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OneNOAA Science Seminars


March 2012OneNOAA Science Seminars: March 2012

A joint effort by several NOAA offices to provide the most complete summary of upcoming NOAA science seminars. For further information please contact

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Web page last updated: Tuesday, 04-Sep-2012 15:40:55 UTC

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March 01, 2012

You Still Can't Have Your Hake and Eat It Too: Growth and Movement of a Species of Concern

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Date and Time: March 01, 2012, 11:00-12:00 Pacific Time Zone [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: NOAA Northwest Fisheries Science Center, NWFSC (2725 Montlake Blvd. E, Seattle, WA)
Speaker(s): (Northwest Fisheries Science Center)
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NOAA NWFSC Monster Seminar JAM
Abstract:

To aid the recovery of a species, information about somatic growth and movement can be useful for targeting conservation and management efforts. For Georgia Basin Pacific hake (Merluccius productus), which consist of two populations - a degraded population in Puget Sound (which has seen dramatic declines in biomass and size) and a more stable population in Georgia Strait - we sought to identify the age(s) at which differences in growth arise between these populations and the extent to which they are connected. Using archived otoliths (collected from 1979-2002) we determined that the smaller body size of Puget Sound individuals (relative to Georgia Strait) was a consequence of slow summer somatic growth for fish that are 3 to 5 years old. Furthermore, Puget Sound fish showed a decline in summer growth (in 2 year olds) from 1980s to 1990s, while no such pattern was present for Georgia Strait fish. When we assessed population mixing (by linking otolith natal chemical signatures to otolith signatures of fish from known spawning locations) we determined that the Puget Sound population was essentially self-seeding, while the Georgia Strait population was self-seeding and receiving individuals from Puget Sound. Our findings of limited dispersal of Georgia Strait fish to the Puget Sound population (and the loss of Puget Sound fish to Georgia Strait) indicate that the recovery of the Puget Sound population will depend primarily on that regions conservation and management practices. And when considering results from our growth analysis, recovery efforts should consider targeting summer resource use (e.g., prey and habitat quality and availability) important to hake 3 years old and older.

About the Speaker:

is a Research Ecologist in the Fish Ecology Division at NWFSC, where he conducts research on growth and movement of fishes in the Pacific Northwest. Paul received his Ph.D. in biology from the University of Windsor (Canada) where he examined pelagic and ontogenetic movement of Caribbean reef fishes. His current research includes studies on Chinook salmon to quantify timing and identify patterns of downstream migration, as well as understand variability in somatic growth among natal and rearing habitats; work on juvenile English sole to assess the role of contaminant levels and environmental factors on growth; and work on Pacific hake to identify natal spawning grounds and growth and movement patterns.

Relevant Publications:

  • Chittaro P, Finley R, Levin P (2009) Spatial and temporal patterns in the contribution of fish from their nursery habitats. Oecologia 160:49-61.
  • Chittaro P, Klinger T, Telmer K, Sanborn M, Morgan L (2010) Using otolith chemistry to investigate population structure of quillback rockfish in Puget Sound. Northwest Science 84:243-254.
Remote Access and Notes:

Remote Access: https://nwfsc.webex.com/nwfsc/j.php?ED=167620787&UID=1237300907&RT=MiM0 (this meeting does not require a password), click "Join". The audio conference only call-in toll number (US/Canada): +1-408-600-3600 Access code: 806 330 184. For assistance go to https://nwfsc.webex.com/nwfsc/mc click "Support" on the left navigation bar. For further information please contact (206) 860-3380.

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Thursday, January 12, 2012 8:57 AM / Last updated Friday, February 24, 2012 7:55 AM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are the most complete summary of upcoming NOAA science seminars; a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science across NOAA and our contituents. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] or join our RSS feed by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

OneNOAA Science Seminar Number: 1174

Comparison of Subantarctic Mode Water and Antarctic Intermediate Water Formation Rates in the South Pacific between NCAR-CCSM4 and Hydrographic Observations

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Date and Time: March 01, 2012, 12:00-13:00 Eastern Time Zone [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: NOAA SSMC-3 4th Floor, Room 4517 (1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD, 20910)
Speaker(s): (University of Miami, RSMAS)
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NOAA NODC
Abstract:

The formation of Subantarctic Mode Water (SAMW) and Antarctic Intermediate Water (AAIW) significantly contributes to the total uptake and storage of anthropogenic gases, i.e. CO2 and CFCs within the Southern Hemisphere. These water masses play an important role in the earth's heat, freshwater, carbon budgets and resupply of oxygen and nutrients to the subtropical oceans to sustain the marine ecosystem. The South Pacific is a principle formation site of SAMW and AAIW in the Southern Hemisphere. Formation rates of SAMW and AAIW within the South Pacific are calculated based on CFC-12 inventories from World Ocean Circulation Experiment (WOCE), Climate Variability and Prediction (CLIVAR), and hydrographic data collected in the southeast Pacific in the winter of 2005. These programs allow for the direct comparison of model CFC fields with hydrographic observations. CFC uptake within the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Community Climate System Model version 4 (CCSM4) in the South Pacific is underestimated compared to observations particularly in the density surfaces that define SAMW and AAIW. To quantify this bias, we compare observed and model formation rates of SAMW and AAIW based on CFC-12 inventories across the South Pacific. This research demonstrations the importance of model-observational comparisons to better to identify the important biases in the model simulation, as well as increasing our understanding of SAMW and AAIW in the South Pacific.

About the Speaker:

Corinne Hartin graduated from Queens College in New York in 2006 with a B.S. in Geology and from there went on to pursue her Ph.D. at the Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science at the University of Miami, working under Dr. Rana Fine. She is currently finishing up her Ph.D. research on Subantarctic Mode Water and Antarctic Intermediate Water in the South Pacific. This research has involved extensive use of hydrographic and tracer data, as well as working with numerical model output of present and paleo oceans. She recently was awarded the best student presentation at the WCRP conference in Denver and the Koczy Prize by RSMAS for best graduate student research in their last year.

Remote Access and Notes:

Remote Access: http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?sigKey=mymeetings&i=741636509&p=TECHDIR&t=c. The audio conference only call-in toll number (US/Canada): Dial 1-888-452-2047 and enter passcode 8324347. For further information please contact

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Wednesday, February 15, 2012 12:49 PM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are the most complete summary of upcoming NOAA science seminars; a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science across NOAA and our contituents. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] or join our RSS feed by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

OneNOAA Science Seminar Number: 1175

Recent Findings on Mechanisms Controlling Hypoxia in the Gulf of Mexico

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Date and Time: March 01, 2012, 12:00-13:00 Eastern Time Zone [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: NOAA SSMC-4 Room 8150 (1305 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD, 20910)
Speaker(s): (Associate Professor, Department of Oceanography, Texas A&M University)
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NOAA NOS Science Seminar Series and NOS National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science, Center for Sponsored Coastal Research
Abstract:

The Mechanisms Controlling Hypoxia of the Louisiana Shelf (MCH) Project has been funded by the NCCOS Center of Sponsored Coastal Ocean Research since 2003 to investigate the hypoxic region of the northern Gulf of Mexico, a.k.a., the Louisiana Deadzone. Forming each summer and averaging nearly 6000 square miles over the past five years, the Louisiana Deadzone is the largest coastal Deadzone in the western hemisphere. The principal objectives of the MCH project are to investigate (i) how wind, river discharge, and currents affect stratification over the Texas-Louisiana Shelf; (ii) how water column processes, organic and nutrient inputs, and benthic oxygen demand vary along the shelf from the mississippi River Delta to coastal Texas; and (iii) to enhance a realistic coupled physical-biological-geochemical numerical model of the northeastern Gulf of Mexico with integrated and coupled surface gravity waves, and a diagenetic model of the upper seabed.

Emphasis will be given to principal findings made during 2010 and 2011 where multiple high-resolution field observations of the Texas-Louisiana Shelf were made using a shipboard undulating water-column profiler and moored observations of water column dissolved oxygen concentration off Texas and Louisiana. Multiple variable statistical analyses have revealed the role of alongshore winds in contributing to the variability of the observed hypoxic area. Additionally, the results of an operational coupled physical-oxygen now/forecast model of the shelf, which debuted in summer 2011, will be discussed. Lastly, plans for the 2012 field year will be presented. In 2001, the Gulf of Mexico Task Force issued an Action Plan to reduce the hypoxic area to less than 2000 square miles by 2015. The MCH project follows an ecosystem based approach to provide information to better define the relationships between nutrient and physical driving to best assess management strategies to assess progress towards reaching the Action Plan goals. For more information, visit the project website at http://hypoxia.tamu.edu/

Speaker's Research Interests:

Observational oceanography and ocean observing systems, physical oceanography of Gulf of Mexico and southwest Indian Ocean, hypoxia of the northern Gulf of Mexico.

