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OneNOAA Science Seminars


April 2012OneNOAA Science Seminars: April 2012

A joint effort by several NOAA offices to provide the most complete summary of upcoming NOAA science seminars. For further information please contact

[OneNOAA Seminar Partner's contacts]
Web page last updated: Tuesday, 04-Sep-2012 15:40:55 UTC

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April 03, 2012

(Canceled) The Assimilation of Microwave Imager Data at ECMWF

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Date and Time: (CANCELED) April 03, 2011, 14:00-15:00 Eastern Time Zone [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: World Weather Building (5200 Auth Road, Camp Springs, MD 20746); Room 707
Speaker(s): (ECMWF)
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NOAA Joint Center for Satellite Data Assimilation (JCSDA)
Abstract:

TBD

Remote Access and Notes:

Video:

  1. Go to JCSDA Seminar and click on the seminar title
  2. Enter your name and email address
  3. Enter the meeting password: JCSDAseminars707
  4. Click "Join Now"
  5. Follow the instructions that appear on your screen
  6. For further information visit http://www.jcsda.noaa.gov/JCSDASeminars.php

Phone Access:

  • USA participants: 1-866-715-2479
  • Passcode: 9457557
  • Enter the meeting password: JCSDAseminar2010
  • International: 1-517-345-5260
  • For further information please contact

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Monday, February 6, 2012 7:36 AM / Last updated Wednesday, February 22, 2012 8:38 AM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are the most complete summary of upcoming NOAA science seminars; a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science across NOAA and our contituents. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] or join our RSS feed by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

OneNOAA Science Seminar Number: 1203

April 04, 2012

Little Fish, Big Impact: Managing a Crucial Link in Ocean Ecosystems

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Date and Time: April 04, 2011, 12:00-13:00 Eastern Time Zone [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: NOAA SSMC-3, 2nd Floor, Library (1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD, 20910)
Speaker(s): (Executive Director of the Institute for Ocean Conservation Science and Professor at the Stony Brook University School of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences)
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NOAA NODC Central Library
Abstract:

Forage fish, or small schooling fish such as anchovies and sardines, play a critical role in the marine food web as prey for larger fish, seabirds, and marine mammals. Markets for fish meal and fish oil to support the growing aquaculture and farm animal industries have placed these species under increasing commercial pressure. The Lenfest Forage Fish Task Force was established to develop and recommend ecosystem-based standards for the sustainable management of forage fisheries.

Thirteen preeminent scientists with expertise in a wide range of disciplines conducted a comprehensive examination of the science and management of forage fish populations. Their research explored whether conventional management of these species poses substantial risks of population crashes and contributes to declines of their predators. Ellen Pikitch, the Task Force Chairperson, will share key results from the report, which include specific management recommendations for forage fish species.

Download Presentation: Slides
About the Speaker:

Dr. Ellen K. Pikitch is Executive Director of the Institute for Ocean Conservation Science and Professor at the Stony Brook University School of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences. She is an international expert in ocean conservation science and management whose research has focused on the assessment of fish stocks, the management of bycatch, and ecosystem-based fishery management. See http://www.oceanconservationscience.org/foragefish/task/pikitch.html

Remote Access and Notes:

For remote access via webinar, please fill out the registration form a few minutes before the meeting is scheduled to begin. The Meeting Number is 742656968; the Passcode is brownbag. For audio in the US and Canada, dial 866-833-7307. The participant passcode is 8986360. For questions about this seminar contact (301-713-2600 ext. 115) or (301-713-2600 ext. 155).

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Friday, February 10, 2012 9:01 AM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are the most complete summary of upcoming NOAA science seminars; a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science across NOAA and our contituents. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] or join our RSS feed by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

OneNOAA Science Seminar Number: 1204

Ask the Experts: Sea Level Rise and Coastal Flooding Impacts Viewer

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Date and Time: April 04, 2012, 14:00-15:00 Eastern Time Zone [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: Seminar available via webinar only (see Remote Access and Notes section below)
Speaker(s): , , , , Matt Pendleton, William Brooks, and Mike Sutherland (NOAA Coastal Services Center)
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NOAA Coastal Services Center
Abstract:

It is one thing to have a discussion or write about a one- or two-foot rise in the ocean surface and the potential impacts to a local community, and it is another to show someone a map highlighting the areas that will potentially be impacted. The ability to visualize the potential height and inland extent of water gives us a better understanding of the corresponding impacts and consequences. The Sea Level Rise and Coastal Flooding Impacts Viewer is a next generation tool that allows users to do just that.

For this webinar, participants will have the opportunity to log on for a live Q & A session with a panel of technical experts who developed the tool. The panel will include experts in inundation mapping, elevation data, marsh migration modeling, and land cover data.

As a prerequisite, participants should view the recording of the November 2011 webinar, which features a demonstration of the Sea Level Rise and Coastal Flooding Impacts Viewer, as well as background on its development. The recorded webinar can be viewed here.

In this webinar, participants will ask questions and learn more about

  • The benefits of providing interactive maps online for visualizing inundation risks and potential impacts
  • New mapping techniques that incorporate high-resolution data sources
  • The methods used to develop the Sea Level Rise and Coastal Flooding Impacts Viewer, its current status, and plans for expanding the tool to the rest of the coastal U.S.
Remote Access and Notes:

Presentations are available remotely via a webinar. To register, visit http://noaacsc.adobeconnect.com/apr2012digcst/event/registration.html?preview=false. If you have previously registered with us, click here. This webinar will be recorded for on-demand playback. For further information about this seminar please contact Krista.McCraken@noaa.gov.

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Wednesday, March 7, 2012 8:08 AM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are the most complete summary of upcoming NOAA science seminars; a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science across NOAA and our contituents. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] or join our RSS feed by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

OneNOAA Science Seminar Number: 1205

(Canceled) Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) Associated With Oil and Natural Gas Operations in Colorado and Utah: Regional Characteristics and Potential Atmospheric Impacts

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Date and Time: (CANCELED) April 4, 2012. 15:30-16:30 (Boulder, CO) Mountain Standard Time [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: NOAA ESRL Chemical Sciences Division seminar Room 2A305, David Skaggs Research Center (NOAA Building), 325 Broadway, Boulder, CO (Directions)
Speaker(s): (NOAA ESRL CSD & CU CIRES)
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NOAA ESRL Chemical Science Division seminar
Abstract:

In the United States, Colorado and Utah rank 5th and 9th, respectively, in the production of natural gas, and 10th and 11th, respectively, for domestic crude oil production. Raw natural gas surfacing at a completed wellhead is a mixture of approximately 75 mole percent methane (C1) while the remaining fraction is mostly composed of ethane (C2), propane (C3), and higher hydrocarbons (C4-C6+) that are subsequently distilled. An extensive set of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and other trace gases were measured in the ambient air near two highly active areas of oil and natural gas production in Colorado's Denver-Julesburg Basin and Utah's Uintah Basin. The Colorado study took place in February-March 2011 at the NOAA Boulder Atmospheric Observatory (BAO) in southwestern Weld County as part of the Nitrogen, Aerosol Composition, and Halogens on a Tall Tower (NACHTT) experiment. The Utah study took place in January-February 2012 in northeastern Utah as part of the Uintah Basin Winter Ozone Study (UBWOS). Both of these data sets are characterized by 1) highly elevated hydrocarbon mixing ratios and 2) very strong correlations amongst the alkanes and several aromatics indicating a common source for all of these compounds. For example, the median mixing ratios for propane were 16 and 31 ppbv during the Colorado and Utah studies, respectively, which is substantially greater than median urban values that range between 1-5 ppbv. The VOC measurements from these two studies will be compared to previous experiments in Pasadena, CA and other sites in Colorado's northern Front Range to show that the chemical signature associated with oil and natural gas operations is very distinctive and can be clearly differentiated from urban VOC emission sources that are dominated by vehicular exhaust. We will compare the regional characteristics of the Colorado and Utah data sets in order to assess the potential atmospheric impacts of VOC emissions from the oil and gas sector, such as the photochemical production of ozone.

Seminar attendees agree not to cite, quote, copy, or distribute material presented without the explicit written consent of the seminar presenter. Any opinions expressed in this seminar are those of the speaker alone and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of NOAA or ESRL CSD.

Remote Access and Notes:

Remote access: TBD. For further information about this seminar please contact [(303) 497-3599] or [(303) 497-5431].

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Monday, March 26, 2012 7:42 AM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are the most complete summary of upcoming NOAA science seminars; a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science across NOAA and our contituents. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] or join our RSS feed by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

OneNOAA Science Seminar Number: 1206

April 05, 2012

(Canceled) Emission Modeling for Air Quality Forecasting at ARL: A Decadal Review

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Date and Time: (CANCELED) April 05, 2012, 13:00-14:00 Eastern Time Zone [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: NOAA SSMC-3 ARL Large Conference Room 3404 (1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD, 20910)
Speaker(s): (NOAA Air Resources Laboratory)
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NOAA NOAA Air Resources Laboratory
Abstract:

TBD

Remote Access and Notes:

Conference Line: 203-277-3283; Passcode: 9643195#. Webex TBD. For further information about this seminar please contact

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Wednesday, February 22, 2012 2:31 PM / Last updated Tuesday, March 20, 2012 7:52 AM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are the most complete summary of upcoming NOAA science seminars; a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science across NOAA and our contituents. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] or join our RSS feed by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

OneNOAA Science Seminar Number: 1207

Designing Evaluations

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Date and Time: April 05, 2011, 12:00-13:00 Eastern Time Zone [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: NOAA SSMC-3, 2nd Floor, Library (1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD, 20910)
Speaker(s): Stephanie Shipman and Valerie Caracelli (Applied Research Methods Team, Government Accountability Office)
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NOAA NODC Central Library
Abstract:

Dr. Stephanie Shipman and Dr. Valerie Caracelli of the Government Accountability Office (GAO) will discuss the recently released report, Designing Evaluations: 2012 Revision, (GAO-12-208G) which will serve as a reference in GAO and federal agency evaluation offices. This revision reflects performance measurement and evaluation thinking and practice post-GPRA, and the expansion of program evaluation to the full range of federal programs and policies. The guide introduces key issues in planning evaluation studies of federal programs and describes a variety of evaluation designs for answering different types of questions about program performance - from examining the implementation of national programs to assessing the effectiveness of specific practices and interventions. The guide is a tool for planning useful evaluations and developing educated consumers of evaluation.

Download Presentation: Slides
Remote Access and Notes:

For remote access via webinar, please fill out the registration form a few minutes before the meeting is scheduled to begin. The Meeting Number is 742656968; the Passcode is brownbag. For audio in the US and Canada, dial 866-833-7307. The participant passcode is 8986360. For questions about this seminar contact (301-713-2600 ext. 115) or (301-713-2600 ext. 155).

