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DecemberDecember 2011 OneNOAA Science Seminars

A joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science and management information.

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Web page last updated: Tuesday, 04-Sep-2012 15:40:57 UTC

The OneNOAA Science discussion seminar series is a joint effort to help share science and management information and to promote constructive dialogue between scientists, educators, and resource managers across NOAA. Please help us spread the word about these seminars to anyone interested. For further information please contact Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov.

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December 01, 2011

Abundance, Survival, and Life History of Salmonid Populations in Western Washington

Date and Time: December 01, 2011, 11:00-12:00 Pacific Time Zone [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: NOAA Northwest Fisheries Science Center (NWFSC) (2725 Montlake Boulevard East, Seattle, WA 98112; Map to NWFSC), Room: Auditorium.
Speaker(s): Dr. Mara Zimmerman (Research Scientist, Wild Salmonid Production Evaluation Unit, Fish Science Division, Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife)
Speaker's Email:
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NOAA NWFSC Monster Seminar JAM
Abstract:

Efforts to conserve, recover, and manage anadromous salmonid populations are based on inherent assumptions regarding which variables most influence population dynamics. Monitoring and research conducted by the Wild Salmonid Production Evaluation Unit (WSPE) use a life cycle framework to identify and test these assumptions. Current research topics include (1) estimation of juvenile and adult abundance and freshwater life histories, (2) identification of variables limiting select salmonid populations, (3) testing and explanation of population-level responses to habitat restoration, and (4) improvement of wild coho forecasting methods for Washington State. This presentation will provide an overview of ongoing work to develop this research program.

About the Speaker:

Dr. Mara Zimmerman has worked as a Research Scientist for the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife since 2008. She received her B.A. from Bowdoin College and her Ph.D. from the University of Michigan. Her post-doctoral work focused on lake trout ecotypes and re-establishment of deep-water native fish communities in the Great Lakes. Mara currently leads the Wild Salmonid Production Evaluation Unit (WSPE) and coordinates juvenile and adult monitoring of ESA-listed species in western Washington. The goals of the WSPE unit are to understand variables influencing the abundance, survival, and life history of wild salmon, steelhead, and char in western Washington and to make these results available for the purpose of species conservation and management. http://wdfw.wa.gov/conservation/research/staff/zimmerman_mara.html

Salient Publications

  • Zimmerman, M. S. 2011. 2011 wild coho forecasts for Puget Sound, Washington Coast, and Lower Columbia. Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, Washington (wdfw.wa.gov/conservation/research/projects/wild_coho).
  • Kinsel, C., and Zimmerman, M. 2011. Intensively Monitored Watersheds: 2009 fish population studies in the Hood Canal stream complex, FPA 11-06. Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, Washington.
  • Zimmerman, M. and Kinsel, C. 2011. Migration of anadromous juvenile bull trout in the Skagit River, 1990-2009, FPT 11-01. Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, WA.
  • McPhee, M.V., Zimmerman, M.S., Beacham, T.D., Beckman, B.R., Olsen, J.B., Seeb, L.W., Templin, W.D. 2010. Hierarchies in pattern and process: genetics and ecology of Pacific salmon in the Arctic-Yukon-Kuskokwim region. In C. C. Krueger, and C. E. Zimmerman, editors. Sustainability of the Arctic-Yukon-Kuskokwim salmon fisheries: what do we know about salmon ecology, management, and fisheries? American Fisheries Society. Bethesda, Maryland.
  • Zimmerman, M.S. and Krueger, C.C. 2009. An ecosystem perspective on re-establishing native deepwater fishes in the Laurentian Great Lakes. North American Journal of Fisheries Management. 29:1352-1371.
  • Zimmerman, M.S., Schmidt, S.N., Krueger, C.C., Vander Zanden, M.J., and Eshenroder, R.L. 2009. Ontogenetic niche shifts and resource partitioning of lake trout morphotypes. Canadian Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences. 66: 1007-1018.
Remote Access and Notes:

Webinar access:

  1. Go to https://nwfsc.webex.com/nwfsc/j.php?ED=162473362&UID=1218681822&RT=MiM0 (This meeting does not require a password.) Click "Join".
  2. If requested, enter your name and email address.
  3. If a password is required, enter the meeting password: (This meeting does not require a password.)
  4. Click "Join".

Audio access:

  • Call-in toll number (US/Canada): +1-408-600-3600
  • Access code: 800 033 252

For Assistance during the presentation go to https://nwfsc.webex.com/nwfsc/mc On the left navigation bar, click "Support". Contact:

For questions about this seminar please contact Diane L. Tierney-Jamieson (206-860-3380; )

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Wednesday, September 28, 2011 9:18 AM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science and management information. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] or join our RSS feed by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].


Evaluation of Hub-Height Wind Speed Forecast from the ESRL/GSD High Resolution Rapid Refresh (HRRR) Model and NCEP Hires West CONUS 4 km WRF Model

Date and Time: December 01, 2011, 11:30-12:30 Eastern Time Zone [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: NOAA SSMC-3 (1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD, 20910); Room 3404
Speaker(s): Will Pendergrass (NOAA Air Resources Laboratory)
Speaker's Email:
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NOAA Air Resources Laboratory
Abstract:

TBD

Remote Access and Notes:

Call-in is 1-203-277-3283; passcode 9643195. For questions about this seminar please contact Patrena Mcgruder ()

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Friday, October 14, 2011 12:10 PM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science and management information. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

December 06, 2011

BIOMap Alaska: Citizen Science for Alaska's Oceans

Date and Time: December 06, 2011, 10:00-11:00 Alaska Local Time (14:00-15:00 ETZ) [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: The ACCAP office is located on the second floor of the Denali Building, 3352 College Rd., Fairbanks, Alaska
Speaker(s): (Anthropology and the International Arctic Research Center, UAF) and (Director of Conservation, Alaska SeaLife Center)
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NOAA ACCAP monthly climate webinar
Abstract:

Investigators from the University of Alaska Fairbanks and the Alaska Sea Life Center are developing a citizen-science initiative to collect local ecological information on the marine ecosystems along the Alaska region of the Chukchi and Bering seas. Using a web-based tool community members will be able to contribute their observations of the marine environment and of species of interest including those that may be extending historical ranges or that may be considered invasive. A companion marine species identification guide, including photographs and English, Yup'ik, and Iñupiaq translations, will be developed to aid identifications. The information contributed will be publicly available and useful to the development of ecosystem-based fisheries management in Alaska. Join this webinar to learn more about this unique stakeholder outreach and survey program.