Remote Access and Notes:

Presentations are available remotely for free via a combination of phone (US &territories) & webcast. Remote access is limited to 50 connections on a first-come-first served basis. To participate remotely via phone and internet:

  • For the audio part of the presentation, Dial toll-free (U.S.) 1-877-708-1667. When prompted enter passcode 7028688 and the # sign. Please use your phone's mute button (*6 toggles on or off) during the presentation until you are ready to ask questions. The phone conference does not start until about five minutes before the seminar.
  • For the visual part of the presentation, you can access the web meeting by going to: http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?sigKey=mymeetings&i=744925156&p=&t=c. Enter meeting number 744925156 if needed; no passcode is required. Enter other required fields - First and last name, org. Check the box that that you have read the Privacy Policy, and click Proceed.

For questions about this seminar please contact Tracy Gill () at least 45 minutes before the seminar, or if it is within 5 minutes of the seminar start, call the toll free number above.

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Tuesday, February 28, 2012 9:45 AM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are the most complete summary of upcoming NOAA science seminars; a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science across NOAA and our contituents. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] or join our RSS feed by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

OneNOAA Science Seminar Number: 1176

Fukushima Daiichi - How Much Radioactivity Was Really Released?

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Date and Time: March 01, 2012, 13:00-14:00 Eastern Time Zone [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: NOAA SSMC-3 ARL Large Conference Room 3404 (1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD, 20910)
Speaker(s): (NOAA Air Resources Laboratory)
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NOAA NOAA Air Resources Laboratory
Abstract:

TBD

Remote Access and Notes:

Conference Line: 203-277-3283; Passcode: 9643195#. Webex TBD. For further information about this seminar please contact

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Wednesday, February 22, 2012 2:31 PM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are the most complete summary of upcoming NOAA science seminars; a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science across NOAA and our contituents. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] or join our RSS feed by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

OneNOAA Science Seminar Number: 1177

March 06, 2012

Interagency Science in The Arctic

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Date and Time: March 06, 2012, 10:00-11:00 Alaska Local Time (14:00-15:00 Eastern Time Zone) [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: The ACCAP office is located on the second floor of the Denali Building, 3352 College Rd., Fairbanks, Alaska
Speaker(s): (National Science Foundation)
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NOAA ACCAP monthly climate webinar
Abstract:

Change in the Arctic has arrived in many forms, whether environmental, social, technological, economic, or a combination of these. Measuring and observing these changes in partnerships with the affected communities is important to improving our understanding of the Arctic as a whole, developing informed policies, and providing useful solutions for the challenges and opportunities that change can present. The Arctic Observing Network (AON) is one contribution to this effort to document change and distribute information broadly to the scientific community and public at large. A successful network draws on all relevant information sources, including efforts spearheaded within communities, other agencies, and other nations active in the Arctic. This webinar is intended to discuss opportunities to engage with the Arctic Observing Network but also hear from the community about developing efforts and needs for an AON.

Download Presentation:
Remote Access and Notes:

Pre-registration is strongly encouraged. To register please fill out the web-form at: http://ine.uaf.edu/accap/teleconference.htm#register, or contact: Brook Gamble, Assistant Coordinator and Outreach Specialist, (907) 474-7812, . Please let us know if you intend to come in person. You are welcome to join us in our Fairbanks conference room. The ACCAP office is located on the second floor of the Denali Building, 3352 College Rd., Fairbanks.

How to Participate / Log-In to the Alaska Climate Webinar:

  • Point your web browser to: http://infiniteconferencing.com/Events/accap/
  • Enter Participant Code 83847342
  • Enter the rest of the requested information (The name and organization you enter will be seen by other participants, but your contact information will remain confidential
  • Click the blue "log-in" button

Audio / conference call:

  • With a regular telephone dial: 1- (877) 594-8353
  • When prompted, enter the Participant passcode: 83847342.Please mute your phone during the presentation. The audio is very sensitive and your external conversations and typing can be heard by other participants.

For support during a call, press *0 on your phone and a conferencing coordinator will assist you. For further information please contact Brook Gamble, Assistant Coordinator and Outreach Specialist, (907) 474-7812,

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Monday, January 16, 2012 2:42 PM / Last updated Tuesday, April 10, 2012 7:37 AM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are the most complete summary of upcoming NOAA science seminars; a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science across NOAA and our contituents. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

OneNOAA Science Seminar Number: 1178

K-computer Project in Japan and Tokyo Metropolitan Area Convection Study

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Date and Time: March 06, 2012, 15:30-16:30 Central Time Zone [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: National Weather Center (120 David L. Boren Blvd, University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK), NWC Room. 1350 (Directions to the National Weather Center).
Speaker(s): Kazuo Saito (Meteorological Research Institute, Ibaraki, Japan)
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NOAA NWS National Weather Center Colloquium
Abstract:

Accuracy of the quantitative precipitation forecast of operational mesoscale NWP at JMA has been remarkably improved in recent years. This achievement was attained by implementation of the nonhydrostatic model with sophisticated physical processes, advanced data assimilation techniques such as nonhydrostatic 4DVAR, and use of remote sensing data. On the other hand, prediction of local heavy rainfalls on unstable atmospheric conditions without strong synoptic/orographic forcing is still a challenging subject in NWP for disaster prevention. Several studies have been conducted at the Meteorological Research Institute (MRI) of JMA, including development of a cloud-resolving data assimilation system, assimilation of mesoscale remote-sensing observation data such as GPS, and development of high-resolution ensemble prediction systems. Computer resource and observation data are keys to realize full-scale dynamical and probabilistic forecasts of local heavy rainfalls.

The next generation supercomputer, "K", has been constructed in Kobe, as a national funded science project of Japan. The supercomputer started its operation in April 2011 and the whole system will be completed in 2012. A five-year research plan of high performance NWP has been endorsed as one of the five strategic research fields on the K-computer. Collaborating with the Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology and Numerical Prediction Division of JMA, development of a cloud resolving ensemble analysis and prediction system is underway. As for observation data, a field campaign as a possible international test-bed for deep convection with a dense observation network (Tokyo Metropolitan Area Convection Study; TOMACS) is conducted for summers of 2011-2013 by MRI, the National Research Institute for Earth Science and Disaster Prevention, and twelve collaborative institutions.

Presentation Access:

Video Presentation (EchoPlayer)

Remote Access and Notes:

Remote access will not be available. Presentations will be recorded as well as powerpoint slides so anyone can watch the seminars at their leisure. For further information about this seminar please contact or

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Friday, February 3, 2012 5:43 PM / Last updated Thursday, March 8, 2012 9:10 AM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are the most complete summary of upcoming NOAA science seminars; a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science across NOAA and our contituents. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] or join our RSS feed by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

OneNOAA Science Seminar Number: 1179

Observation Impact Study for Tropical Cyclones Using WRF-based Ensemble Data Assimilation Aystem

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Date and Time: March 06, 2012, 12:00-13:00 Eastern Time Zone [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: NOAA World Weather Building (5200 Auth Road, Camp Springs, MD 20746); Room 707 (Directions from Google).
Speaker(s): Masaru Kunii (University of Maryland, JMA)
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NOAA National Centers for Environmental Prediction Environmental Modeling Center (EMC) Seminar
Abstract:

The local ensemble transform Kalman filter (LETKF, Hunt et al. 2007) is a realistic implementation of ensemble Kalman square root filters for advanced data assimilation and ensemble prediction. The LETKF has been successfully applied to various numerical models including global and regional numerical weather prediction (NWP) models, global and regional ocean models, and even a Martian atmospheric model. Recently the LETKF has been applied to the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model, a widely used nonhydrostatic regional NWP model. The LETKF system includes the recently developed adaptive inflation method. The WRF-LETKF system performed properly with real observations, so that a 9-day assimilation cycle experiment reproduced Typhoon Sinlaku (2008) very well although the typhoon was not generated at all without assimilation.

The ensemble sensitivity method of Liu and Kalnay (2008) is applied to the WRF-LETKF system, and impacts of real observations on short-range forecasts are assessed with additional enhancements of considering localization and introducing a targeted area that are essential for the high-dimensional real application. This ensemble-based method achieves the same goals as the adjoint-based method (Langland and Baker 2004) but without using an adjoint model. The results in the case of Typhoon Sinlaku show that upper-air soundings have the largest impact on improving 12-h forecasts and that the targeted impact evaluation performs as expected with shorter computational time. Denying negative-impact observations actually improves the forecasts, validating the estimated observation impact.