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Friday, March 16, 2012 8:45 AM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are the most complete summary of upcoming NOAA science seminars; a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science across NOAA and our contituents. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] or join our RSS feed by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

OneNOAA Science Seminar Number: 1208

Transitioning from FGDC to ISO 101 and ISO Content and Organization: Q&A for Unified Modeling Language (UML) Basics

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Date and Time: April 05, 2012, 13:00-14:00 Central Time Zone [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: Webinar access only
Speaker(s): (NCDDC)
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NOAA NCDDC
Abstract:

Module: Q&A for Unified Modeling Language (UML) Basics

NODC NCDDC is offering a series of ISO Metadata Training sessions in an online format. Each session will last approximately one hour starting at 1:00pm CST. Select (click) the module title to register for that session. Once registered you will receive an email confirming your registration with information you need to join the Webinar. Alternately, you may download the complete schedule as a PDF document to view the dates, times and hyperlinks to register for each session.

Remote Access and Notes:

(space limited) Gotomeeting Link to register for this webinar: https://www1.gotomeeting.com/register/617622840. Once registered you will receive an email confirming your registration with information you need to join the Webinar. For further information about this seminar please contact [(866) 732-2382]

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Monday, April 2, 2012 . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are the most complete summary of upcoming NOAA science seminars; a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science across NOAA and our contituents. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] or join our RSS feed by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

OneNOAA Science Seminar Number: 1209

Marine Protected Areas and Fisheries Management: What do we Know From Theory and the Field

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Date and Time: April 05, 2012, 11:00-12:00 Pacific Time Zone [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: NOAA Northwest Fisheries Science Center (NWFSC) Auditorium (2725 Montlake Boulevard East, Seattle, WA 98112); Map to NWFSC
Speaker(s): Dr. Ray Hilborn (Professor, School of Aquatic & Fishery Sciences, University of Washington)
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NOAA NWFSC Monster Seminar JAM
Abstract:

In this talk I will review the existing literature on the interaction between marine protected areas and fisheries management, and provide a history of the MPA movement as related to fisheries. I will talk particularly about the implementation of MPAs in California and the role of science in that process. The role of models in the California process will be considered and the "conflict" between using models to evaluate alternative proposals compared to providing stakeholders with guidelines for size and spacing of reserves. My general conclusions are that when fishing pressure is well managed MPAs can only provide increases in fisheries yield either if there are significant source sink dynamics that are known and stable across years, or if weak stocks can be protected by MPAs allowing productive stocks to be fully exploited elsewhere. When overfishing is taking place, MPAs appear to frequently provide a win-win situation providing both for higher abundance of stocks, and increased yields.

About the Speaker:

Ray Hilborn is a Professor in the School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences, University of Washington specializing in natural resource management and conservation. He teaches graduate and undergraduate courses in environmental science, conservation and quantitative population dynamics. He authored "Overfishing: what everyone needs to know" (with Ulrike Hilborn) in 2012, "Quantitative fisheries stock assessment" with Carl Walters in 1992, and "The Ecological Detective: confronting models with data" with Marc Mangel, in 1997 and has published over 200 peer reviewed articles. He serves on the Editorial Boards of 7 journals including the Board of Reviewing Editors of Science Magazine. He has received the Volvo Environmental Prize, the American Fisheries Societies Award of Excellence, The Ecological Society of America's Sustainability Science Award and the American Institute of Fisheries Research Biologists Outstanding Achievement Award. He is a Fellow of the Washington State Academy of Sciences, the Royal Society of Canada and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

Salient Publications

  • Hilborn, R., K. Stokes, J.J. Maguire, A.D.M. Smith, L.W. Botsford, M. Mangel, J. Orensanz, A. Parma, J. Rice, J. Bell, K.L. Cochrane, S. Garcia, S.J. Hall, G.P. Kirkwood, K. Sainsbury, G. Stefansson, C.J. Walters. 2004. When can marine reserves improve fisheries management? Ocean and Coastal Management 47/3-4:197-205.
  • Hilborn, R., F. Micheli, and G.A. De Leo. 2006. Integrating marine protected areas with catch regulation. Canadian Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences 63:642-649
  • Hilborn, R. 2012. The role of science in MPA establishment in California: a personal Perspective. Environmental Conservation 39 (2): 1-4
Remote Access and Notes:

Webinar: Go to https://nwfsc200.webex.com/nwfsc200/j.php?ED=13502408&UID=40245523&RT=MiM0 (This meeting does not require a password.) Click "Join". ) Call-in toll-free number (US/Canada): 1-855-244-8681; Access code: 856 489 473. For Assistance during the presentation go to https://nwfsc.webex.com/nwfsc/mc On the left navigation bar, click "Support". For questions about this seminar please contact Diane L. Tierney-Jamieson (206-860-3380; )

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Wednesday, April 4, 2012 9:47 AM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science and management information. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] or join our RSS feed by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

OneNOAA Science Seminar Number: 1210

April 06, 2012

Big Questions About Small Things: Bacteria, Archaea, and Their Viruses

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Date and Time: April 06, 12:00-13:00 Eastern Time Zone [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: NOAA Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory, Michigan-Huron Room
Speaker(s): Dr. Vincent J. Denef and Dr. Melissa B. Duhaime (University of Michigan, Dept of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology)
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NOAA GLERL-CILER Joint Seminar Series
Abstract:

Future perspectives: While the role of bacterio- and viroplankton communities as part of the freshwater microbial loop is well appreciated, the resolution at which these communities are incorporated in food web models is rather coarse. Efforts to increase this resolution by employing novel DNA sequencing-based technologies lag significantly behind similar efforts in the marine environment. The currently planned sampling by GLERL of the surface and profundal environment along the Alpena transect in April, July and September provides the opportunity to obtain a highly genetically resolved view of the bacterioplankton and virus communities in a Laurentian Great Lake in the context of analyses of the entire food web. Very few such studies have been performed in any system, terrestrial or aquatic. We are also examining impacts of the dreissenid invasion on the dynamic interplay between bacterial and viral populations, and their role in carbon cycling in inland Michigan lakes, and anticipate that insights from the Lake Huron project and the inland lakes project can complement each other.

Remote Access and Notes:

Remote Access Not available. For further information about this seminar please contact .

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Tuesday, April 3, 2012 7:51 AM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are the most complete summary of upcoming NOAA science seminars; a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science across NOAA and our contituents. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] or join our RSS feed by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

OneNOAA Science Seminar Number: 1211

Global Simulations of Tropical Cyclone Statistics Interannual Variability and The Response to Global Warming

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Date and Time: April 06, 2012, 16:00-17:00 Central Time Zone [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: University of Colorado, Boulder, CO; CIRES Auditorium (Directions to CIRES)
Speaker(s): Issac M. Held (NOAA GFDL)
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NOAA CIRES Distinguished Lecture Series
Abstract:

We at GFDL have been experimenting with global "mesoscale" atmospheric models with horizontal grid sizes in the 25 to 50 km range, as have other groups around the world. We have focused in particular on the simulations of tropical cyclone climatology, interannual variability, and response to global warming. I will discuss some of the lessons we have learned from these studies, both about the tropical cyclone problem as well as issues related to convective parameterization. Simulations with realistic model configurations will also be briefly compared to "aqua-planet" simulations on the sphere as well as doubly periodic simulations of rotating radiative-convective equilibrium.

About The Speaker:

Isaac Held is a Senior Scientist at the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory (GFDL)/NOAA. He is also a Lecturer with Rank of Professor in the Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences Program at Princeton University. His research has focused on the general circulation of the atmosphere and on climate change. He was elected a member of the National Academy of Sciences in 2003 and received the Rossby Medal from the American Meteorological Society in 2008.

Remote Access and Notes:

Remote access not be available. CIRES Distinguished Lecture Series. For questions about this seminar contact [(303) 492-1595]

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Thursday, March 29, 2012 4:16 PM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are the most complete summary of upcoming NOAA science seminars; a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science across NOAA and our contituents. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] or join our RSS feed by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

OneNOAA Science Seminar Number: 1212

April 10, 2012

Understanding and Modeling Climate Extremes

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Date and Time: April 10, 2012, 12:30-14:00 Eastern Time Zone [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: NOAA SSMC-3 12th floor Fishbowl (1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD, 20910). Remote attendance is encouraged
Speaker(s): Lance Bosart (SUNY Albany); Suzana Camargo (Columbia University); Kerry Emanuel (MIT); Rong Fu (University of Texas at Austin); Upmanu Lall (Columbia University); Chunzai Wang (NOAA AOML)
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NOAA OAR CPO Modeling, Analysis, Predictions, and Projections program monthly webinar
Abstracts:

Suzana Camargo and Kerry Emanuel -- Tropical Cyclones and Climate Change -- We will discuss climate control of tropical cyclone activity from theoretical and empirical perspectives, including the effects of ENSO and the possible effects of anthropogenic aerosols and greenhouse gases. Evidence will be presented to the effect that the observed multi-decadal variability of Atlantic tropical cyclones is mostly attributable to multi-decadal variations in radiative forcing. We will also present preliminary results exploring possible changes in tropical cyclone tracks in the Atlantic in present and future climates using cluster analysis.

Chunzai Wang -- Climate Factors Influencing Hurricane Landfall -- Almost all of the severest hurricane-related loss and damage occur when hurricanes make landfall. Thus, a better understanding of factors controlling hurricane landfall is both scientifically and socially important. We use observations and numerical model experiments to examine the influences of large-scale climate on U. S. landfalling hurricanes. It is shown that the Atlantic Warm Pool (AWP) - a large body of warm water comprised of the Gulf of Mexico, the Caribbean Sea and the western tropical North Atlantic - plays an important role in the hurricane track. An eastward expansion of the AWP shifts the hurricane genesis location eastward, decreasing the possibility for a hurricane to make landfall. A large AWP also induces barotropic stationary wave patterns that weaken the North Atlantic subtropical high and produce the eastward steering flow anomalies along the eastern seaboard of the United States. Due to these two mechanisms, hurricanes are steered toward the northeast without making landfall in the U. S. during large AWP years. As an example, the AWP in 2010 was extremely large and the 2010 Atlantic hurricane season was very active; however, no hurricanes made landfall in the United States. Although the La Nina event in the Pacific may be associated with the increased number of Atlantic hurricanes, its relationship with landfalling activity has been offset in 2010 by the effect of the extremely large AWP. The impacts of other climate factors on the hurricane track are also discussed.

Lance Bosart -- Extreme Weather over North America Arising from Variability of the North Pacific Subtropical Jet -- Observations suggest that the structure of the North Pacific subtropical jet (STJ) varies on synoptic to intraseasonal time scales in response to poleward-directed diabatically driven outflow associated with tropical disturbances, and equatorward-directed flow associated with the passage of higher latitude extratropical disturbances. A case study will be presented of the contributions of tropical disturbance-related outflow and higher latitude extratropical disturbances to the formation of a very strong North Pacific STJ during October 2010, which subsequently entered western North America and helped trigger a record-breaking cyclone (< 960 hPa) over the Upper Midwest on 25-26 October. To complement the case study, composite analyses will be used to illustrate North Pacific STJ variability in the context of the onset of strong North Pacific STJs and the recurvature of western North Pacific tropical cyclones (TCs). Particular focus will be on the climatological influence of strong North Pacific STJs and recurving western North Pacific TCs on the large-scale flow pattern downstream over North America.