Download Presentations:

View the webinar video (52 MB MP4)

Listen to the webinar podcast

Presentation/Slides

Remote Access and Notes:

Pre-registration is strongly encouraged. To register please fill out the web-form at: http://ine.uaf.edu/accap/teleconference.htm#register, or contact: Brook Gamble, Assistant Coordinator and Outreach Specialist, (907) 474-7812, . Please let us know if you intend to come in person. You are welcome to join us in our Fairbanks conference room. The ACCAP office is located on the second floor of the Denali Building, 3352 College Rd., Fairbanks.

How to Participate / Log-In to the Alaska Climate Webinar:

  • Point your web browser to: http://infiniteconferencing.com/Events/accap/
  • Enter Participant Code 83847342
  • Enter the rest of the requested information (The name and organization you enter will be seen by other participants, but your contact information will remain confidential
  • Click the blue "log-in" button

Audio / conference call:

  • With a regular telephone dial: 1- (877) 594-8353
  • When prompted, enter the Participant passcode: 83847342.Please mute your phone during the presentation. The audio is very sensitive and your external conversations and typing can be heard by other participants.

For support during a call, press *0 on your phone and a conferencing coordinator will assist you. For further information please contact Brook Gamble, Assistant Coordinator and Outreach Specialist, (907) 474-7812,

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Monday, October 3, 2011 1:54 PM / Last updated Wednesday, December 7, 2011 12:13 PM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science and management information. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].


NOAA Technology Transfer: Meeting the President's challenge

Date and Time: December 06, 2011, 12:00-1:00 Eastern Time Zone (12:00-13:00 ETZ) [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: NOAA SSMC-3 (1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD, 20910); 2nd Floor, NOAA Library
Speaker(s): Henry Wixon and Mark Madsen
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NOAA Office of Research and Technology Application (ORTA)
Abstract:

The goal of Federal technology transfer is to promote public/private sector partnerships that enhance U.S. competitiveness and leverage the Nation's investment in Federal Research and Development. The Presidential Memorandum, Accelerating Technology Transfer and Commercialization of Federal Research in Support of High-Growth Businesses, issued October 28, 2011 (Attachment 1), directs that each agency with Federal laboratories develop plans that establish performance goals to increase the number and pace of effective technology transfer and commercialization activities in partnership with non federal entities, including private firms, research organizations, and non-profit entities.

This seminar will cover the impact of President Obama's directive on NOAA Managers and Scientists. Questions and answers are expected to address exactly what technology transfer is, why the President has addressed its importance and what mechanisms are available within NOAA.

About the Speakers:

Henry Wixon is Chief Counsel for DOC/NIST. He is a registered patent attorney and Certified Licensing Professional. His office provides legal guidance, representation and management assistance to NIST's scientists and employees, and interacts with principal developers and users of research, including private and public laboratories, universities, corporations and governments. The NIST Office of Chief Counsel reviews and approves all Cooperative Research and Development Agreements, Non-Disclosure Agreements and Material Transfer Agreements.

Mark Madsen is Counsel for Technology Transfer and Intellectual Property at NIST.

Remote Access and Notes:
  1. Go to http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?sigKey=mymeetings&i=742656968&=brownbag&t=c
  2. Enter the required fields
  3. Indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy
  4. Click on Proceed
  5. Passcode: brownbag
  6. For audio in the US and Canada, dial 866-833-7307. The participant passcode is 8986360
Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Friday, December 2, 2011 . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science and management information. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

December 07, 2011

Earth's Eye: Observatory for Ecosystem Changes in Muskegon Lake

Date and Time: December 07, 2011, 10:30-11:30 Eastern Time Zone [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: NOAA Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory, Lake Superior Hall (4840 South State Road, Ann Arbor, MI)
Speaker(s): Dr. Bopi Biddanda (Associate Professor, Annis Water Resources Institute and Lake Michigan Center Grand Valley State University)
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NOAA Cooperative Institute for Limnology and Ecosystems Research (CILER)
Abstract:

Lakes are sentinels of change that reflect their regional climate and landscape. We have now established a long-term, multi-sensor buoy-based observatory in Muskegon Lake (Michigan) to track physical, chemical and biological changes taking place in this Area of Concern (AOC) undergoing restoration in real-time. Observatory-derived lake and meteorological time-series data will be used to assess indicators of ecosystem change such as food web structure, water quality and harmful algal blooms. Information is being shared through a live data display, web and regional observing networks for monitoring, research, and educational outreach and support for the restoration of this coastal environment.

Our observatory for tracking ecosystem changes in Muskegon Lake is now gathering vital time-series data on parameters including the lake's water quality, currents, production, and respiration. The observatory seeks to link regional conditions to seasonal aquatic productivity. With the aid of the new Lake Observatory, I will discuss the implications of some observed trends in plankton metabolism to our understanding of carbon cycling and food webs in this Great Lakes tributary lake.

Remote Access and Notes:

Presentations are available remotely via a webinar. Remote access via webinar: https://www2.gotomeeting.com/register/110726770. For further information please contact Giselle.Maira@noaa.gov.

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Monday, December 5, 2011 9:13 AM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science and management information. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] or join our RSS feed by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].


