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OctoberOctober 2011 OneNOAA Science Seminars

A joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science and management information.

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Web page last updated: Tuesday, 04-Sep-2012 15:40:56 UTC

The OneNOAA Science discussion seminar series is a joint effort to help share science and management information and to promote constructive dialogue between scientists, educators, and resource managers across NOAA Please help us spread the word about these seminars to anyone interested. For further information please contact Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov.

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October 04, 2011

The Ecology of Narwhals in Baffin Bay and the Impacts of a Warming Climate

Date and Time: October 04, 2011, 12:00-13:00 Eastern Time Zone [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: NOAA SSMC-3 (1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD, 20910); 2nd Floor, NOAA Library
Speaker(s): Kristin Laidre (Polar Science Center, Applied Physics Lab, University of Washington)
Speaker's Email:
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NOAA NODC Central Library
Abstract:

The offshore pack ice is one of the most important habitats for narwhals (Monodon monoceros), yet few data are available to quantify ecological relationships. Winter movements of narwhals (n=34) satellite-tagged between 2003 and 2005 on Baffin Island were combined with data on distribution and abundance collected from a visual aerial survey on the wintering grounds conducted in April 2008 to examine habitat use in the pack ice. Continuous high-resolution digital photographic sea ice images (n= 2,685) and downward-looking video were also collected on the survey tracklines facilitating a detailed description of the habitat. A fully corrected abundance estimate of 17,239 narwhals (cv=0.58) was calculated for the 9,500 sq. km area, which had only 2% open water. Narwhals ranged most widely and had the highest velocities in years with the most dense sea ice cover, but remained stationary over their preferred foraging grounds in years with low sea ice cover. This may suggest heavy sea ice requires whales to conduct compensatory movements to keep up with leads and cracks that move up to 25 km/day. Some whales were tagged with transmitters which collected and transmitted water column temperature profiles from dives >1,000 m between December and April 2005-2007, a project funded by the NOAA Ocean Exploration program. Data from these tags suggest the previously documented warming in Baffin Bay continued through 2007 and is associated with a warmer West Greenland Current in both of its constituent water masses. Understanding narwhal habitat use in the pack ice is critical to this species given climate change induced sea ice loss rates of 9% decade in Baffin Bay.

About the Speaker:

Kristin Laidre is currently a research scientist at the Polar Science Center, Applied Physics Lab, University of Washington. She is partially supported by the Greenland Institute of Natural Resources in Nuuk, Greenland. Her primary research interests lie in spatial modeling of movement and spatially-explicit foraging ecology of top marine predators. She is interested in how environmental features and habitat variables manifest themselves as constraints on movement and behavior, and how these constraints differentially impact demographics of sub-populations or metapopulations of marine species. Her research is focused on exploring these relationships using satellite and archival telemetry, in combination with remotely-sensed satellite data and quantitative spatial models in a Geographic Information System (GIS). Her research also links spatial environmental fluctuation to bioenergetic models and food webs in the marine ecosystem. Much of her research is focused in the high Arctic, where both short food chains and very limited and specific production periods strongly shape the behavior of top predators (http://psc.apl.washington.edu/wordpress/people/investigators/kristin-laidre/).

Remote Access and Notes:
  1. Go to http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?sigKey=mymeetings&i=742656968&=brownbag&t=c
  2. Enter the required fields
  3. Indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy
  4. Click on Proceed
  5. Passcode: brownbag
  6. For audio in the US and Canada, dial 866-833-7307. The participant passcode is 8986360
Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Thursday, September 22, 2011 9:48 AM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science and management information. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] or join our RSS feed by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].


Modeling of Complex Dynamical Systems with Neural Networks

Date and Time: October 04, 2011, 15:30-16:30 Central Time Zone [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: National Weather Center (120 David L. Boren Blvd, University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK), NWC Room. 1350 (Directions to the National Weather Center (PDF, ~60 kb).
Speaker(s): Dr. Reza Jafari (Electrical and Computer Engineering, Oklahoma State University)
Speaker's Email:
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NOAA NWS National Severe Storms Laboratory Seminar Series
Abstract: Recurrent Neural Networks (RNNs) have great potential applications in the areas of modeling, control, digital signal processing, communications, pattern recognition,etc. Although RNNs are more powerful than feedforward networks, this comes at the expense of difficulties in their training, which are caused in part by potential instabilities in the networks. In this talk, I am going to address how RNNs can be used to model complex nonlinear systems. I will also introduce an efficient method for determining the stability of RNNs.

Remote Access and Notes:

Presentations are available remotely for free via a combination of phone (US and territories) and webcast. Remote access is limited to 50 connections on a first-come-first served basis. To participate remotely via phone and internet:

  1. For the audio and video part of the presentation, you can access the webex meeting by going to: https://www1.gotomeeting.com/register/645151040
  2. Enter other required fields - First and last name - Check the box that that you have read the Privacy Policy, and click Proceed

For information please contact Race Clark () or Jonathan Gourley ().