Rong Fu -- Predictability of Severe to Exceptional Drought in Texas -- The 2011 drought was the worst single-year drought on record in Texas. In early 2011, both the CFSv2 and NMME predicted a reduction in rainfall deficit and recovery from the winter drought, as expected from a weakening La Nina in the summer of 2011. However, the drought rapidly intensified in April. By August 2011, extreme drought had spread over most of the US southern tier states. What could cause such a sudden intensification of the 2011 drought and other extreme droughts during the past century? Is such a cause predictable? How well can CFSv2, NMME and selected CMIP5 models simulate the anomalous large-scale circulation and the relationship between rainfall deficits in the US southern tier states and their SST forcings? In this webinar, we will present the results of our analyses to explore these questions.

Upmanu Lall -- Exploring Oceanic Source Regions And Moisture Transport for Extreme Floods: Ohio River Basin --

Download Webcast: Webcast (mp4 format)
Remote Access and Notes:

Webex: https://cpomapp.webex.com/cpomapp/onstage/g.php?t=a&d=628133026. Password: 20910. Audio available only by teleconference: Teleconference Number: 1-866-710-6541; Participant Passcode: 5841149

For further information about this seminar please contact

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Monday, February 6, 2012 2:00 PM / Last updated Thursday, April 12, 2012 3:23 PM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are the most complete summary of upcoming NOAA science seminars; a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science across NOAA and our contituents. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

OneNOAA Science Seminar Number: 1213

Meteorological Research and Development from the Perspective of Cognitive Systems Engineering

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Date and Time: April 10, 2012, 15:30-16:30 Central Time Zone [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: National Weather Center (120 David L. Boren Blvd, University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK), NWC Room 1350 (Directions to the National Weather Center).
Speaker(s): Robert Hoffman (Institute for Human and Machine Cognition, Pensacola, FL)
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NOAA NWS National Weather Center Colloquium
Abstract:

This presentation will discuss research and development activities from the perspective of cognitive ergonomics and expertise studies. The research is premised on certain national policy issues of training and workforce, and issues in the procurement of new technologies. A theme to the research is "Human-Centered Computing," and the primary methodology is referred to as Cognitive Task Analysis. The presentation will include highlights from research that used a variety of methods including proficiency scaling, cognitive modeling, and knowledge elicitation. Work analyses have been conducted at locations including WFOs, the UK Met Office, US Navy METOC facilities, and private sector forecasting companies, spanning a period over 10 years. At the broadest level, the research illustrate how collaboration of meteorologists and cognitive systems engineers can lead to improved methods for workflow, interface design, training and other areas as well.

View Presentation: Video
About The Speaker:

Robert R. Hoffman, Ph.D. is a Senior Research Scientist at the IHMC. He is a Fellow of the Association for Psychological Science, a Fulbright Scholar, and an Honorary Fellow of The British Library Eccles Center for American Studies. He received his Ph.D. in experimental psychology at the University of Cincinnati, and Postdoctoral Associateship at the Center for Research on Human Learning at the University of Minnesota. He has been recognized internationally for his fundamental contributions to multiple fields, including cognitive psychology, psycholinguistics, remote sensing, weather forecasting, and artificial intelligence. He is Editor for the book Series, "Expertise: Research and Applications." He is Editor for the Regular Department on Human-Centered Computing in IEEE: Intelligent Systems. His recent books include:

  • Hoffman, R. R., Trafton, G. and Roebber, P. (due 2012). Minding the Weather: How Expert Forecasters Think. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.
  • Hoffman, R.R. and Militello, L.G. (2008). Perspectives on Cognitive Task Analysis: Historical Origins and Modern Communities of Practice. Boca Raton, FL: CRC Press/Taylor and Francis.
  • Crandall, B., Klein, G., and Hoffman R.R. (2006). Working Minds: A Practitioner's Guide to Cognitive Task Analysis. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.
  • Ericsson, K.A., Charness, N., Feltovich, P.J. and Hoffman, R.R., (Eds.) (2006). Cambridge handbook of expertise and expert performance. New York: Cambridge University Press.
Remote Access and Notes:

Remote access is not available. Presentations will be recorded as well as powerpoint slides so anyone can watch the seminars at their leisure. For further information about this seminar please contact or

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Tuesday, March 20, 2012 1:16 PM / Last updated Wednesday, April 11, 2012 12:50 PM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are the most complete summary of upcoming NOAA science seminars; a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science across NOAA and our contituents. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] or join our RSS feed by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

OneNOAA Science Seminar Number: 1214

Assessing Restoration Success in Muskegon Lake using Fish and Macrophytes

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Date and Time: April 10, 10:30-11:30 Eastern Time Zone [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: NOAA Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory, Lake Superior Hall (4840 South State Road, Ann Arbor, MI)
Speaker(s): Dr. Carl R. Ruetz III and Mary Ogdahl (Annis Water Resources Institute, Grand Valley State University)
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NOAA CILER Seminar Series
Abstract:

TBD

About The Speakers:

Carl Ruetz has a PhD in Fisheries from the University of Minnesota. His research interests are broadly focused on population and community ecology of fish in freshwater environments. Since arriving at GVSU, much of his research has been conducted in drowned river mouth lakes.

Mary Ogdahl is a Research Assistant in Al Steinman's lab at GVSU's Annis Water Resources Institute, where she has worked for 8 years. She holds a Bachelor's degree in Biology from Wittenberg University and a Master's degree in Environmental Science from Indiana University.

Remote Access and Notes:

Remote access via webinar: https://www2.gotomeeting.com/register/629745042. For further information about this seminar please contact .

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Tuesday, April 3, 2012 10:50 AM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are the most complete summary of upcoming NOAA science seminars; a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science across NOAA and our contituents. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] or join our RSS feed by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

OneNOAA Science Seminar Number: 1215

April 11, 2012

Modeling Black Carbon with the OsloCTM2: Current Status and Planned Work

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Date and Time: April 11, 2012; 15:30-16:30 (Boulder, CO) Mountain Standard Time [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: NOAA ESRL Chemical Sciences Division seminar Room 2A305, David Skaggs Research Center (NOAA Building), 325 Broadway, Boulder, CO (Directions)
Speaker(s): Marianne Tronstad Lund (Center for International Climate and Environmental Research, Oslo, Norway)
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NOAA ESRL Chemical Science Division seminar
Abstract:

Black carbon (BC) has received increasing attention as an important contributor to global warming and can impact climate through several mechanisms. BC aerosols are mainly hydrophobic upon emission and are removed by wet deposition. The particles then become more hygroscopic, i.e. aged, through interaction with water-soluble species such as sulfate and organic carbon, forming an internal mixture. The lifetime, and hence transport and distribution, as well as cloud nucleating and optical properties of BC depend on the mixing state of the particles, and the parameterization of aging is an important element of global aerosol modeling. A microphysical aerosol module (M7) has been implemented in the chemistry transport model OsloCTM2 to represent aerosol size distribution and interaction and the formation of mixed particles and has been compared to the original bulk parameterization of aerosols. While the microphysical module captures seasonal and regional variations in BC aging by accounting for coating of the particles by sulfate, a fixed transfer rate from hydrophobic to hygroscopic particles is applied in the bulk parameterization. This leads to differences in lifetime and distribution of BC in OsloCTM2 and to differences in the model performance compared to measurements. There are significant uncertainties related to the microphysics of BC, such as coating thickness, interaction of BC with organics and nitrate and wet removal processes, which will be explored. For validation of the model, the M7 microphysical module will also be compared to more measurements from surface stations and from aircraft campaigns with the Single Particle Soot Photometer.

Seminar attendees agree not to cite, quote, copy, or distribute material presented without the explicit written consent of the seminar presenter. Any opinions expressed in this seminar are those of the speaker alone and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of NOAA or ESRL CSD.

Remote Access and Notes:

Webinar Registration: https://www2.gotomeeting.com/register/838486306 and view system requirements. Space is limited. Confirmation of registration includes information about joining the GoToMeeting. For further information about this seminar please contact [(303) 497-3599] or [(303) 497-5431].

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Friday, March 30, 2012 2:41 PM / Last updated Tuesday, April 3, 2012 7:57 AM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are the most complete summary of upcoming NOAA science seminars; a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science across NOAA and our contituents. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] or join our RSS feed by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

OneNOAA Science Seminar Number: 1216

April 12, 2012

(Postponed to May 10, 2012) Early results from the Barnegat Bay Sea Nettle Barrier Pilot Project

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Date and Time: (Postponed to May 10, 2012; See updated seminar information
Location: NOAA, NMFS, NEFSC, James J. Howard Marine Sciences Laboratory Conference Room. The Conference Room is located on the first floor of Office Building 74 (74 Magruder Road, Sandy Hook, New Jersey, Directions)
Speaker(s): Jim Vasslides, Jennifer Barny, Nina Sassano (Barnegat Bay Partnership, Ocean County College, Toms River, NJ)
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NOAA James J. Howard Marine Sciences Laboratory seminar series
Abstract:

In recent years, Atlantic sea nettle (Chrysaora quinquecirrha) populations have been increasing in Barnegat Bay. Because little is known on how to reduce populations, we developed a project to test the effectiveness of a barrier net in protecting bathers from these stinging jellyfish. Two beaches were chosen for this pilot program: Windward Beach on the Metedeconk River in Brick, NJ, and Brooklyn Avenue Beach on Barnegat Bay in Lavallette, NJ. From June through September of 2011, a 1 ½-inch (38mm) square mesh gillnet was deployed twice a week at each beach, with the intent of preventing nettles from entering the beaches' bathing areas. Once a week, we pulled a 50-foot bag seine both inside and outside the barrier at each beach to test the barrier's efficacy at excluding nettles from the bathing areas. Peak jellyfish abundance occurred in the first two weeks of August, and coincided with the optimal water temperature range (26-30°C) established by researchers in the nearby Chesapeake Bay. However, we found peak abundance did not match the optimal salinity range established by previous research. In both Brick and Lavallette, peak abundance occurred when salinity was above the 16 psu threshold established in Chesapeake studies. Our results show a bell diameter distribution of 8-120mm, with a mean of 34.6mm in Brick and 44.5mm in Lavallette, and a mode of 30mm in Brick and 39mm in Lavallette. In general, the barrier was successful at excluding 59.9% of the jellyfish from the swim area in Brick, and 54.6% from the swim area in Lavallette. These seemingly wide ranges are likely a result of the different gillnet deployment methods utilized, as well as deteriorating barrier net conditions due to blue crabs. These preliminary results indicate that barrier nets may be useful at some bathing beaches in the Barnegat Bay with additional refinement of mesh size and other net properties.

About The Speaker:

Jim Vasslides is the Program Scientist at the Barnegat Bay Partnership, a designated National Estuary Program working to improve the health of the Barnegat Bay, a nationally significant estuary. Jim received a BS in Natural Resource Management, an MS in Ecology and Evolution from Rutgers University, and is currently pursuing a doctoral degree. His current research interests focus on understanding the effects of increasing urbanization within the Barnegat Bay watershed, including the apparent proliferation of stinging sea nettles, impediments to diadromous species movements, and modeling the impacts of various management strategies on higher trophic level biota.