Marshes on the Move: Understanding and Using Model Results that Show Future Sea Level Rise Impacts on Coastal Wetlands

Date and Time: December 07, 2011, 14:00-15:00 Eastern Time Zone [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: Seminar available via webinar only (see Remote Access and Notes section below)
Speaker(s): Brian Smith and Nancy Cofer-Shabica (NOAA Coastal Services Center); Adam Whelchel and Roger Fuller (The Nature Conservancy)
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NOAA Coastal Services Center
Abstract:

The scientific community is in agreement that global sea level is rising and coastal marshes are changing as a result. Understanding where and how coastal environments will change in response to sea level rise, however, is a complex modeling challenge. This webinar will help participants understand key considerations and questions to ask when presented with models and maps estimating the future condition and location of coastal wetlands in response to rising sea level.

In this webinar, participants will learn about

  • Gain a basic understanding of some key parameters and uncertainties associated with these models
  • Interact with technical specialists regarding real world implications of model results
  • Learn how modeling results can be incorporated into management initiatives
Remote Access and Notes:

Presentations are available remotely via a webinar. To register, visit http://www.csc.noaa.gov/digitalcoast/webinar/index.html. You will receive an email prior to the webinar containing information about join. This webinar will be recorded for on-demand playback. For further information please contact Krista.McCraken@noaa.gov.

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Wednesday, September 28, 2011 10:37 AM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science and management information. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] or join our RSS feed by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

December 08, 2011

NMFS's Role in Bycatch Reduction

Date and Time: December 08, 2011, 11:00-12:00 Pacific Time Zone [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: NOAA Northwest Fisheries Science Center (NWFSC) (2725 Montlake Boulevard East, Seattle, WA 98112; Map to NWFSC), Room: Auditorium.
Speaker(s): Lee Benaka (National Coordinator, Bycatch Reduction Engineering Program, NOAA NMFS Office of Sustainable Fisheries)
Speaker's Email:
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NOAA NWFSC Monster Seminar JAM
Abstract:

NOAA NMFS works under several Federal mandates to reduce fisheries interactions, and the effects of those interactions, with living marine resources. Although NMFS performs a variety of bycatch reduction activities at each of its Regional Offices/Science Centers, the Office of Sustainable Fisheries attempts to ensure coordination as necessary through implementation of the NMFS National Bycatch Strategy, as well as the Bycatch Reduction Engineering Program created through Section 316 of the Magnuson-Stevens Fishery Conservation and Management Act. This presentation will provide an overview of NMFS bycatch reduction mandates, the NMFS National Bycatch Strategy, bycatch-reduction challenges and solutions from around the country, and the organization and achievements of the Bycatch Reduction Engineering Program.

About the Speaker:

Lee Benaka has a Bachelor of Arts degree in religion from Columbia University, and a Master of Marine Affairs degree from the University of Rhode Island. Prior to joining the fisheries field, Mr. Benaka served as an intern in the Spider-Man office at Marvel Comics, interviewed people in the professional wrestling industry as a post-graduate fellow, and worked as a book editor for the American Hospital Association. Lee was the first-ever Sea Grant Fellow with the American Fisheries Society, focusing on fish habitat issues. After his Fellowship, Mr. Benaka worked in the Highly Migratory Species Management Division in the NMFS HQ Office of Sustainable Fisheries (OSF) for about a year, and then worked on the Saltonstall-Kennedy Grant Program for a few years. In 2003, Lee joined the Domestic Fisheries Division of OSF, where he has worked on bycatch reduction efforts and other topics.

Salient Publications

  • Tromble, G. R., D. M. Lambert, and L. R. Benaka. 2009. Prelude to sustainability: ending overfishing in U.S. Fisheries. In: Our living oceans. Report on the status of U.S. living marine resources, 6th edition. U.S. Dep. Commer., NOAA Tech. Memo. NMFS-F/SPO-80, pp. 57-66.
  • Benaka, L. R., and T. J. Dobrzynzski. 2004. The National Marine Fisheries Service's national bycatch strategy. Marine Fisheries Review 66(2):1-9.
  • Benaka, L. R., editor. 1999. Fish habitat: essential fish habitat and rehabilitation. American Fisheries Society, Symposium 22, Bethesda, Maryland.
Remote Access and Notes:

Webinar access:

  1. Go to https://nwfsc.webex.com/nwfsc/j.php?ED=165939527&UID=1231230412&RT=MiM0 (This meeting does not require a password.) Click "Join".
  2. If requested, enter your name and email address.
  3. If a password is required, enter the meeting password: (This meeting does not require a password.)
  4. Click "Join".

Audio access:

  • Call-in toll number (US/Canada): +1-408-600-3600
  • Access code: 805 442 298

For Assistance during the presentation go to https://nwfsc.webex.com/nwfsc/mc On the left navigation bar, click "Support". Contact:

For questions about this seminar please contact Diane L. Tierney-Jamieson (206-860-3380; )

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Wednesday, September 28, 2011 9:18 AM / Last updated Monday, December 5, 2011 12:08 PM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science and management information. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] or join our RSS feed by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].


Does Tidal Management Affect Sub-adult Fish Assemblages in South Carolina's Historic Impounded Marshes?

Date and Time: December 08, 2011, 12:00-12:30 Eastern Time Zone [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: NOAA SSMC-3 (1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD, 20910); 2nd Floor, NOAA Library
Speaker(s): Ben L. Carswell (East Coast Regional Coordinator, NOAA Marine Debris Program, Office of Response and Restoration, National Ocean Service)
Speaker's Email:
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NOAA NODC and NOAA 2011 Sea Grant Knauss Fellows
Abstract:

As much as 14% (28,593 ha) of South Carolina's coastal marshes are restricted by impoundments. Most impounded marshes in South Carolina are relics of rice agriculture that flourished in many areas of the coastal Southeast circa 1760 - 1860. Near Beaufort, SC, the Nemours Wildlife Foundation (NWF) manages 809 hectares of impounded marshes and wetlands with the primary goal of maximizing waterfowl habitat. A minority of the Nemours impoundments are managed to maximize recreational fisheries. Water-level in the impoundments is central to each strategy and is controlled with a system of tide gates. "Waterfowl" management promotes production of habitat for migratory birds, a goal that demands prolonged restriction of tidal connectivity. "Fish" management aims to promote an abundance of sport fish and allows daily tidal exchange. Tidal restriction raises concerns about how fragmentation and habitat change may affect nursery function for fishes. Our research examined assemblage composition, diversity, and abundance of fishes during early life stages, a phase that has received little attention in studies of coastal impoundments. We used light traps and a push net to sample two impoundments of each management type monthly for 10 months. We collected 61,527 sub-adult fishes, representing 21 species and 16 families, in light traps and 12,670 sub-adult fishes, representing 13 species and 11 families, in push net samples. The effective number of species detected at larval stages in "fish" impoundments (summer mean=2.52±0.20, winter mean=2.02±0.66) was greater than in "waterfowl" impoundments (summer mean=1.27±0.14, winter mean=1.06±0.09); confidence intervals are 90%. Species richness did not differ between management types, but hierarchical linear modeling predicts differences in assemblage composition. Our findings underscore the importance of daily water exchange in promoting nursery function for transient fishes in managed coastal impoundments.

