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NovemberNovember 2011 OneNOAA Science Seminars

A joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science and management information.

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The OneNOAA Science discussion seminar series is a joint effort to help share science and management information and to promote constructive dialogue between scientists, educators, and resource managers across NOAA. Please help us spread the word about these seminars to anyone interested. For further information please contact Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov.

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November 01, 2011

Regional Distribution of Upper-Ocean Thermosteric Sea-Level and Sea-Level Changes: 1960 to 2009

Date and Time: November 01, 2011; 11:00-12:00h Eastern Time Zone; [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: SSMC-3, 4th Floor, Room 4817 (1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD, 20910)
Speaker: (CSIRO Marine and Atmospheric Research, Hobart, Australia )
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NOAA National Oceanographic Data Center (NODC)
Abstract:

We expand our recent work on global mean upper-ocean warming and thermosteric sea level rise(Domingues et al., 2008; Church et al., 2011) to the analysis of their spatio-temporal variability, from 1960 to 2009. Although we reconstruct 0-700 m ocean heat content (OHC), potential temperature(PT) and thermosteric sea level (ThSL), we focus on the latter. We compare our ThSL estimates with ThSL estimates from other groups (Levitus et al., 2009; Ishii and Kimoto, 2009), and also with sea level estimates from satellite altimeter (1993-2009) and a tide gauge (1960-2009) reconstruction (Church and White, 2011). The comparison is made in terms of global and basin time series and regional maps for different trend periods. Our ThSL analysis only includes temperature observations from bottles, CTDs, XBTs and Argo floats (no MBTs or other instrument types). XBT biases are minimized using the time-dependent but depth-constant fall-rate correction of Wijffels et al.(2008). For the Argo pressure biases, we use the Barker et al. (2011) corrections. Our estimates have near-global coverage, from 65N to 65S (~90% of the ice-free ocean area), and are mapped to a regular grid (1 deg longitude x 1 deg latitude) using an EOF-based reconstruction (Kaplan et al.,1997, 1998, 2000). The 30 leading spatial EOF modes of sea level variability from satellite altimeter are used to statistically infill the observational gaps from 1960 onwards. ThSL is reconstructed directly whereas OHC and PT are derived from spatially-variable linear regressions. All of these regularly gridded fields are yearly estimates but smoothed with a 3-year running mean to reduce unwanted noise.

Remote Access and Notes:

Online web access:

  • Click on http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?i=744868915&p=science&t=c
  • type in other required fields (i.e., your name, e-mail, organization; meeting number is 744868915; password is "science" -without quotation marks, password is case sensitive- )
  • indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy
  • click on Proceed and follow the instructions that appear on your screen.

Audio / conference call:

  • Toll free dial 877-725-4068 using a touch-tone phone
  • when prompted enter participant code 8634769 followed by a "#"
  • Please mute your phone during the presentation or toggle *6 otherwise it produces a sound feedback and we will disconnect everyone
  • Phone access limited to the first 50 callers only

You will need both the web/phone access to see the slides and hear the speaker. For further information please contact or .

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Monday, October 17, 2011 11:00 AM / Last updated Wednesday, October 19, 2011 11:07 AM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science and management information. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] or join our RSS feed by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].


Water Use Optimization Toolset: Hydrologic forecasting

Date and Time: November 01, 2011, 14:00-15:30 Eastern Time Zone [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: SSMC-2 (1325 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD, 20910); Room 8246
Speaker(s): (Chief Scientist, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, PNNL) and (Research Scientist, PNNL)
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NOAA NWS Office of Hydrologic Development
Abstract:

Hydroelectric power production is one of many competing demands for available water along with other priority uses such as irrigation, recreation, thermoelectric cooling, and environmental performance. Each demand has specific temporal and spatial requirements that must be balanced against other priority hydrosystem functions such as flood control. An accurate forecast of the magnitude and timing of water supply is essential for optimal management. Such forecasts set the parameters that define both water resources supply and demand at various timescales with the associated uncertainty. Forecasts further assist managers in integrated planning and operations to balance competing water uses against current and future supply while protecting against the possibility of water or energy shortages and excesses with real-time actions.

The hydrosystem may be presently operated using overly conservative constraints set decades ago to meet multiple water use objectives and mitigate the impacts of hydrologic extremes (flood, drought). Today's increased forecast accuracy and lead times may allow improved system optimization by relaxing overly conservative constraints without increased risk. The objective of the Water Use Optimization Toolset is to develop an integrated modeling approach that will incorporate current enhanced hydrological forecasts into optimization components (day-ahead to seasonal) in order to assess the potential for enhancing operating rules and optimizing water uses among the different demands.

The hydrologic forecasting task consists of developing and demonstrating an automated national medium-range (1-14 days) to seasonal forecasting approach that incorporates: 1) enhanced forecasting approaches; 2) a distributed physics-based hydrologic model; 3) current spatiotemporal data sets; 4) automated data acquisition and processing; and 5) automatic dissemination of results in a web-based interface. This task addresses unique forecast requirements of DOE and the hydropower industry in the face of increasing competition for water, considering traditional objectives (i.e., power generation, flood control, water supply), as well as emerging needs for renewable energy integration and environmental requirements. It is then fully integrated into the Water Use Optimization Toolset to inform reservoir and power operations, and guide environmental performance decision making.

The Water Use optimization toolset is first presented, followed by preliminary results over the Feather River Basin, California. We also discuss directions of future work and collaborations with NOAA.

About the Speaker:

Dr. Nathalie Voisin is a research scientist at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. She finished her PhD in 2010 working with Dr. Dennis Lettenmaier at the University of Washington's Civil & Environmental Engineering Department (Seattle). Previously, she received her M.Sc. in Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences from McGill University (Montreal, Canada) and both M.Eng. and B.Eng. degrees in Hydraulics and Fluid Mechanics Engineering from ENSEEIHT (Engineering School; Toulouse, France). Her expertise is water resources modeling, in particular streamflow forecasting in ungauged basins using satellite-based observations. She has also been conducting research on the impact of climate change on hydrology and water resources and on the use of climate forecasts for western US power planning. Ongoing research includes ensemble flow forecasting, data assimilation of snow water equivalent and river flow, and integrated water resources modeling.

Dr. Mark Wigmosta is a Chief Scientist at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory with over twenty five years of professional experience in distributed watershed hydrology, land-use management, hydroclimatology, snow processes, and surface and subsurface contaminant transport. He has directed numerous studies to evaluate the effect of land use, energy production, and climate change on watershed hydrology and water resources. Ongoing research includes enhanced hydrologic forecasting, water-energy interactions, and the study of biofuel production potential and resource constraints. Prior to joining Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Dr. Wigmosta managed the Snohomish County Basin Planning and River Improvement Programs, served as a hydrologist for the King County Basin Planning Program, and managed the Seattle geology section of Ecology and Environment, Inc.

Remote Access and Notes:

Web/Audio access:

If you have problems during the seminar please call 301-713-1658. For further information about this seminar please contact Ken Pavelle at 301-713-0640 Ext 183 ()

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Tuesday, October 25, 2011 9:39 . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science and management information. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

November 02, 2011

Hydrometeorological Service of Serbia (RHMSS) and South East European Virtual Climate Change Center: Overview of Operational, Research and Development Activities

Date and Time: November 02, 2011, 10:00-11:00 Eastern Time Zone [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: World Weather Building (5200 Auth Road, Camp Springs, MD 20746); Room 707 (Directions from Google).
Speaker(s): Milan Dacic, Vladimir Djurdjevic, Goran Pejanovic (Hydrometeorological Service of Serbia, RHMSS)
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NOAA National Centers for Environmental Prediction Environmental Modeling Center (EMC) Seminar
Abstract:

The Republic Hydrometeorological Service of Serbia (RHMSS) is the national weather service of Serbia. RHMSS is the host of the South East European Virtual Climate Change Center (SEEVCCC). The SEEVCCC has been given a mandate by the WMO Regional Association VI (Europe and Middle East) to develop and implement data services, training and capacity-building, and research and development in South East Europe. This work will be carried out in accordance with the WMO RA VI Implementation plan for Regional Climate Center-Network, and will be in compliance with the WMO Information System requirements (WIS) for a Data Collection and Production Center (DCPC) covering South East Europe. The South East Europe Climate Change Framework Action Plan for Adaptation was developed at the UNECE Ministerial Conference "Environment for Europe" (Belgrade, 2007). The plan also specifies priorities for enhancement of international and bilateral co-operation in order to contribute to relevant WMO programs. The research agenda of SEEVCCC was adopted during the recent Ministerial Meeting and the Expert Research and Development Workshop in Belgrade. The place of RHMSS and SEEVCCC within the WMO system will be explained and an overview of their operational, research and development activities will be given.

RHMSS performs the role of a national meteorological center as defined by WMO. Operational short range forecasts are computed with the NCEP Eta and WRF-NMM models. Since recently, medium range forecasts are produced using the global NCEP NMMB atmospheric model. Operational activities of SEEVCCC include maintenance of a system for climate data collection and climate monitoring over South East Europe and application of a system for regional dynamical downscaling and seasonal forecasting. Activities connected with research and development cover evaluation of climate change scenarios using coupled atmospheric-ocean regional climate model. Numerical simulations are used for impact studies, dust-aerosol transport and interaction with various processes in the atmosphere, and hydrological modeling. The main research effort is aimed at developing an accurate and robust Earth Modeling System with NCEP NMMB as the driving module. The Earth Modeling System includes components such as aerosols, ocean, soil, hydrology etc. Examples of various operational products and results from development activities will be presented.

Remote Access and Notes:

Remote access via Go To Meeting + phone

For further information please contact

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Tuesday, November 1, 2011 12:53 PM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science and management information. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].


Using the Web and Social Media as Communication Tools: An Integrated Approach

Date and Time: November 02, 2011, 12:00-13:00 Eastern Time Zone [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: SSMC-4 (1305 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD, 20910); Room 8150.
Speaker(s): Emily Crum (Chief, Communications and Content Services Branch; NOS Communications and Education Division)
Speaker's Email:
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NOAA NOS Science Seminar Series and the NOS Communications and Education Division
Abstract:

This is a series of presentations exploring the social media tools that the National Ocean Service is currently using.