Remote Access:

To join the meeting online:

  1. Go to https://nmfs-st.webex.com/nmfs-st/j.php?ED=162114557&UID=0
  2. Enter your name and email address.
  3. Enter the meeting password: (This meeting does not require a password)
  4. Click "Join"

To join the teleconference audio:

  1. Dial: 1-866-658-9153
  2. Enter the passcode: 3373926

For further information about this seminar including remote access please contact or

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Friday, March 16, 2012 9:08 AM / Last updated Friday, April 6, 2012 10:50 AM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are the most complete summary of upcoming NOAA science seminars; a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science across NOAA and our contituents. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

OneNOAA Science Seminar Number: 1217

Current Legal and Policy Issues Related to Antarctic Diplomacy

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Date and Time: April 12, 2012, 12:00-13:00 Eastern Time Zone [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: NOAA SSMC-3, 2nd Floor, Library (1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD, 20910)
Speaker(s): (US Department of State)
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NOAA International Affairs Council Working Group on the Law of the Sea Convention
Abstract:

Mr. Bloom will speak on "Current Legal and Policy Issues Related to Antarctic Diplomacy" and provide an overview of the Antarctic Treaty system with a focus on topics such as establishment of marine protected areas in the Southern Ocean, regulation of tourism, and enforcement of environmental regulations, including liability rules.

Download Presentation: Presentaion Slides
About The Speaker:

In addition to serving as Director of the State Department's Office of Ocean and Polar Affairs, Mr. Bloom is head of the U.S. delegation to Antarctic Treaty Consultative Meetings and U.S. representative to the Commission for the Conservation of Antarctic Marine Living Resources (CCAMLR). He spent most of his career as a lawyer at the State Department and in private practice and has been working on Antarctic issues for over 15 years. He recently returned from leading a joint inspection with Russia of foreign facilities in Antarctica and a visit to the South Pole.

Remote Access:

For remote access via webinar, please fill out the registration form a few minutes before the meeting is scheduled to begin. The Meeting Number is 742656968; the Passcode is brownbag. For audio in the US and Canada, dial 866-833-7307. The participant passcode is 8986360. For questions about this seminar contact (301-713-2600 ext. 115) or (301-713-2600 ext. 155).

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Monday, March 19, 2012 9:31 AM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are the most complete summary of upcoming NOAA science seminars; a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science across NOAA and our contituents. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

OneNOAA Science Seminar Number: 1218

Chicago Climate Action Plan

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Date and Time: April 12, 2012, 12:00-13:00 Eastern Daylight Time [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: WebEx Event, remote access only (see Remote Access and Notes section below)
Speaker(s): (Civic Consulting Alliance)
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: Ohio Sea Grant
Abstract:

Urban areas are responsible for 70% of global greenhouse gas emissions and cities are increasingly seen as the place where the solutions to climate change will be found. Chicago developed its Climate Action Plan in 2007 to outline the mitigation and climate readiness goals for the city. It has since been recognized as one of the leading plans in the country because of its scientific rigor, community involvement, and actionable targets.

Moving from plan to action has involved thousands of people, many different sources of support, and a set of innovative approaches. This webinar will provide information about:

  • The process for creating the Chicago Climate Action Plan
  • How Chicago moved from plans to action
  • Accomplishments and next steps
About the Speaker:

Tom McKone is helping address many of Chicago's environmental and transportation issues. Since joining Civic Consulting in 2006, Tom has strengthened regional planning, developed programs to create a more sustainable city, improved the operations of Chicago's transit system, recommended improvements to Chicago's infrastructure, and supported the implementation of the Chicago Climate Action Plan.

Tom helped create the implementation plan for the Chicago Climate Action Plan, facilitated Mayor Emanuel's environment transition committee, and is currently working with Chicago's Chief Sustainability Officer to accelerate sustainability and climate action in Chicago. Under Tom's leadership, the Civic Consulting Alliance provided over $15 million in pro bono support from 20 firms to the Chicago Climate Action Plan and received Boeing's 2011 Game Changer Award in recognition of these efforts.

Tom has a master's degree from the University of Chicago's Harris School of Public Policy and an undergraduate degree in economics from Northwestern.

http://www.ccachicago.org/people/tom-mckone

Remote Access and Notes:

To receive remote access information, you must register at http://changingclimate.osu.edu/ before the start of the webinar. Registration is free, and log-in information will be sent to the email address you provide during registration. Please contact , Ohio Sea Grant Assistant Director, with questions.

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Tuesday, March 20, 2012 2:10 PM / Last updated Thursday, March 29, 2012 9:08 AM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are the most complete summary of upcoming NOAA science seminars; a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science across NOAA and our contituents. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] or join our RSS feed by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

OneNOAA Science Seminar Number: 1219

Transitioning from FGDC to ISO 101 and ISO Content and Organization: Tool Overview

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Date and Time: April 12, 2012, 13:00-14:00 Central Time Zone [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: Webinar access only
Speaker(s): (NCDDC)
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NOAA NCDDC
Abstract:

Module: Tool Overview: GeoNetwork, GeoPortal, ISOMorph, XMLSpy, oXygen

NODC NCDDC is offering a series of ISO Metadata Training sessions in an online format. Each session will last approximately one hour starting at 1:00pm CST. Select (click) the module title to register for that session. Once registered you will receive an email confirming your registration with information you need to join the Webinar. Alternately, you may download the complete schedule as a PDF document to view the dates, times and hyperlinks to register for each session.

Remote Access and Notes:

(space limited) Gotomeeting Link to register for this webinar: https://www1.gotomeeting.com/register/317308537. Once registered you will receive an email confirming your registration with information you need to join the Webinar. For further information about this seminar please contact [(866) 732-2382]

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Monday, April 2, 2012 . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are the most complete summary of upcoming NOAA science seminars; a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science across NOAA and our contituents. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] or join our RSS feed by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

OneNOAA Science Seminar Number: 1220

White Sharks of California: A Conservation Success Story or an Insidious Trophic Tragedy in the Making?

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Date and Time: April 12, 2012, 11:00-12:00 Pacific Time Zone [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: NOAA Northwest Fisheries Science Center (NWFSC) Auditorium (2725 Montlake Boulevard East, Seattle, WA 98112); Map to NWFSC
Speaker(s): Dr. Chris Lowe (Professor, Biological Sciences, California State University Long Beach)
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NOAA NWFSC Monster Seminar JAM
Abstract:

Poorly regulated commercial gillnet fishing impacted numerous large fish populations including white sharks (Carcharodon carcharias) in southern California from the 1970s-1990s. Various forms of improved fisheries management and protection of white sharks in the mid 1990s have promoted recovery of this population. However, southern California's legacy of chemical dumping (particularly DDT and PCBs) and subsequent bioaccumulation of contaminants may pose challenges for the recovering white shark population. Organochlorine contaminants and heavy metals were measured in tissues of incidentally caught juvenile white sharks, and found to be extremely high given their young age. Despite data suggesting the white shark population is increasing in California, accumulating contaminants may pose a growing threat to population recovery.

About the Speaker:

Lowe grew up on Martha's Vineyard, where he spent a vast majority of his youth fishing and diving. He received his B.A. in Marine Biology at Barrington College, M.S. in Biology at Cal. State Univ. Long Beach, and a Ph.D. in Zoology at the Univ. of Hawaii. In 1998, he was hired as a Professor of Marine Biology at Cal. State Univ. Long Beach where he runs the CSULB Shark Lab originally founded by Dr. Donald R. Nelson. Over the last 20 years he has used and developed acoustic telemetry techniques to study the movements, behavior, and physiology of sharks, rays, and game fishes. Some of his recent research has focused on the development of robots for autonomously tracking sharks. Lowe received the Outstanding Professor award for CSULB in 2009.

Salient Publications

  • Lowe, C.G., M.E. Blasius, E.T. Jarvis, T.J. Mason, G.D. Goodmanlowe, J.B. O'Sullivan. 2012. Historic fishery interactions with white sharks in the Southern California Bight. In: M. Domeier (Ed). Global Perspectives on the Biology and Life History of the Great White Shark Research (Carcharodon carcharias). Taylor & Francis
  • Mull, C.G., M.E. Blasius, J. O'Sullivan, C.G. Lowe. 2012. Heavy metals, trace elements and organochlorine contaminants in muscle and liver tissue of juvenile white sharks (Carcharodon carcharias) from the Southern California Bight. In: M. Domeier (Ed). Global Perspectives on the Biology and Life History of the Great White Shark Research (Carcharodon carcharias). Taylor & Francis.
  • Weng, K.C., J. O'Sullivan, C.G. Lowe, C. Winkler, M.E. Blasius, K.A. Loke-Smith, T. Sippel, J.M. Ezcurra, S.J. Jorgensen, and M.J. Murray. 2012. Back to the wild: release of juvenile white sharks from the Monterey Bay Aquarium. In: M. Domeier (Ed). Global Perspectives on the Biology and Life History of the Great White Shark Research (Carcharodon carcharias). Taylor & Francis.
  • Papastamatiou, Y.P. and C.G. Lowe. In press. An analytical and hypothesis driven approach to elasmobranch movement studies. Journal of Fish Biology.
Remote Access and Notes:

(Updated remote access) Webinar: Go to https://nwfsc200.webex.com/nwfsc200/j.php?ED=13502408&UID=40245523&RT=MiM0 (This meeting does not require a password.) Click "Join". Call-in toll-free number (US/Canada): 1-855-244-8681; Access code: 856 489 473. For Assistance during the presentation go to https://nwfsc.webex.com/nwfsc/mc On the left navigation bar, click "Support". For questions about this seminar please contact Diane L. Tierney-Jamieson (206-860-3380; )

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Wednesday, April 4, 2012 9:47 AM / Last updated Thursday, April 12, 2012 2:54 PM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science and management information. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] or join our RSS feed by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

OneNOAA Science Seminar Number: 1221

April 13, 2012

NOAA CIRES Distinguished Lecture: A Tribute to Dr. George Reid by Dr. Susan Solomon

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Date and Time: April 13, 2012, 16:00-17:00 Central Time Zone [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: University of Colorado, Boulder, CO; Visual Arts Complex (VAC), Art & Art History Building, Room 1B20 (Map)
Speaker(s): Dr. Susan Solomon
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NOAA CIRES
Abstract:

George Colvin Reid (1929-2011) was an eminent atmospheric scientist who pioneered research into critical environmental issues such as stratospheric ozone depletion and global climate change. Always a progressive thinker, he was one of the initial four fellows who founded the Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences in 1968.

From the Mesosphere to the Tropical Tropopause: A few of George Reid's accomplishments and linkages to current issues in climate change. The first part of this talk will briefly summarize some of George C. Reid's many scientific accomplishments, ranging across the breadth of our atmosphere. The second part will cover current issues in climate change of the tropical lower stratosphere and troposphere, starting with Reid's work but also going beyond it.