Remote Access and Notes:

Remote access TBD. For further information about this seminar please contact (301)763-8000 Ext. 7551 or Takamesa Miyoshi (301-405-7797)

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Wednesday, February 22, 2012 8:28 AM / Last updated Monday, March 5, 2012 8:35 AM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are the most complete summary of upcoming NOAA science seminars; a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science across NOAA and our contituents. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] or join our RSS feed by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

OneNOAA Science Seminar Number: 1180

Exploring Social Media Tools: A Case Study of One Office's Journey to Implement a Blog

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Date and Time: March 06, 2012, 12:00-13:00 Eastern Time Zone [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: NOAA SSMC-3, 2nd Floor Library (1315 East-West Hwy, Silver Spring, MD 20910)
Speaker(s): and (NCCOS/Center for Coastal Monitoring and Assessment)
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NOAA NODC Library
Abstract:

NOAA's National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science (NCCOS)/Center for Coastal Monitoring and Assessment (CCMA) is launching the NOAA Coastal Ocean Science (COS) Blog. The goal of this seminar is the talk about the process NCCOS underwent to review, select and execute a new social media tool to promote their active, ongoing research. This overview is intended to be a case study of one office's approach to the social media planning and implementation. This presentation will outline the process of developing a blog for your organization, including how NCCOS was able to work within the guidelines of social media activities within the context of a federal agency. Additionally, we hope to provide insights on using social media for the promotion of science, and some key questions each office should consider before embarking on this process.

Download Presentation:
About the Speaker:
  • began working with CCMA in October 2011. Coming on as the communications intern, she was tasked with developing the Coastal Ocean Science Blog. Sara graduated from the University of Maryland, College Park in May 2011 with a B.S. in Ecology and Evolution and a minor in Leadership Studies.
  • joined CCMA in September 2011 as the center's communications and marketing specialist doing communications and legislative outreach. Previous to that, Becky was the national communications specialist for the Office of Response and Restoration's Marine Debris Program for two years, doing communications and legislative outreach. Becky has been in the communications field for over 15 years and has provided communications strategy and planning for public relations agencies in NY and DC, industry clients such as AT&T, IBM and Johnson & Johnson, an environmental non-profit on the Hill, and in the federal sector here at NOAA. She graduated from Richard Stockton College of New Jersey majoring in English with a minor in Biology.
Remote Access and Notes:

For remote access via webinar, please fill out the registration form a few minutes before the meeting is scheduled to begin. The Meeting Number is 742656968; the Passcode is brownbag. For audio in the US and Canada, dial 866-833-7307. The participant passcode is 8986360. For further information about this seminar please contact or .

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Thursday, February 23, 2012 11:38 AM / Last updated Thursday, March 8, 2012 8:35 AM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are the most complete summary of upcoming NOAA science seminars; a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science across NOAA and our contituents. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] or join our RSS feed by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

OneNOAA Science Seminar Number: 1181

March 07, 2012

Digital Coast Data Access

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Date and Time: March 07, 2012, 14:00-15:00 Eastern Time Zone [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: Seminar available via webinar only (see Remote Access and Notes section below)
Speaker(s): (NOAA Coastal Services Center)
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NOAA Coastal Services Center
Abstract:

The Digital Coast Data page provides access to many of the coastal data sets most requested by Digital Coast partners, including land cover, elevation, and socioeconomic data sets. Access to data managed by the NOAA Coastal Services Center is provided through the Data Access Viewer (DAV), which allows for user-specified geographies, formats, and resolutions. Other data sets are provided through various mechanisms maintained by the responsible agencies. This session will introduce users to a number of the data sets available through the Digital Coast Data page and will provide a short demonstration of the Data Access Viewer.

In this webinar, participants will learn about

  • Explore Digital Coast data resources
  • See a demonstration of the Data Access Viewer
  • Learn about data provisioning options in the Data Access Viewer
Remote Access and Notes:

Presentations are available remotely via a webinar. To register, visit http://www.csc.noaa.gov/digitalcoast/webinar/index.html. You will receive an email prior to the webinar containing information about join. This webinar will be recorded for on-demand playback. For further information about this seminar please contact Krista.McCraken@noaa.gov.

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Friday, January 13, 2012 7:52 AM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are the most complete summary of upcoming NOAA science seminars; a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science across NOAA and our contituents. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] or join our RSS feed by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

OneNOAA Science Seminar Number: 1182

Status of the Development of Geo-microwave Sounder/GeoSTAR and PATH

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Date and Time: March 07, 2012, 14:30-15:30 Eastern Time Zone [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: NOAA World Weather Building (5200 Auth Road, Camp Springs, MD 20746); Room 707 (Directions from Google).
Speaker(s): (NOAA NESDIS/Office of Systems Development)
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NOAA STAR Seminar
Abstract:

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has been flying microwave sounders since 1975 on Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellites (POES). Microwave observations have made significant contributions to the understanding of the atmosphere and Earth surface, helping to improve weather forecasts. However, NOAA's Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites (GOES) have requirements for all-weather observations that cannot be met due to the unavailability of proven technologies.

Since 2002, OSD has been working with NASA and its Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), who is developing a geostationary microwave sounder called the Geostationary Thinned Aperture Radiometer (GeoSTAR), with a sparse aperture array. Geo-STAR is the sensor recommended to be flown on a geostationary research satellite mission called the Precipitation and All-weather Temperature and Humidity sounder Mission (PATH). PATH is one of the 15 NASA satellite missions recommended by the National Research Council in its 2007 Earth Science Decadal Survey. Progress and status of the development of GeoSTAR will be presented. The presentation will be followed by an open discussion of how NOAA may partner in a possible satellite demonstration of GeoSTAR in the near future.

Download Presentation: Presentation Slides
Remote Access and Notes:

Dial in information: USA participants: 866-832-9297 International: 203-566-7610 Passcode: 6070416. Presentation slides available at http://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/seminars.php#Kurapov20110810. For further information about this seminar please contact Patrick Sweeney [301-763-8102 Ext 175] or Ralph Ferraro [301-405-0893].

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Friday, February 17, 2012 10:12 AM / Last updated Wednesday, March 7, 2012 8:01 AM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are the most complete summary of upcoming NOAA science seminars; a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science across NOAA and our contituents. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] or join our RSS feed by

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OneNOAA Science Seminar Number: 1183

The Impact of Mixing State on Black Carbon Aerosol Physical Properties

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Date and Time: March 07, 2012. 15:30-16:30 (Boulder, CO) Mountain Standard Time [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: NOAA ESRL Chemical Sciences Division seminar Room 2A305, David Skaggs Research Center (NOAA Building), 325 Broadway, Boulder, CO (Directions)
Speaker(s): (Colorado State University)
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NOAA ESRL Chemical Science Division seminar
Abstract:

Atmospheric models indicate that black carbon (BC) aerosol has substantially different atmospheric impacts and spatial distributions depending on how it is mixed with other species. Measurements in the last decade using single-particle techniques have dramatically increased our understanding of the degree to which BC is mixed with other material and the timescales on which this mixing occurs. There are fewer direct measurements of the impacts the BC mixing state has on the resulting mixed particle properties, and most focus on laboratory-generated BC proxies. Here I present recent ambient measurements examining the relationship between BC mixings state and aerosol optical and hygroscopic properties. I will show results from several field campaigns featuring simultaneous measurements of BC mixing state by a single particle soot photometer and optical properties using photoacoustic and filter-based absorption measurements. Second, I describe a method for directly measuring BC hygroscopicity and mixing state simultaneously and show results for measurements made at an urban site in the United Kingdom. The collection of observations shows only a limited impact of BC mixing state on bulk aerosol optical properties but a clear relationship with measured BC hygroscopicity. To conclude I will discuss the implications of the results and also briefly describe some upcoming measurements investigating the impacts of BC and BC mixing state on clouds.

About the Speaker:

http://chem.atmos.colostate.edu/gavin/#

Remote Access and Notes:

Remote access Join the GoToMeeting at https://www2.gotomeeting.com/join/344776586. Join the conference call at 1-866-749-8607 with passcode 1679385#. Remote Access: Contact (303-497-5319) with problems connecting. For further information about this seminar please contact [(303) 497-3599] or [(303) 497-5431].

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Tuesday, February 28, 2012 2:48 PM / Last updated Thursday, March 8, 2012 9:13 AM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are the most complete summary of upcoming NOAA science seminars; a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science across NOAA and our contituents. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] or join our RSS feed by

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OneNOAA Science Seminar Number: 1184

March 08, 2012

Contaminants in Pinniped Blubber: Associations with Disease and Survival

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Date and Time: March 08, 2012, 11:00-12:00 Pacific Time Zone [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: NOAA Northwest Fisheries Science Center, NWFSC (2725 Montlake Blvd. E, Seattle, WA)
Speaker(s): Dr. Denise Greig (Veterinary Science, The Marine Mammal Center)
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NOAA NWFSC Monster Seminar JAM
Abstract:

TBD

About the Speaker:

TBD

Remote Access and Notes:

Remote Access: https://nwfsc.webex.com/nwfsc/j.php?ED=167620787&UID=1237300907&RT=MiM0 (this meeting does not require a password), click "Join". The audio conference only call-in toll number (US/Canada): +1-408-600-3600 Access code: 806 330 184. For assistance go to https://nwfsc.webex.com/nwfsc/mc click "Support" on the left navigation bar. For further information please contact (206) 860-3380.