About the Speaker:

Ben's scientific background centers on coastal and estuarine ecology with a recent focus on fish diversity and habitat fragmentation. He is currently wrapping up his M.S. through the Warnell School of Forestry and Natural Resources at The University of Georgia where he was sponsored by the Georgia Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit. Ben's undergraduate degree is from the Department of Environmental Sciences at the University of Virginia. A representative of Georgia Sea Grant, Ben is serving as the East Coast Regional Coordinator for the NOAA Marine Debris Program and is analyzing program policy regarding the economic impacts of marine debris. Prior to graduate school, Ben conducted blue crab research at the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center, worked as an Interpretive Naturalist on a Georgia barrier island, served as a NMFS Fisheries Observer on commercial longline vessels in the Pacific, and monitored shark populations with the Georgia Department of Natural Resources.

Remote Access and Notes:
  1. Go to http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?sigKey=mymeetings&i=742656968&=brownbag&t=c
  2. Enter the required fields
  3. Indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy
  4. Click on Proceed
  5. Passcode: brownbag
  6. For audio in the US and Canada, dial 866-833-7307. The participant passcode is 8986360
Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Monday, December 5, 2011 9:51 AM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science and management information. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] or join our RSS feed by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].


Waterscape Genetics of the Yellow Perch (Perca flavescens): Patterns Across Large Connected Ecosystems and Isolated Relict Populations

Date and Time: December 08, 2011, 12:30-13:00 Eastern Time Zone [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: NOAA SSMC-3 (1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD, 20910); 2nd Floor, NOAA Library
Speaker(s): Jhonatan Sepulveda (NOAA Great Lakes Habitat Restoration Program)
Speaker's Email:
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NOAA NODC and NOAA 2011 Sea Grant Knauss Fellows
Abstract:

Comparisons of a species' genetic diversity and divergence patterns across large connected populations versus isolated relict areas, provide important data for understanding potential response to global warming and other perturbations. Aquatic taxa offer ideal case studies for interpreting these patterns, because their dispersal and gene flow often are constrained through narrow connectivity channels that have changed over geological time and from contemporary anthropogenic alterations. Our research objective is to understand the interplay between historic (climate change, lake basin formation, and channel connectivity shifts during and after the Pleistocene glaciations) and modern-day factors (fishery exploitation, stocking supplementation, and habitat loss) in shaping population genetic patterns of the yellow perch Perca flavescens (Percidae: Teleostei) across its native North American range. We employ a dual genome and modified landscape genetic approach, analyzing complete sequences from the mitochondrial DNA control region (912 base pairs) and 15 nuclear DNA microsatellite loci of 664 spawning adults from 24 locations. Results support contribution from three primary glacial refugia to contemporary northern populations; the Missourian refugium founded the Northwest Lake Plains and western Lake Superior, the Mississippian refugium colonized most of the Great Lakes, and the Atlantic refugium contributed to the lower Great Lakes and founded the northern Atlantic seaboard. Genetic diversity is highest in southern unglaciated populations, and is appreciable in northern areas that were founded from multiple refugia. Divergence is greater in isolated population sites, both north and south; the southern Gulf coast relict populations are the most divergent, reflecting their long history. Understanding the influence of past and current waterway connections on the genetic structure of yellow perch populations may help us to assess the role of ongoing climate change towards conserving aquatic biodiversity.

About the Speaker:

Jhonatan received a B.S. in Aquacultural Engineering from the Universidad Autonoma de Guadalajara, and a M.S. in Biology from Central Michigan University. His previous academic research has included Nutritional efficiency on freshwater crustaceans, developmental biology of marine shrimp, and proteomic research. An aquatic enthusiast at heart, Jhonatan joined Dr. Carol Stepien's Great Lakes Genetics Laboratory to focus on yellow perch and percid population genetics and stock assessments for the Great Lakes, particularly Lake Erie and its tributaries. During his participation in the NSF GK-12 program, he learned how to best approach and relate to the lay audience, and how to effectively teach scientific concepts in a manner that is easy to understand, and relevant to the day-to-day life of students and teachers. Currently, Jhonatan is a Knauss fellow in NOAA's Great Lakes habitat restoration program, which focuses of aquatic habitat restoration across 31 areas of concerns in the US portion of the Great Lakes watershed. Jhonatan has recently defended his doctoral dissertation and looks forward to continue his work at the interface of science, management and policy.

Remote Access and Notes:
  1. Go to http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?sigKey=mymeetings&i=742656968&=brownbag&t=c
  2. Enter the required fields
  3. Indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy
  4. Click on Proceed
  5. Passcode: brownbag
  6. For audio in the US and Canada, dial 866-833-7307. The participant passcode is 8986360
Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Monday, December 5, 2011 9:51 AM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science and management information. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] or join our RSS feed by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

December 12, 2011

Mapping the Deep: A European Perspective

Date and Time: December 12, 2011, 12:00-13:00 Eastern Time Zone [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: SSMC-3 (1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD, 20910); 15th Floor, Room 15836
Speaker(s): French Research Institute for Exploration of the Sea (IFREMER)
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NOAA Office of Habitat Conservation
Abstract:

In Europe there is a vast array of work being undertaken on mapping deep-sea communities. With legislative requirements, particularly for listed habitats such as cold-water coral reef and coral gardens, there has been a concerted effort to acquire acoustic and groundtruthing data to aid mapping efforts. Work that has been underway for the last 6 years in the UK and that which is currently underway in France will be presented here.