Remote Access and Notes:

Remote access not be available. CIRES Distinguished Lecture Series. For questions about this seminar contact [(303) 492-1595]

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Thursday, March 29, 2012 4:16 PM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are the most complete summary of upcoming NOAA science seminars; a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science across NOAA and our contituents. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] or join our RSS feed by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

OneNOAA Science Seminar Number: 1222

April 17, 2012

Annual Tzvi Gal-Chen Lecture Series: Predicting the Weather From Days to A Season Ahead: Developments at ECMWF

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Date and Time: April 17, 2012, 15:30-16:30 Central Time Zone [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: National Weather Center (120 David L. Boren Blvd, University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK), NWC Room. 1313 (Directions to the National Weather Center).
Speaker(s): Professor Alan J. Thorpe (Director-General ECMWF, Reading, UK)
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NOAA NWS National Weather Center Colloquium
Abstract:

Over its 36 year history the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts has pioneered the science and practice of global numerical weather prediction. The ongoing increase in forecast skill over this period represents a huge scientific success story of the international research and operational community. In this talk these developments and the outlook for future innovation are discussed. Scientific issues such as those related to: predicting forecast skill, weather regime transitions, model uncertainty, detecting climate change, and forecasting severe weather events will be presented. A perspective on so-called seamless prediction will be given.

About the Speaker: Alan Thorpe New Director-General of ECMWF
Remote Access and Notes:

Remote access will not be available. Presentations will be recorded as well as powerpoint slides so anyone can watch the seminars at their leisure. For further information about this seminar please contact or

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Monday, February 13, 2012 4:16 PM / Last updated Sunday, March 11, 2012 2:23 PM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are the most complete summary of upcoming NOAA science seminars; a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science across NOAA and our contituents. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] or join our RSS feed by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

OneNOAA Science Seminar Number: 1223

April 18, 2012

Recent and Planned Development of Data Assimilation and Modeling Systems at ECMWF

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Date and Time: April 18, 2012, 14:00-15:00 Eastern Time Zone [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: NOAA World Weather Building (5200 Auth Road, Camp Springs, MD 20746); Room 707
Speaker(s): (Head, Model Division European Center for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts -ECMWF-)
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NOAA Joint Center for Satellite Data Assimilation
Abstract:

The presentation will summarize some of the key updates of the ECMWF model and data assimilation systems over the past 2 years, after a brief introduction of ECMWF and its forecasting framework. Three examples of system upgrades will be given, namely the introduction of the ensemble of data assimilations, the revision of microwave sounder observation errors, and the new prognostic cloud scheme. Their respective impact on analysis and forecast skill will be demonstrated as well as the difficult trade-off between objective system improvements and positive impact on skill. Finally, the importance of observation monitoring in data assimilation will be highlighted with two examples.

Download Presentation: Summary Slides (~9.1 MB)
Remote Access and Notes:

Video:

  1. Go to JCSDA Seminar and click on the seminar title
  2. Enter your name and email address
  3. Enter the meeting password: JCSDAseminars707
  4. Click "Join Now"
  5. Follow the instructions that appear on your screen
  6. For further information visit http://www.jcsda.noaa.gov/JCSDASeminars.php

Phone Access:

  • USA participants: 1-866-715-2479
  • Passcode: 9457557
  • Enter the meeting password: JCSDAseminar2010
  • International: 1-517-345-5260
  • For further information please contact

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Monday, February 6, 2012 2:17 PM / Last updated Wednesday, April 18, 2012 4:03 PM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are the most complete summary of upcoming NOAA science seminars; a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science across NOAA and our contituents. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] or join our RSS feed by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

OneNOAA Science Seminar Number: 1224

Wyoming Winter-time Ozone Research by the University of Wyoming in the Pinedale Anticline Project Area

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Date and Time: April 18, 2012; 15:30-16:30 (Boulder, CO) Mountain Standard Time [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: NOAA ESRL Chemical Sciences Division seminar Room 2A305, David Skaggs Research Center (NOAA Building), 325 Broadway, Boulder, CO (Directions)
Speaker(s): Robert Field (University of Wyoming)
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NOAA ESRL Chemical Science Division seminar
Abstract:

Since the pioneering work of Haagen-Smit, ozone has been widely recognized as an important air pollutant which is produced through photochemical reaction of precursor compounds. In 2005 the Pinedale Middle School Science project of Tracy McCarty identified the phenomenon of wintertime ground level ozone. Here we present the results of two independent projects; the Upper Green River Basin Ozone Investigation (O3i) and the Pinedale Anticline Spatial Air Quality Assessment (PASQUA). The first project started in 2009 was initially designed to define the scope of wintertime ozone episodes. The second project set-up in late 2010 considered spatial and temporal variations of key ozone precursor compounds in the vicinity of the Pinedale Anticline Project Area (PAPA) and Jonah developments in Sublette County, Wyoming. We present temporal VOC data, from our background air sampling location Boulder South Road that is located 4 miles from the edge of PAPA. The UW case study site is in a location that is considered as both rural and remote, despite proximity to oil and natural gas developments. Our linked spatial assessments using canister and passive sampling methods show variations that indicate the importance of different emission sources for oxides of nitrogen and VOC. For VOC we indicate two areas with relatively high VOC concentrations. We identify some important emission processes with relatively different compositions. We highlight emission pathways that have greater proportions of reactive VOC that have relatively high ozone creation potentials. Effective policy decisions require an understanding of the relationship between air quality measurements and meteorology with emission inventories and modeling. We discuss the problem of gaining clear focus on a problem that has ever changing conditions. We outline our current understanding and possible future research assessments.

Seminar attendees agree not to cite, quote, copy, or distribute material presented without the explicit written consent of the seminar presenter. Any opinions expressed in this seminar are those of the speaker alone and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of NOAA or ESRL CSD.

Remote Access and Notes:

Webinar Registration: https://www2.gotomeeting.com/register/762018794 and view system requirements. Space is limited. Confirmation of registration includes information about joining the GoToMeeting. For further information about this seminar please contact [(303) 497-3599] or [(303) 497-5431].

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Tuesday, April 3, 2012 8:00 AM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are the most complete summary of upcoming NOAA science seminars; a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science across NOAA and our contituents. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] or join our RSS feed by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

OneNOAA Science Seminar Number: 1225

April 19, 2012

Applications of Manually-Generated Cloud Masks for Cloud Model Verification

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Date and Time: April 19, 2012, 15:00-16:00 Eastern Time Zone [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: NOAA World Weather Building (5200 Auth Road, Camp Springs, MD 20746); Room 707
Speaker(s): Dr. Keith D. Hutchison
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NOAA Center for Satellite Applications and Research
Abstract:

Dr. Keith D. Hutchison has authored many publications and reports that cite his use of manually-generated clouds masks to quantify the performance of automated cloud analysis and forecast systems. In his seminar, Dr. Hutchison will discuss the process he has used to create these manually-generated cloud analyses and show examples with VIIRS imagery. The seminar will focus on the use of these manual cloud analyses from the initial evaluation of the VIIRS cloud mask algorithm, in 2003, through the final pre-launch tuning of the remediated VCM algorithm in 2011. He will discuss, in detail, the results using a unique pre-launch tuning process, which was recently published in the International Journal of Remote Sensing, developed to tune the VCM algorithm for the NPP program. Dr. Hutchison will also overview new applications for these analyses to a variety of scientific investigations, including his plans to quantify the performance of cloud forecasts generated by the WRF model and regional climate models, in conjunction with researchers associated with the Joint Institute for the Study of the Atmosphere and Ocean (JISAO) at the University of Washington in Seattle.

Remote Access and Notes:

Dial in information: U.S. participants: 866-832-9297; International participants: 203-566-7610; Passcode: 6070416

For further information please contact (301-763-8127 x100) or (301-763-8127 x101)

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Thursday, March 29, 2012 8:02 AM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are the most complete summary of upcoming NOAA science seminars; a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science across NOAA and our contituents. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] or join our RSS feed by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

OneNOAA Science Seminar Number: 1226

Transitioning from FGDC to ISO 101 and ISO Content and Organization: QandA for Tool Overview

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Date and Time: April 19, 2012, 13:00-14:00 Central Time Zone [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: Webinar access only
Speaker(s): (NCDDC)
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NOAA NCDDC
Abstract:

Module: QandA for Tool Overview: GeoNetwork, GeoPortal, ISOMorph, XMLSpy, oXygen

NODC NCDDC is offering a series of ISO Metadata Training sessions in an online format. Each session will last approximately one hour starting at 1:00pm CST. Select (click) the module title to register for that session. Once registered you will receive an email confirming your registration with information you need to join the Webinar. Alternately, you may download the complete schedule as a PDF document to view the dates, times and hyperlinks to register for each session.

Remote Access and Notes:

(space limited) Gotomeeting Link to register for this webinar: https://www1.gotomeeting.com/register/259688600. Once registered you will receive an email confirming your registration with information you need to join the Webinar. For further information about this seminar please contact [(866) 732-2382]

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Monday, April 2, 2012 . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are the most complete summary of upcoming NOAA science seminars; a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science across NOAA and our contituents. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] or join our RSS feed by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

OneNOAA Science Seminar Number: 1227

An Ocean Health Index: Quantifying and Mapping the Health of Global Marine Ecosystems

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Date and Time: April 19, 2012, 11:00-12:00 Pacific Time Zone [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: NOAA Northwest Fisheries Science Center (NWFSC) Auditorium (2725 Montlake Boulevard East, Seattle, WA 98112); Map to NWFSC
Speaker(s): Dr. Benjamin Halpern (Director/Research Biologist, Center for Marine Assessment and Planning; National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis, UC Santa Barbara)
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NOAA NWFSC Monster Seminar JAM
Abstract:

The ocean plays a critical role in supporting human well-being, from providing food, livelihoods and recreational opportunities to regulating global climate. Sustainable management aimed at maintaining the flow of a broad range of services from the ocean requires a comprehensive and quantitative method to measure the health of coupled human-ocean systems. We created an Ocean Health Index comprising ten diverse public goals for a healthy ocean and calculated the Index for every coastal country. I will present the rationale, methodology and global results for the Index and discuss potential policy and management applications and implications.

About the Speaker:

Dr. Ben Halpern focuses his research at the interface between marine ecology and conservation biology. His research has addressed a broad range of questions that span local to global scales, including spatial population dynamics, trophic interactions in community ecology, and the interface between ecology and human dynamics, all with the ultimate aim to inform and facilitate conservation and resource management efforts in marine systems. He received his Ph.D. in marine ecology from UC Santa Barbara and then held a joint post-doctoral fellowship at the National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis (NCEAS) and the Smith Fellowship Program sponsored by The Nature Conservancy. He is currently the Director of the Center for Marine Assessment and Planning and a Research Biologist at UC Santa Barbara. He also served as the project lead for a research initiative to evaluate and better inform efforts to do ecosystem-based management (EBM) in marine ecosystems around the world and is the lead scientist for the Ocean Health Index project. Ben has led and participated in several key synthetic research projects that have advanced our understanding of the state of the world's oceans and the potential for marine reserves to improve ocean condition. In particular he has led the development and mapping of cumulative impact assessments at global and regional scales in marine and freshwater systems. He has also conducted field expeditions in tropical and temperate systems in the Caribbean, Red Sea, Mediterranean, Solomon Islands, Indonesia, various parts of the South Pacific, California and Chile.