About the Speaker:

Emily Crum is the Chief of the Communications and Content Services Branch within NOAA's National Ocean Service Communications and Education Division. She serves as the managing editor of the National Ocean Service Web site; manages and implements NOS's social media tools; manages the development of NOS outreach materials; and is involved in messaging and communications strategy/planning for the organization. Emily has been with been at NOAA for five years; she previously did science policy (lobbying) and media relations work for the American Geophysical Union and developed Earth science textbooks and educational Web sites for the American Geological Institute. She holds a master's degree in science communication, a master's degree in geological sciences, and an undergraduate degree in environmental geology and art studio.

Remote Access and Notes:

Presentations are available remotely for free via a combination of phone (US & territories) & webcast. Remote access is limited to 50 connections on a first-come-first served basis.

To participate remotely via phone and internet:

  1. For the audio part of the presentation, Dial toll-free (U.S.) 1-877-708-1667. When prompted enter passcode 7028688 and the # sign. Please use your phone's mute button (*6 toggles on or off) during the presentation until you are ready to ask questions. The phone conference does not start until about five minutes before the seminar.
  2. For the visual part of the presentation, you can access the webex meeting by going to: http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?sigKey=mymeetings&i=744925156&p=&t=c. Enter meeting number 744925156 if needed; no passcode is required. Enter other required fields - First and last name - Check the box that that you have read the Privacy Policy, and click Proceed.

For further information please contact at least 45 minutes before the seminar, or if it is within 5 minutes of the seminar start, call the toll free number above.

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Monday, September 19, 2011 11:04 AM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science and management information. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].


Mapping and Visualizing Sea level Rise and Coastal Flooding Impacts

Date and Time: November 02, 2011, 14:00-15:00 Eastern Time Zone [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: Seminar available via webinar only (see Remote Access and Notes section below)
Speaker(s): Douglas Marcy (NOAA Coastal Services Center)
Speaker's Email:
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NOAA Coastal Services Center
Abstract:

It is one thing to have a discussion or write about a one- or two-foot rise in the ocean surface and the potential impacts to a local community, and it is another to show someone a map, highlighting the areas that will potentially be impacted. The ability to visualize the potential height and inland extent of water gives us a better understanding of the corresponding impacts and consequences. Over the past several years, the lessons learned from investigating pilot sea level change mapping applications have led to the development of a next generation sea level rise and coastal flooding viewer. This presentation will provide a brief history of previous sea level change visualization pilots and a detailed discussion of new methods, featuring a demonstration of the Sea Level Rise and Coastal Flooding Impacts Viewer.

In this webinar, participants will learn about

  • The benefits of providing interactive maps online for visualizing inundation risks and potential impacts
  • New mapping techniques that incorporate high-resolution data sources
  • The methods used to develop the Sea Level Rise and Coastal Flooding Impacts Viewer, its current status, and plans for expanding the tool to the rest of the coastal U.S.
Remote Access and Notes:

Presentations are available remotely via a webinar. To register, visit http://www.csc.noaa.gov/digitalcoast/webinar/index.html. You will receive an email prior to the webinar containing information about join. This webinar will be recorded for on-demand playback. For further information please contact .

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Wednesday, August 31, 2011 7:07 AM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science and management information. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

November 03, 2011

The Influence of Nonlinear Mesoscale Eddies on Oceanic Chlorophyll

Date and Time: November 03, 2011, 10:00-11:00 Eastern Time Zone [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: NOAA World Weather Building Room 707 (5200 Auth Road, Camp Springs, MD 20746; See Map & Directions from Google).
Speaker(s): Peter Gaube (College of Ocean and Atmospheric Sciences / Cooperative Institute for Oceanographic Satellite Studies, Oregon State University, Corvallis, Oregon)
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NOAA NESDIS Center for Satellite Applications and Research (STAR) seminar
Abstract:

High-resolution sea-surface height (SSH) fields constructed from altimeter data have revealed the ubiquity of nonlinear, coherent eddies with mesoscale radii of ~100 km throughout the World Ocean. We investigate the influence of these eddies on oceanic biology from 10 years of upper-ocean chlorophyll (CHL) estimates collocated to the eddies inferred from the SSH fields. The observed westward co-propagation of CHL and SSH previously attributed to linear Rossby waves is shown to be due to nonlinear eddies that were not resolvable in the SSH fields analyzed in past studies. At temporal scales of weeks to months and spatial scales greater than 100 km, the dominant mechanism is shown to be eddy-induced horizontal stirring of the ambient CHL field.

While the horizontal advection of CHL by the rotational velocities of eddies dominates the statistics of CHL variability globally, trapping of CHL within the cores of highly nonlinear eddies is found to be important in anticyclonic eddies in specific regions. From collocation of scatterometer wind fields to the eddies, it is shown that the interaction between the anticyclonic eddy surface currents and the background wind field results in a sustained cyclonic wind stress curl at the cores of anticyclonic eddies. This eddy-induced Ekman pumping injects nutrients into the euphotic zone and thus plays a critically important role in sustaining the ecosystems trapped within the nonlinear cores of anticyclonic eddies.

Download Presentation: http://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/documents/seminardocs/2011/Gaube20111103.pdf (~83.6 MB)
About the Speaker: http://www.oce.orst.edu/index.cfm?fuseaction=content.search&searchtype=people&detail=1&id=851
Remote Access and Notes:

Remote access details: Phone access: USA participants: 866-832-9297 International: 203-566-7610 Passcode: 6070416. Presentation slides available at http://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/seminars.php. For questions about this seminar please contact Patrick Sweeney (301-763-8102 Ext 175; )

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Thursday, October 27, 2011 7:52 AM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science and management information. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].


Lessons for Fisheries Management from Laboratory Experiments

Date and Time: November 03, 2011, 11:00-12:00 Pacific Time Zone [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: NOAA Northwest Fisheries Science Center (NWFSC) (2725 Montlake Boulevard East, Seattle, WA 98112; Map to NWFSC), Room: Auditorium.
Speaker(s): Dr. Chris Anderson (Associate Professor, Dept. of Environmental and Natural Resource Economics, U. of Rhode Is./School of Aquatic and Fisheries Sci., UW)
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NOAA NWFSC Monster Seminar JAM
Abstract:

TBD

Remote Access and Notes:

Webinar access:

  1. Go to https://nwfsc.webex.com/nwfsc/j.php?ED=162473362&UID=1218681822&RT=MiM0 (This meeting does not require a password.) Click "Join".
  2. If requested, enter your name and email address.
  3. If a password is required, enter the meeting password: (This meeting does not require a password.)
  4. Click "Join".

Audio access:

  • Call-in toll number (US/Canada): +1-408-600-3600
  • Access code: 800 033 252

For Assistance during the presentation go to https://nwfsc.webex.com/nwfsc/mc On the left navigation bar, click "Support". Contact:

For questions about this seminar please contact Diane L. Tierney-Jamieson (206-860-3380; )

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Wednesday, September 28, 2011 9:18 AM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science and management information. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].


Atmospheric Photochemistry and Ozone Production: Results from SHARP 2009 in Houston, Texas

Date and Time: November 03, 2011, 11:30-12:30 Eastern Time Zone [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: NOAA SSMC-3 (1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD, 20910); Room 3404
Speaker(s): Xinrong Ren (NOAA Air Resources Laboratory)
Speaker's Email:
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NOAA Air Resources Laboratory
Abstract:

TBD

Remote Access and Notes:

Call-in is 1-203-277-3283; passcode 9643195. For questions about this seminar please contact Patrena Mcgruder ()

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Friday, October 14, 2011 12:10 PM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science and management information. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].


Annual Tzvi Gal-Chen Lecture: The Cloud Conundrum - Climate Science's Greatest Challenge

Date and Time: November 03, 2011, 15:30-17:00 Central Time Zone [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: National Weather Center (120 David L. Boren Blvd, University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK), NWC Room. 1313 (Directions to the National Weather Center).
Speaker(s): Bjorn Stevens (Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences, University of California Los Angeles currently at Max Planck Institute for Meteorology, Hamburg Germany)
Speaker's Email:
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NOAA NWS National Severe Storms Laboratory Seminar Series
Abstract:

The development of understanding of how atmospheric carbon-dioxide effects Earth's climate is one of the great success stories of twentieth century science — one to which Tvi Gal-Chen also contributed. The challenge of the twenty-first century will be to understand how clouds mediate the response of the climate system to external perturbations, whether they be increasing concentrations of greenhouse gases such as carbon dioxide, or changing aerosol burdens. We review the development of understanding of the cloud conundrum, and recent steps toward its resolution. These include arguments arising out of my own research as to why aerosol-cloud effects are likely to be small, and why cloud-climate feedbacks are likely to be positive.

Remote Access and Notes:

Presentations are available remotely for free via a combination of phone (US &territories) & webcast. Remote access is limited to 50 connections on a first-come-first served basis. To participate remotely via phone and internet:

  • For the audio and video part of the presentation, you can access the webex meeting by going to: https://www1.gotomeeting.com/register/507549256. Enter other required fields - First and last name, e-mail address, and organization - Check the box that that you have read the Privacy Policy, and click Proceed.

For information please contact Jonathan Gourley () or Race Clark ().

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Tuesday, September 27, 2011 7:36 AM / Last updated Tuesday, November 1, 2011 7:36 AM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science and management information. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

November 04, 2011

Effects of Temperature and Latitude on the Reproduction of an Invasive Crab, Hemigrapsus sanguineus, in Northern and Southern New England

Date and Time: November 04, 2011, 12:00-12:30 Eastern Time Zone [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: NOAA SSMC-3 (1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD, 20910); 2nd Floor, NOAA Library
Speaker(s): Emily Gamelin (Congressional Analysis and Relations Division in NOAA's Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research)
Speaker's Email:
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NOAA 2011 Sea Grant Knauss Fellows
Abstract:

The Asian shore crab, Hemigrapsus sanguineus is native to the western Pacific and was first found in the U.S. in 1988. The species is currently distributed from North Carolina to mid-coast Maine, and has become the dominant intertidal crab in areas south of Boston Harbor, pushing out the previous dominant, the European Green crab (Carcinus maenas). H. sanguineus populations were studied in northern and southern New England to determine if crabs differ in reproductive behavior or characteristics between these regions. Additionally, effects of temperature on reproductive activity were quantified through laboratory experiments.

Number of broods per season increased with temperature, but the seasonal total was limited to three broods per female crab in laboratory experiments. Broods experienced limited success at the lowest temperature tested, 10°C. The reproductive season was longer at lower latitudes, and females at this site had smaller average ovigerous size. Patterns of ovigery varied between the regions, suggesting the production of one brood per season for most female crabs in New Hampshire, compared to two to three broods per season per female in Rhode Island. Overall, temperature may limit the possibility and degree of reproductive output by females, which may slow the spread or limit establishment of this species in northern latitudes.