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Monday, October 3, 2011 7:15 AM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science and management information. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] or join our RSS feed by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

October 05, 2011

Modeling Great Lakes Circulation and Ecosystem Responses Using Finite Volume Coastal Ocean Model (FVCOM)

Date and Time: October 05, 2011, 10:30-11:30 Eastern Time Zone [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: NOAA Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory, Lake Superior Hall (4840 South State Road, Ann Arbor, MI)
Speaker(s): Jia Wang (Research Ice Climatologist, NOAA GLERL)
Speaker's Email:
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NOAA Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory (GLERL)
Abstract:

A unstructured grid model, FVCOM (Finite Volume Coastal Ocean Model), was implemented for the entire 5 Great Lakes in order to investigate the response of lake ice, hydrodynamics, and ecosystems to large-scale climate forcing. The model triangle grids are variable with an average resolution of 5 km. The model uses atmospheric forcing derived from the NCEP North America Regional Analysis (NARR). The forcing has a spatial resolution of 30km and temporal resolution of 3 hours. The model was run from 1995 to 1998. The model was validated using buoys, water temperature records, satellite measurements, and in situ measurements derived from the EEGLE (Episodic Events-Great Lakes Experiments) field campaign in 1998. The 5-lakes FVCOM has produced reasonable seasonal cycles of water temperature, mixed-layer depth, and circulation patterns. Furthermore, the coupled lower trophic level ecosystem model (NPZD-nutrient-phytoplankton-zooplankton-detritus) was applied to Lake Michigan for the year of 1998. This talk will discuss in depth the model performance, and the potential for future climate studies using the coupled ice-circulation-ecosystem model.

About the Speaker:

http://www.glerl.noaa.gov/about/pers/profiles/wang.html

Remote Access and Notes:

Remote access via webinar: https://www2.gotomeeting.com/register/145695154

For questions about this seminar please contact Giselle Maira ().

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Monday, October 3, 2011 7:30 AM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science and management information. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] or join our RSS feed by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].


Corals, Crops and Collaboration: An Interagency Assessment of the Jobos Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve, Puerto Rico

Date and Time: October 05, 2011, 12:00-13:00 Eastern Time Zone [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: NOAA SSMC-4 (1305 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD, 20910); Room 8150
Speaker(s): David Whitall and Laurie Bauer (Center for Coastal Monitoring and Assessment, National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science)
Speaker's Email: Dave.whitall@noaa.gov ;
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NOAA NOS Science Seminar Series and the National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science
Abstract:

A recently completed environmental assessment of Jobos Bay, Puerto Rico establishes a baseline for the Bay, including the Jobos Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve and the surrounding coral reef ecosystems. The objective of the study was to establish baseline values for the distribution of habitats, nutrients, contaminants, fish and benthic communities. Levels of contaminants in the Bay were generally below levels of concern, and the coral reef ecosystems were similar to those observed in other regions of Puerto Rico. This baseline assessment is the first step in evaluating the effectiveness in changes in best management practices in the watershed, and was conducted in close collaboration with the U.S. Department of Agriculture as part of their Conservation Effects Assessment Project.

About the Speaker:

Dr. Whitall is a senior scientist with the Center for Coastal Monitoring and Assessment where he studies the distribution, magnitude and effects of pollution in a variety of coastal systems as part of the National Status and Trends Program. He has been with NOAA since 2003 and has been studying pollution in the U.S. Caribbean since 2005. He holds a PhD from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and a B.S. from the Pennsylvania State University.

Laurie Bauer is a marine ecologist and is a contractor with Consolidated Safety Services. She has worked with NOAA's Center for Coastal Monitoring And Assessment Biogeography Branch since 2006. She holds an M.S. from the University of Maryland and a B.A. from Wittenberg University.

Remote Access and Notes:

Presentations are available remotely for free via a combination of phone (US &territories) & webcast. Remote access is limited to 50 connections on a first-come-first served basis. To participate remotely via phone and internet:

  1. For the sound of the presentation, Dial toll-free (U.S.) 1-877-708-1667. When prompted enter passcode 7028688 and the # sign. Please use your phone's mute button (*6 toggles on or off) during the presentation until you are ready to ask questions. The phone conference does not start until about five minutes before the seminar.
  2. For the visual part of the presentation, you can access the webex meeting by going to: http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?sigKey=mymeetings&i=744925156&p=&t=c. Enter meeting number 744925156 if needed; no passcode is required. Enter other required fields - First and last name, other. Check the box that that you have read the Privacy Policy, and click Proceed.

For questions about this seminar please contact Tracy Gill () at least 45 minutes before the seminar, or if it is within 5 minutes of the seminar start, call the toll free number above.

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Wednesday, September 21, 2011 3:51 PM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science and management information. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] or join our RSS feed by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].


Community Resilience, Part II: Ecosystem-Based Adaptation Case Studies

Date and Time: October 05, 2011, 14:00-15:00 Eastern Time Zone [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: Seminar available via webinar only (see Remote Access and Notes section below)
Speaker(s): Adam Whelchel, PhD (The Nature Conservancy)
Speaker's Email:
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NOAA Coastal Services Center
Abstract:

Many coastal communities are looking for ways to apply ecosystem-based management approaches for community resilience. This presentation will highlight the four-step process of The Nature Conservancy's Coastal Resilience project, which includes awareness, risk, choice, and action. This approach focuses on the need to tailor options to fit the varying needs and pace of different communities. The case studies that will be presented focus on communities that have moved beyond the awareness phase in the process to assessing vulnerability and developing options for future action.

Remote Access and Notes:

Presentations are available remotely via a webinar. To register, visit http://www.csc.noaa.gov/digitalcoast/webinar/index.html. You will receive an email prior to the webinar containing information about join. This webinar will be recorded for on-demand playback. For further information please contact Krista.McCraken@noaa.gov.