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Thursday, January 12, 2012 8:57 AM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are the most complete summary of upcoming NOAA science seminars; a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science across NOAA and our contituents. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] or join our RSS feed by

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OneNOAA Science Seminar Number: 1185

March 09, 2012

Multi Radar and Multi-sensor (MRMS) system: Description, Results, and Future Plans

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Date and Time: March 09, 2012, 09:00-10:00 Eastern Time Zone [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: NOAA World Weather Building (5200 Auth Road, Camp Springs, MD 20746); Room 209 (Directions from Google).
Speaker(s): (NOAA National Severe Storms Laboratory)
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NOAA National Centers for Environmental Prediction Environmental Modeling Center (EMC) Seminar
Abstract:

The national Multi Radar and Multi-sensor (MRMS) system was initially developed from a joint initiative between the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's National Severe Storms Laboratory, the Federal Aviation Administration's Aviation Weather Research Program, and the Salt River Project. Further development has continued with additional support from the National Weather Service (NWS) Office of Hydrologic Development, the NWS Office of Climate, Water, and Weather Services, and the Central Weather Bureau of Taiwan. The objectives of MRMS research and development (R&D) are 1) to develop a meteorological platform for assimilating different observational networks toward creating high spatial and temporal resolution multi-sensor QPEs for flood warnings and water resource management and 2) to develop a seamless high-resolution national 3D grid of radar reflectivity for severe weather detection, data assimilation, numerical weather prediction model verification, and aviation product development. Through about ten years of R&D, a real-time MRMS system has been implemented (http://nmq.ou.edu). Since June 2006, the system has been generating high-resolution 3D reflectivity mosaic grids (31 vertical levels) and a suite of severe weather and QPE products in real-time for the conterminous United States at a 1-km horizontal resolution and 2.5 minute update cycle. The experimental products are provided in real-time to end users ranging from government agencies, universities, research institutes, and the private sector and have been utilized in various meteorological, aviation, and hydrological applications. Further, a number of operational QPE products generated from different sensors (radar, gauge, satellite) and by human experts are ingested in the MRMS system and the experimental products are evaluated against the operational products as well as independent gauge observations in real time.

Remote Access and Notes:

Web access: Go to meeting https://www2.gotomeeting.com/join/206371386. Access Code: 206-371-386 Dial +1 (832) 999-1005. For further information about this seminar please contact (301)763-8000 Ext. 7263.

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Wednesday, March 7, 2012 6:15 PM / Last updated Thursday, March 8, 2012 9:20 AM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are the most complete summary of upcoming NOAA science seminars; a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science across NOAA and our contituents. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] or join our RSS feed by

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OneNOAA Science Seminar Number: 1186

March 13, 2012

Climate Model Development and Climate Process Teams

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Date and Time: March 13, 2012, 13:00-14:00 Eastern Time Zone [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: NOAA SSMC-3 12th floor Fishbowl (1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD, 20910). Remote attendance is encouraged
Speaker(s): (University of Washington); Chris Fairall; (NOAA NCEP EMC)
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NOAA OAR CPO Modeling, Analysis, Predictions, and Projections program monthly webinar
Abstract:

-- The NCEP-NCAR Climate Process Team on the Stratocumulus to Trade Cumulus Transition - Evaluating and Improving the GFS as a Climate Model -- The NCEP-NCAR Climate Process Team on the Stratocumulus to Trade Cumulus Transition was funded as a MAPP project in October 2010, and also involves PIs at JPL, the University of Washington, UCLA and LLNL. The goal has been to improve the representation of physical processes important in simulating low cloud cover in the operational GFS and the CAM5, using the subtropical Sc-Cu transition as an example. Both models implemented significant upgrades in their moist physics just before the CPT began, so evaluation of how well these upgrades are working was also a priority, using both single-column and global simulations. Due to the time limitations, we focus on our GFS results. We adapted the GFS to perform idealized single-column simulations of three boundary-layer cloud cases that have been studied in international intercomparisons. These revealed the need for adjusting some parameters associated with entrainment and precipitation within the shallow cumulus parameterization. We also did a 50-year free-running ocean-coupled simulation of the GFS and evaluated it using NCAR's climate diagnostics package. This showed a pervasive lack of radiatively-active cloud and significant global energy nonconservation in the GFS. We have since performed short coupled sensitivity simulations making the recommended changes to the shallow cumulus convection. These have had some positive impact on the boundary layer structure, cloud cover and SST over the tropical Pacific. NCEP has also implemented a new parameterization of heating due to boundary-layer turbulent kinetic energy dissipation that has greatly improved the GFS energy conservation. Upcoming CPT plans include implementing a new eddy-diffusion mass-flux (EDMF) moist boundary layer parameterization, improving stratocumulus-top entrainment, and changing aspects of cloud microphysics and fractional cloud cover to try to address the global cloud cover biases. Overall, the CPT has demonstrated a successful well-focussed interaction between internal work at NCEP and external scientists.

Chris Fairall -- Evaluation and Improvement of Climate GCM Air-Sea Interaction Physics: An EPIC/VOCALS Synthesis Project -- This project is a joint NOAA/ESRL/PSD, Oregon State University, and University of Hawaii effort to synthesize recent research to promote its application in the NOAA Coupled Forecasting System (CFS) model. Our approach combined three key sources: 1) data obtained in several NOAA field studies, 2) the IPRC Regional Ocean Atmosphere Model (IROAM). EPIC2001 was an intensive field study of convection and air-sea interactions in the East Pacific ITCZ and the equatorial upwelling zone conducted in the fall of 2001, 3) the ensemble of coupled climate model output from the fourth IPCC Assessment. The EPIC monitoring program consisted of detailed surface flux, atmospheric boundary layer profiles, and cloud observations made during the twice-a-year maintenance cruises to the TAO buoy lines at 110° and 95°W from the fall of 1999 through fall 2004 plus four cruises to the Chilean Stratus region with more planned in the future. The high-resolution regional model will be the International Pacific Research Center (IPRC) Regional Ocean Atmosphere Model (IROAM). The IROAM is configured as a tropical Pacific Ocean general circulation model coupled to the IPRC Regional Atmospheric Model of the eastern Pacific. The initial research focus was to compare the IROAM and IPCC climatologies with the observations with an emphasis on surface fluxes (turbulent, radiative, and precipitation), marine boundary layer structure, and cloud properties. Besides the EPIC field data, additional sources (reanalyses, satellite, buoys, and surface flux gridded products) were used to provide the most credible and comprehensive climatology. IROAM played a key role by providing important detail not available in the observations and by reconciling the mismatch of time/space averaging between the observations and the climate models. This allowed us to evaluate possible improvements of the representation of subgrid processes; for example, treatments of shallow convection, cloud-top entrainment, and drizzle.

-- Impact of Land Surface Parameterizations on Summer-season Predictions in the NCEP Climate Forecast System -- To examine the impact from using different land surface parameterizations on the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP)'s fully-coupled Climate Forecast System version 2 (CFSv2) where the Noah land model is employed to compute surface fluxes, T126 CFSv2 reforecast experiments are carried out for selected nine years with four ensemble members using the original turbulent flux parameterizations implemented in the operational forecasts, where the ratio of momentum roughness length and thermal roughness length is independent of vegetation fractions, and a modified vegetation fraction-dependent parameterization scheme. The nine years are composed of three ENSO-cold, warm and neutral years. The four ensemble members are the four cycles with 6 hours apart on the first day of May. To avoid any inconsistency between the forecast model and its initial realizations, land initial conditions used in the CFS runs are taken from the land analysis in CFS Reanalysis (CFSR) where the exactly same Noah land model is used. Soil moisture and temperature in the CFSR are derived using a "semi-coupled" Global Land Data Assimilation System (GLDAS)-based approach, where the GLDAS/Noah is driven by near-surface meteorological forcing fields from its parent atmospheric model and an observation-based synthetic precipitation product generated from using an optimal blending technique, where different weights are assigned to the products based on their qualities. Using anomaly correlation as a measure, the summer-month prediction skill of the CFSv2 using different turbulent flux parameterizations is assessed for SST, precipitation, and 2-m temperature over the Globe as well as the United States on an ensemble basis. Comparisons between the two runs show that the new parameterization has a relatively small impact on the CFSv2 prediction skills in the first month and the skill gain/loss varies with geographic regions globally, while the 2-m temperature prediction skill with the new parameterization show a general improvement over the U.S. The divergence of the two CFS runs is at the second month. Significant gain/loss varies with different climate regimes. This study indicates that a careful and an improved treatment for the turbulent flux parameters in the Noah land model are important to intra-seasonal and seasonal predictions.