Downolad Presentation:

Downolad Presentation (PDF format). For further information please contact or .

Remote Access and Notes:
  1. Go to http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?sigKey=mymeetings&i=742656968&=brownbag&t=c
  2. Enter the required fields
  3. Indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy
  4. Click on Proceed
  5. Passcode: brownbag
  6. For audio in the US and Canada, dial 866-833-7307. The participant passcode is 8986360
Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Monday, October 31, 2011 7:08 AM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science and management information. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] or join our RSS feed by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].


Below the Surface of the Salt Marsh: How Water and Nutrients Move Through Estuary Wetlands

Date and Time: November 04, 2011, 12:30-13:00 Eastern Time Zone [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: NOAA SSMC-3 (1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD, 20910); 2nd Floor, NOAA Library
Speaker(s): Matthew Lettrich (Estuarine Reserves Division, NOAA/NOS/OCRM)
Speaker's Email:
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NOAA 2011 Sea Grant Knauss Fellows
Abstract:

Coastal wetlands serve as sources and sinks of nitrogen to surrounding estuarine waters through advective drainage and denitrification. The advective nitrogen flux of three intertidal estuary wetlands in the New River Estuary in North Carolina was determined using two approaches; 1) Darcy-derived drainage measurements; and 2) Calculating the difference between tidal ebb and tidal flood flux. The magnitude of drainage was greatest and most closely linked to tidal elevation in the most down-estuary site and was least in the up-estuary site ranging from a daily mean drainage of 0.34 L m shoreline-1 day-1 in the up-estuary site to 87 L m shoreline-1 day-1 in the down-estuary site. Nitrogen concentrations in the marsh porewaters peaked in late 2009. N flux was determined as a function of drainage (water flux) and porewater N concentration. Advective N flux showed a seasonal pattern that increased in the summer and the winter. Drainage was found to be correlated to tidal elevation within each site and trended with tidal amplitude within the estuary, providing proxies for estimating advective N flux at other sites when given those easily measured parameters combined with porewater N concentration.

Downolad Presentation:

Downolad Presentation (PDF format). For further information please contact or .

Remote Access and Notes:
  1. Go to http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?sigKey=mymeetings&i=742656968&=brownbag&t=c
  2. Enter the required fields
  3. Indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy
  4. Click on Proceed
  5. Passcode: brownbag
  6. For audio in the US and Canada, dial 866-833-7307. The participant passcode is 8986360
Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Monday, October 31, 2011 7:12 AM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science and management information. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] or join our RSS feed by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

November 09, 2011

Increasing the Social Power of Scientific Information used for Decisions: A Case Study using New Zealand's Marine Protected Areas

Date and Time: November 09, 2011, 11:00-12:00 Eastern Time Zone [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: SSMC-4 (1305 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD, 20910); Room 11153.
Speaker(s): Dr. David Wiley (Research Coordinator, Stellwagen Bank National Marine Sanctuary)
Speaker's Email:
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NOAA NOS Science Seminar Series and the Office of the National Marine Sanctuaries
Abstract:

Environmental problem-solving in the 21st century has moved away from the techno-rational approach that dominated past decision-making and management. Modern decision-making is increasingly viewed as deliberative and participatory, characterized by multi-stakeholder processes such as those convened to inform management in New Zealand's marine protected areas. Information provided to stakeholders for decision-making contains both social and technical components. Traditionally scientists have focused on the technical aspects of problem-solving and relied on confidence in the scientific process to eliminate social concerns. This study demonstrates that social aspects of research are a high-order concern and invariably used by stakeholders to invalidate information that is counter to their preconceptions or desires. The study used an index of 1 - 100 to calculate stakeholder acceptance of different information sources. Results counter the traditional perception that scientific research is viewed as credible and unbiased because it is conducted in isolation from those most impacted by its results (i.e., stakeholders). Such research contributes to entrenchment by allowing stakeholders to construct myriad reasons to reject it, rather than contributing to problem-solving by providing agreed upon information for decisions. Research that is inclusive, balances input from a diversity of interests and demonstrates a full set of problem definitions and potential solutions (as identified by those most impacted) is identified as providing results that are seen as more credible and more likely to be accepted by stakeholders for consensus decisions. Attention to such aspects of research will increase the social power of results and help scientists achieve the scientific ideal of producing information that is judged unbiased and defensible. Stakeholder involvement in research can take many forms and I provide a "Ladder of Scientific Participation" that can help identify ways that scientists might interact with stakeholders, and the potential outcome and results of each. Ultimately, increasing the social power of scientific research will increase its efficacy as a cost effective problem-solving tool, thereby increasing its ability to conserve biodiversity and protect the resources and economies on which we depend.

About the Speaker:

David Wiley is the Research Coordinator for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Agency's (NOAA) Stellwagen Bank National Marine Sanctuary and has been investigating the marine environment for over 25 years. He received his PhD in Environmental Studies from Antioch University with a focus on environmental decision-making and conservation biology. Dr. Wiley's research has ranged from studying the reproductive and foraging ecology of endangered whales to mapping marine toxic/hazardous dumpsites. He has worked with fishermen to redesign fishing gear to reduce the risk of whale entanglement and pioneered methods to successfully rescue mass stranded whales and dolphins. Most recently, his research led to the shifting of shipping lanes into the port of Boston, MA, an international effort to reduce the risk of ship strike to endangered whales. Currently he is leading a multi-organizational study using advanced telemetry and novel visualization software to explore the underwater behavior of endangered whales. His results have appeared in numerous scientific journals such as Animal Behaviour, Behaviour, Biological Conservation and Conservation Biology. He is the recipient of a Switzer Environmental Leadership Award, Gulf of Maine Visionary Award, and the Massachusetts Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals' Human Hero Award. He has been recognized as a NOAA Employee of the Year, Office of National Marine Sanctuary's Science Team of the Year and awarded the US Department of Commerce Individual Gold Medal for scientific leadership. He spent much of 2011 in New Zealand conducting research on marine protected areas as part of an Ian Axford (Fulbright) Fellowship in Public Policy. His research has been featured on the Discovery Channel, BBC documentaries, National Geographic and National Public Television and Radio. He is also adjunct faculty in the College of Science and Mathematics at the University of Massachusetts Boston. For more information on Dave and his activities visit: http://stellwagen.noaa.gov/welcome.html.

Remote Access and Notes:

To join the webinar, you will need to click on the registration web link: https://www2.gotomeeting.com/register/966364466

For further information please contact at least 45 minutes before the seminar, or if it is within 5 minutes of the seminar start, call the toll free number above.

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Friday, November 4, 2011 3:41 PM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science and management information. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].


Ocean Frontiers Documentary: Inspiring Stories from the Frontiers of Ocean Conservation Sneak Video Previews, Part 1 of 2

Date and Time:

November 09, 2011, 12:00-13:00 Eastern Time Zone [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time] (Part 2: Wednesday, November 16, 2011, 12:00 - 13:00 Eastern Time Zone)

Location: SSMC-4 (1305 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD, 20910); Room 8150. Special notes below for participating remotely to this seminar - we will be showing parts of a movie.
Speaker(s): Karen Anspacher-Meyer (Executive Director, Green Fire Productions www.greenfireproductions.org, www.ocean-frontiers.org)
Speaker's Email:
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NOAA NOS Science Seminar Series and Green Fire Productions
Abstract:

Ocean Frontiers takes a balanced, bi-partisan approach to both the problems we face in managing our oceans and the solutions at hand. The film features on-the-ground reporting from places across the country that are at the forefront of implementing promising new approaches to ocean and coastal management.

Ocean Frontiers is an inspiring voyage to seaports and watersheds across the country where we meet unlikely allies, industrial shippers and whale biologists, pig farmers and wetland ecologists, sport fishers and reef snorkelers and many more, all embarking on a new course of collaboration, in defense of the seas that sustain us.

Ocean Frontiers is designed as a tool to educate key audiences and build support for the national ocean policy, coastal and marine spatial planning and ecosystem-based management. Shorter versions are in the works and will be available soon. [Check http://ocean-frontiers.org/c/videos/ for shorter versions.]

Green Fire Productions is leading the Ocean Frontiers outreach campaign and drawing together a broad range of NGOs, agencies, industry associations, aquariums and user groups to present the film to targeted audiences and encourage support and participation in comprehensive ocean planning across the country.

In addition to these events, the film is available for screening among agency staff, at conferences, for policymakers and other key players in the national ocean policy realm. Please contact Karen Meyer to learn more about this.

About the Speaker:

Karen Meyer is the co-founder and executive director of Green Fire Productions. Since 1989 she has produced dozens of award-winning, solutions-oriented documentaries on conservation issues that are used worldwide by NGOs, natural resource agencies, businesses, industry associations and Native American tribes.

Remote Access and Notes:

Presentations are available remotely for free via a combination of phone (US & territories) & webcast. Remote access is limited to 50 connections on a first-come-first served basis.

To participate remotely via phone and internet:

  1. For the audio part of the presentation, Dial toll-free (U.S.) 1-877-708-1667. When prompted enter passcode 7028688 and the # sign. Please use your phone's mute button (*6 toggles on or off) during the videos. The phone conference does not start until 5-10 minutes before the seminar.
  2. For the visual part of the presentation: Special options for this seminar (and the follow-up on 11/16): we will be showing a movie and there will be two options for viewing it: a) thru the normal webex setup (see sign-up info below) and if once the movie start that does not work well for you, try b) links to the video clips, below. Please have these links open in a new window, but the video paused, in case the webex does not work for you. You can then easily switch to the links option.

So, for normal webex/internet setup, follow these instructions:

After a brief 'live' introduction to the movie, we will start it. If the webex sound or visual does not work well for you, turn off the webex, mute your phone, and try the links below. They are movies that use Flash, and depending on the speed of your connection, you might have temporary delays due to buffering, but if you pause the movie for a few minutes, it will catch up and the buffering should stop.

Day 1: Part 1 Ocean Frontiers - Introduction & Massachusetts Bay - 28 min (http://greenfireproductions.org/client/work_1.html)

Day 1: Part 2 Ocean Frontiers - Florida Keys - 11 min (http://greenfireproductions.org/client/work_2.html)

Questions and discussion are encouraged before and after the movies. The second half of the movie will be held on 11/16. For further information please contact at least 45 minutes before the seminar, or if it is within 5 minutes of the seminar start, call the toll free number above.

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Friday, November 4, 2011 3:22 PM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science and management information. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].