Both the UK and France have large EEZs, although they are strikingly different. The UK's deep-sea area is complex and varied, with a range of topographical features ranging from seamounts, banks, ridges to submarine canyons. In contrast, the French Margin hosts an impressive and rugged terrain with over 130 submarine canyons. Spectacular communities have been sampled from these features and this talk will take you on a tour of the wonders we have encountered!

About the Speaker:

Jaime is a post-doc at Ifremer in France, working on the EU CoralFISH project. Her work is focused on defining and mapping cold-water coral communities in the Bay of Biscay, which will also aid in the development of more robust definitions of OSPAR listed habitats. Prior to working at Ifremer, she worked at Plymouth University (UK) for 6 years during which time she completed her PhD. During this time her lab was involved in a number of government funded research cruises, with the goal to inform managers of the ecology of the area and produce biotope maps for specific features of interest which may be used to inform Marine Protected Area network design.

Remote Access and Notes:

Web/Audio access:

For further information about this seminar please contact at least 45 minutes before the seminar, or if it is within 10 minutes of the seminar start, call the toll free number above

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Monday, December 12, 2011 7:33 AM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science and management information. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].


0-6 Hour Precipitation Forecasts from Extrapolation of Remote-Sensor Fields and a Physical-Dynamical Prediction Model

Date and Time: December 12, 2011, 14:00-15:00 Eastern Time Zone [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: SSMC-2 (1325 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD, 20910); Room 8246
Speaker(s): , , and Shaorong Wu (Office of Hydrologic Development, National Weather Service, NOAA Silver Spring, Maryland, USA)
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NOAA NWS Office of Hydrologic Development
Abstract:

Short-range precipitation forecasts for the 0 6 hour time frame are often crucial to providing advance warning of floods during major precipitation events. Ideally, such forecasts should blend the most recent information from radar, satellite, lightning, and ground observing networks with forecasts from recently-initialized numerical weather prediction models. In the first few hours, the extrapolative model provides information on the location, intensity, and movement of the precipitation pattern, while later on the numerical prediction model provides information on the development or decay of the precipitation due to large-scale forcing. These principles guide the preparation of forecasts by staff at NWS field offices and the National Centers for Environment Prediction. Also, a number of automated precipitation prediction systems based on these principles have been developed or proposed.

The 0-6h prediction described herein incorporates extrapolation precipitation forecasts based on radar, satellite, and lightning, and output of the Rapid Update Cycle 2 (RUC2) model, including precipitation, humidity, and stability forecasts. The RUC2, operated by the National Centers for Environmental Prediction in the United States, is updated on an hourly cycle and uses three-dimensional radar reflectivity in its initialization. Forecasts are for the 0-6-h period, and are generated in deterministic (amount) and probabilistic forms. Probabilities of precipitation exceeding 0.25, 2.5, 12.5, 25, 50, and 75 mm are created. Forecast fields are defined on a map grid with a mesh length of ~4 km, and cover the conterminous United States and adjacent areas of Mexico and Canada.

The forecast system was developed by using linear screening regression and other techniques to relate optimal combinations of the possible inputs to StageIV (gauge-only or gauge-radar) precipitation estimates. The development or training sample was derived from data during the period April 2009 to March 2011. Further details on the development methodology will be presented during the seminar.

Results from within the development sample and from independent cases observed during 2011 show that the deterministic forecasts generally resemble those of the NCEP Hydrometeorological Prediction Center (HPC) in terms of the location of the precipitation areas; however the statistical forecasts generally contain higher peak values and often show the influence of individual mesoscale features within the initial-time radar reflectivity fields. Comparison among the HPC, RUC2 precipitation, and statistical forecasts show that the statistical forecasts generally rank higher in skill than those of the RUC2, but lower than those of HPC. In terms of the detection of large precipitation events, the probabilistic forecasts for amounts = 75 mm generally show higher skill than the RUC2 or HPC forecasts.

We have the capability to run the 0-6h forecast system in real time within the Office of Hydrologic Development. Issues for future development of the system, such as the replacement of the RUC2 with the Rapid Refresh model, and possibilities for operational implementation, will be discussed.

Remote Access and Notes:

Web/Audio access:

If you have problems during the seminar please call 301-713-1658. For further information about this seminar please contact Ken Pavelle at 301-713-0640 Ext 183 () or

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Tuesday, December 6, 2011 7:19 AM / Last updated Wednesday, December 7, 2011 7:02 AM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science and management information. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

December 13, 2011

A NOAA Top Ten List from Mary Glackin's Perspective

Date and Time: December 13, 2011, 12:00-13:00 Eastern Time Zone [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: NOAA SSMC-3 (1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD, 20910); 2nd Floor, NOAA Library
Speaker(s): Mary M. Glackin (Deputy Under Secretary for Operations, NOAA)
Speaker's Email:
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NOAA NODC
Abstract:

Deputy Under Secretary for Operations Mary Glackin will share ten stories from her tenure that demonstrate different aspects of "NOAA pride".