Remote Access and Notes:

(Updated remote access) Webinar: Go to https://nwfsc200.webex.com/nwfsc200/j.php?ED=13502408&UID=40245523&RT=MiM0 (This meeting does not require a password.) Click "Join". Call-in toll-free number (US/Canada): 1-855-244-8681; Access code: 856 489 473. For Assistance during the presentation go to https://nwfsc.webex.com/nwfsc/mc On the left navigation bar, click "Support". For questions about this seminar please contact Diane L. Tierney-Jamieson (206-860-3380; )

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Wednesday, April 4, 2012 9:47 AM / Last updated Thursday, April 12, 2012 2:54 PM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science and management information. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] or join our RSS feed by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

OneNOAA Science Seminar Number: 1228

Flounder Stock Enhancement: Post-Release Performance and Assessment of Cage Conditioned Japanese Flounder, Paralichthys olivaceus, in Wakasa Bay, Japan

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Date and Time: April 19, 2012, 12:00-12:30 Eastern Time Zone [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: NOAA SSMC-3, 2nd Floor, Library (1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD, 20910)
Speaker(s): (NOAA/NMFS Office of Sustainable Fisheries - Domestic Fisheries Division)
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NOAA National Sea Grant College Program Dean John A. Knauss Marine Policy Fellowship Seminars
Abstract:

Conditioning is the process of providing individuals reared for stock enhancement with some degree of "natural" experience prior to release. Conditioning flatfish in predator-free cages may help adjustment to the wild. From 2008-2010, Obama Laboratory conducted pre-release, experimental cage conditioning for Japanese flounder in both the Takahama and Obama portions of Wakasa Bay, Japan. Recaptured fish were acquired through a cooperative effort between researchers and local fishermen. The objectives were to describe how characteristics of released flounder changed with cage exposure and to determine how recapture rates compared between conditioned and non-conditioned fish. Significantly more conditioned fish were recaptured than non-conditioned fish in Obama Bay in 2010 (p < 0.05). In 2008 and 2009, recapture rates of conditioned and non-conditioned flounder followed the same trend, although these were not significantly different. Laboratory experiments revealed that conditioned fish had significantly better burying abilities (p < 0.001) and enhanced feeding abilities compared to non-conditioned fish. This study is the first to examine flatfish conditioning strategies using market data and shows that cage conditioning can favorably alter the attributes and recapture rates of released fish.

Download Presentation: TBD
About The Speaker:

Mick Walsh received a B.A. in Biological Sciences from Rutgers University, NJ, and a M.Ed. in Education from St. Peter's College, NJ. She worked as a laboratory technician for NOAA's Northeast Fisheries Science Center, Sandy Hook Laboratory, NJ for 4 years after her undergraduate education and taught high school Biology, Ecology, and Marine Science for 2 years after completing her Master's degree. She is now finishing her Ph.D. research on flounder stock enhancement strategies at The University of New Hampshire. Over the past year, she completed a Fulbright fellowship conducting collaborative research with Japan's Fisheries Research Agency on Japanese and marbled flounder at Kyoto University. Her Knauss Fellowship will add a policy element to her academic and research-based fisheries experience.

Remote Access:

For remote access via webinar, please fill out the registration form a few minutes before the meeting is scheduled to begin. The Meeting Number is 742656968; the Passcode is brownbag. For audio in the US and Canada, dial 866-833-7307. The participant passcode is 8986360. For questions about this seminar contact (301-713-2600 ext. 115) or (301-713-2600 ext. 155).

For questions about the Knauss seminar series contact or .

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Friday, April 13, 2012 8:35 AM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are the most complete summary of upcoming NOAA science seminars; a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science across NOAA and our contituents. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

OneNOAA Science Seminar Number: 1229

By-catch in the Saginaw Bay, Lake Huron Commercial Trap Net Fishery

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Date and Time: April 19, 2012, 12:30-13:00 Eastern Time Zone [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: NOAA SSMC-3, 2nd Floor, Library (1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD, 20910)
Speaker(s): (NOAA Restoration Center, Office of Habitat Conservation)
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NOAA National Sea Grant College Program Dean John A. Knauss Marine Policy Fellowship Seminars
Abstract:

This study provides species-specific catch and baseline mortality estimates of non-target species (by-catch) for the Saginaw Bay, Lake Huron commercial trap net fishery. By-catch can represent a significant mortality source that is often unknown. By-catch and by-catch mortality rates in the Saginaw Bay commercial trap net fishery, which primarily targets lake whitefish (Coregonus clupeaformis), yellow perch (Perca flavescens), and channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus), are currently unknown. From May through August 2010, we observed onboard commercial trap net vessels and took species-specific counts of by-catch and estimated initial bycatch mortality (i.e., morbid or floating fish). The high levels of walleye (Sander vitreus) catch and mortality observed within inner Saginaw Bay have not been previously documented in the Laurentian Great Lakes. Walleye by-catch averaged 127.3 individuals per trap net lift and 42% of those caught were morbid. The levels of lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) catch observed were within the range observed in previous studies, but mortality (percent) was higher than has been previously observed. Lake trout by-catch averaged 39.4 individuals per lift and 39.2% of those were morbid. Through the use of generalized linear models, this analysis also indicated factors that most influenced catch of non-target species including time of year and soak time (i.e., time interval between trap net lifts). Surface water temperature and trap net depth most influenced mortality. These results may inform fishers and fisheries managers and highlight the need for comprehensive by-catch monitoring throughout the Great Lakes.

Download Presentation: TBD
About The Speaker:

I grew up in southern Idaho and pursued an undergraduate degree in biology from Willamette University in western Oregon. My early days at Willamette introduced me to potential careers in natural resources and following my freshmen year, I worked for the Idaho Department of Environmental Quality conducting fish habitat surveys. My interest in natural resources was solidified when I spent a semester studying marine resource management in the Turks and Caicos Islands. Since that time, I have worked for the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, the Wyoming Game and Fish Department, and recently completed a Master's degree in Fisheries and Wildlife at Michigan State University where I studied commercial fishery by-catch in the Great Lakes. My Knauss placement is with the NOAA Restoration Center. I will be focusing on Great Lakes habitat restoration issues and will also be doing some work to support the Community-based Restoration Program (CRP). The CRP invests funding and technical expertise in habitat restoration projects across the country.

Remote Access:

For remote access via webinar, please fill out the registration form a few minutes before the meeting is scheduled to begin. The Meeting Number is 742656968; the Passcode is brownbag. For audio in the US and Canada, dial 866-833-7307. The participant passcode is 8986360. For questions about this seminar contact (301-713-2600 ext. 115) or (301-713-2600 ext. 155).

For questions about the Knauss seminar series contact or .

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Friday, April 13, 2012 8:35 AM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are the most complete summary of upcoming NOAA science seminars; a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science across NOAA and our contituents. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

OneNOAA Science Seminar Number: 1230

April 20, 2012

Taking the Pulse: A proposed framework for Assessing and Reporting on the Status and Trends in Ocean and Coastal Health in Canada

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Date and Time: April 20, 2012, 11:00-12:00 Eastern Time Zone [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: NOAA SSMC-3, 2nd Floor, NOAA Library (1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD 20910)
Speaker(s): Dr. Colleen Mercer Clarke (University of Ottawa)
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NOAA NODC NOAA Library
Abstract:

For over 100 years governments, academia, industry and community-based organizations throughout the world have monitored oceanic and coastal environments by collecting and recording data on multiple biological, chemical and physical parameters. Yet despite advances in fisheries management, pollution abatement technologies, and the creation of marine protected areas, conditions in most of the world's oceans continue to decline, sometimes dramatically. In 2010, to tackle these complexities, and disparities, and to ensure that the knowledge gained from CHONe research was effectively applied to policy and decision-making, CHONe embarked on an initiative to develop a framework for oceans and coastal health for Canada. Efforts concentrated on the standardization of widely used, but too often ambiguous terminology, and on the identification and incorporation of useful approaches and tools derived from the efforts and experience of Canadian as well as international initiatives. The proposed Framework is a science-based approach to defining, monitoring, assessing, rating and reporting on the status and trends in ocean and coastal health in Canada.

About The Speaker:

In addition to a Doctorate in Interdisciplinary Studies, Colleen holds Master's degrees in both marine ecology and landscape architecture. Having spent over 30 years in the private sector, her portfolio has included senior project management and design for industrial, commercial and municipal development in Canada, and internationally. Colleen's career interests focus on the detection, avoidance and sustainable management of detrimental change in coastal landscapes, and on the promotion and protection of biodiversity in coastal and marine landscapes. She has served as President of the Canadian Society of Landscape Architects and as a member of the Boards of the Oceans Institute of Canada, the Canadian Society of Environmental Biologists, and the Council of Centres for Sustainable Development Research. Colleen has represented the Oceans Institute of Canada at the United Nations Commission on Sustainable Development, and was the Canadian Co-Chair of the widely acclaimed bi-national Global Programme of Action Coalition for the Gulf of Maine (GPAC). She is well known for her volunteer efforts to advance conservation ethics within her own profession, as well as in her community, in recognition of which she has been elected by her peers to the College of Fellows of the Canadian Society of Landscape Architects. Currently an active Adjunct Professor with the Telfer School of Management at the University of Ottawa, Colleen is also part of an international team working to assist coastal communities in Canada and the Caribbean with planning and adapting to the challenges posed by climate change.

Remote Access and Notes:

For remote access via webinar, please fill out the registration form a few minutes before the meeting is scheduled to begin. The Meeting Number is 742656968; the Passcode is brownbag. For audio in the US and Canada, dial 866-833-7307. The participant passcode is 8986360. For questions about this seminar contact (301-713-2600 ext. 115) or (301-713-2600 ext. 155).

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Wednesday, April 4, 2012 3:13 PM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are the most complete summary of upcoming NOAA science seminars; a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science across NOAA and our contituents. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] or join our RSS feed by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

OneNOAA Science Seminar Number: 1231

April 24, 2012

Development and Aplication of An Integrated Ecosystem Model for Alaska

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Date and Time: April 24, 2012, 10:00-11:00 Alaska Local Time (14:00-15:00 Eastern Time Zone) [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: ACCAP office, second floor of the Denali Building, 3352 College Rd., Fairbanks, Alaska
Speaker(s): Amy Breen (Scenarios Network for Alaska & Arctic Planning, SNAP, UAF); Dave McGuire (USGS, IAB, UAF); Scott Rupp (SNAP, SNRAS, UAF); Eugenie Euskerchin (IAB, UAF); Vladimir Romanovsky (Permafrost Lab, GI, UAF); and Sergei Marchenko (Permafrost Lab, GI, UAF)
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NOAA ACCAP monthly climate webinar
Abstract:

Ongoing climate change may affect ecosystems and the services they provide to Alaska and the nation. The physical and biological components that characterize arctic and boreal ecosystems are tightly linked and sensitive to climate change. Understanding the effects of climate change on ecosystem services is challenging due to the lack of available tools to forecast the rate and ways that landscape structure and function may respond to change. The Alaska Integrated Ecosystem Modeling (IEM) Project is a collaborative project that takes a multi- disciplinary approach to understanding ecosystem change. This presentation will describe the development of a dynamically linked model framework for Alaska's terrestrial ecosystems that incorporates climate-driven changes to vegetation, disturbance, hydrology, and permafrost, and their interactions and feedbacks. Download the IEM Project Flier

Download Presentation: Presentation Slides

Remote Access and Notes:

Pre-registration is strongly encouraged. To register please fill out the web-form at: http://ine.uaf.edu/accap/teleconference.htm#register, or contact: Brook Gamble, Assistant Coordinator and Outreach Specialist, (907) 474-7812, . Please let us know if you intend to come in person. You are welcome to join us in our Fairbanks conference room. The ACCAP office is located on the second floor of the Denali Building, 3352 College Rd., Fairbanks.