Download Presentations:

Chris Bretherton: The NCEP-NCAR Climate Process Team on the Stratocumulus to Trade Cumulus Transition - Evaluating and Improving the GFS as a Climate Model

Chris Fairall: Evaluation and Improvement of Climate GCM Air-Sea Interaction Physics: An EPIC/VOCALS Synthesis Project

Rongqian Yang: Impact of Land Surface Parameterizations on Summer-season Predictions in the NCEP Climate Forecast System

Download Webcast (mp4 format)

Remote Access and Notes:

Remote access: To view the slideshow: Click on (copy and paste the link to a browser): https://cpomapp.webex.com/cpomapp/onstage/g.php?t=a&d=935468580. Enter your name and e-mail address, and click "Join Now". To hear the audio: Teleconference Number: 1-866-710-6541. Participant Passcode: 5841149. If necessary, enter the event passcode: 20910 For further information about this seminar please contact

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added February 6, 2012 11:07 AM / Last updated Monday, March 19, 2012 8:10 AM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are the most complete summary of upcoming NOAA science seminars; a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science across NOAA and our contituents. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

OneNOAA Science Seminar Number: 1187

Towards Non-Hydrostatic Spectral Model

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Date and Time: March 13, 2012, 12:00-13:00 Eastern Time Zone [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: World Weather Building (5200 Auth Road, Camp Springs, MD 20746); Room 707 (Directions from Google).
Speaker(s): Takeshi Enomoto (Kyoto University)
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NOAA National Centers for Environmental Prediction Environmental Modeling Center (EMC) Seminar
Abstract:

The Earth Simulator ignited high-resolution global simulations. We conducted 10-km simulations using AFES (AGCM for the Earth Simulator) at T1279L96 in 2002 (Ohfuchi et al. 2004). Although we believe it was a landmark in the history of AGCM, it seemed to me that T1279 hit the limit of hydrostatic spectral models. In fact other groups started developing a non-hydrostatic grid-point models such as NICAM (Tomita and Satoh 2004) to permit explicit cumulus convection and to avoid computationally demanding Legendre transforms. While I have enjoyed seeing development of non-hydrostatic models, I have always felt that spectral models can also be improved. In this seminar I will discuss my contributions with collaborators to keep spectral models competitive in the non-hydrostatic regime. They are 1) accurate methods to calculate the associated Legendre functions (ALF), 2) an accurate and simple interpolation scheme and 3) simple and stable non-hydrostatic formulation.

ALF is the prerequisite for the accuracy of the Legendre transform thus of the dynamical core. Enomoto et al. 2008) show that ALF calculated with the common three-point recurrence fails at high degree and order and recommend the alternative four-point recurrence (Swarztrauber 1993). Although the latter enables stable calculation at high order and degree, the accuracy of each value of ALF has not been confirmed. Recently Fukushima (2011) proposed an efficient and accurate method to calculate ALF with the conventional three-point recurrence using the extended floating-point arithmetic. ALF calculated with the four-point recurrence are verified with those calculated with Fukushima's method. ALF calculated with the four-point recurrence is accurate to about 13 digits below the floating point but are inaccurate at very small values (say <10). Although these small values do not affect the accuracy of the Legendre transform, Fukusimas method is a good replacement due to its capability to calculate wide range ofvalues and to parallelize in the zonal wave number m.

Majority of weather forecast and some climate models uses semi-Lagrangian advection in favour of a longer time step. In addition it eliminates dispersion, which is unavoidable with Eulerian advection. The problem of semi-Lagrangian advection is dissipation inherent in interpolation. Enomoto (2008) proposes the use of the spectral derivatives in the bicubic interpolation. He conducted rotation of a Gaussian hill (Ritchie 1987) with various interpolation methods and demonstrated the advantages of the new method. Although the advective form does not formally conserve mass, dissipation is very small with this interpolation. Recently a standard suite of advection tests has been proposed (Lauritzen et al. 2012). It includes smooth and non-smooth tracers under deformational non-divergent and divergent flows. The proposed interpolation is verified with the standard tests and is found to be very competitive with other state-of-art advection schemes.

The rapid increase of computing power is making global non-hydrostatic simulations affordable. A natural approach is to extend the formulation to include the non-hydrostatic effect. The advantage of this approach is that the existing data assimilation and tools require minimal changes. ECMWF and JMA seem to pursue this approach. ECMWF has achieved TL7999 (corresponding to approximately 2.5 km) with a fast Lendre transform using the butterfly algorithm (N. Wedi, pers. comm.). Hiromasa Yoshimura (MRI/JMA) has built a non-hydrostatic version of JMA GSM using double Fourier series. Their formulations are based on Laprise 1992) that proposes the vertical co-ordinates based on hydrostatic pressure. Juang (1992, 2000) also adopts hydrostatic -co-ordinates in the vertical but there are subtle differences. The latter introduces the hydrostatic temperature. In a limited-area model, such as MSM, the hydrostatic temperature may be given xternally. In a GCM, however, the hydrostatic temperature must be determined intternally if is not time-independent. I investigated the two formations and found the assumption of the hydrostatic state of Laprise (1992) may be used to diagnose the hydrostatic temperature within MSM. Similarly the hydrostatic assumption of Arakawa and Konor (2009) can be used. MSM is found to run stably with any of these diagnosed hydrostatic states. The diagnosed hydrostatic temperature would enable the application of the formulation of MSM to the global domain.

Download Presentation: Enomoto_20120313_NCEP
Remote Access and Notes:

Go to meeting https://www2.gotomeeting.com/join/385868586. Access Code: 385-868-586 Dial +1 (404) 891-0553. For further information about this seminar please contact (301)763-8000 Ext. 7551 or Takamesa Miyoshi (301-405-7797)

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Wednesday, February 15, 2012 8:43 AM / Last updated Friday, March 16, 2012 9:00 AM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are the most complete summary of upcoming NOAA science seminars; a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science across NOAA and our contituents. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] or join our RSS feed by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

OneNOAA Science Seminar Number: 1188

March 14, 2012

NO3-Initiated Secondary Organic Aerosol (SOA) Production and NOy Chemistry in a Pine Forest (BEACHON-RoMBAS 2011)

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Date and Time: March 14, 2012. 15:30-16:30 (Boulder, CO) Mountain Standard Time [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: NOAA ESRL Chemical Sciences Division seminar Room 2A305, David Skaggs Research Center (NOAA Building), 325 Broadway, Boulder, CO (Directions)
Speaker(s): (Reed College, Portland, Oregon)
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NOAA ESRL Chemical Science Division seminar
Abstract:

Biogenic hydrocarbons, such as monoterpenes (C10) and sesquiterpenes (C15), react rapidly with nitrate radical (NO3) to form low-volatility products. We hypothesize therefore that nitrate oxidation may be an important source of secondary organic aerosol in pollution-impacted forest environments. Ambient measurements of NOy (NO2, peroxy- and alkyl-nitrates, and the gas/aerosol partitioning of the latter) and Potential Aerosol Mass measurements of NO3-initiated secondary organic aerosol formation in a 15 L flow-through reactor were made during the BEACHON-RoMBAS field campaign in U.S. Forest Service Manitou Forest Observatory, Colorado (July-August 2011). A cavity ringdown spectrometer (CRDS) is used to monitor NO3 and N2O5, Thermal Desorption - Laser Induced Fluorescence (TD-LIF) is used to detect the NOy species as NO2; an Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS) monitors chemical composition of aerosol; Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometry (PTR-MS) monitors the gas-phase organic compounds; and a thermal converter/chemiluminescent NO/NOx/NH3 analyzer monitors gas-phase inorganic nitrogen compounds. With this suite of measurements we seek to elucidate the role of nitrate radical in biogenic SOA formation, as well as the fate of NOy in a forest environment. We observe significant concentrations of ambient alkyl- and peroxynitrates, despite the remote forest location, with peak aerosol organic nitrate concentrations observed at night. Regional and box models and laboratory chamber experiments are applied to interpret field observations.

Remote Access and Notes:

Remote access: Join the GoToMeeting at https://www2.gotomeeting.com/join/886498138. Contact (303-497-5319) with problems connecting. Join the conference call at 1-866-749-8607 with passcode 1679385#. This seminar was originally scheduled for February 08, 2012; now March 14, 2012. For further information about this seminar please contact [(303) 497-3599] or [(303) 497-5431].

