-NOAA visitors wanting to attend in person a seminar should contact in advance the contact person listed under "Remote Access and Notes" for specific information about obtaining building access.

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Monday, May 7, 2012 4:34 PM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are the most complete summary of upcoming NOAA science seminars; a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science across NOAA and our contituents. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] or join our RSS feed by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

OneNOAA Science Seminar Number: 1281

Picking Our Battles: A Strategy to Enhance Long-term Restoration Success of Invasive Plant Control Projects

Add This OneNOAA Science Seminar to your Google Calendar
Date and Time: May 31, 2012, 12:00-13:00 Eastern Time Zone [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: NOAA SSMC-4 Room 8150 (1305 East-West Hwy, Silver Spring, MD).
Speaker(s): (Stewardship Coordinator, Great Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve)
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NOAA NOS Science Seminar Series and Office of Ocean and Coastal Resource Management, Estuarine Reserves Division
Abstract:

Invasive plants are changing the face of America. They can cause significant ecological and economic harm and are a common focus of coastal restoration projects. However, these projects may not be successful in the long-term when conducted at the individual stand or property scale. Invasive plants know no boundaries and can easily reestablish from surrounding areas unless a landscape-scale strategic approach is taken to prioritizing control projects.

This presentation reviews the results of a decision maker-driven GIS model that was developed with expert review to create a landscape-scale prioritization strategy for invasive plant control projects throughout the Great Bay and coastal watersheds of New Hampshire. Areas of ecological significance and human functional value were evaluated in concert with areas of high risk of invasive plant spread into new areas. Over 111 individuals, including natural resource professionals, academics, and conservation groups contributed to the building of this model. Extensive community input was solicited to make this strategy relevant to as many end-users as possible. The GIS model is supported by an outreach strategy and species "invasiveness" prioritization list, allowing users to comprehensively prioritize individual projects in context with the surrounding landscape. Consideration of the landscape scale is particularly important in the face of climate change as alterations in species range are likely. We will demonstrate this strategy using real world case studies. Customized models and species lists are being distributed to each town and major watershed group within the state, the scale at which most decision making and funding for invasive control projects takes place.

We hope this prioritization model and outreach strategy will enable natural resource managers and community groups to select stands of invasive plants for removal that will have the most immediate impact and most effectively protect our native natural resources in the long-term. The principles applied in this strategy are applicable to other invasive organisms in any user-defined geographic area.

About the Speaker:

Rachel Stevens is the Stewardship Coordinator at Great Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve. She is vice chair of a regional Cooperative Weed Management Area and a member of the statewide NH Natural Heritage Bureau and NH Fish and Game Department Invasive Plant Working Group.

Remote Access and Notes:

Presentations are available remotely via a combination of phone (US only) & webcast. Note that remote access is limited to 25 connections on a first-come-first served basis, so we cannot guarantee participation. This will be taped so those not able to attend can view the presentation afterwards - information on how to access the link will be distributed after the webinar. To participate remotely, you must connect via the phone and internet:

  1. To access the webinar meeting, go to https://mmancusa.webex.com/mmancusa/j.php?ED=183091092&UID=1278733732&PW=NZGU4YmQzNjU1&RT=MiMxMQ%3D%3D. If requested, enter your name and email address. If a password is required, enter the meeting password: erd1234. Click Join.
  2. Dial toll-free (U.S.) 1-877-708-1667. When prompted enter passcode 7028688 followed by the # sign. Please use your phone's mute button (*6 toggles on or off) during the presentation until you are ready to ask questions. The phone conference does not start until about five minutes before the seminar.

For further information about this seminar please contact , or if it is within 5 minutes of the seminar start, call the toll free number above and she will try to answer your questions.

Visitor Information:

Unless otherwise specified, all non-NOAA visitors wanting to attend in person a seminar should contact in advance the contact person listed under "Remote Access and Notes" for specific information about obtaining building access.

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Friday, May 18, 2012 7:50 AM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are the most complete summary of upcoming NOAA science seminars; a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science across NOAA and our contituents. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] or join our RSS feed by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

OneNOAA Science Seminar Number: 1292

Fast Processes in Large Scale Models, Their Parameterization and Evaluation

Add This OneNOAA Science Seminar to your Google Calendar
Date and Time: May 31, 2012, 11:00-12:00 Eastern Time Zone [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: NOAA World Weather Building Room 707 (5200 Auth Road, Camp Springs, MD 20746)
Speaker(s): Liu Yang (Brookhaven National Lab)
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NOAA NCEP Environmental Modeling Center (EMC) Seminar
Abstract:

Many processes affecting the Earth's weather and climate occur over space-time scales smaller than typical grid sizes of large scale models, including aerosols, clouds and precipitation, and need to be parameterized. Inadequate representation of such fast-physics processes and their interactions have been long recognized as a major source of uncertainties in model climate sensitivity and cloud feedbacks, hampering our ability to predict climate and future climate changes. Model evaluation and identification of parameterization deficiencies are essential to improving fast physics parameterization and thus advancing climate models. Over the last few decades, progress has been made in both areas of model evaluation and parameterization development, but in a frustratingly slow pace and much more and creative efforts are needed. In this seminar, the major obstacles to further progress will be discussed and approaches/strategy to overcome these obstacles to accelerate/improve model evaluation and parameterization will be explored. In particular, the multi-institution project funded by the US DOE Earth System Modeling (ESM) program, FAst -physics System Testbed and Research (FASTER), including its main objectives and key tasks will be introduced, sharing some accomplishments we have achieved so far, and challenges we still have ahead.