GSFLOW - A Coupled Groundwater/Surface-Water Flow Model for Watershed Analysis

Date and Time:

November 09, 2011, 15:00-16:00 Eastern Time Zone [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]

Location: SSMC-2 (1325 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD, 20910); Room 14316.
Speaker(s): Steve Regan (National Research Program, USGS, Lakewood, Colorado)
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NOAA NWS Office of Hydrologic Development
Abstract:

Modeling environmental resource-management and policy issues requires an interdisciplinary and adaptive approach. Development of integrated models for these purposes has been hindered because individual models often have different spatial and temporal resolutions, use incompatible software and programming techniques, and lack feedback mechanisms to link the models. No existing model accounts for all environmental processes and interactions and each model and modeler produce differing results based on their different approaches and biases. A modeling structure is needed to facilitate integration of interdisciplinary scientific contributions.

To understand complex environmental resource issues integrated modeling of the hydrologic cycle is needed. As a step towards addressing integrated modeling, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has developed the GSFLOW model; a coupled groundwater/surface-water flow model. It is an integration of the USGS Precipitation-Runoff Modeling System (PRMS) and Modular Groundwater Flow Model (MODFLOW). GSFLOW uses climate, solar radiation, topography, geology, land-use, and pumping data to simulate the temporal and spatial distribution of evapotranspiration, infiltration, surface runoff, snowpack and melt, interflow, recharge, streamflow, lake mechanics, unsaturated and saturated groundwater flow, and groundwater/surface-water interactions.

The extensible design of GSFLOW allows for inclusion of new solution techniques, which provides modelers with a structure to integrate additional models. It also allows for ease of comparison between alternative model components for a given process as their algorithms can be tested and compared, which can lead to improvements and better understanding of interactions, feedbacks, and sensitivities in a hydrologic system.

About the Speaker:

Steve is a member of the Modeling of Watershed Systems (MOWS) project in the National Research Program, USGS, Lakewood, Colorado. MOWS research objectives include improving the understanding and simulation of watershed-scale hydrologic processes. Steve's primary research and development focuses on coupled simulation model development of surface-water and groundwater hydrology. This research involves incorporating new simulation algorithms and enhancements of existing algorithms within the Precipitation-Runoff Modeling System (PRMS) and the Modular Groundwater Flow Model (MODFLOW).

Steve started working for the National Research Program, Reston, VA in 1981 focusing on research and development of hydraulic models and related software tools, including the Branched Network 1-D Unsteady Flow Model (BRANCH), 2D Simulation of Surface-Water Integrated Flow and Transport (SWIFT2D), and Water Surface Profile Program (WSPRO).

Remote Access and Notes:

Presentations are available remotely for free via a combination of phone (US & territories) & webcast. Remote access is limited to 25 connections on a first-come-first served basis.

To participate remotely via phone and internet:

  1. For the audio part of the presentation, Dial toll-free (U.S.) (866) 713-2373, passcode 9960047.
  2. For the visual part of the presentation: https://www1.gotomeeting.com/join/466269817

For further information please contact (301-713-0640 x183) or (301-713-0640 x210)

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Tuesday, November 8, 2011 7:07 AM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science and management information. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

November 10, 2011

Biodiversity and the Functioning of Ecosystems: The Evolution and Future of a Paradigm

Date and Time: November 10, 2011, 10:30-11:30 Eastern Time Zone [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: NOAA Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory, Lake Superior Hall (4840 South State Road, Ann Arbor, MI)
Speaker(s): Dr. Bradley J. Cardinale (Assistant Professor, School of Natural Resources and Environment, University of Michigan)
Speaker's Email:
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NOAA CILER
Abstract:

TBD

About the Speaker:

Dr. Bradley J. Cardinale is an Assistant Professor in the School of Natural Resources and Environment at the University of Michigan. He received his Ph.D. from the University of Maryland in 2002, and then completed a postdoc at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. His work combines mathematical theory, novel experiments, and meta-analyses of existing data to develop predictive models of extinction risk, and to forecast how loss of genes, species, and entire communities can alter ecological processes that are required to sustain higher life. To date, Dr. Cardinale has published 59 peer-reviewed papers, including five papers in Nature, one in Science, three in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, and 16 in Ecology or Ecology Letters. He has won several research awards, including the Hynes Award for the most influential paper by a young scientist in aquatic ecology from the North American Benthological Society and, most recently, the Harold J. Plous Award - the highest honor given to junior faculty at the University of Santa Barbara for excellence in research. He serves on the editorial board of Ecology and Ecological Monographs, and is an elected member of the Freshwater Biodiversity Committee of DIVERSITAS - An International Program of Biodiversity Science.

Remote Access and Notes:

Webinar:

For further information about this seminar please contact Giselle Maira at 734-741-2242

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Friday, October 28, 2011 9:52 AM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science and management information. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].


Understanding Changes in Extreme Precipitation Projections in a High-Resolution Modeling Framework

Date and Time: November 10, 2011, 12:00-13:00 Eastern Time Zone [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: SSMC-2 (1325 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD, 20910); Room 8246
Speaker(s): Dr. Kelly Mahoney (Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences, CIRES)
Speaker's Email:
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NOAA NWS Office of Hydrologic Development
Abstract:

One of the challenges inherent to understanding the effect of global climate change on precipitation extremes is the mismatch of scale. Climate models simulate large-scale patterns of long-term change, while weather models generally diagnose small-scale weather phenomena such as extreme rainfall. Linking changes in the atmosphere to changes in surface hydrology (e.g., flash flooding and stream behavior) adds an additional layer of complexity to this challenge. Therefore, understanding the potential effects of global-scale changes on local-scale weather and hydrology requires new research approaches to connect questions and processes across all of these scales.

This study represents one such integrated approach by investigating projected changes in warm-season extreme precipitation events using a dynamical downscaling framework that sequentially interfaces climate- and weather-scale data. Focusing on the Colorado Front Range, global simulations are first downscaled to a medium/regional-scale resolution; the resulting simulations are then further downscaled using a high-resolution weather model. The high-resolution model is able to explicitly simulate intense thunderstorms using 1.3-km grid spacing, thus resolving the small-scale physical processes that generate extreme precipitation.

Physical process explanations are sought for projected changes in rainfall amount, hail occurrence, and flood risk. Past and future extreme event simulations are compared with respect to environmental drivers such as low-level instability (e.g., CAPE), large-scale forcing, and vertical temperature and moisture profiles. The events are also examined for systematic differences in storm-scale processes such as updraft strength, hail production and hail melting, dry air entrainment, and downdraft formation. Qualitative and quantitative consistency (or the lack thereof) across global, regional, and local-scale simulations is also explored.

Future directions of this work seek effective ways to link the high-resolution model output to hydrologic models, as well as methods of estimating uncertainty in these types of high-resolution downscaling approaches. One of the ultimate objectives of this work is this information to better inform the needs of decision-makers, stakeholders, and water resources managers in the western US.

About the Speaker:

Dr. Kelly Mahoney is a Research Scientist with the Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences (CIRES) at NOAA ESRL in Boulder, CO. In October 2011, she completed a two-year postdoctoral research fellowship through UCAR's Postdocs Applying Climate Expertise (PACE) program, during which time she focused on warm season extreme precipitation events in the Front Range of the Rocky Mountains, and how these types of events may change in future climate scenarios.

Dr. Mahoney graduated in 2010 from North Carolina State University where she earned B.S., M.S. and PhD degrees in Atmospheric Science. While at N.C. State, she worked on a number of collaborative research projects with the National Weather Service though the CSTAR and COMET programs, focusing on topics such as quantitative precipitation forecasting and numerical forecast model representation of severe thunderstorms. Her dissertation work focused on model representation of convective momentum transport, with a larger goal of improving forecasts of organized, warm-season convective systems and the prediction of damaging surface winds.

Remote Access and Notes:

Web/Audio access:

If you have problems during the seminar please call 301-713-1658. For further information about this seminar please contact Ken Pavelle at 301-713-0640 Ext 183

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Wednesday, September 21, 2011 9:44 AM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science and management information. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].


New Directions in Fisheries Acoustics: Perspectives from New Zealand

Date and Time: November 10, 2011, 11:00-12:00 Pacific Time Zone [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: NOAA Northwest Fisheries Science Center (NWFSC) (2725 Montlake Boulevard East, Seattle, WA 98112; Map to NWFSC), Room: Auditorium.
Speaker(s): Dr. Stephane Gauthier (Acoustic Research Scientist, Applied Technology Section Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Pacific Region)
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NOAA NWFSC Monster Seminar JAM
Abstract:

In this seminar I will paint a broad picture of some of the novel projects I was involved in during five years as a fisheries scientist in New Zealand, with a focus on recent mesopelagic fish studies. As potential ecosystem indicators, mesopelagic fish resources have been acoustically monitored on the Chatham Rise and Subantarctic annual bottom trawl surveys since the 1990s. These resources are composed of complex and dynamic communities, and efforts have recently been directed at defining their acoustic characteristics and potential acoustic discrimination using multiple narrow-band frequencies. Application of such tools and techniques in Antarctic waters will also be discussed. Finally, I will present some results on the deployment of an acoustic-optical system designed to be mounted on the headline of a trawl for the estimation of deep-water fish target strength.

About the Speaker:

Dr. Gauthier is a newly appointed scientist at the Institute of Ocean Sciences (Fisheries and Oceans Canada) in Sidney, British-Columbia. He spend the past five years in New-Zealand as a fisheries scientist with the National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research (NIWA), where he has work on a wide range of acoustic project, from surveys of small pelagic fish resources off the Arabian coast of Oman, to the survey of whale's prey fields in Antarctica. Dr. Gauthier has a background in freshwater ecology. After obtaining a M.Sc. degree at the University of Montreal, he obtained a PhD under the supervision of Dr. George Rose at the Memorial University of Newfoundland, where he worked on the acoustic properties of Atlantic redfish (Sebastes spp.). His post-doctoral experience includes work on the Gulf of Alaska forage fish species with Dr. John Horne at the University of Washington, here in Seattle.