Download Presentation:

Download Presentation(pdf format)

About the Speaker:

http://www.noaa.gov/glackin.html

Remote Access and Notes:
  1. Go to http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?sigKey=mymeetings&i=742656968&=brownbag&t=c
  2. Enter the required fields
  3. Indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy
  4. Click on Proceed
  5. Passcode: brownbag
  6. For audio in the US and Canada, dial 866-833-7307. The participant passcode is 8986360
Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Monday, December 5, 2011 9:37 AM / Last updated Friday, December 9, 2011 1:37 PM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science and management information. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] or join our RSS feed by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

December 14, 2011

A Sustainable Idea: Virginia Sea Grant's Seafood Education for the Culinary Community

Date and Time: December 14, 2011, 12:00-13:00 Eastern Time Zone [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: NOAA SSMC-3 (1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD, 20910); 2nd Floor, NOAA Library
Speaker(s): Vicki Clark (Marine and Seafood Education Specialist, Virginia Sea Grant)
Speaker's Email:
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NOAA Sea Grant
Abstract:

One of Sea Grant's National Focus Areas is a "safe sustainable seafood supply." Seafood is central to the culture and economy of our coastal regions, and nowhere is this more apparent than in Virginia. Virginia Sea Grant has become well-known for its research, advisory work and education activities focusing on seafood resources. VASG educators began providing science-based seafood information to consumers and culinary professionals over 20 years ago, and the opportunities and needs in this area have never been greater. Currently there is an unprecedented interest in culinary careers, and chefs as well as consumers are looking for information on sustainable, locally sourced seafood. Ms. Clark will present an overview of VASG's seafood education program, describing its evolution from an event-based design to its current integrated approach involving numerous industry, agency, and educational partners and target audiences. There will be recipes and fish stories too!

Remote Access and Notes:
  1. Go to http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?sigKey=mymeetings&i=742656968&=brownbag&t=c
  2. Enter the required fields
  3. Indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy
  4. Click on Proceed
  5. Passcode: brownbag
  6. For audio in the US and Canada, dial 866-833-7307. The participant passcode is 8986360
Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Friday, October 21, 2011 11:54 AM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science and management information. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] or join our RSS feed by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].


The GOES-R Advanced Baseline Imager (ABI)

Date and Time: December 14, 2011, 13:00-14:00 Eastern Time Zone [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: World Weather Building (5200 Auth Road, Camp Springs, MD 20746); Room 707
Speaker(s): (NOAA NESDIS)
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NOAA Joint Center for Satellite Data Assimilation (JCSDA)
Abstract:

The next generation geostationary satellite series will offer a continuation of current products and services and enable improved and new capabilities. The Advanced Baseline Imager (ABI) on the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites (GOES)-R series will monitor a wide range of phenomena. As with the current GOES Imager, the ABI will be used for weather, oceanographic, climate, and environmental applications. The ABI will improve upon the current GOES Imager with more spectral bands, faster imaging, higher spatial resolution, better navigation, and more accurate calibration. The ABI expands from five spectral bands on the current GOES imagers to a total of 16 spectral bands in the visible (2), near-infrared (4) and infrared (10) spectral regions. There will be an increase of the coverage rate leading to full disk scans at least every 15 minutes and continental US (CONUS) scans every 5 minutes. These improvements will greatly assist a host of data assimilation and Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) applications, especially on the regional and meso-scales via both direct assimilation and in-direct validations.

Download presentation: Slides, (PDF, about 28 MB)

About the Speaker: http://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/Schmit_T.php

Remote Access and Notes:

Video:

  1. Go to JCSDA Seminar and click on the seminar title
  2. Enter your name and email address
  3. Enter the meeting password: JCSDAseminars707
  4. Click "Join Now"
  5. Follow the instructions that appear on your screen
  6. For further information visit http://www.jcsda.noaa.gov/JCSDASeminars.php

Phone Access:

  • USA participants: 1-866-715-2479
  • Passcode: 9457557
  • Enter the meeting password: JCSDAseminar2010
  • International: 1-517-345-5260
  • For further information please contact

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Friday, October 28, 2011 1:21 PM / Last updated Tuesday, December 6, 2011 11:50 AM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science and management information. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] or join our RSS feed by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

December 15, 2011

An Ecologist's Perspective on the Progress of Ecosystem-Based Management by the Fishery Management Councils

Date and Time: December 15, 2011, 11:00-12:00 Pacific Time Zone [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: NOAA Northwest Fisheries Science Center (NWFSC) (2725 Montlake Boulevard East, Seattle, WA 98112; Map to NWFSC), Room: Auditorium.
Speaker(s): Selina Heppell (Associate Professor, Department of Fisheries and Wildlife, Oregon State University)
Speaker's Email:
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NOAA NWFSC Monster Seminar JAM
Abstract:

The move towards ecosystem-based fishery management in the U.S. is necessarily an evolving process, and some Fishery Management Councils have made more progress than others. Science and Statistical Committees (SSCs) that advise the Councils must determine how to rigorously evaluate tools and data that contribute to new management strategies, but are often also asked to define ecosystem-based management and its goals and objectives. This may blur the line between science and policy advice. The Pacific Fisheries Management Council's SSC is developing terms of reference for evaluation of ecosystem-based analyses. Fresh from the National SSC meeting in Virginia, I will provide my prospective on how different SSCs are approaching the issue of ecosystem considerations in assessment science and evaluation of ecosystem models and their use in management.

About the Speaker:

I am a professor and marine fisheries ecologist at Oregon State University. I devote most of my research to some of the oldest and slowest-growing animals in the sea: sea turtles, sharks, sturgeon, and U.S. west coast rockfish (scientifically known as Sebastes, which means ""magnificent""). These marine animals commonly share three traits: long lifespans, late age at maturity, and threats that can lead to overexploitation. I primarily use computer models and simulations to help us understand how populations respond to human impacts and to guide research and management policy towards their recovery. I am particularly interested in how these animals will respond to climate change and increasing human populations on our coastlines, and in finding ways to protect species and habitats while supporting local fisheries. Providing a bridge between science and policy in sustainable fisheries management is a primary goal of my career. I believe it is essential to improve communication and understanding among scientists, managers, and user groups as marine ecosystems continue to be pressured by human development, climate change and an increasing demand for seafood products. Many of my research projects are collaborative efforts with fishermen or local management agencies. I am Chair of the Ecosystem Management Subcommittee for the Science and Statistical Committee of the Pacific Fishery Management Council, a member of the Science and Technical Advisory Committee for Oregon's Ocean Policy Advisory Council, and a member of the Marine Turtle Specialists Group of the International Union for the Conservation of Nature. I have recently served on several advisory teams in marine fisheries conservation projects, including a National Research Council review of sea turtle assessment methods and the Lenfest Forage Fish Task Force. http://fw.oregonstate.edu/About%20Us/personnel/faculty/heppellse.htm