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Friday, August 12, 2011 11:03 AM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science and management information. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] or join our RSS feed by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

October 06, 2011

National Air Quality Forecasting Capability (NAQFC) 03 Predictions over Remote Sensing-derived Physical and Chemical Regimes

Date and Time: October 06, 2011, 11:30-12:30 Eastern Time Zone [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: NOAA SSMC-3 (1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD, 20910); Room 3404
Speaker(s): Yunsoo Choi (NOAA Air Resources Laboratory)
Speaker's Email:
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NOAA Air Resources Laboratory
Abstract:

Simulation results from the NAQFC (utilizing Community Multiscale Air Quality, CMAQ model version 4.7) over the Conterminous United States (CONUS) for August 2009 are analyzed to evaluate O3 biases, weekly surface O3 cycles, and bottom-up NOx emissions inventory from EPA's National Emission Inventory at stations classified according to their O3-NOx-VOC chemical sensitivity regimes (NOx-saturated/mixed/NOx-sensitive regime which are inferred by the values of photochemical indicators based on the ratio of HCHO to NO2 column data from the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment 2, GOME-2), their geophysical regions (urban/others/forest region which are derived by the land use categories from Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer, AVHRR), or geological regions (e.g., northeastern or southeastern US). It was found that the largest simulated O3 bias region is characterized as the NOx-sensitive regime over the CONUS. We also found that weekly O3 cycle (including weekend effect) from EPA AQS measurements is more clearly shown over GOME-2 chemical regimes than geophysical regions. Further, it was seen that CMAQ with modified NOx emissions (using the comparison of CMAQ and GOME NO2 column data) better capture in-situ observed NOx concentrations and high daytime O3 concentrations, particularly over the Lower Midwestern and Southeastern US.

Remote Access and Notes:

Remote access details: Call-in number is 203-277-3283; Passcode 9643195. Questions? Contact Patrena Mcgruder (Patrena.Mcgruder@noaa.gov)

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Thursday, July 14, 2011 9:15 AM / Last updated Monday, September 12, 2011 10:30 AM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science and management information. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] or join our RSS feed by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].


The XML Hydrographic Metadata System and the Hydrographic Survey Metadata Data Base (HSMDB)

Date and Time: October 06, 2011, 12:00-13:00 Eastern Time Zone [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: NOAA SSMC-3 (1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD, 20910); 2nd Floor, NOAA Library
Speaker(s): Daniel Neumann (IT Specialist, Hydrographic Surveys Division, NOAA Office of Coast Survey)
Speaker's Email:
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NOAA NODC Central Library
Abstract:

Metadata is crucial for the efficient archiving and retrieval of hydrographic survey data. Currently, hydrographic metadata is created in multiple formats and housed in manually populated databases. NOAA's Office of Cost Survey (OCS) is developing tools, using eXtensible Markup Language (XML), to enable NOAA to provide structured XML packaging of information that will allow metadata to be constrained and parsed more efficiently for multiple outputs. When completed, this will support a more efficient, semi-automated workflow for capturing metadata throughout the hydrographic survey lifecycle. This lifecycle is from initial project instructions to final descriptive reports and other supporting documents. Part of the improved workflow is eliminating the manual input of metadata to the authoritative HSMDB at the National Geophysical Data Center (NGDC). Timely automated update will free Hydrographic survey Division (HSD) data control resources to focus on HSMDB population of archived hydrographic surveys. This will in turn enable different user communities to easily query and harvest more historic hydrographic survey information. This presentation will first offer an overview of the current status and proposed end product of the XML system. Secondly, the interaction of this XML as an extract and insert tool for the HSMDB will be explored stressing the notion that "enter once, use multiple times" approach greatly reduces errors, while also increasing efficiency and usability.

Remote Access and Notes:
  1. Go to http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?sigKey=mymeetings&i=742656968&=brownbag&t=c
  2. Enter the required fields
  3. Indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy
  4. Click on Proceed
  5. Passcode: brownbag
  6. For audio in the US and Canada, dial 866-833-7307. The participant passcode is 8986360
Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Tuesday, September 27, 2011 1:33 PM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science and management information. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] or join our RSS feed by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].


Elwha River Dam Removal: Past, Present, and Future

Date and Time: October 06, 2011, 11:00-12:00 Pacific Time Zone [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: NOAA Northwest Fisheries Science Center (NWFSC) (2725 Montlake Boulevard East, Seattle, WA 98112; Map to NWFSC), Room: Auditorium.
Speaker(s): Sarah Morley (Research Ecologist, Watershed Program, Fish Ecology Division, NOAA NWFSC)
Speaker's Email:
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NOAA NWFSC Monster Seminar JAM
Abstract:

The removal of the Elwha River dams on the Olympic Peninsula of Washington State is a unique opportunity to examine ecosystem recovery on a watershed scale, and has spurred collaborative research efforts among divergent groups. For the past century, the two dams have blocked the upstream movement of anadromous fish to over 90% of the watershed, and restricted the downstream movement of sediment, wood, and other organic materials to the lower river and estuary. Populations of all five Pacific salmon species and steelhead in the Elwha are critically low, habitat complexity decreased in the middle and lower river, and downstream coastal habitats are sediment starved. Simultaneous deconstruction of the two dams began in September 2011 and will take three years to complete. During and after that time, researchers are examining dam removal effects in three geographic regions: the soon-to-be former reservoirs, across the river floodplain, and in the nearshore environment. Short-term (< 3 years post dam removal) monitoring is focused on the projected downstream transport of approximately four million cubic meters of fine sediments accumulated in the reservoir deltas, associated peaks in river and estuary turbidity levels, and re-vegetation of the reservoir themselves. Longer-term effects of dam removal (> 5 years) to be evaluated are the delivery of gravels and cobbles to the lower river and nearshore, the re-establishment of a natural wood delivery regime, the re-colonization of the upper watershed by anadromous fish, and the associated effects on aquatic and riparian foodwebs. This talk will provide an overview of the Elwha restoration project, but particularly highlight the research of NWFSC researchers examining river floodplain dynamics, salmon re-colonization, and aquatic foodwebs. The removal of the Elwha Dams has been long awaited by the Lower Elwha Klallam Tribe and others and will provide ongoing learning opportunities for future dam removal efforts across the United States and elsewhere.