Salient Publications

  • O'Driscoll, R.O., Macaulay, G. J., Gauthier, S, Pinkerton, M, and Hanchet, S. 2011. Distribution, abundance, and acoustic properties of Antarctic silverfish (Pleurogramma Antarctica). Deep Sea Research II 58: 181-195.
  • O'Driscoll, R.O., Gauthier, S, and Devine, J.A. 2009. Acoustic estimates of mesopelagic fish: as clear as day and night? ICES Journal of Marine Science 66: 1310-1317.
  • Gauthier, S. and Rose, G.A. 2005. Diel vertical migration and shoaling heterogeneity in Atlantic redfish: effects on acoustic and bottom trawl surveys. ICES Journal of Marine Science 62: 75-85.
  • Gauthier, S. and Horne, J.K. 2004. Potential acoustic discrimination within boreal fish assemblages. ICES Journal of Marine Science 61: 836-845.
Remote Access and Notes:

Webinar access:

  1. Go to https://nwfsc.webex.com/nwfsc/j.php?ED=162473362&UID=1218681822&RT=MiM0 (This meeting does not require a password.) Click "Join".
  2. If requested, enter your name and email address.
  3. If a password is required, enter the meeting password: (This meeting does not require a password.)
  4. Click "Join".

Audio access:

  • Call-in toll number (US/Canada): +1-408-600-3600
  • Access code: 800 033 252

For Assistance during the presentation go to https://nwfsc.webex.com/nwfsc/mc On the left navigation bar, click "Support". Contact:

For questions about this seminar please contact Diane L. Tierney-Jamieson (206-860-3380; )

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Wednesday, September 28, 2011 9:18 AM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science and management information. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].


New Business Models for Small-Scale Fishermen and Processors

Date and Time: November 10, 2011, 12:00-13:00 Eastern Time Zone [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: NOAA SSMC-3 (1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD, 20910); 2nd Floor, NOAA Library
Speaker(s): Barry Nash (Seafood Technology and Marketing Specialist, NC Sea Grant) and Susan Andreatta (Associate Professor, University of North Carolina Greensboro, Department of Anthropology)
Speaker's Email: and
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NOAA Sea Grant
Abstract:

Historically, small-scale fishermen and processors along the southeastern United States have been an invisible industry. They earned a steady living supplying local residents and metropolitan areas of the Eastern Seaboard of the United States with quality, seasonal seafood without a well-recognized commercial image to identify their commodities or trade. As globalization began opening domestic markets to less expensive products, price became a deciding sales factor in consumer choices. Facing significant declines in market share and income, fishermen began abandoning their industry. Over the last decade, the demand for local seafood has grown stronger as consumers become more conscious of the origins of their food. The growing public demand for local seafood offers opportunities for producers to tap niche markets to stabilize and increase their incomes. This presentation will discuss how the Sea Grant network can offer practical guidance to help fishermen and processors build market-focused enterprises that create competitive advantages over foreign producers.

Download Presentation:

Download Presentation (PDF format)

About the Speaker:

Barry Nash (http://www.ncseagrant.org/component/content/article/68?template=clear&class=about); Susan Andreatta (http://www.uncg.edu/ant/andreatta.html)

Remote Access and Notes:
  1. Go to http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?sigKey=mymeetings&i=742656968&=brownbag&t=c
  2. Enter the required fields
  3. Indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy
  4. Click on Proceed
  5. Passcode: brownbag
  6. For audio in the US and Canada, dial 866-833-7307. The participant passcode is 8986360
Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Wednesday, October 12, 2011 7:11 AM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science and management information. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] or join our RSS feed by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].


"Tales Tags Tell": 46 Years of Recreational Angler Fish Tagging with The American Littoral Society

Date and Time: (Seminar Canceled) November 10, 2011, 11:00-12:00 Eastern Time Zone [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: NOAA Howard Laboratory Conference Room, Northeast Fisheries Science Center, James J. Howard Marine Sciences Laboratory (74 Magruder Road, Sandy Hook, Highlands, NJ 07732)
Speaker(s): Jeff Dement (American Littoral Society, Sandy Hook, NJ)
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NOAA James J. Howard Marine Sciences Laboratory Seminar Series
Abstract:

The American Littoral Society's fish coastal marine fish tagging program was started in 1965 by Graham Macmillan, a Society vice president and an avid sport fisherman. After consulting with fisheries biologists, he set up the program that, with only a few refinements, has served us well since. The premise of the program is that many fishermen release much of what they catch, especially those fish with a legal minimum size such as striped bass and fluke. Why not encourage fishermen to tag those fish before they release them?

The Society decided to make the program self-supporting (i.e., the fishermen would pay the cost of the program) and to make data collection as easy as possible. From the program's inception it was decided that all data produced would be published and made available to the fisheries scientists who would use it, and that all taggers and recapturers would hear about the fish they had released or recaptured. Based on the principles set up in 1965, the tagging program has grown to be the largest all voluntary fish tagging program in the nation and is recognized by the ASMFC Interstate Tagging Committee.

This presentation for the NOAA lecture series will focus upon the past, present and future of this invaluable citizen science effort, as well as, interesting and noteworthy tagging, and recapture events through the years.

About the Speaker:

Jeff Dement is a graduate of Cook College, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ. He holds a degree in Ecology/ Professional Natural Resource Management, and a professional Certificate in Environmental Geomatics (GIS). He also sits on the board of directors of the Shark River Cleanup Coalition, in Neptune, NJ. Dement joined the American Littoral Society in 2008 to manage its 45-year-old citizen science, salt- water fish tagging program, the largest and longest-running program in the U.S. In this role, Jeff manages 1,250 volunteer anglers from Maine to Florida including individuals, fishing clubs, and charter boat captains.

In addition to maintaining and improving the quality control of data and workflow, processing/overseeing data capture and system maintenance for approximately 25,000 tagged fish and 1,450 recaptures annually, Jeff disseminates data to lay and scientific audiences by writing articles and field notes for American Littoral Society publications; including The Underwater Naturalist.

Remote Access and Notes:

To join the meeting online (Now from iPhones too!)

  1. Go to https://nmfs-st.webex.com/nmfs-st/j.php?ED=158370592&UID=0
  2. Enter your name and email address.
  3. Enter the meeting password: (This meeting does not require a password).
  4. Click "Join".

To join the teleconference audio

  • Dial: 1-866-658-9153
  • Enter the passcode: 3373926

For questions about this seminar please contact Linda Stehlik ()

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Tuesday, October 25, 2011 7:45 AM / Last updated Thursday, November 10, 2011 9:07 AM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science and management information. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

November 15, 2011

California Undercurrent Studies

Date and Time: (Seminar date moved to Nov 16, 2011 (click here for details)
Location: SSMC-3, 4th Floor, Room 4817 (1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD, 20910)
Speaker: (Naval Postgraduate School, Monterrey, CA)
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NOAA National Oceanographic Data Center (NODC)
Abstract:

TBD

Remote Access and Notes:

Online web access:

  • Click on http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?i=744868915&p=science&t=c
  • type in other required fields (i.e., your name, e-mail, organization; meeting number is 744868915; password is "science" -without quotation marks, password is case sensitive- )
  • indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy
  • click on Proceed and follow the instructions that appear on your screen.

Audio / conference call:

  • Toll free dial 877-725-4068 using a touch-tone phone
  • when prompted enter participant code 8634769 followed by a "#"
  • Please mute your phone during the presentation or toggle *6 otherwise it produces a sound feedback and we will disconnect everyone
  • Phone access limited to the first 50 callers only

You will need both the web/phone access to see the slides and hear the speaker. For further information please contact or .

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Friday, October 28, 2011 6:53 AM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science and management information. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] or join our RSS feed by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].


Mapping Species and Habitats to Meet Regional and Local Management Needs: An Introduction to NOAA's Biogeography Branch

Date and Time: November 15, 2011, 14:00-15:00 Eastern Time Zone (notice time change) [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: NOAA Howard Laboratory Conference Room, Northeast Fisheries Science Center, James J. Howard Marine Sciences Laboratory (74 Magruder Road, Sandy Hook, Highlands, NJ 07732)
Speaker(s): Dr. Chris Caldow (NOAA, NOS, CCMA, Silver Spring, Maryland)
Speaker's Email:
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NOAA James J. Howard Marine Sciences Laboratory Seminar Series
Abstract:

TBD

About the Speaker:

Chris Caldow is a Senior Scientist and Project Manager with NOAA's Biogeography Branch and is one of the principle investigators for this mission. Chris has a Bachelor's degree in Aquatic Biology from the University of California, Santa Barbara and a Masters degree in Biology from the University of Houston. Since 2000, he has been assisting the Branch in carrying out its mission to supply marine resource managers with critical information on the distribution of the living marine resources they manage. During this cruise, Chris will be overseeing day-to-day operations of the diving and mapping efforts to ensure that the cruise is a success and project objectives are met.

Remote Access and Notes:

To join the meeting online (Now from iPhones too!)

  1. Go to https://nmfs-st.webex.com/nmfs-st/j.php?ED=158370592&UID=0
  2. Enter your name and email address.
  3. Enter the meeting password: (This meeting does not require a password).
  4. Click "Join".

To join the teleconference audio

  • Dial: 1-866-658-9153
  • Enter the passcode: 3373926

For questions about this seminar please contact Vincent Guida ()

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Tuesday, November 8, 2011 7:19 AM / Last updated Monday, November 14, 2011 7:47 AM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science and management information. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

November 16, 2011

California Undercurrent Studies

Date and Time: November 16, 2011; 10:00-11:00h Eastern Time Zone; [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: SSMC-3, 4th Floor, Room 4817 (1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD, 20910)
Speaker: (Naval Postgraduate School, Monterrey, CA)
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NOAA National Oceanographic Data Center (NODC)
Abstract:

TBD

Remote Access and Notes:

Online web access:

  • Click on http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?i=744868915&p=science&t=c
  • type in other required fields (i.e., your name, e-mail, organization; meeting number is 744868915; password is "science" -without quotation marks, password is case sensitive- )
  • indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy
  • click on Proceed and follow the instructions that appear on your screen.

Audio / conference call:

  • Toll free dial 877-725-4068 using a touch-tone phone
  • when prompted enter participant code 8634769 followed by a "#"
  • Please mute your phone during the presentation or toggle *6 otherwise it produces a sound feedback and we will disconnect everyone
  • Phone access limited to the first 50 callers only

You will need both the web/phone access to see the slides and hear the speaker. For further information please contact or .

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Friday, October 28, 2011 6:53 AM / Last updated Monday, November 14, 2011 12:24 PM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science and management information. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] or join our RSS feed by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].