Salient Publications

  • Bjorndal, KA, BW Bowen, M Chaloupka, LB Crowder, SS Heppell, CM Jones, ME Lutcavage, D Policansky, AR Solow, and BE Witherington. 2011. Better science needed for restoration in the Gulf of Mexico. Science 331:537-538.
  • Gunderson, D.R., A. M. Parma, R. Hilborn, J. M. Cope, D. L. Fluharty, M. L. Miller, R. D. Vetter, H. G. Greene, and S. S. Heppell. 2008. The challenge of managing temperate rocky reef resources. Fisheries 33:172-179.
  • Heppell, S. S., S. A. Heppell, F. Coleman and C. Koenig. 2006. A model to assess conservation strategies for a protogynous fish. Ecological Applications 16:238-249.
  • Heppell, S. S., H. Caswell and L. B. Crowder. 2000. Life histories and elasticity patterns: perturbation analysis for species with minimal demographic data. Ecology 81(3):654-665.
Remote Access and Notes:

Webinar access:

  1. Go to https://nwfsc.webex.com/nwfsc/j.php?ED=162473362&UID=1218681822&RT=MiM0 (This meeting does not require a password.) Click "Join".
  2. If requested, enter your name and email address.
  3. If a password is required, enter the meeting password: (This meeting does not require a password.)
  4. Click "Join".

Audio access:

  • Call-in toll number (US/Canada): +1-408-600-3600
  • Access code: 800 033 252

For Assistance during the presentation go to https://nwfsc.webex.com/nwfsc/mc On the left navigation bar, click "Support". Contact:

For questions about this seminar please contact Diane L. Tierney-Jamieson (206-860-3380; )

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Thursday, September 29, 2011 8:17 AM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science and management information. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] or join our RSS feed by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].


Patterns Associated with Hurricanes Making Landfall in the United States

Date and Time: December 15, 2011, 13:45 - 14:30 Eastern Standard Time [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: NOAA SSMC-2 (1325 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD, 20910), Room 14316
Speaker(s): Charlie Paxton (NWS Tampa Bay)
Speaker's Email:
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NOAA NWS OCWWS
Abstract:

Atlantic hurricanes, category 2 or higher striking the U.S. indicate a multi-year clustering of Atlantic and Gulf Coast landfalls. Eight seasons with Gulf of Mexico (west) landfalls and eight seasons with Atlantic coast (east) landfalls were chosen to illustrate the atmospheric and ocean differences between two landfall regions. Bi-monthly averages were produced from December prior to the hurricane season through October to show the evolution of synoptic patterns. The SST for both landfall areas indicated the onset of La Nina prior to the peaks of hurricane season but the onset was later for Gulf of Mexico landfall seasons. The 700 hPa zonal winds also reflected that with more persistent westerly flow in the February to May time frame for the Gulf of Mexico cases as did the negative sea level pressure anomalies over the southern Pacific Ocean. Persistent sea level pressure anomalies were present over North Africa for the East Coast cases but not the Gulf Coast cases. Positive precipitable water anomalies were significant and increase over the main development region from February to September for Gulf of Mexico landfall years. NCEP reanalysis data were extracted to show trends at locations where significant differences exist between the two regimes. This research indicates differences in the evolution of hurricane seasons in which landfalls are distinctly along the Atlantic Coast or Gulf of Mexico Coast.

About the Speaker:

Charlie Paxton is the Science and Operations Officer with the Tampa Bay Area National Weather Service office. Charlie gained an interest in weather while growing up near the Kennedy Space Center along the east coast of Florida. He joined the Navy in 1975 as an Aerographers Mate (weatherman) and was stationed at Mayport, Florida and on the Aleutian Island, Adak. He started his National Weather Service career during 1984 in Huntington, West Virginia. Charlie became a forecaster for the Tampa Bay area in 1986 and the Science and Operations Officer in 1993. His job encompasses a blend of research, computer programming, teaching, and of course, forecasting. Charlie attended the Florida State University for undergraduate and master's meteorology degrees and is currently working towards a PhD. degree in Environmental Science & Policy at the University of South Florida in Tampa.

Remote Access and Notes:

Please join my meeting, Thursday, December 15, 2011 at 1:45 PM Eastern Standard Time. Gotomeeting: https://www1.gotomeeting.com/join/462501289. Join the conference call: 1-866-756-2908; Code 186099

For questions about this seminar please contact )

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Monday, December 5, 2011 8:52 AM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science and management information. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] or join our RSS feed by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].


Life Line for the Dead Zone: Nutrient Reduction in the Atchafalaya Basin, LA

Date and Time: December 15, 2011, 12:00-13:00 Eastern Time Zone [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: NOAA SSMC-3 (1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD, 20910); 2nd Floor, NOAA Library
Speaker(s): Amy Scaroni (National Sea Grant Office, Coordinator for Safe and Sustainable Seafood Supply and Healthy Coastal Ecosystems focus areas)
Speaker's Email:
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NOAA NODC and NOAA 2011 Sea Grant Knauss Fellows
Abstract:

The Mississippi and Atchafalaya rivers are the major sources of freshwater and nutrients to the Gulf of Mexico. Increased nutrient loads from these rivers exacerbate eutrophication in coastal receiving waters and contribute to the large area of hypoxia that develops seasonally in the Gulf. Levees along the Mississippi River have reduced contact between the river and the historic floodplain; this limits the ability of floodplain wetlands to naturally mitigate excess nutrients. However, the Atchafalaya River diverges from the Mississippi 217 km from the Gulf and enters a large river floodplain with a widely spaced levee system. This enhances the ability of the Atchafalaya River Basin to remove and sequester nutrients, potentially reducing downstream eutrophication. Overbank flow spreads river-water and sediment across the floodplain. Over time, sedimentation has filled in many of the open water areas on the floodplain, such that lakes are transitioning to baldcypress swamps and bottomland hardwood forests. These habitats differ in their available nutrient reservoirs and the rates at which they transform and store nutrients.