About the Speaker:

Sarah Morley is a field ecologist whose research focuses on biological assessment-using biota to evaluate the condition of a place and better identify the causes of degradation. Within this broad framework, she has conducted research on the effects of urbanization on the health of Puget Sound streams and evaluated the effectiveness of restoration actions on streams and rivers across the Pacific Northwest. Recent projects include examining the effects of shoreline armoring on the biota of the Duwamish River estuary, the effectiveness of green stormwater management strategies in improving urban stream health, and aquatic foodweb effects of dam removal on the Elwha River. Sarah holds a B.S. in Environmental Science from U.C. Berkeley and an M.S. in Aquatic and Fisheries Sciences from the University of Washington. She has been a member of the Watershed Program at the Northwest Fisheries Science Center since 2000. http://www.nwfsc.noaa.gov/research/staff/display_staffprofile.cfm?staffid=649

Salient Publications

  • Duda, J. J., H. Coe, S. A. Morley, K. Kloehn. 2011. Establishing Spatial Trends in Water Chemistry and Stable Isotopes (d15N and d13C) in the Elwha River Prior to Dam Removal: A Foodweb Perspective. River Research and Applications. doi:10.1002/rra.1413
  • Kloehn, K.K., T.J. Beechie, S.A. Morley, H.J. Coe, and J.J. Duda. 2008. Influence of dams on river-floodplain dynamics in the Elwha River, Washington. Northwest Science 82: 224-235.
  • Morley, S.A., J.J. Duda, H.J. Coe, K.K. Kloehn, and M.L. McHenry. 2008. Benthic Invertebrates and Periphyton in the Elwha River Basin: Current Conditions and Predicted Response to Dam Removal. Northwest Science 82:179-196.
  • Morley, S. A., P. S. Garcia, T. R. Bennett, P. Roni. 2005. Juvenile salmonid (Oncorhynchus spp.) use of constructed and natural side channels in Pacific Northwest Rivers. Canadian Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences, 62:2811-2821.
  • Pess, G. R., S. A. Morley, J. L. Hall, R. K. Timm. 2005. Monitoring floodplain restoration. Pages 127-166 in Roni, P. (Ed.) Methods for monitoring stream and watershed restoration. American Fisheries Society, Bethesda, Maryland.
Remote Access and Notes:

To join the online meeting (Now from mobile devices!)

  1. Go to https://nwfsc.webex.com/nwfsc/j.php?ED=161880897&UID=1216578137&RT=MiM0
  2. If requested, enter your name and email address.
  3. If a password is required, enter the meeting password: (This meeting does not require a password.)
  4. Click "Join".
  5. To view in other time zones or languages, please click the link: https://nwfsc.webex.com/nwfsc/j.php?ED=161880897&UID=1216578137&ORT=MiM0

To join the audio conference only

  • Call-in toll number (US/Canada): +1-408-600-3600
  • Access code:800 176 372

For assistance during the online meeting

  1. Go to https://nwfsc.webex.com/nwfsc/mc
  2. On the left navigation bar, click "Support".
  3. You can contact us at: nwfsc.webex@noaa.gov

For questions about this seminar please contact Diane L. Tierney-Jamieson (206-860-3380; )

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Wednesday, September 28, 2011 9:18 AM / Last updated Wednesday, October 5, 2011 11:47 AM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science and management information. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] or join our RSS feed by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

October 11, 2011

(Seminar Canceled) An Updated Precipitation Frequency Analysis For the State of Alaska

Date and Time: (Seminar Canceled) October 11, 2011, 10:00-11:00 Alaska Local Time (14:00-15:00 Eastern Time Zone) [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: The ACCAP office is located on the second floor of the Denali Building, 3352 College Rd., Fairbanks, Alaska
Speaker(s): Doug Kane and Sveta Steuffer (Water and Environmental Research Center, University of Alaska Fairbanks)
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NOAA ACCAP monthly climate webinar
Abstract:

TBD

Remote Access and Notes:

Pre-registration is strongly encouraged. To register please fill out the web-form at: http://ine.uaf.edu/accap/teleconference.htm#register, or contact: Brook Gamble, Assistant Coordinator and Outreach Specialist, (907) 474-7812, accap@uaf.edu. Please let us know if you intend to come in person. You are welcome to join us in our Fairbanks conference room. The ACCAP office is located on the second floor of the Denali Building, 3352 College Rd., Fairbanks.

How to Participate / Log-In to the Alaska Climate Webinar:

  • Point your web browser to: http://infiniteconferencing.com/Events/accap/
  • Enter Participant Code 83847342
  • Enter the rest of the requested information (The name and organization you enter will be seen by other participants, but your contact information will remain confidential
  • Click the blue "log-in" button

Audio / conference call:

  • With a regular telephone dial: 1- (877) 594-8353
  • When prompted, enter the Participant passcode: 83847342.Please mute your phone during the presentation. The audio is very sensitive and your external conversations and typing can be heard by other participants.

For support during a call, press *0 on your phone and a conferencing coordinator will assist you. For further information please contact Brook Gamble, Assistant Coordinator and Outreach Specialist, (907) 474-7812, accap@uaf.edu

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Tuesday September 6, 2011 7:37 AM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science and management information. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] or join our RSS feed by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].