I. Development, verification, and natural variability in MIROC5. II. Overview of decadal climate prediction using a coupled climate model MIROC

Date and Time: November 16, 2011; 10:00-11:00h Eastern Time Zone; [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: World Weather Building (5200 Auth Road, Camp Springs, MD 20746); Room 707 (Directions from Google).
Speaker: Masahiro Watanabe and Yoshi Chikamoto (AORI, Univ of Tokyo)
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NOAA (National Centers for Environmental Prediction Environmental Modeling Center Seminar)
Abstract:

A Japanese community climate model, called Model for Interdisciplinary Research on Climate (MIROC), has been developed for use of various aspects of climate research. We are currently under operation of MIROC with three types of configuration: a high-resolution climate model for the decadal climate prediction, a low-resolution Earth system model, and a low-resolution new version of the climate model (MIROC5). In this talk, I would like to introduce outcomes from MIROC5, in which many of the atmospheric parameterization schemes have been updated. Improvements in the climate simulation with MIROC5 and a high sensitivity of the ENSO simulation to a perturbation in the cumulus convection scheme are presented.

Toward coming IPCC AR5, we have performed decadal climate prediction using three versions of the coupled atmosphere-ocean model MIROC. In these hindcast experiments, initial conditions were obtained with an anomaly assimilation procedure using the observed oceanic temperature and salinity while prescribing natural and anthropogenic forcing based on the IPCC emission scenarios. Our hindcast experiments show that initialization contributes to enhance the predictive skills of AMO and PDO indices for several years in advance. In addition to these major climate phenomena, the hindcast experiments tend to simulate a pattern of stepwise sea surface temperature increase in the Pacific during the late 1990s. Although further studies are need to enhance predictive skills of decadal climate variability, our results suggest that the decadal climate prediction has a potential to provide useful information in order to solve socioeconomic problems arising from climate change.

Remote Access and Notes:

Remote access via Go To Meeting + phone: TBD. For further information please contact (301)763-8000 Ext7551

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Tuesday, November 15, 2011 7:33 AM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science and management information. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] or join our RSS feed by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].


Ocean Frontiers Documentary: Inspiring Stories from the Frontiers of Ocean Conservation Sneak Video Previews, Part 2 of 2

Date and Time:

November 16, 2011, 12:00-13:00 Eastern Time Zone [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]

Location: SSMC-4 (1305 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD, 20910); Room 8150. Special notes below for participating remotely to this seminar - we will be showing parts of a movie.
Speaker(s): Karen Anspacher-Meyer (Executive Director, Green Fire Productions www.greenfireproductions.org, www.ocean-frontiers.org)
Speaker's Email:
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NOAA NOS Science Seminar Series and Green Fire Productions
Abstract:

Ocean Frontiers takes a balanced, bi-partisan approach to both the problems we face in managing our oceans and the solutions at hand. The film features on-the-ground reporting from places across the country that are at the forefront of implementing promising new approaches to ocean and coastal management.

Ocean Frontiers is an inspiring voyage to seaports and watersheds across the country where we meet unlikely allies, industrial shippers and whale biologists, pig farmers and wetland ecologists, sport fishers and reef snorkelers and many more, all embarking on a new course of collaboration, in defense of the seas that sustain us.

Ocean Frontiers is designed as a tool to educate key audiences and build support for the national ocean policy, coastal and marine spatial planning and ecosystem-based management. Shorter versions are in the works and will be available soon. [Check http://ocean-frontiers.org/c/videos/ for shorter versions.]

Green Fire Productions is leading the Ocean Frontiers outreach campaign and drawing together a broad range of NGOs, agencies, industry associations, aquariums and user groups to present the film to targeted audiences and encourage support and participation in comprehensive ocean planning across the country.

In addition to these events, the film is available for screening among agency staff, at conferences, for policymakers and other key players in the national ocean policy realm. Please contact Karen Meyer to learn more about this.

About the Speaker:

Karen Meyer is the co-founder and executive director of Green Fire Productions. Since 1989 she has produced dozens of award-winning, solutions-oriented documentaries on conservation issues that are used worldwide by NGOs, natural resource agencies, businesses, industry associations and Native American tribes.

Remote Access and Notes:

Presentations are available remotely for free via a combination of phone (US & territories) & webcast. Remote access is limited to 50 connections on a first-come-first served basis.

To participate remotely via phone and internet:

  1. For the audio part of the presentation, Dial toll-free (U.S.) 1-877-708-1667. When prompted enter passcode 7028688 and the # sign. Please use your phone's mute button (*6 toggles on or off) during the videos. The phone conference does not start until 5-10 minutes before the seminar.
  2. For the visual part of the presentation: Special options for this seminar (and the follow-up on 11/16): we will be showing a movie and there will be two options for viewing it: a) thru the normal webex setup (see sign-up info below) and if once the movie start that does not work well for you, try b) links to the video clips, below. Please have these links open in a new window, but the video paused, in case the webex does not work for you. You can then easily switch to the links option.

So, for normal webex/internet setup, follow these instructions:

After a brief 'live' introduction to the movie, we will start it. If the webex sound or visual does not work well for you, turn off the webex, mute your phone, and try the links below. They are movies that use Flash, and depending on the speed of your connection, you might have temporary delays due to buffering, but if you pause the movie for a few minutes, it will catch up and the buffering should stop.

Day 1: Part 1 Ocean Frontiers - Introduction & Massachusetts Bay - 28 min (http://greenfireproductions.org/client/work_1.html)

Day 1: Part 2 Ocean Frontiers - Florida Keys - 11 min (http://greenfireproductions.org/client/work_2.html)

Questions and discussion are encouraged before and after the movies. The second half of the movie will be held on 11/16. For further information please contact at least 45 minutes before the seminar, or if it is within 5 minutes of the seminar start, call the toll free number above.

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Friday, November 4, 2011 3:22 PM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science and management information. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].


Ionospheric Data Assimilation

Date and Time: November 16, 2011, 14:00-15:00 Eastern Time Zone [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: World Weather Building (5200 Auth Road, Camp Springs, MD 20746); Room 707
Speaker(s): (USU) and (Naval Research Laboratory)
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NOAA Joint Center for Satellite Data Assimilation (JCSDA)
Abstract:

The ionosphere is a highly variable portion of the upper atmosphere, which undergoes dramatic changes on timescales ranging from hours to years in response to variability in both solar ultraviolet irradiance and solar wind. The variability of the upper atmosphere originating from the Sun is referred to as "space weather." Space weather can have detrimental effects on a variety of civilian and military systems, such as GPS navigation, over-the-horizon radar, and radio and satellite communications. Consequently, the ability to accurately specify the state of the ionosphere and mitigate or forecast the effects of space weather is important to many operational systems. In 1999, the Office of Naval Research sponsored a Multidisciplinary University Research Initiative (MURI), with the goal being to determine the feasibility of using data assimilation models for the ionosphere. This ultimately led to an ionospheric data assimilation model placed into operational use at the Air Force Weather Agency. Two models were investigated under the MURI program, which was called Global Assimilation of Ionospheric Measurements (GAIM). The most sophisticated GAIM model uses a physics-based ionosphere-plasmasphere model and an ensemble Kalman filter as a basis for assimilating the measurements. This "full physics" model (GAIM-FP) is global, takes account of six ion species, and covers the altitude range of from 90 to 30,000 km. The GAIM models can assimilate bottom-side Ne profiles from hundreds of ionosondes, slant Total Electron Content (TEC) from 1000 ground GPS/TEC receivers, in situ Ne from 4 DMSP satellites, occultation data from multiple satellites, and both limb and disk UV emissions measured by satellites.

Remote Access and Notes:

Video:

  1. Go to JCSDA Seminar and click on the seminar title
  2. Enter your name and email address
  3. Enter the meeting password: JCSDAseminars707
  4. Click "Join Now"
  5. Follow the instructions that appear on your screen
  6. For further information visit http://www.jcsda.noaa.gov/JCSDASeminars.php

Phone Access:

  • USA participants: 1-866-715-2479
  • Passcode: 9457557
  • Enter the meeting password: JCSDAseminar2010
  • International: 1-517-345-5260
  • The audio portion of JCSDA Seminars is now being recorded and posted on the JCSDA Website the day after the seminar. Those who are unable to attend the live presentation can now view the slides and listen to the seminar at their own convenience. For further information please contact

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Thursday, July 14, 2011 9:42 AM / Last updated Tuesday, November 15, 2011 7:36 AM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science and management information. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] or join our RSS feed by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

November 17, 2011

Trends in Status of Global Marine Fisheries

Date and Time: November 17, 2011, 11:00-12:00 Pacific Time Zone [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: NOAA Northwest Fisheries Science Center (NWFSC) (2725 Montlake Boulevard East, Seattle, WA 98112; Map to NWFSC), Room: Auditorium.
Speaker(s): Trevor Branch (Assistant Professor, School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences, University of Washington)
Speaker's Email:
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NOAA NWFSC Monster Seminar JAM
Abstract:

What are the prospects for global marine fisheries? Predictions made from trends in catch data suggest that around 70% of all fisheries are overexploited, 30% collapsed to less than 10% of original levels, and that the trend in these numbers is worsening over time. Conversely, compilations of stock assessments find lower numbers of overexploited (30%) and collapsed (10%) fisheries, and a trend in exploitation rates suggesting that most fisheries should rebuild in the future. FAO status reports agree with the stock assessment results. We found a substantial bias in the catch-based method explains most of this difference. For example, status estimates from simulated random catches with no trend also inexplicably suggest a worsening trend in status over time. However, there is much confusion over definitions of what should constitute overfished, and over whether stock assessments taken mainly from developed countries can be used to infer status and trends of the entire world. The greatest data gaps are the absence of reliable survey estimates of abundance from most of the developing world, yet most resources are expended on more detailed assessments of stocks in developed countries. I propose developing a global fleet of survey vessels operated by an international organization like the FAO to fill this need.