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Monday, January 23, 2012 7:40 AM / Last updated Friday, March 9, 2012 1:56 PM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are the most complete summary of upcoming NOAA science seminars; a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science across NOAA and our contituents. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] or join our RSS feed by

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OneNOAA Science Seminar Number: 1189

What's Happening: Japan Tsunami Marine Debris

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Date and Time: March 14, 2012. 12:00-13:00 Eastern Standard Time [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: NOAA SSMC-4 Room 8150 (1305 East-West Hwy, Silver Spring, MD 20910)
Speaker(s): (NOAA Marine Debris Program)
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NOAA The NOS Science Seminar Series and the NOAA Marine Debris Program
Abstract:

As the tsunami that hit Japan in March 2011 receded from land, it washed much of what was in the inundation zone into the ocean. Heavier materials sank closer to shore, while buoyant materials went on to make up the debris fields we saw in satellite imagery and aerial photos of the waters surrounding Japan. Months later, debris fields are no longer visible. Winds and ocean currents scattered items in the massive North Pacific Ocean, and scientists predict some of the debris may eventually reach U.S. coasts. NOAA and its federal and non-federal partners, including the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and U.S. EPA, are leading efforts to collect data, assess the debris and possible impacts based on sound science, and protect our natural resources and coasts.

About the Speaker:

Dianna Parker is the Legislative and Communications Specialist for the (NOAA Marine Debris Program

Remote Access and Notes:

Presentations are available remotely for free via a combination of phone (US & territories) & webcast. Remote access is limited to 50 connections on a first-come-first served basis. To participate remotely via phone and internet:

  1. For the audio part of the presentation, Dial toll-free (U.S.) 1-877-708-1667. When prompted enter passcode 7028688 and the # sign. Please use your phone's mute button (*6 toggles on or off) during the presentation until you are ready to ask questions. The phone conference does not start until about five minutes before the seminar.
  2. For the visual part of the presentation, you can access the web meeting by going to: http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?sigKey=mymeetings&i=744925156&p=&t=c. Enter meeting number 744925156 if needed; no passcode is required. Enter other required fields - First and last name, org. Check the box that that you have read the Privacy Policy, and click Proceed.

For further information about this seminar please contact at least 45 minutes before the seminar, or if it is within 5 minutes of the seminar start, call the toll free number above.

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Friday, February 17, 2012 3:22 PM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are the most complete summary of upcoming NOAA science seminars; a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science across NOAA and our contituents. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] or join our RSS feed by

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OneNOAA Science Seminar Number: 1190

March 15, 2012

Oil Thickness observations from SAR and Optical Data

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Date and Time: March 15, 2012, 10:00-11:00 Eastern Time Zone [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: NOAA World Weather Building (5200 Auth Road, Camp Springs, MD 20746); Room 707 (Directions from Google).
Speaker(s): Dr. Oscar Garcia (Florida State University)
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NOAA STAR Seminar
Abstract:

To date, one of the most significant challenges in assessing an oil spill is to estimate the surface oil thickness (volume) at synoptic scale. Satellite and airborne remote sensing provided accurate information on the spatial extent of the surface oil (presence/absence) for the oil spill, yet no effort has been made to estimate the thickness or volume. Here I present the latest results of my investigation on similarities between SAR and Optical data in an attempt to distinguish categories of different thickness inside the extent of an oil slick. Combining SAR + Optical data sheds light towards quantifying the volume of oil in a given area. This could be of interest for oil spill responders towards planning burning, dispersant and skimming operations

Remote Access and Notes:

Dial information: USA participants: 866-832-9297 International: 203-566-7610 Passcode: 6070416. Presentation slides available at http://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/seminars.php. For further information about this seminar please contact Patrick Sweeney [301-763-8102 Ext 175] or Xiaofeng Li [301-763-8177 x321] or Bill Pichel [301-763-8231 x166]

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Sunday, March 11, 2012 3:11 PM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are the most complete summary of upcoming NOAA science seminars; a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science across NOAA and our contituents. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] or join our RSS feed by

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OneNOAA Science Seminar Number: 1191

Regulating Ocean Acidification through International Law

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Date and Time: March 15, 2012. 12:00-13:00 Eastern Standard Time [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: NOAA Central Library (SSMC3, 2nd Floor; 1315 East-West Hwy, Silver Spring, MD 20910)
Speaker(s): (President of the Ocean Foundation)
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NOAA International Affairs Council Law of the Sea Convention Working Group
Abstract:

Mr. Spalding will discuss existing legal tools available and identify important gaps in domestic and international law to regulate ocean acidification. Fundamental changes in sea water chemistry are occurring throughout our oceans. Serving as the world's largest natural carbon sink, the ocean absorbs about a quarter of the CO2 released into the atmosphere each year. As carbon emissions increase, a greater amount of carbon dissolves in the ocean, altering the pH level and causing the ocean to be more acidic. This relatively sharp increase in acidity has significant implications for marine ecosystems and the human activities dependent upon such resources. Unfortunately, no specific international law targeting the regulation of ocean acidification exists today. This seminar will discuss the regulatory gaps and the possible application of extant legal tools to regulate the carbon emission behavior of key nations to address ocean acidification.

About the Speaker:

Mark Spalding is the President of the Ocean Foundation and an authority on international environmental policy and law. He is the chair of the Council of the National Whale Conservation Fund and serves on the International Bering Sea Forum. He has consulted for the Alaska Conservation Foundation, San Diego Foundation, the International Community Foundation, the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation, and the Fundacion La Puerta. He designed and managed the Orca Fund and served as a member of the Environmental Grants Advisory Committee of FINCOMUN (Tijuanas Community Foundation). From 2003 to 2006, he headed up the Alaska Oceans Program, which supported ecosystem-based advocacy efforts to reform fisheries management, increased ocean literacy in Alaska, fostered the creation of a Shipping Safety Partnership, and supported national and international work to promote sustainable seafood choices. Mark holds a B.A. in history with Honors from Claremont McKenna College, a J.D. from Loyola Law School, and a Master in Pacific International Affairs (MPIA) from IR/PS.

Remote Access and Notes:

For remote access via webinar, please fill out the registration form a few minutes before the meeting is scheduled to begin. For audio in the US and Canada, dial 866-833-7307. The participant passcode is 8986360. The Meeting Number is 742656968; the Passcode is brownbag. For further information about this seminar please contact or .

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Thursday, February 23, 2012 8:38 AM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are the most complete summary of upcoming NOAA science seminars; a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science across NOAA and our contituents. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] or join our RSS feed by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

OneNOAA Science Seminar Number: 1192

March 16, 2012

Development and Application of an Unmanned Surface Craft: A Sample of the Future

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Date and Time: March 16, 2012. 10:30-11:30 Eastern Standard Time [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: NOAA Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory, Lake Superior Hall (4840 South State Road, Ann Arbor, MI)
Speaker(s): (Director, Wave-Current-Surge Information System, ExxonMobil Professor, Coastal Studies Institute, Assoc. Professor, Dept. of Oceanography and Coastal Sciences, Louisiana State University)
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NOAA Cooperative Institute for Limnology and Ecosystems Research (CILER)
Abstract:

TBD

About the Speaker:

Chunyan Li is the Director of WAVCIS (http://www.wavcis.lsu.edu), ExxonMobil Professor of the Coastal Studies Institute, and an Associate Professor of the Department of Oceanography and Coastal Sciences, Louisiana State University. He has a B.S. degree in Atmospheric Physics from the University of Science and Technology of China, a M.S. degree in Physical Oceanography from the Chinese Academy of Science, and a Ph.D. degree in Oceanography from the University of Connecticut. His recent interests include winter storm induced bay flushing, hurricane storm surges, innovative observations and instrumentation, among other topics.

Remote Access and Notes:

For remote access via webinar: https://www2.gotomeeting.com/register/215593994. For questions about this seminar please contact .

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Tuesday, March 6, 2012 10:51 AM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are the most complete summary of upcoming NOAA science seminars; a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science across NOAA and our contituents. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] or join our RSS feed by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

OneNOAA Science Seminar Number: 1193

March 20, 2012

Climate Change & Invaders: Sources of Uncertainty in Managing the Great Lakes Region

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Date and Time: March 20, 2012, 12:00-13:00 Eastern Daylight Time [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: WebEx Event, remote access only (see Remote Access and Notes section below)
Speaker(s): (US Geological Survey)
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: Ohio Sea Grant
Abstract:

Invasive species have dramatically altered terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems around the Great Lakes. Managing these invaders in the face of greater uncertainty due to climate change provides additional challenges to resource managers. Can management actions be adapted to address invasive species concerns?

This webinar will provide information about:

  • Invasive species found in the Great Lakes region
  • Potential impact of climate change on the ranges and effects of invasive species in the region
  • Research needs and adapting management actions to address future conditions in the region
About the Speaker:

Cindy Kolar is a Science Advisor in the Fisheries and Aquatic Endangered Resources Program of the US Geological Survey. She has studied invasive species for almost two decades and is interested in how global stressors interact to affect ecosystems. She grew up in and around the Great Lakes.

Remote Access and Notes:

To receive remote access information, you must register at http://changingclimate.osu.edu/ before the start of the webinar. Registration is free, and log-in information will be sent to the email address you provide during registration. Please contact , Ohio Sea Grant Assistant Director, with questions.