Data Assimilation of the Global Ocean using the Local Ensemble Transform Kalman Filter

Date and Time: October 11, 2011, 12:00-13:00 Eastern Time Zone [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: World Weather Building (5200 Auth Road, Camp Springs, MD 20746); Room 707 (directions)
Speaker(s): Dr. Steve Penny (University of Maryland)
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NOAA NCEP Environmental Modelling Center seminars
Abstract:

Ocean data assimilation combines forecasts from computational models with observations such as XBT and Argo float profiles, and satellite measurements of surface data. Specifically for the ocean, observations are limited and special techniques are required to manage the sparseness of the data. Two data assimilation schemes have been successfully implemented with a global ocean model: (1) the Local Ensemble Transform Kalman Filter (LETKF) of Hunt et al, and (2) an Optimal Interpolation (OI) method via the Simple Ocean Data Assimilation (SODA) of Carton et al, which has been shown to be mathematically equivalent to 3D-Var. In a 7-year historical reanalysis (1997-2003) using only observed vertical profiles, LETKF is shown to outperform the OI method - particularly in the data-rich equatorial regions. The LETKF system has since been upgraded to include the capability to assimilate observations of sea surface temperature, sea surface height, sea surface salinity, and drifter velocities. LETKF is currently being integrated with GODAS to facilitate the development of a hybrid EnKF/3D-Var data assimilation system.

Remote Access and Notes:

Go To Meeting https://www2.gotomeeting.com/join/983507466. Phone access: Dial +1 (636) 277-0137; Access Code: 983-507-466; Meeting ID: 983-507-466. For questions about this seminar please contact Jose-Henrique Alves (301 763-8000 x7211; Henrique.Alves@NOAA.gov )

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Wednesday, October 5, 2011 8:08 AM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science and management information. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] or join our RSS feed by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].


Ensemble Forecasting and Initial Condition Sensitivity for Hurricanes

Date and Time: October 11, 2011, 15:30-16:30 Central Time Zone [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: National Weather Center (120 David L. Boren Blvd, University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK), NWC Room. 1350 (Directions to the National Weather Center (PDF, ~60 kb).
Speaker(s): Sharan Majumdar (Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science, University of Miami)
Speaker's Email:
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NOAA NWS National Severe Storms Laboratory Seminar Series
Abstract: Tropical cyclone (TC) forecasts are sensitive to initial perturbations in the near and far environment. Several approaches to explore these sensitivities and the utility of new ensemble forecast diagnostics will be presented. They include: (1) the dynamical mechanisms behind the spreading of singular-vector based ensemble perturbations around TCs; (2) the sensitivity of the tracks of Typhoon Sinlaku (2008) and Hurricane Ike (2008) to direct perturbations of the initial conditions; (3) the influence of assimilating supplemental rawinsonde and dropwindsonde observations on NCEP GFS track forecasts of Hurricane Irene (2011); and (4) Real-time ensemble products on tropical cyclogenesis.

Remote Access and Notes:

Presentations are available remotely for free via a combination of phone (US &territories) & webcast. Remote access is limited to 50 connections on a first-come-first served basis. To participate remotely via phone and internet:

  • For the audio and video part of the presentation, you can access the webex meeting by going to: https://www1.gotomeeting.com/register/988344841. Enter other required fields - First and last name - Check the box that that you have read the Privacy Policy, and click Proceed.

For information please contact Race Clark () or Jonathan Gourley ().

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Monday, September 26, 2011 7:51 AM / Last updated Tuesday, October 11, 2011 7:11 AM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science and management information. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] or join our RSS feed by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

October 12, 2011

The Habitat Assessment Program in the National Marine Fisheries Service

Date and Time: October 12, 2011, 12:00-13:00 Eastern Time Zone [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: NOAA SSMC-4 (1305 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD, 20910); Room 8150
Speaker(s): Dr. Steve Brown (Chief, Assessment and Monitoring Division NOAA Fisheries Office of Science and Technology)
Speaker's Email:
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NOAA NOS Science Seminar Series and the Fisheries Office of Science and Technology
Abstract:

In 2008, NOAA Fisheries began developing a strategic plan to improve the agency's ability to conduct and provide the science needed to meet the habitat-related mandates of the Magnuson-Stevens Re-authorization Act. The resulting Marine Fisheries Habitat Assessment Improvement Plan (HAIP) was published in May 2010 (http://www.st.nmfs.noaa.gov/st4/documents/habitatAssesmentImprovementPlan_052110.PDF). Habitat assessment is defined as the process and products associated with consolidating, analyzing, and reporting the best available information on habitat characteristics relative to the population dynamics of fishery species and other living marine resources. The scope of the HAIP is the 519 managed stocks and stock complexes within fishery management plans, with particular focus on the 230 stocks in the Fisheries Stock Sustainability Index (FSSI), which yield over 90% of commercial landings. The HAIP contains nine major recommendations to enable the agency to improve the scientific basis for habitat management, conservation and restoration, and to improve stock assessments by reducing habitat-related uncertainty.

A key first step to support the HAIP was to convene an internal workshop to identify national and regional issues and strategies for implementation. The first National Habitat Assessment Workshop, co-sponsored by the Office of Science and Technology and Habitat Conservation, was held in May 2010 (http://www.st.nmfs.noaa.gov/st4/documents/NSAW_NHAW_Proceedings_final.pdf). This workshop was designed to catalyze internal communication, and included a joint session with the agency's 11th National Stock Assessment Workshop. Other recommendations currently being implemented include supporting pilot projects that incorporate habitat information into stock assessments, and convening of a work group to develop criteria for prioritizing stocks and geographic areas for habitat assessments.