We investigated the major retention and removal mechanisms for carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus in the three major habitat types of the Atchafalaya River Basin. These reservoirs include denitrification, sedimentation, and assimilation by aboveground biomass. Total retention and removal for the entire basin is on the order of 1,177,605 - 1,561,805 t C yr-1, 46,049 - 47,603 t N yr-1, and 20,040 - 20,175 t P yr-1. Rates varied by habitat, highlighting the need to consider habitat change when developing management strategies to improve water quality. Data from this study can be used to parameterize nutrient models for the Atchafalaya River Basin, as well as for river diversions and floodplains with similar habitat types.

Remote Access and Notes:
  1. Go to http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?sigKey=mymeetings&i=742656968&=brownbag&t=c
  2. Enter the required fields
  3. Indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy
  4. Click on Proceed
  5. Passcode: brownbag
  6. For audio in the US and Canada, dial 866-833-7307. The participant passcode is 8986360
Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Friday, December 9, 2011 1:51 PM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science and management information. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] or join our RSS feed by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].


On Wave-Induced Ocean Mixing

Date and Time: December 15, 2011, 15:00-16:00 Eastern Time Zone [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: World Weather Building (5200 Auth Road, Camp Springs, MD 20746); Room 707
Speaker(s): Dr. Yeli Yuan (The First Institute of Oceanography, State Oceanic Administration of China)
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NOAA STAR seminars
Abstract:

The main part of the ocean mixing is induced by the sea waves (the surface and internal ones), which can be divided into the wave- generated turbulence mixing and the wave stirring. The ocean turbulence in sub-small scale is mainly generated by the sea waves and its mixing can be described by a closed second order moment model with shear instability generation term in the characteristic variation equations and breaking and collapse generation terms in the boundary conditions. The sea wave stirring described by the Reynolds averaged transport fluxes can be calculated by the unified linear theory of wave-like perturbation in second order accuracy. The results for the surface wave induced mixing have be derived analytically and compared consistently with field measurements and laboratory experiments in quality and quantity.

Remote Access and Notes:

Audio access: U.S. participants: 866-832-9297. International participants: 203-566-7610. Passcode: 6070416

For questions about this seminar please contact , ,

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Monday, December 12, 2011 3:54 PM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science and management information. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] or join our RSS feed by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

December 16, 2011

Tropical Cyclones Induced Ocean Mixing and Air-Sea Heat Fluxes Based on Argo Observations

Date and Time: December 16, 2011, 11:00-12:00 Eastern Time Zone [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: SSMC-3, 4th Floor, Room 4817 (1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD, 20910)
Speaker(s): Lijing Cheng (International Center for Climate and Environment Sciences, Institute of Atmospheric Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China)
Speaker's Email:
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NOAA NODC
Abstract:

TBD

Remote Access and Notes:

Online web access:

  • Click on http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?i=744868915&p=science&t=c
  • type in other required fields (i.e., your name, e-mail, organization; meeting number is 744868915; password is "science" -without quotation marks, password is case sensitive- )
  • indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy
  • click on Proceed and follow the instructions that appear on your screen.

Audio / conference call:

  • Toll free dial 877-725-4068 using a touch-tone phone
  • when prompted enter participant code 8634769 followed by a "#"
  • Please mute your phone during the presentation or toggle *6 otherwise it produces a sound feedback and we will disconnect everyone
  • Phone access limited to the first 50 callers only

You will need both the web/phone access to see the slides and hear the speaker. For further information please contact and .

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Monday, December 5, 2011 3:11 PM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science and management information. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] or join our RSS feed by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

December 21, 2011

Polychlorinated Biphenyls and Chlorinated Pesticides in the Young-of-the-Year Bluefish from the U.S. Atlantic Bays and Estuaries

Date and Time: December 21, 2011, 11:00-12:00 Eastern Time Zone [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: NOAA, NMFS, NEFSC, James J. Howard Marine Sciences Laboratory Conference Room. The James J. Howard Marine Sciences Laboratory is located at 74 Magruder Road, Sandy Hook, New Jersey (see directions). The Conference Room is located on the first floor of Office Building 74
Speaker(s): and (NOAA/NMFS/ NEFSC)
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NOAA NMFS James J. Howard Marine Sciences
Abstract:

TBD

Remote Access and Notes:

Online web access:

Audio / conference call:

  • Toll free dial 1-866-658-9153
  • when prompted enter participant code 3373926
  • Please mute your phone

This WebEx service includes a feature that allows audio and any documents and other materials exchanged or viewed during the session to be recorded. By joining this session, you automatically consent to such recordings. If you do not consent to the recording, do not join the session. For further information please contact Ashok Deshpande ().

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Friday, December 16, 2011 10:02 AM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science and management information. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] or join our RSS feed by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

OneNOAA Science Seminars Subscription Information

i-access to our OneNOAA science seminar announcements:

  1. Join our weekly e-mail seminar announcement [nominally, email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list]. You can subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminars moderated email list by sending an email message to: with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body (don't include the quotes) or visit https://list.woc.noaa.gov/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/onenoaascienceseminars and fill in your email address (see also how to suscribe).
  2. Online OneNOAA web access: http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/ (Web page maintained by )
  3. Archive of previous OneNOAA science discussion seminars (by calendar year): [2010] [2009] [2008] [2007] [2006] [2005] [2004].
  4. Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar RSS feed.
  5. Interested in becoming a OneNOAA science seminar partner?
  6. When available, all seminars can be accessed remotely by anyone on a first-come-first serve basis.
  7. Note: All seminars subject to title, location, date, and time changes without notice. Please check the OneNOAA seminar web page for the latest seminar updates. Unless otherwised indicated, seminars are open to the public. The contents of the OneNOAA Science Seminars web page do not reflect any position of the Federeal Government or NOAA. References to trade names or commercial entities do not imply endorsement of any kind. Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer]. The information provided by the OneNOAA Science Seminars is for broad information purposes only. See privacy policy [NOAA Privacy policy]

 

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  Last modified:    Tue, 4-Sep-2012 15:40 UTC NODC.Webmaster@noaa.gov
 
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