Remote Access and Notes:

Remote access https://www2.gotomeeting.com/join/613189034. Phone Access: Dial +1 (510) 443-0604; Access Code and Meeting ID: 613-189-034. For questions about this seminar contact Binbin Zhou ()

Visitor Information:

Unless otherwise specified, all non-NOAA visitors wanting to attend in person a seminar should contact in advance the contact person listed under "Remote Access and Notes" for specific information about obtaining building access.

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Thursday, May 24, 2012 7:58 AM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are the most complete summary of upcoming NOAA science seminars; a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science across NOAA and our contituents. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] or join our RSS feed by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

OneNOAA Science Seminar Number: 1293

(Seminar date change to June 31, 2012) Development of an Integrated Benthic Ecosystem Survey

Date and Time: (Seminar date change to June 31, 2012, 12:00-13:00 Eastern Time Zone:) [Click here to go to the updated seminar information]
Location: NOAA SSMC-3, 2nd Floor, Library (1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD, 20910)
Speaker(s): (NMFS Northeast Fisheries Science Center)
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NOAA NODC Library
Abstract:

The NEFSC is transitioning its traditional dredge-based sea scallop survey into an integrated benthic ecosystem survey. Central to this transition is deployment of a towed camera system known as HabCam. The HabCam vehicle houses stereo digital still cameras with synchronized strobes, a synthetic aperture side-scan sonar, and an array of oceanographic instruments, including sensors for chlorophyll, dissolved oxygen, water color (spectra) and a CTD. Some dredge tows will continue to be performed, in order to ensure continuity of the time series and to obtain physical samples. A prototype HabCam survey of Georges Bank was conducted in 2011 that collected over 2.5 million images of the sea floor. HabCam will be deployed in both the Mid-Atlantic and Georges Bank starting in 2012. I will discuss results from the traditional dredge survey, the prototype 2011 HabCam survey and preliminary results from the 2012 surveys, and the insights they provide on sea scallop and benthic community dynamics.

Remote Access:

For remote access via webinar, please fill out the registration form a few minutes before the meeting is scheduled to begin. The Meeting Number is 742656968; the Passcode is brownbag. For audio in the US and Canada, dial 866-833-7307. The participant passcode is 8986360. For questions about this seminar contact (301-713-2600 ext. 115) or (301-713-2600 ext. 155). This seminar was originally scheduled for May 31, 2012.

Visitor Information:

Unless otherwise specified, all non-NOAA visitors wanting to attend in person a seminar should contact in advance the contact person listed under "Remote Access and Notes" for specific information about obtaining building access.

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Monday, May 14, 2012 8:02 AM / Last updated Tuesday, May 22, 2012 8:12 AM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are the most complete summary of upcoming NOAA science seminars; a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science across NOAA and our contituents. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

OneNOAA Science Seminar Number: 1287

OneNOAA Science Seminars Subscription Information

i-access to our OneNOAA science seminar announcements:

  1. Join our weekly e-mail seminar announcement [nominally, email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list]. You can subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminars moderated email list by sending an email message to: with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body (don't include the quotes) or visit https://list.woc.noaa.gov/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/onenoaascienceseminars and fill in your email address (see also how to suscribe).
  2. Online OneNOAA web access: http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/ (Web page maintained by )
  3. Archive of previous OneNOAA science discussion seminars (by calendar year): [2011] [2010] [2009] [2008] [2007] [2006] [2005] [2004].
  4. Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar RSS feed.
  5. Interested in becoming a OneNOAA science seminar partner?
  6. When available, all seminars can be accessed remotely by anyone on a first-come-first serve basis.
  7. Note: All seminars subject to title, location, date, and time changes without notice. Please check the OneNOAA seminar web page for the latest seminar updates. Unless otherwised indicated, seminars are open to the public. The contents of the OneNOAA Science Seminars web page do not reflect any position of the Federeal Government or NOAA. References to trade names or commercial entities do not imply endorsement of any kind. Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer]. The information provided by the OneNOAA Science Seminars is for broad information purposes only. See privacy policy [NOAA Privacy policy]

 

Back to top

 

  Last modified:    Tue, 4-Sep-2012 15:40 UTC NODC.Webmaster@noaa.gov
 
Dept. of Commerce - NOAA - NESDIS - NODC
* Offsite Link Notification
USA.gov - The U.S. Government's Web Portal