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Thursday, February 16, 2012 10:42 AM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are the most complete summary of upcoming NOAA science seminars; a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science across NOAA and our contituents. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] or join our RSS feed by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

OneNOAA Science Seminar Number: 1194

Roger Revelle Lecture Series: Tsunamis: Are We Underestimating The Risk?

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Date and Time: March 20, 2012, 5:30-7:30 PM Eastern Daylight Time [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: Smithsonian's National Museum of Natural History, Baird Auditorium (10th St. & Constitution Ave. NW, in Washington, D.C. 20560, See MAPS)
Speaker(s): Dr. Eddie Bernard (Affiliate Professor at the University of Washington and Scientist Emeritus for NOAA PMEL)
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: This seminar is sponsored by NSF, ONR, USGS, NASA, and NOAA (Lecture Sponsors)
Abstract:

The Roger Revelle Commemorative Lecture was created by the Ocean Studies Board in honor of Dr. Revelle's contributions to the ocean sciences and his dedication to making scientific knowledge available to policymakers. The 2012 speaker is Dr. Eddie Bernard, Scientist Emeritus of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory. Dr. Bernard will present Tsunamis: Are we underestimating the risk?.

The horrific December 26, 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami, which killed over 230,000 people and displaced 1.7 million across 14 countries, was a wake-up call for nations around the world, stimulating governments to address tsunami hazards. In the United States, Congress passed legislation to improve tsunami warning systems, preparedness, and education both internationally and locally. Then, the 2011 Japanese tsunami killed about 20,000 people in the most tsunami prepared nation in the world. Major questions remain: are we still underestimating the threat to the United States and how best can we prepare our coastal communities in case of a devastating tsunami?

About the Speaker:

Dr. Eddie Bernard

Remote Access and Notes:

The lecture is free and open to the public (see Roger Revelle Lecture Series). No remote access available. For more information please contact or . The lecture is held annually sponsored by NSF, ONR, USGS, NASA, and NOAA.

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Tuesday, March 20, 2012 12:25 PM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are the most complete summary of upcoming NOAA science seminars; a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science across NOAA and our contituents. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] or join our RSS feed by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

OneNOAA Science Seminar Number: 1195

March 21, 2012

Progress and Plans for the Environmental Modeling Center's (EMC) Gridpoint Statistical Interpolation (GSI) Development

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Date and Time: March 21, 2012, 14:00-15:00 Eastern Time Zone [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: NOAA World Weather Building (5200 Auth Road, Camp Springs, MD 20746); Room 707
Speaker(s): (NCEP)
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NOAA Joint Center for Satellite Data Assimilation (JCSDA)
Abstract:

TBD

Download Presentation: Summary Slides

Remote Access and Notes:

Video:

  1. Go to JCSDA Seminar and click on the seminar title
  2. Enter your name and email address
  3. Enter the meeting password: JCSDAseminars707
  4. Click "Join Now"
  5. Follow the instructions that appear on your screen
  6. For further information visit http://www.jcsda.noaa.gov/JCSDASeminars.php

Phone Access:

  • USA participants: 1-866-715-2479
  • Passcode: 9457557
  • Enter the meeting password: JCSDAseminar2010
  • International: 1-517-345-5260
  • For further information please contact

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Wednesday, January 11, 2012 9:23 AM / Last updated Wednesday, March 21, 2012 8:24 AM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are the most complete summary of upcoming NOAA science seminars; a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science across NOAA and our contituents. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] or join our RSS feed by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

OneNOAA Science Seminar Number: 1196

Understanding 'fast' night time chemistry over Northern Europe

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Date and Time: March 21, 2012. 15:30-16:30 (Boulder, CO) Mountain Standard Time [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: NOAA ESRL Chemical Sciences Division seminar Room 2A305, David Skaggs Research Center (NOAA Building), 325 Broadway, Boulder, CO (Directions)
Speaker(s): (Department of Chemistry, University of York / National Centre for Atmospheric Science)
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NOAA ESRL Chemical Science Division seminar
Abstract:

On average half of the planet is in darkness at any one time. However, from the perspective of atmospheric chemistry, much of the focus is on the day time 'photochemistry'. The 'ROle of Nighttime chemistry in controlling the Oxidising Capacity of the AtmOsphere' (RONOCO) project measured a range of atmospheric constituents, including short lived species such as OH, HO2, NO3, and N2O5 as well as longer lived species (O3, CO, VOCs, oVOCs) from the UK large research aircraft (FAAM BAe146) over Northern Europe during the night. These observations complement previous datasets as they were made away from urban centres and so show very low NO concentrations. Analysis of the observations through use of a constrained box model finds a highly complex and little explored area of atmospheric chemistry. Our box model simulations are less successful than our equivalent daytime simulations but they provide significant insight into this unusual chemistry. The model tends to over-predict NO3 by a factor of 2, whilst under predicting HO2 by a factor of 3. Hydrocarbon oxidation is dominated by NO3 chemistry across C=C bonds (on average 1/3 of the oxidation is by O3 initiated attack, 2/3 from NO3). This initiates a cascade of complex and badly constrained chemistry. NO3 also acts to process radicals through RO2+NO3 reactions. Thus under these conditions, NO3 plays a dual role, equivalent in the daytime to the combined role of OH and NO. We will discuss the chemistry in terms of RO2, NO3, NO3x budgets etc and discuss implications for VOC oxidation, nitric acid production etc. We then compare the results of our box model simulation with the complex MCM chemistry with those obtained from equivalent box model simulations using the simplified chemistry scheme from a Chemical Transport Model (GEOS-Chem). We find significant differences between the two chemistry schemes leading to significant failures to simulate HOx at night in the simplified chemistry. In light of the knowledge gained from the observationally constrained model we adapt the chemistry scheme in GEOS-Chem and investigate the global implications of this night time chemistry.

About the Speaker:

http://www.york.ac.uk/chemistry/staff/academic/d-g/evansm/

Remote Access and Notes:

Remote access: Join the GoToMeeting at https://www2.gotomeeting.com/join/578838074. Contact (303-497-5319) with problems connecting. Join the conference call at 1-866-749-8607 with passcode 1679385#. For further information about this seminar please contact [(303) 497-3599] or [(303) 497-5431].

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Friday, March 9, 2012 1:56 PM / Last updated Sunday, March 11, 2012 2:30 PM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are the most complete summary of upcoming NOAA science seminars; a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science across NOAA and our contituents. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] or join our RSS feed by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

OneNOAA Science Seminar Number: 1197

March 22, 2012

Communicating Climate Science and Uncertainty Through Scenarios and Integrated Regional Modeling

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Date and Time: March 22, 2012, 13:00-14:00 Eastern Time Zone [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: NOAA SSMC-2 Room 14316 (1325 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD, 20910)
Speaker(s): [Joint Global Change Research Institute (JGCRI)]
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NOAA NWS/OCWWS/CSD
Abstract:

Hefty technical reports aren't the best way to help the public and policymakers understand climate change's potential impacts. But detailed scientific tomes have historically been a main communication vehicle for climate researchers. In this seminar, Richard Moss will describe new efforts to supplement assessments by working with scenarios and integrated models to convey to regional and local decision makers how their plans or interests could be affected by climate change. Moss will describe use of scenarios in the U.S. Climate Assessment, which is scheduled for completion in 2013. He serves on the federal advisory committee overseeing the report and is leading development of scenarios for the report's preparation. He will also touch on development of scenarios for the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change and an approach for characterizing and propagating uncertainty in regional models.

Download Presentation:
About the Speaker:

Richard H. Moss is a senior scientist at the Joint Global Change Research Institute (JGCRI). His previous professional positions include serving as Director of the Office of the US Global Change Program (2000-06) and Head of the technical support unit of one of IPCC's working groups (1993-99). He chairs the US National Research Council's Board on Environmental Change and Society and serves in several capacities for the US National Climate Assessment and the IPCC Fifth Assessment Report. He is a DOE "distinguished associate" and a fellow of the AAAS. He received his Ph.D. in public policy from Princeton University.

Remote Access and Notes:

Please register for the GoTo Webinar by clicking at https://www1.gotomeeting.com/register/212517185. For further information about this seminar please contact .