How to Participate / Log-In to the Alaska Climate Webinar:

  • Point your web browser to: http://infiniteconferencing.com/Events/accap/
  • Enter Participant Code 83847342
  • Enter the rest of the requested information (The name and organization you enter will be seen by other participants, but your contact information will remain confidential
  • Click the blue "log-in" button

Audio / conference call:

  • With a regular telephone dial: 1- (877) 594-8353
  • When prompted, enter the Participant passcode: 83847342.Please mute your phone during the presentation. The audio is very sensitive and your external conversations and typing can be heard by other participants.

For support during a call, press *0 on your phone and a conferencing coordinator will assist you. For further information please contact Brook Gamble, Assistant Coordinator and Outreach Specialist, (907) 474-7812,

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Thursday, March 29, 2012 8:37 AM / Updated Tuesday, April 24, 2012 7:40 AM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are the most complete summary of upcoming NOAA science seminars; a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science across NOAA and our contituents. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

OneNOAA Science Seminar Number: 1232

New Conformal Overset Polyhedral Global Grids based on Riemann Surfaces free of Strong Singularities

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Date and Time: April 24, 2012, 12:00-13:00 Eastern Time Zone [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: World Weather Building Room 707 (5200 Auth Road, Camp Springs, MD 20746)
Speaker(s): and (NOAA/NCEP/EMC)
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NOAA National Centers for Environmental Prediction Environmental Modeling Center (EMC)
Abstract:

The well-known inefficiencies and numerical problems in numerical weather prediction associated with the convergence of meridians and the polar singularities of a latitude-longitude-based grid system have spurred the development of polyhedron-based alternative grids, such as the cubed sphere and the (triangular-gridded) icosahedron. Except at the vertices, the continuous mappings for these configurations can be made perfectly conformal (angle preserving), which substantially simplifies the adaptation of existing grid-based regional models to these global geometries. However, the unavoidable vertex singularities on continuous polyhedral grids still remain too strong to avoid severe numerical difficulties for any model based on spatial finite differencing.

While no completely continuous gridding of the sphere can be completely free of mathematical singularities, the introduction of small and isolated regions of overlap bounded by pairs of weakly-singular branch points near the original vertices, combined with a mechanism for the frequent reconciliation of the overlapped solutions there, provides a method by which all strong singularities are avoided, while an adequate degree of smooth continuity of the entire computational grid domain is preserved. We have formulated a new method, based on the concept of a Riemann surface in the theory of complex analytic functions, that enables such smooth global grids to be constructed corresponding to any simply-connected polyhedron that exhibits a griddable surface. Moreover, these grids are guaranteed to possess the desirable conformal property which facilitates their application to almost any existing regional dynamical formulations that are based on either square or triangular-hexagonal grids.

The technique is immediately applicable to smooth mappings no longer constrained to correspond to merely convex polyhedra; rather, we are now granted the opportunity to formulate coherent dynamically-adapting global grids with multiple regions of enhanced resolution wherever and whenever there is a need. We describe the method of construction and discuss the opportunities for the potential unification of global and regional forecasts and climate simulations that these new gridding methods seem to offer.

Remote Access and Notes:

Gotomeeting: https://www2.gotomeeting.com/join/540145122. Audio: Dial +1 (312) 878-3080; Access Code and meeting ID: 540-145-122. For further information please contact Michiko Masutani (301)763-8000 Ext. 7551,

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Thursday, April 5, 2012 8:33 AM / Last updated Friday, April 20, 2012 10:30 AM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are the most complete summary of upcoming NOAA science seminars; a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science across NOAA and our contituents. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] by

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OneNOAA Science Seminar Number: 1233

April 25, 2012

Ecological Effects of Sea Level Rise in the Northern Gulf of Mexico: Progress to-Date

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Date and Time: April 25, 2012, 12:00-13:00 Eastern Time Zone [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: NOAA SSMC-4, Room 8150 (1305 East-West Hwy, Silver Spring, MD 20910)
Speaker(s): , Ph.D., P.E., D.CE, D.WRE (University of Central Florida)
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NOAA NOS Science Seminar Series and National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science, Center for Sponsored Coastal Ocean Research
Abstract:

This project is examining the effects of sea level rise (SLR) to the coasts and coastal habitats of the Northern Gulf of Mexico in order to provide tools and data layers that can be utilized by coastal resource managers. Global climate change scenarios, bathymetric, topographic and remotely-sensed data, and results from field and laboratory experiments in oyster habitats and marshes will serve as input to the integrated models representing wave, tidal, overland, bay, coastal erosion and biological processes. The models are applied to the study area to simulate hydrodynamic properties including waves, tides, and surge, and also to estimate sediment and salinity transport to coastal marshes, wetlands and estuaries. The findings are expected to yield delineations of new tidal boundaries, sediment loadings from overland runoff to estuarine systems, magnitudes of potential change in salinity regime of estuarine systems, marsh erosion/accretion/biodensity estimates, habitat and land cover changes, and sensitivities of oysters to sediment levels and inundation. Project outcomes include products that will provide assessments and predictions on the effects of SLR for this region that can be applied to similar environments in other locations. These tools and data layers can be used by coastal resource managers to address issues including risk planning, optimal local land use, shoreline restoration construction guidelines, water resource impact assessment, improvement of water quality, prevention of habitat loss, protection of threatened and endangered species, and reallocation of restoration funding to sustainable habitats.

About The Speaker:

Scott is Director of the University of Central Florida Coastal Hydroscience Analysis, Modeling & Predictive Simulations (CHAMPS) Laboratory (http://champs.cecs.ucf.edu) and on the Governing Board of the ASCE / Coast, Ocean, Ports and Rivers Institute. Dr. Hagen is Principal Investigator on a five-year Ecological Effects of Sea Level Rise grant funded by NOAA/NCCOS/CSCOR.

Remote Access and Notes:

Presentations are available remotely via a combination of phone (US only) & webcast. Note that remote access is limited to 50 connections on a first-come-first served basis, so we cannot guarantee participation. To participate remotely via phone and internet:

Dial toll-free (U.S.) 1-877-708-1667. When prompted enter passcode 7028688 followed by the # sign. Please use your phone's mute button (*6 toggles on or off) during the presentation until you are ready to ask questions. The phone conference does not start until about five minutes before the seminar.

To access the webex meeting, go the to the webcast site at http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?sigKey=mymeetings&i=744925156&p=&t=c. Enter meeting number 744925156 if needed; no passcode is required. Enter other required fields - First and last name. Check the box that that you have read the Privacy Policy, and click Proceed.

For further information about this seminar please contact ), or if it is within 5 minutes of the seminar start, call the toll free number above and she will try to answer your questions.

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Tuesday, April 10, 2012 8:53 AM / Last modified Tuesday, May 22, 2012 1:20 PM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are the most complete summary of upcoming NOAA science seminars; a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science across NOAA and our contituents. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] or join our RSS feed by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

OneNOAA Science Seminar Number: 1234

April 26, 2012

Transitioning from FGDC to ISO 101 and ISO Content and Organization: ISO Creation Methods

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Date and Time: April 26, 2012, 13:00-14:00 Central Time Zone [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: Webinar access only
Speaker(s): (NCDDC)
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NOAA NCDDC
Abstract:

Module: ISO Creation Methods: Transforms, Stylesheets

NODC NCDDC is offering a series of ISO Metadata Training sessions in an online format. Each session will last approximately one hour starting at 1:00pm CST. Select (click) the module title to register for that session. Once registered you will receive an email confirming your registration with information you need to join the Webinar. Alternately, you may download the complete schedule as a PDF document to view the dates, times and hyperlinks to register for each session.

Remote Access and Notes:

(space limited) Gotomeeting Link to register for this webinar: https://www1.gotomeeting.com/register/401635400. Once registered you will receive an email confirming your registration with information you need to join the Webinar. For further information about this seminar please contact [(866) 732-2382]

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Monday, April 2, 2012 . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are the most complete summary of upcoming NOAA science seminars; a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science across NOAA and our contituents. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] or join our RSS feed by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

OneNOAA Science Seminar Number: 1235

Spatial Statistical Models for Stream Networks

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Date and Time: April 26, 2012, 11:00-12:00 Pacific Time Zone [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: NOAA Northwest Fisheries Science Center (NWFSC) Auditorium (2725 Montlake Boulevard East, Seattle, WA 98112); Map to NWFSC
Speaker(s): Dr. Jay Ver Hoef (Statistician, Polar Ecosystems Program, National Marine Mammal Laboratory), Dr. Erin Peterson (Research scientist, Division of Mathematics, Informatics and Statistics, CSIRO -Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization-), Dr. Dan Isaak (Research scientist, Rocky Mountain Research Station, U.S. Forest Service)
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NOAA NWFSC Monster Seminar JAM
Abstract:

Spatial autocorrelation is an intrinsic characteristic of freshwater stream environments, where watersheds are nested within one another and sites are connected by stream flow through directed networks. Analyzing spatially-correlated data requires the use of spatial statistical methods because the assumption of independence is violated, making many conventional statistical methods inappropriate. We have developed a class of spatial statistical methods that incorporate the unique spatial configuration, longitudinal connectivity, flow volume, and flow direction that occur in stream ecosystems. These methods provide significant advancements for ecological research and aquatic monitoring because they can quantify patterns of spatial autocorrelation across multiple scales, make predictions at unobserved sites with estimates of prediction uncertainty, and yield unbiased regression parameter estimates that relate ecological variables to the environment. The spatial stream models can be generalized to accommodate Gaussian, binomial, and Poisson distributions and as such, may be used to model most types of aquatic data measured on stream networks. In addition to an overview of the models, we will describe a custom ArcGIS toolset and an R package that we have developed to help users fit these models. Finally, we will highlight a current application in the northwest that involves developing a regional stream temperature model.