Another key recommendation of the HAIP involves seeking opportunities for inter-line office collaboration on habitat science. This effort has already borne fruit. NMFS scientists are working with scientists from NCCOS's Biogeography Branch on the National Fish Habitat Action Plan (NFHAP). This team developed the coastal component of the NFHAP report: Through a Fish's Eye: The status of Fish Habitats in the United States 2010 (http://fishhabitat.org/images/documents/fishhabitatreport_012611.pdf). For this effort, the team was awarded NFHAP's 2010 Science Achievement Award. We believe that there are many more opportunities for collaboration in the future.

About the Speaker:

Dr. Brown received his PhD from the Rutgers University Ecology Graduate Program in 1983. He held post-doctoral positions at Hopkins Marine Station of Stanford University and at the University of Washington School of Fisheries. He started his Federal service with the NOS Strategic Assessment Branch in 1990. He began working for the NMFS Office of Science and Technology in 1998, where he is currently chief of the Assessment and Monitoring Division.

Remote Access and Notes:

Presentations are available remotely via a combination of phone (US only) & webcast. Note that remote access is limited to 50 connections on a first-come-first served basis, so we cannot guarantee participation.

To participate remotely via phone and internet:
  1. Dial toll-free (U.S.) 1-877-708-1667. When prompted enter passcode 7028688 followed by the # sign. Please use your phone's mute button (*6 toggles on or off) during the presentation until you are ready to ask questions. The phone conference does not start until about five minutes before the seminar.
  2. To access the webex meeting, go the to the webcast site at http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?sigKey=mymeetings&i=744925156&p=&t=c. Enter meeting number 744925156 if needed; no passcode is required. Enter other required fields - First and last name. Check the box that that you have read the Privacy Policy, and click Proceed

Questions? Contact Tracy Gill (), or if it is within 5 minutes of the seminar start, call the toll free number above and she will try to answer your questions.

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Thursday, August 4, 2011 2:25 PM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science and management information. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] or join our RSS feed by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

October 13, 2011

Fisheries Science and Management of U.S. West Coast Groundfishes in Resource-Limited Situations

Date and Time: October 13, 2011, 11:00-12:00 Pacific Time Zone [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: NOAA Northwest Fisheries Science Center (NWFSC) (2725 Montlake Boulevard East, Seattle, WA 98112; Map to NWFSC), Room: Auditorium.
Speaker(s): Dr. Jason Cope (Research Fishery Biologist, Groundfish Analysis Program, Fishery Resource Analysis and Monitoring Division, NOAA NWFSC)
Speaker's Email:
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NOAA NWFSC Monster Seminar JAM
Abstract:

TBD

About the Speaker:

http://www.nwfsc.noaa.gov/research/staff/display_staffprofile.cfm?staffid=2138

Remote Access and Notes:

Remote access details: TBD. For questions about this seminar please contact Diane L. Tierney-Jamieson (206-860-3380; )

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Wednesday, September 28, 2011 9:18 AM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science and management information. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] or join our RSS feed by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].


Using Satellite Multiple Sensor Products to Monitor Vegetation Properties: Vegetation-atmosphere Interaction

Date and Time: October 13, 2011, 12:00-13:00 Eastern Time Zone [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: World Weather Building, Room 701 (5200 Auth Road, Camp Springs, MD 20746)
Speaker(s): Dr. Qilong Min (Atmospheric Sciences Research Center (ASRC), CESTM State University of New York)
Speaker's Email:
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NOAA STAR seminar series
Abstract:

Vegetation physical and biological properties and vegetation-atmosphere interactions, especially vegetation water content and evapotranspiration (ET), are important aspect of land surface hydrology. Measurements of these properties and interactions in large spatial and long temporal scales are generally not available at present. We have developed a novel technique that links vegetation properties and ET fluxes with a microwave emissivity difference vegetation index? (EDVI), defined as the microwave land surface emissivity differences between two wavelengths. The EDVI values can be derived from a combination of satellite microwave measurements with visible and infrared observations. This technique is applicable both day- and night-times under all-weather conditions, which provides a great potential for monitoring vegetation biomass and ecosystem exchange processes, particularly under cloudy conditions where classic optical indexes are unavailable. The EDVI values represent physical properties of crown vegetation such as vegetation water content of crown canopies, and are statistically sensitive to evapotranspiration fractions (EF) under all-sky conditions. For clear skies, EDVI estimates exhibit a stronger relationship with EF than normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI). Applying this technique to Amazon Basin using satellite measurements shows that the microwave based EDVI can provide the vegetation information over 99% of the land surface while only small fraction (15%) of land surface information can be extracted by the methods with classic vegetation indexes.

Download Presentation:

http://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/documents/seminardocs/2011/Min20111013.pdf (~3.34 MB)

Remote Access and Notes:

Phone access: USA participants: 866-832-9297 International: 203-566-7610 Passcode: 6070416. For questions about this seminar please contact Patrick Sweeney (301-763-8102 Ext 175; ) or Felix Kogan (301-763-8042 Ext 119; )

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Wednesday, October 5, 2011 10:20 AM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science and management information. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] or join our RSS feed by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].


Tales and Tails - 41 Sea Years of Texas Sea Grant

Date and Time: October 13, 2011, 12:00-13:00 Eastern Time Zone [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: NOAA SSMC-3 (1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD, 20910); 2nd Floor, NOAA Library
Speaker(s): Gary Graham (Texas Sea Grant extension agent)
Speaker's Email:
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NOAA Sea Grant
Abstract:

Gary Graham, longtime fisheries specialist with the Texas Sea Grant Program will present his experiences with the early years of interaction with marine resource users. An overview of cooperative work with the fishing industry to identify and plot trawl obstructions, development of more environmentally acceptable fishing gear and the emotional times which ultimately yielded successes with turtles and TEDs will be discussed. Graham will describe adaptations in working with different minority groups within the fisheries as well as challenges in engaging industry to solve their own problem.