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Wednesday, March 7, 2012 5:00 PM / Last updated Monday, April 23, 2012 9:08 AM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are the most complete summary of upcoming NOAA science seminars; a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science across NOAA and our contituents. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] or join our RSS feed by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

OneNOAA Science Seminar Number: 1198

March 23, 2012

(postponed) Big Questions About Small Things: Bacteria, Archaea, and Their Viruses

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Date and Time: (postponed) March 23, 2012, 12:00-13:00 Eastern Time Zone [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: NOAA Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory, Michigan-Huron Room
Speaker(s): Dr. Vincent J. Denef and Dr. Melissa B. Duhaime (University of Michigan, Dept of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology)
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NOAA GLERL-CILER Joint Seminar Series
Abstract:

Future perspectives: While the role of bacterio- and viroplankton communities as part of the freshwater microbial loop is well appreciated, the resolution at which these communities are incorporated in food web models is rather coarse. Efforts to increase this resolution by employing novel DNA sequencing-based technologies lag significantly behind similar efforts in the marine environment. The currently planned sampling by GLERL of the surface and profundal environment along the Alpena transect in April, July and September provides the opportunity to obtain a highly genetically resolved view of the bacterioplankton and virus communities in a Laurentian Great Lake in the context of analyses of the entire food web. Very few such studies have been performed in any system, terrestrial or aquatic. We are also examining impacts of the dreissenid invasion on the dynamic interplay between bacterial and viral populations, and their role in carbon cycling in inland Michigan lakes, and anticipate that insights from the Lake Huron project and the inland lakes project can complement each other.

Remote Access and Notes:

Remote Access Not available. For further information about this seminar please contact .

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Tuesday, March 20, 2012 8:08 AM / Last updated Wednesday, March 21, 2012 2:33 PM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are the most complete summary of upcoming NOAA science seminars; a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science across NOAA and our contituents. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] or join our RSS feed by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

OneNOAA Science Seminar Number: 1199

March 26, 2012

It Is Necessary to Revolutionize Climate Prediction: Is It Possible?

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Date and Time: March 26, 2012, 15:30-16:30 Central Time Zone [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: National Weather Center (120 David L. Boren Blvd, University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK), NWC Room. 1313 (Directions to the National Weather Center).
Speaker(s): Jagadish Shukla (George Mason University, President, Institute of Global Environment & Society, Calverton, MD)
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NOAA NWS National Weather Center Colloquium
Abstract:

This presentation will review our current understanding of the limits of predictability for weather, seasonal and decadal variations and climate change. The talk will also describe the scientific and institutional challenges in producing accurate, reliable and quantitative predictions of high-impact weather, and changes in statistics of regional weather events in a changing climate.

It will be argued that because of the complexity of the climate system, and because the regional manifestations of climate change are mainly through changes in the statistics of regional weather variations, the scientific and computational requirements to predict its behavior reliably are so enormous that the nations of the world should establish a small number of multi-national research and high performance computing facilities dedicated to the grand challenges of predicting regional high-impact weather and climate change.

Motivated by the success of internationally-funded infrastructure in other areas of science, the presentation will suggest that a small number of highly connected multi-national computational and data facilities should be established with about 20 petaflop in the near future and about 200 petaflop by the end of the next decade. Such facilities will enable future IPCC assessments to be made using about 10 km resolution climate models, and dynamical seasonal predictions using 3-5 km cloud system resolving atmosphere models and eddy revolving ocean models. This will also enable weather-climate modeling and prediction research using about 1 km resolution global atmosphere models and about 5 km ocean models. Such facilities will play a key role in the development of next generation climate models, build global capacity, nurture a highly trained workforce, and engage the global user community, policymakers and stakeholders.

About The Speaker: http://www.iges.org/people/shukla.html
About The Speaker: Video Presentation (EchoPlayer)
Remote Access and Notes:

Remote access is not be available. Presentations are recorded as well as powerpoint slides so anyone can watch the seminars at their leisure. For further information about this seminar please contact or

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Friday, March 16, 2012 9:33 AM / Last updated Thursday, March 29, 2012 8:14 AM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are the most complete summary of upcoming NOAA science seminars; a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science across NOAA and our contituents. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] or join our RSS feed by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

OneNOAA Science Seminar Number: 1200

March 27, 2012

A Contemporary Scheme of Semi-Lagrangian Advection

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Date and Time: March 27, 2012, 12:00-13:00 Eastern Time Zone [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: NOAA World Weather Building (5200 Auth Road, Camp Springs, MD 20746); Room 707 (Directions from Google).
Speaker(s): (NOAA NCEP/EMC)
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NOAA National Centers for Environmental Prediction Environmental Modeling Center (EMC) Seminar
Abstract:

The semi-Lagrangian advection method is not new. We all know the most advantage of using a semi-Lagrangian method for advection is to avoid the numerical instability due to nonlinear computation of Eulerian method, thus we can have a large time step while using semi-Lagrangian advection method. For more than two decades, the concept of semi-Lagrangian advection for efficient computation has been applied to atmospheric and oceanic modeling with different numerical methods of implementation. Those methods were concentrated on the determination of trajectory, the accuracy of the interpolation, the time integration with semi-implicit, the remap of polar area for global modeling, the treatment of orographic resonant etc etc, and it comes to be more on the mass conservation and high order interpolation with monotonic and positive definiteness for up to date consideration, I called it contemporary schemes while the semi-Lagrangian considers mass conservation integration and/or interpolation. In this seminar, I would like to introduce a contemporary semi-Lagrangian advection scheme. It is contemporary because the method has the same consideration of mass conserving, and it is not 'very' traditional. The method has no need to do iteration to determine trajectory, no need to do interpolation for the Lagrangian forcing, no need to remap the polar area, and no need to treat orographic resonant. For massively parallel computing, it has no need to generate halo but using transpose to make sure global mass conservation interpolation by dimensional split in 3D advection. It is called non-iteration dimensional-split semi-Lagrangian (NDSL) method. Several theoretical test results and implementation into GFS will be presented.

Remote Access and Notes:

Remote access TBD. For further information about this seminar please contact (301)763-8000 Ext. 7220.

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Thursday, March 8, 2012 8:43 AM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are the most complete summary of upcoming NOAA science seminars; a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science across NOAA and our contituents. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] or join our RSS feed by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

OneNOAA Science Seminar Number: 1201

March 28, 2012

Temporal Variability and Potential Coupling of Terrestrial Methyl Halide and C2-C4 Alkene Emissions

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Date and Time: March 28, 2012. 15:30-16:30 (Boulder, CO) Mountain Standard Time [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: NOAA ESRL Chemical Sciences Division seminar Room 2A305, David Skaggs Research Center (NOAA Building), 325 Broadway, Boulder, CO (Directions)
Speaker(s): Robert Rhew (University of California, Berkeley)
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NOAA ESRL Chemical Science Division seminar
Abstract:

Methyl halides (CH3Cl, CH3Br, CH3I) and C2-C4 alkenes are important for ozone depletion in the stratosphere and ozone creation in the troposphere, respectively, but their terrestrial fluxes are poorly quantified. A major problem in constraining terrestrial sources of methyl halides and C2-C4 alkenes is the large temporal variability exhibited by every ecosystem studied thus far. The cause of this variability is unknown, but it generates biases in field sampling and scaling up results. A related question is whether the dominant production mechanism for these compounds is biotic (enzymatic) or abiotic. I will present a hypothesis that methyl halide and light alkene emissions in terrestrial ecosystems are predominantly biogenic, are strongly coupled to each other, and are affected by rapid hormonal shifts in plants associated with transitions between growth stages. Collaborative experiments will be proposed to test the driving factors behind the production and temporal variability of these compounds.

Remote Access and Notes:

Remote access: TBD. For further information about this seminar please contact [(303) 497-3599] or [(303) 497-5431].

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Friday, March 16, 2012 9:57 AM / Last updated Wednesday, March 21, 2012 9:50 AM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are the most complete summary of upcoming NOAA science seminars; a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science across NOAA and our contituents. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] or join our RSS feed by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

OneNOAA Science Seminar Number: 1202

March 29, 2012

CANCELED Spatial and Temporal Considerations in Evaluating and Utilizing Radar QPE Estimates

Date and Time: CANCELED
Location: CANCELED
Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Friday, March 16, 2012 4:48 PM / Last updated Wednesday, March 21, 2012 9:05 AM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are the most complete summary of upcoming NOAA science seminars; a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science across NOAA and our contituents. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] or join our RSS feed by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

OneNOAA Science Seminars Subscription Information

i-access to our OneNOAA science seminar announcements:

  1. Join our weekly e-mail seminar announcement [nominally, email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list]. You can subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminars moderated email list by sending an email message to: with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body (don't include the quotes) or visit https://list.woc.noaa.gov/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/onenoaascienceseminars and fill in your email address (see also how to suscribe).
  2. Online OneNOAA web access: http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/ (Web page maintained by )
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  6. Interested in becoming a OneNOAA science seminar partner?
  7. When available, all seminars can be accessed remotely by anyone on a first-come-first serve basis.
  8. Note: All seminars subject to title, location, date, and time changes without notice. Please check the OneNOAA seminar web page for the latest seminar updates. Unless otherwised indicated, seminars are open to the public. The contents of the OneNOAA Science Seminars web page do not reflect any position of the Federeal Government or NOAA. References to trade names or commercial entities do not imply endorsement of any kind. Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer]. The information provided by the OneNOAA Science Seminars is for broad information purposes only. See privacy policy [NOAA Privacy policy]

 

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