About the Speakers:
  • Dan Isaak is a research scientist with the US Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station in Boise, ID. He has extensive experience with salmonid ecology and conservation in western landscapes. Research interests include the effects of climate on stream ecosystems, development and application of river network-scale stream temperature and species occurrence models, and development of monitoring protocols for sensitive species and temperatures across western landscapes.
  • Jay Ver Hoef is a statistician with the National Marine Mammal Lab of the NOAA/NMFS Alaska Fisheries Science Center in Seattle, WA. He works in Fairbanks, Alaska, where he develops statistical methods and consults on a wide variety of topics related to ecological data in general, and marine mammals in particular. His research interests are in spatial statistics and Bayesian statistics, especially as applied to ecological data. He is a fellow of the American Statistical Association and an adjunct professor of statistics with the Mathematics and Statistics Department of the University of Alaska, Fairbanks.
  • Erin Peterson is a research scientist with the CSIRO Division of Mathematics, Informatics, and Statistics in Brisbane, Australia. She works at the interface of geospatial science, aquatic ecology, landscape ecology, and environmental statistics. She has a keen interest in tool development, which helps to ensure that the methodologies she develops are made accessible to ecologists and natural resource managers.
View WebEx recording:

Go to https://nwfsc200.webex.com/nwfsc200/ldr.php?AT=pb&SP=MC&rID=27023302&rKey=b078e40ed3f3057a (57 min)

Remote Access and Notes:

(Updated remote access) Webinar: Go to https://nwfsc200.webex.com/nwfsc200/j.php?ED=13502408&UID=40245523&RT=MiM0 (This meeting does not require a password.) Click "Join". Call-in: 1-650-479-3207 (Not a toll-free number); Access code: 856 489 473. For Assistance during the presentation go to https://nwfsc.webex.com/nwfsc/mc On the left navigation bar, click "Support". For questions about this seminar please contact Diane L. Tierney-Jamieson (206-860-3380; )

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Wednesday, April 4, 2012 9:47 AM / Last updated Wednesday, May 2, 2012 9:36 AM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science and management information. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] or join our RSS feed by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

OneNOAA Science Seminar Number: 1236

Employing State-of-the-Art Hydrological Modeling Tools to Improve Historical Estimates and Forecasts of Great Lakes Basin Runoff

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Date and Time: April 26, 2012, 10:00-11:00 Eastern Time Zone [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: NOAA Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory, Lake Superior Hall (4840 South State Road, Ann Arbor, MI)
Speaker(s): (Hydrologist, GLERL) and (Post-Doctoral Fellow, CILER)
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NOAA CILER
Abstract:

A thorough understanding of the Great Lakes water balance is the cornerstone of effective local and regional-scale water resources management. Streamflow simulations and forecasts, for example, are needed to quantify contaminant loadings to coastal ecosystems, and to assess potential impacts on the services they provide. Similarly, but on a broader scale, impacts of changing water levels across all of the Great Lakes impact multiple sectors of the economy (such as shipping, hydropower, and others) as well as human and environmental safety and health. To address the need for basin-wide estimates of the Great Lakes water balance, NOAA's Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory (GLERL), in the early 1980s, began developing some of the first tools for simulating and forecasting runoff for each of the Great Lakes basins. One of these tools, the Large Basin Runoff Model (LBRM), is still employed in operational forecasting and remains the only conceptual rainfall-runoff model to be systematically applied to the entire Great Lakes basin. With the availability of new datasets, new hydrological modeling tools, increased computing power, and modern geographic information systems, there is both a clear need and an opportunity to develop new estimates of historical runoff and basin-wide runoff forecasting schemes. In light of this opportunity, several new partnerships are forming between federal and academic institutions from both the United States and Canada to develop new runoff estimates for use in lake level and water quality forecasting. These partnerships can generally be categorized as focusing on: (1) characterizing hydrologic response and watershed attributes in gauged watersheds throughout the Great Lakes basin, (2) developing new historical basin-wide runoff estimates using new knowledge of drivers of hydrologic response, (3) recalibrating the LBRM so that forecasts of runoff reflect the effects of drivers of hydrologic response, and (4) applying new runoff forecasts to predict contaminant loadings at river mouths in ungauged locations.

Remote Access and Notes:

Remote access via webinar: https://www2.gotomeeting.com/register/970372034. For questions about this seminar please contact )

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Monday, April 23, 2012 10:13 AM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science and management information. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] or join our RSS feed by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

OneNOAA Science Seminar Number: 1237

April 27, 2012

Atmospheric Turbulence and Geographic Diversity in Wind-powered Electricity Generation

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Date and Time: April 27, 2012, 10:00-11:00 Mountain Time Zone [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: David Skaggs Research Center, Room GC402 (325 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80305)
Speaker(s): Mark Handschy, Ph.D. (Enduring Energy, LLC) and Julie Lundquist (University of Colorado)
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NOAA NREL Sustainable Energy and Atmospheric Sciences Seminars
Abstract:

Variability of electric generation from renewable wind and solar resources poses a challenge for regulation and stability of the electric grid. It has been widely suggested that this variability can be reduced by aggregating geographically diverse generators, with a benefit determined by the degree of correlation between sites. Here, we propose a general quantitative form for site-to-site correlation using a simple model that shows how the geographic size of an aggregation region affects the time scale of electric-grid regulation requirements for wind and solar power.

Wind speed power spectra exhibit the same dependence on temporal frequency (f-5/3) as on spatial wave number (k-5/3), which suggests a characteristic velocity connects space and time domains even when atmospheric turbulence is not "frozen" as required by Taylor's hypothesis. With this connection, the temporal cut-off frequency below which trends are removed from time-series data substitutes for the outer spatial scale in determining correlation length. Some previously published results for wind-speed correlations seem to agree with this conjecture. Data for solar irradiance also show similar scaling, indicating that wind influence on cloud size, shape, and motion may determine solar power variability statistics.

About The Speaker:

Prior to his current position as a Partner at Enduring Energy, LLC, Dr. Handschy served as Senior Advisor to the U.S. Department of Energy's Under Secretary, Kristina Johnson. Before his government service he founded and served as Chief Technology Officer for Displaytech, a consumer-electronics components manufacturer. Dr. Handschy received his B.A. and Ph.D. in physics from the University of Colorado at Boulder.

Remote Access and Notes:

(space limited) Reserve your Webinar seat now at: https://www2.gotomeeting.com/register/529072594. Once registered you will receive an email confirming your registration with information you need to join the Webinar. For further information about this seminar please contact . If you plan to attend and do not work at NOAA, please contact Rhonda Lange at least one day in advance, so that she can give your name to the security office to facilitate your entrance to the campus.

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Tuesday, April 10, 2012 7:17 AM / Last updated Friday, April 13, 2012 3:45 PM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are the most complete summary of upcoming NOAA science seminars; a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science across NOAA and our contituents. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] or join our RSS feed by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

OneNOAA Science Seminar Number: 1238

Sensitivity of Water Resources of Pacific Atolls to Climate Variability and Change

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Date and Time: April 27, 2012, 14:00-14:30 Eastern Time Zone [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: NOAA SSMC-2 Room 14246 (1325 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD, 20910)
Speaker(s): (University of Auckland)
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NOAA NWS Climate Services Division Seminars
Abstract:

For most Pacific atolls, fresh water is a scarce resource. Water catchment areas are small and groundwater storage is in the form of a shallow fresh water lens. Water resources are under increasing pressure as populations grow and rates of development increase. Realization of the possible impact of climate change have highlighted the sensitivity of island communities to the availability of water. However, to assess this sensitivity requires not only standard climatic data such as air temperature and rainfall, but also more specialized data on net allwave radiation and surface-to-air water vapour gradients. Therein lies a major problem as very little island-specific climatic data are available. The aim here is to assemble and validate a suitable database suitable for modeling the water balance of atolls. Reanalysis data are used for that part of the Pacific bounded by latitudes 30ºS to 30ºN and longitudes 150Eº to 120ºW and compared with the climate records of selected low islands. Data are at a 2.5º x 2.5º grid resolution and cover the period January 1962 to December 2000. Results are presented for a variety of water surplus or deficit indicators, which include indices developed to assess regional sensitivity to climate change. With this information, planning decision-making is possible without knowing precisely the magnitude of climate change that might occur.

Remote Access and Notes:

Reserve your Webinar seat now at: https://www1.gotomeeting.com/register/437917576. Join the conference call: 1-866-756-2908; 186099#. For further information about this seminar please contact .

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Monday, April 23, 2012 8:16 AM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are the most complete summary of upcoming NOAA science seminars; a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science across NOAA and our contituents. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] or join our RSS feed by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

OneNOAA Science Seminar Number: 1239

Assessing Short-term Human Health Impacts of Changed Climate Conditions

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Date and Time: April 27, 2012, 14:30-15:00 Eastern Time Zone [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: NOAA SSMC-2 Room 14246 (1325 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD, 20910)
Speaker(s): (Russian Academy of Sciences)
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NOAA NWS Climate Services Division Seminars
Abstract:

One possible feature of future climate is increased variability in short-term changes in thermal conditions. The work here examines a possibly useful measure of the physiological significance of this in terms of impact on human health and well-being. Following a spell of hot conditions that was preceded by a contrasting spell of cold, or vice versa, there is a period of short-term acclimatization adjustment during which the body experiences additional thermally induced physiological strain. The first signs of this show up in the respiratory organs because respiration is the body-environment heat exchange process in which the body is in closest contact with the ambient air. De Freitas and Grigorieva (2009) show that the physiological significance of this may be expressed as an adjustment loading, or "acclimatization thermal loading" (ATL) and used the ATL to quantify the physiological impact of the change expressed as an Acclimatization Thermal Stress Index (ATSI) value. ATSI describes the additional thermal loading on respiratory organs until full acclimatization is achieved. Thus, ATSI is a measure of induced thermal strain on the body due to short-term changes in thermal conditions based on actual human-health responses. The research reported here is a case study for contrasting climates simulating the impact of short-term thermal changes; namely, movement between the thermal extremes of the climates of Niger (dry tropical), Singapore (humid equatorial) and the Russian Far East (hot-cold extreme). The results show the extent to which air temperature plays a role in increased strain on the body, but they also show that the difference in the vapor content of the air is a key factor in determining high ATSI levels. The method used gives useful bioclimatic information on the risks involved in increases in short-term thermal variability in weather conditions. This could be useful in assessing the impact of climatic changes in terms health services to the public and measures that might be used to help mitigate the impacts.

Remote Access and Notes:

Reserve your Webinar seat now at: https://www1.gotomeeting.com/register/437917576. Join the conference call: 1-866-756-2908; 186099#. For further information about this seminar please contact .

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Monday, April 23, 2012 8:16 AM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are the most complete summary of upcoming NOAA science seminars; a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science across NOAA and our contituents. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] or join our RSS feed by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

OneNOAA Science Seminar Number: 1240

OneNOAA Science Seminars Subscription Information

i-access to our OneNOAA science seminar announcements:

  1. Join our weekly e-mail seminar announcement [nominally, email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list]. You can subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminars moderated email list by sending an email message to: with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body (don't include the quotes) or visit https://list.woc.noaa.gov/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/onenoaascienceseminars and fill in your email address (see also how to suscribe).
  2. Online OneNOAA web access: http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/ (Web page maintained by )
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  6. When available, all seminars can be accessed remotely by anyone on a first-come-first serve basis.
  7. Note: All seminars subject to title, location, date, and time changes without notice. Please check the OneNOAA seminar web page for the latest seminar updates. Unless otherwised indicated, seminars are open to the public. The contents of the OneNOAA Science Seminars web page do not reflect any position of the Federeal Government or NOAA. References to trade names or commercial entities do not imply endorsement of any kind. Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer]. The information provided by the OneNOAA Science Seminars is for broad information purposes only. See privacy policy [NOAA Privacy policy]

 

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