Download Presentation:

http://www.lib.noaa.gov/about/news/graham_10132011.pdf

Remote Access and Notes:
  1. Go to http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?sigKey=mymeetings&i=742656968&=brownbag&t=c
  2. Enter the required fields
  3. Indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy
  4. Click on Proceed
  5. Passcode: brownbag
  6. For audio in the US and Canada, dial 866-833-7307. The participant passcode is 8986360
Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Wednesday, October 12, 2011 7:11 AM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science and management information. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] or join our RSS feed by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].


Uncertainty in Seasonal Snow Reconstruction: Relative Impacts of Model Forcing and Image Availability

Date and Time: October 13, 2011, 14:30-15:00 Eastern Time Zone [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: NOAA SSMC-2(1325 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD, 20910); Room 8246
Speaker(s): Andrew.G. Slater (National Snow and Ice Data Center, University of Colorado, Boulder)
Speaker's Email:
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NOAA NWS Office of Hydrologic Development
Abstract:

There are many areas of uncertainty when solving the inverse problems of snow water equivalent (SWE) reconstruction. These include (i) the ability to infer the Final Date of the Seasonal Snow (FDSS) cover, particularly from remote sensing; (ii) errors in model forcing data (such as temperature or radiation fluxes); and (iii) weaknesses in the snow model used for the reconstruction, associated with both the fidelity of the equations used to simulate snow processes (structural uncertainty) and the parameter values selected for use in the model equations. We investigate the trade-offs among these sources of uncertainty using 10,000 station-years worth of data from the western US SNOTEL network. Model structural and parameter uncertainty are eliminated by using a perfect model scenario i.e. comparing results to modelled control runs. The model was calibrated for each station-year to ensure that the model simulations reflect reality. Results indicate that for a temperature index model, a ±5 day error in FDSS gives a median -25%/+32% error in maximum SWE. A 1°C temperature bias produces a SWE error larger than a 5 day error in the FDSS for 50% of the 10,000 cases. Similarly, a 5 days error in FDSS could be accounted for by a net radiation error of 13Wm-2 or less in 50% of cases. Mean absolute errors of 1°C or more are typically reported in the literature for temperature interpolations at high elevations. Observed solar radiation during the melt season can differ by 30 Wm-2 over relatively short distances, while estimates from reanalysis (NARR, ERA-Interim, MERRA, CFSRR) and GOES satellites typically span more than 40Wm-2. Using data from both MODIS sensors (Terra & Aqua) at all snow covered points in the western US, a consecutive 5 day gap in imagery at time of FDSS is likely to occur only 5-10% of the time. This work shows that errors in model forcing data are at least as important, if not more, than image availability when reconstructing SWE.

About the Speaker:

Andrew Slater has worked on problems involving modeling cold regions terrestrial processes for the past 15 years. His work has spanned matters from long term climate modeling to short term hydrologic forecasting and data assimilation. He completed a Bachelor of Economics (Finance) and a Bachelor of Science (Climatology) at Macquarie University in his native city of Sydney, Australia and completed graduate studies at the University of Colorado in Boulder. He is currently at the National Snow and Ice Data Center at the University of Colorado.

Notes:

This is one of three back-to-back Snow Modeling OHD seminars. See (Seminar 1) Andrew.G. Slater: Uncertainty in Seasonal Snow Reconstruction: Relative Impacts of Model Forcing and Image Availability; (Seminar 2) Andy Wood: Research and development to meet operational needs at CBRFC; (Seminar 3) Martyn Clark: Understanding uncertainty in physics-based snow models

Remote Access:

Remote attendance is limited to 25 connections. Teleconference: (866) 713-2373, passcode 9960047. GotoMeeting: https://www1.gotomeeting.com/join/238913393. For questions about this seminar please contact Ken Pavelle (301-713-0640 Ext 183; ken.pavelle@noaa.gov)

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Wednesday, October 5, 2011 8:51 AM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science and management information. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] or join our RSS feed by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].


Research and Development to Meet Operational Needs at Colorado Basin River Forecast Center (CBRFC)

Date and Time: October 13, 2011, 15:00-15:30 Eastern Time Zone [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: NOAA SSMC-2(1325 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD, 20910); Room 8246
Speaker(s): Andy Wood (Development and Operations Hydrologist, Colorado Basin River Forecast Center)
Speaker's Email:
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NOAA NWS Office of Hydrologic Development
Abstract:

CBRFC provides hydrometeorological analyses and predictions from short to long (hours to multiple seasons) lead times to support decision-making by stakeholders in water and other sectors. CBRFC uses a variety of statistical and dynamical (model-based) approaches to meet stakeholder needs, producing operational products across a range that includes gridded, precipitation and snowpack analyses and future weather and climate-scale streamflow ensembles. To advance the technical quality of its operational approaches, CBRFC has worked to develop or facilitate an externally funded program of collaborative research and development (R&D) with agency and academic partners. Primary topics include snow modeling, snow data assimilation, ensemble streamflow prediction for decision support, and sub-seasonal to seasonal climate prediction. This presentation describes the R&D priorities and associated projects that are underway or in proposal review, as well as the philosophy of integrated effort that underpins project and proposal formulation.