About the Speaker:

I obtained a B.Sc. in Computer Science and Zoology, B.Sc.(hons) in Zoology, and M.Sc. in Conservation Biology from the University of Cape Town, South Africa, before moving to the University of Washington for my Ph.D. in Aquatic and Fishery Sciences in 2004. I have published 34 papers. I am most interested in solving real-life biological problems through synthesis of multiple data types and through fitting mathematical models to data. These core interests have led me in a variety of directions. My most recent research focuses on global scale analysis of fisheries, including their current status and future directions, whether fishing down marine food webs is detectable in catches and in ecosystems, and which factors influence patterns in fishery development. I also have a long-standing interest in the human side of fisheries, including fishing behavior and fleet dynamics, and the impacts of individual transferable quotas (catch shares) on target stocks, discards, and the environment. Another major field of interest is the status and trends of large whale populations, particularly blue whales but also humpback and minke whales, interests which have led to papers on abundance estimation, changes in population size over time, and the separation of blue whale subspecies. http://fish.washington.edu/people/branch/

Salient Publications

  • Branch, T. A. 2008. Not all fisheries will be collapsed in 2048. Marine Policy 32:38-39.
  • Branch, T. A., R. Watson, E. A. Fulton, S. Jennings, C. R. McGilliard, G. T. Pablico, D. Ricard, and S. R. Tracey. 2010. The trophic fingerprint of marine fisheries. Nature 468:431-435.
  • Branch, T. A., O. P. Jensen, D. Ricard, Y. Ye, and R. Hilborn. 2011. Contrasting global trends in marine fishery status obtained from catches and from stock assessments. Conservation Biology 25:777-786.
  • Sethi, S. A., T. A. Branch, and R. Watson. 2010. Fishery development patterns are driven by profit but not trophic level. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences U.S.A. 107:12163-12167.
  • Worm, B., R. Hilborn, J. K. Baum, T. A. Branch, J. S. Collie, C. Costello, M. J. Fogarty, E. A. Fulton, J. A. Hutchings, S. Jennings, O. P. Jensen, H. K. Lotze, P. M. Mace, T. R. McClanahan, C. Minto, S. R. Palumbi, A. M. Parma, D. Ricard, A. A. Rosenberg, R. Watson, and D. Zeller. 2009. Rebuilding global fisheries. Science 325:578-585.
Remote Access and Notes:

Webinar access:

  1. Go to https://nwfsc.webex.com/nwfsc/j.php?ED=162473362&UID=1218681822&RT=MiM0 (This meeting does not require a password.) Click "Join".
  2. If requested, enter your name and email address.
  3. If a password is required, enter the meeting password: (This meeting does not require a password.)
  4. Click "Join".

Audio access:

  • Call-in toll number (US/Canada): +1-408-600-3600
  • Access code: 800 033 252

For Assistance during the presentation go to https://nwfsc.webex.com/nwfsc/mc On the left navigation bar, click "Support". Contact:

For questions about this seminar please contact Diane L. Tierney-Jamieson (206-860-3380; )

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Wednesday, September 28, 2011 9:18 AM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science and management information. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].


A Human Health Perspective on Climate Change: Promoting Community-Based Adaptation Planning For Climate Change In Alaska

Date and Time: November 17, 2011, 10:00-11:00 Alaska Local Time (14:00-15:00 ETZ) [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: The ACCAP office is located on the second floor of the Denali Building, 3352 College Rd., Fairbanks, Alaska
Speaker(s): Tenaya Sunbury and David Driscoll (Institute for Circumpolar Health Studies, University of Alaska Anchorage)
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NOAA ACCAP monthly climate webinar
Abstract:

Increasing average temperatures in Arctic regions are affecting human health through multiple pathways, such as changes to the frequency and intensity of extreme weather events and changes in the geographic range and occurrence of infectious and chronic diseases. Following several reports of current and potential human health impacts from climate change, the Institute of Circumpolar Health Studies (ICHS) developed and implemented a monitoring system to capture baseline human health and ecosystem data from three ecologically distinct regions of Alaska. In this presentation, Drs. Driscoll and Sunbury describe the monitoring system and the information it provides for improving public-health decision making.

Remote Access and Notes:

Seminar originally scheduled for November 08, 2011. Pre-registration is strongly encouraged. To register please fill out the web-form at: http://ine.uaf.edu/accap/teleconference.htm#register, or contact: Brook Gamble, Assistant Coordinator and Outreach Specialist, (907) 474-7812, . Please let us know if you intend to come in person. You are welcome to join us in our Fairbanks conference room. The ACCAP office is located on the second floor of the Denali Building, 3352 College Rd., Fairbanks.

How to Participate / Log-In to the Alaska Climate Webinar:

  • Point your web browser to: http://infiniteconferencing.com/Events/accap/
  • Enter Participant Code 83847342
  • Enter the rest of the requested information (The name and organization you enter will be seen by other participants, but your contact information will remain confidential
  • Click the blue "log-in" button

Audio / conference call:

  • With a regular telephone dial: 1- (877) 594-8353
  • When prompted, enter the Participant passcode: 83847342.Please mute your phone during the presentation. The audio is very sensitive and your external conversations and typing can be heard by other participants.

For support during a call, press *0 on your phone and a conferencing coordinator will assist you. For further information please contact Brook Gamble, Assistant Coordinator and Outreach Specialist, (907) 474-7812,

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Tuesday, September 6, 2011 7:43 AM / Last updated Friday, October 21, 2011 7:10 AM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science and management information. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

November 18, 2011

(Seminar Canceled) Thinking about Inference in Ecology: Replication, Metareplication, Induction and Deduction

Date and Time: (seminar canceled) November 18, 2011, 11:00-12:00 Eastern Time Zone [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: NOAA Howard Laboratory Conference Room, Northeast Fisheries Science Center, James J. Howard Marine Sciences Laboratory (74 Magruder Road, Sandy Hook, Highlands, NJ 07732)
Speaker(s): Dr. Samuel Cushman (Research Landscape Ecologist, Rocky Mountain Research Station, US Forest Service)
Speaker's Email:
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NOAA James J. Howard Marine Sciences Laboratory Seminar Series
Abstract:

There is a strong mutual dependence between explanatory theory, available spatial and temporal data and analytical method in determining the lurching progress of ecological knowledge. Limits in each of theory, data, infrastructure and method have continuously constrained advances in understanding ecological systems. However, recent revolutionary advances in data and method are enabling unprecedented expansion of ecological investigation into areas of inquiry previously unapproachable due to lack of fine-detail, broad scale data on environmental conditions, the distribution and performance of organisms, the lack of sufficient computational power to process and analyze such voluminous data sets, and inadequate analytical tools to investigate pattern-process relationships among many interacting entities over large, spatially complex landscapes. This talk explores some ideas about inference in ecology, particularly the utility of metareplication of empirical studies, and linking empirical induction with theoretical deduction and simulation. These are illustrated with several recent examples from our work in landscape genetics.

About the Speaker:

Dr. Samuel Cushman is a research landscape ecologist at the U.S. Forest Service Rocky Mountain Research Station. He received his BS from the Evergreen State College, MS from Western Washington Universtiy, and PHD from the University of Massachuestts. His research focuses on multiscale analysis of pattern-process relationships in ecology, particularly in terrestrial forested landscapes. He is the author of more than 85 publications, including two books, and the ecological analysis software FRAGSTATS, CDPOP and sGD.

Remote Access and Notes:

Remote access details: TBD. For questions about this seminar please contact John Manderson ()

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Monday, October 3, 2011 7:52 AM / Last updated Tuesday, October 25, 2011 7:38 AM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science and management information. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].


Practical Approaches to Climate Change: How Climate Change is Already Becoming Part of Good Management

Date and Time: November 18, 2011, 12:00-13:00 Eastern Time Zone [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: NOAA SSMC-3 (1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD, 20910); Room 15836
Speaker(s): Ph.D. (Chief Scientist and Executive Director, EcoAdapt)
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NOAA NMFS
Abstract:

While researchers work to develop a clearer understanding of how climate change affects natural resources and human communities, there are already managers and planners starting to take on this challenge. Dr. Hansen will share examples of how this work is underway across the United States, the methods being employed, the tools being used and the needs that exist to make it more ubiquitous. The presentation will draw from Dr. Hansen's extensive experience in development and assessment of climate adaptation strategies for coastal, marine and terrestrial ecosystems and the communities that depend on them. She will discuss some of the most exciting efforts to advance natural resource conservation in a changing climate (for more info see the Climate Adaptation Knowledge Exchange at www.cakex.org).

About the Speaker:

Dr. Lara J. Hansen is Executive Director of EcoAdapt, a nonprofit organization focused on adapting conservation and resource management to climate change (www.ecoadapt.org). She has authored a variety of publications on adaptation to climate change including Buying Time: A User's Manual for Building Resistance and Resilience to Climate Change in Natural Systems and Climate Savvy Adapting Conservation and Resource Management to a Changing World (Island Press, 2010).

Remote Access and Notes:

Audio callin: 866-815-0340, passcode: 8172125. For questions about this seminar please contact .

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Tuesday, November 15, 2011 10:02 AM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science and management information. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

November 21, 2011

Seasonal and Extended Range prediction activities in India using the coupled forecast system model (CFS)

Date and Time: November 16, 2011; 10:30-11:30h Eastern Time Zone; [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: World Weather Building (5200 Auth Road, Camp Springs, MD 20746); Room 707 (Directions from Google).
Speaker: Suryachandra Rao (Indian Institute of Tropical Meteorology)
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NOAA (National Centers for Environmental Prediction Environmental Modeling Center Seminar)
Abstract:

TBD

Remote Access and Notes:

Remote access via Go To Meeting + phone: TBD. For further information please contact Glenn White (301)763-8000 Ext 7238

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Tuesday, November 22, 2011 9:36 AM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science and management information. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] or join our RSS feed by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

November 29, 2011

The Goshen County, Wyoming, supercell (5 June 2009) intercepted by VORTEX2: Interesting Evolution Leading up to Tornadogenesis

Date and Time: November 29, 2011, 15:30-16:30 Central Time Zone [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: National Weather Center (120 David L. Boren Blvd, University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK), NWC Room. 1313 (Directions to the National Weather Center (PDF, ~60 kb).
Speaker(s): Paul Markowski (Department of Meteorology, Penn State University)
Speaker's Email:
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NOAA NWS National Severe Storms Laboratory Seminar Series
Abstract:

I will present my analysis of the pretornadic phase (2100--2148 UTC; tornadogenesis occurs at 2152 UTC) of the Goshen County, Wyoming, supercell of 5 June 2009 intercepted by the Second Verification of the Origins of Rotation in Tornadoes Experiment (VORTEX2). The analysis relies on radar data from the WSR-88D in Cheyenne, Wyoming (KCYS), and a pair of Doppler On Wheels (DOW) radars, mobile mesonet observations, and mobile sounding observations.

The storm resembles supercells that have been observed in the past. For example, it develops a couplet of counterrotating vortices that straddle the hook echo within the rear-flank outflow and are joined by arching vortex lines, with the cyclonic vortex becoming increasingly dominant in the time leading up to tornadogenesis. The outflow in the hook echo region, where sampled, has relatively small virtual potential temperature deficits during this stage of evolution (a few kilometers upstream of the location of maximum vertical vorticity, the air is no more than 3 K colder than the warmest air in the inflow of the storm). Forward trajectories originating in the outflow within and around the low-level mesocyclone rise rapidly, which implies that the upward-directed vertical perturbation pressure gradient force exceeds the negative buoyancy. As has been found in past numerical simulations, the circulation of material circuits that converge upon the low-level mesocyclone is principally acquired along the southern periphery of the forward-flank precipitation region, which is a corridor characterized by a horizontal buoyancy gradient; thus, much of the circulation appears to have been baroclinically generated. Conversely, the circulation of the midlevel mesocyclone is derived from the environmental vorticity associated with the ambient vertical wind shear.

Low-level rotation intensifies in the 2140--2148 UTC period. This intensification is preceded by a descending reflectivity core (DRC). The DRC has an important modulating influence on the circulation of the aforementioned material circuits. A circuit that converges upon the low-level mesocyclone center prior to the DRC's arrival at low levels loses some of its previously acquired circulation during the final few minutes its approach. In contrast, a circuit that approaches the low-level mesocyclone center after the DRC arrives at low levels---a significant segment of this circuit passes through the DRC---does not experience the same adversity.

Remote Access and Notes:

Presentations are available remotely for free via a combination of phone (US & territories) & webcast. Remote access is limited to 50 connections on a first-come-first served basis. To participate remotely via phone and internet:

For the audio and video part of the presentation, you can access the webex meeting by going to: https://www1.gotomeeting.com/register/208677665. Enter other required fields - First and last name, e-mail address, and organization - Check the box that that you have read the Privacy Policy, and click Proceed.

For information please contact Jonathan Gourley () or Race Clark ().

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Wednesday, September 28, 2011 7:42 AM / Last updated Tuesday, November 22, 2011 4:02 PM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science and management information. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

November 30, 2011

The Tempest UAS: The VORTEX2 Supercell Thunderstorm Penetrator

Date and Time: November 30, 2011, 10:00-11:00 Central Time Zone [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: National Weather Center (120 David L. Boren Blvd, University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK), NWC Room. 1313 (Directions to the National Weather Center).
Speaker(s): Brian M. Argrow (Alfred and Betty Look Professor of Aerospace Engineering Sciences, University of Colorado)
Speaker's Email:
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NOAA NWS National Severe Storms Laboratory Seminar Series
Abstract:

On 6 May 2010, in northwest Kansas, the Tempest unmanned aircraft system (UAS) team led by researchers from the University of Colorado's Research and Engineering Center for Unmanned Vehicles (RECUV), teamed with meteorologists from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, made the first ever intercept of a supercell thunderstorm as part of the VORTEX2 deployment. This was followed on 10 June 2010, near Deer Trail, Colorado, with the first ever UAS intercept of a tornadic supercell.

The primary engineering objective for the Tempest UAS was to develop a small UAS networked into a mobile command, control, and communications infrastructure designed to meet requirements for supercell penetration, specifically in the rear flank downdraft (RFD). The UAS had to meet requirements for portability, targeting and tracking supercells, rapid launch, storm penetration, and recovery of the unmanned aircraft. Finally, all operations had to meet the regulatory and policy requirements of the FAA, with the required certificates of authorization (COAs).

The concept of operations (CONOPS) for the Tempest UAS is presented to describe the supporting ground vehicles, communications systems, and personnel required for tracking and intercepting storms while satisfying FAA operational constraints. The physical characteristics of the Tempest UAS, including the airframe and the command, control, and communications architecture are described. The UAS performance results from the supercell intercepts are presented and compared to baseline performance during calm operations. In situ measurements from RFD gust-front intercepts are presented.

About the Speaker:

BRIAN ARGROW is the Alfred and Betty Look Professor of Aerospace Engineering Sciences, Associate Dean for Education of the College of Engineering and Applied Science, and cofounder and director of the Research and Engineering Center for Unmanned Vehicles at the University of Colorado at Boulder. Dr. Argrow received his PhD in aerospace engineering from the University of Oklahoma in 1989, where he was a NSF Graduate Research Fellow. His current research includes small UAS design and the integration of UAS into the National Airspace System. He has other research focused on rarefied gas dynamics and satellite drag. He has received numerous teaching and education awards including the 1995 W.M. Keck Foundation Award for Excellence in Engineering Education, and in 2000 he was named a University of Colorado President's Teaching Scholar. In 2008 he was co-chair of the first Symposium for Civilian Applications of Unmanned Aircraft Systems (CAUAS), and since 2008 he has co-chaired three workshops and moderated several panels on research directions for the integration of UAS into the National Airspace System, sponsored by NSF, FAA, DHS, AIAA, and AUVSI. He is an associate fellow of the AIAA and chairs the AIAA Unmanned Systems Program Committee, co-chairs the FAA Research Advisory Group, and in 2009 he completed four years of service on the USAF Scientific Advisory Board. He is currently a member of the NASA Advisory Council's UAS Subcommittee. Dr. Argrow led the UAS Team for the VORTEX2 field deployment 1 May – 15 June 2010. VORTEX2 (the second Verification of the Origin of Rotation in Tornadoes Experiment) the largest effort ever undertaken to understand the origin of tornadoes.

Remote Access and Notes:

Presentations are available remotely for free via a combination of phone (US & territories) & webcast. Remote access is limited to 50 connections on a first-come-first served basis. To participate remotely via phone and internet:

For the audio and video part of the presentation, you can access the webex meeting by going to: https://www1.gotomeeting.com/register/502265464. Enter other required fields - First and last name, e-mail address, and organization - Check the box that that you have read the Privacy Policy, and click Proceed.

This is one of two seminars being offered (see Micro and Nanotechnology-Enabled Environmental Sensing with Lagrangian Drifters). For information please contact Jonathan Gourley () or Race Clark ().

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Friday, October 14, 2011 11:15 AM / Last updated Tuesday, November 22, 2011 3:57 PM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science and management information. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].


Micro and Nanotechnology-Enabled Environmental Sensing with Lagrangian Drifters

Date and Time: November 30, 2011, 10:00-11:00 Central Time Zone [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: National Weather Center (120 David L. Boren Blvd, University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK), NWC Room. 1313 (Directions to the National Weather Center).
Speaker(s): John Manobianco (Founder and Chief Science Officer, Mano Nanotechnologies, Inc. Guilderland, NY)
Speaker's Email:
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NOAA NWS National Severe Storms Laboratory Seminar Series
Abstract:

Technological advancements in micro and nanotechnology have inspired a concept known as Cost-Effective Lightweight Observational Universal Drifters (CLOUD). At the core of this system is a network of airborne probes that leverages advances in electronics miniaturization and component integration to achieve ultra low cost, size, and mass. The probes will be completely disposable, inexpensive enough to deploy in large numbers, and function as Lagrangian drifters using no active propulsion or flight. With low enough mass and aerodynamic shape based on bioinspired designs such as dandelion or maple seeds, probes could remain airborne and make measurements for hours or longer depending on atmospheric conditions (mainly updrafts or downdrafts) and release altitude.

The CLOUD system has potential to expand greatly in situ measurements of thermodynamic and kinematic parameters and transform environmental sensing well beyond current capability. Resulting improvements in forecast accuracy could translate directly into economic benefits for a multitude of weather-sensitive sectors and mitigate the risks associated with life-threatening phenomena. With a modular sensor suite, CLOUD probes could also be used for emergency management applications, air quality assessment, and monitoring /predicting green house gases or other parameters of interest for defense, intelligence, and security agencies.

The presentation will touch on CLOUD enabling technologies and system components, design challenges and tradeoffs, functional specifications, and roadmap for future development including joint efforts with industry, academic, and government collaborators as part of initiatives such as NOAA's “Warn on Forecast

Remote Access and Notes:

Presentations are available remotely for free via a combination of phone (US & territories) & webcast. Remote access is limited to 50 connections on a first-come-first served basis. To participate remotely via phone and internet:

For the audio and video part of the presentation, you can access the webex meeting by going to: https://www1.gotomeeting.com/register/502265464. Enter other required fields - First and last name, e-mail address, and organization - Check the box that that you have read the Privacy Policy, and click Proceed.

This is one of two seminars being offered (see In Situ Sensing in Supercells with the Tempest Unmanned Aircraft System). For information please contact Jonathan Gourley () or Race Clark ().

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Friday, October 14, 2011 11:15 AM / Last updated Tuesday, November 22, 2011 3:59 PM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science and management information. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].


The Impact of NWS Weather Forecast Office Culture on Tornado Warning Performance in the Wake of the Joplin and Tuscaloosa Tornado Disasters

Date and Time: November 30, 2011, 14:00-15:00 Eastern Time Zone [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: NOAA SSMC-2 (1325 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD, 20910); Room 2358.
Speaker(s): Stephan Smith (Office of Science and Technology, Meteorological Development Laboratory, Silver Spring, Maryland)
Speaker's Email:
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NOAA NWS Science and Technology Seminar
Abstract: The talk will discuss the impact of individual office cultures or "idiocultures" in National Weather Service forecast offices (WFOs) on tornado warning performance. A statistical analysis of the results of an employee satisfaction survey and tornado warning performance metrics (particularly False Alarm Rate), reveals the significant and enduring impact of culture on performance. A model of how WFO culture affects performance is proposed and strategies for improving performance based on changes to office culture are discussed.

Remote Access and Notes:

Remote access TBD. For information please contact [(301) 713-1768] or

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Wednesday, November 16, 2011 12:28 PM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science and management information. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

OneNOAA Science Seminars Subscription Information

i-access to our OneNOAA science seminar announcements:

  1. Join our weekly e-mail seminar announcement [nominally, email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list]. You can subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminars moderated email list by sending an email message to: with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body (don't include the quotes) or visit https://list.woc.noaa.gov/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/onenoaascienceseminars and fill in your email address (see also how to suscribe).
  2. Online OneNOAA web access: http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/ (Web page maintained by Bryan Stephenson)
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  4. Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar RSS feed.
  5. Interested in becoming a OneNOAA science seminar partner?
  6. When available, all seminars can be accessed remotely by anyone on a first-come-first serve basis.
  7. Note: All seminars subject to title, location, date, and time changes without notice. Please check the OneNOAA seminar web page for the latest seminar updates. Unless otherwised indicated, seminars are open to the public. The contents of the OneNOAA Science Seminars web page do not reflect any position of the Federeal Government or NOAA. References to trade names or commercial entities do not imply endorsement of any kind. Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer]. The information provided by the OneNOAA Science Seminars is for broad information purposes only. See privacy policy [NOAA Privacy policy]

 

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