About the Speaker:

Dr. Andy Wood's major professional accomplishments are in research focusing on hydrology, water resources, climate change and renewable energy. His doctoral work applied hydrologic models for the assessment of potential climate change impacts on hydrology and water resources. He developed a popular statistical climate downscaling approach now called BCSD, and developed models and methods for real-time monitoring and prediction of hydrologic conditions and streamflow at monthly to seasonal time scales. As research faculty in the Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering at the University of Washington (UW) in Seattle, Andy created quasi-operational hydrologic prediction systems focusing on scales ranging from small river basins to the continental U.S. One example is the UW Surface Water Monitor (http://www.hydro.washington.edu/forecast/monitor/), the products of which (particularly those related to drought) are still used by public and private sector groups. In 2008, Andy joined 3TIER, a Seattle-based firm that provides renewable energy assessment and prediction services for the global wind, solar and hydro energy industry. As 3TIER's lead scientist, he supervised the company's research team while also developing new approaches for solar and hydropower prediction, and for hydro energy assessment. In 2010, Andy joined the NOAA Colorado Basin River Forecast Center, where he is the lead developer for hydrologic prediction approaches and also helps manage a staff of operational streamflow forecasters. He recently co-authored an assessment of NOAA National Weather Service (NWS) performance during the devastating 2010 flooding in Nashville, Tennessee, and the Requirements document for the nascent NWS Hydrologic Ensemble Forecast Service. Andy is a co-leader of the NOAA MAPP Drought Task Force and the NWS Hydrologic Ensemble Prediction Experiment (HEPEX). He also chairs the Hydrology Committee of the American Meteorological Society. Former Positions - Lead Scientist, 3TIER, Inc., Seattle. Research Assistant Professor, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Washington, Seattle.

Notes:

This is one of three back-to-back Snow Modeling OHD seminars. See (Seminar 1) Andrew.G. Slater: Uncertainty in Seasonal Snow Reconstruction: Relative Impacts of Model Forcing and Image Availability; (Seminar 2) Andy Wood: Research and development to meet operational needs at CBRFC; (Seminar 3) Martyn Clark: Understanding uncertainty in physics-based snow models

Remote Access:

Remote attendance is limited to 25 connections. Teleconference: (866) 713-2373, passcode 9960047. GotoMeeting: https://www1.gotomeeting.com/join/238913393. For questions about this seminar please contact Ken Pavelle (301-713-0640 Ext 183; )

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Wednesday, October 5, 2011 8:51 AM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science and management information. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] or join our RSS feed by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].


Understanding Uncertainty in Physics-based Snow Models

Date and Time: October 13, 2011, 15:30-16:00 Eastern Time Zone [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: NOAA SSMC-2(1325 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD, 20910); Room 8246
Speaker(s): Martyn Clark (National Center for Atmospheric Research)
Speaker's Email:
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NOAA NWS Office of Hydrologic Development
Abstract:

In spite of considerable efforts dedicated to understanding and simulating the accumulation and ablation of the snowpack, there is arguably still a colossal amount of uncertainty in physics-based snow models. The fidelity of model representations of snow processes remains compromised by limited process understanding, and limited data. Many modeling decisions are often represented using empirical formulations with model parameters defined based either on order-of-magnitude considerations or by fitting a curve through a limited amount of experimental data. An outstanding challenge for the snow modeling community is to understand the impact of differences among existing snow models on their physical validity and predictive performance, and use this to identify and address fundamental model weaknesses.

We introduce an alternative methodology for understanding differences among snow models. We first define a single set of governing model equations - a "master modeling template" - from which many existing models can be reproduced, and new models derived. The master template is then implemented within a robust numerical framework, and used to explore the impact of differences in the choice of modeling approaches and the choice of model parameter values. To keep the study tractable, we focus on a subset of modeling options available within the template, restricting attention to one-dimensional snow model applied over non-vegetated surfaces. Assessments of forest snow processes and spatial variability are deferred to a separate study.

The differences among existing snow models can be broadly classified into three categories: (i) estimation of fluxes at the snow-atmosphere interface, including the approach used to estimate the surface albedo, the turbulent fluxes of sensible and latent heat, and the partitioning of precipitation between rain and snow; (ii) internal processes within the snowpack, including heat conduction, penetration of shortwave radiation, vertical drainage of liquid water, and compaction of the snowpack associated with metamorphism of the snow crystals; and (iii) estimation of fluxes at the lower boundary associated with heat transfer in the soil. Results show that (in most cases) the impacts of differences in model structure are overwhelmed by uncertainty in a-priori estimates of model parameters, and suggest that careful specification of probability distributions of model parameters can be used to represent model uncertainty.

About the Speaker:

Martyn Clark is a scientist in the Research Applications Laboratory at the National Center for Atmospheric Research in Boulder, Colorado, USA. Martyn received his Bachelors and Masters Degrees from the University of Canterbury (New Zealand) and his Ph.D. Degree from the University of Colorado at Boulder. Martyn's research on the numerical modeling and prediction of hydrologic processes has included coupling of hydrology and climate models, development of spatially distributed hydrologic models, development of methods for hydrologic data assimilation, and development of methods to quantify hydrologic model uncertainty.

Notes:

This is one of three back-to-back Snow Modeling OHD seminars. See (Seminar 1) Andrew.G. Slater: Uncertainty in Seasonal Snow Reconstruction: Relative Impacts of Model Forcing and Image Availability; (Seminar 2) Andy Wood: Research and development to meet operational needs at CBRFC; (Seminar 3) Martyn Clark: Understanding uncertainty in physics-based snow models

Remote Access:

Remote attendance is limited to 25 connections. Teleconference: (866) 713-2373, passcode 9960047. GotoMeeting: https://www1.gotomeeting.com/join/238913393. For questions about this seminar please contact Ken Pavelle (301-713-0640 Ext 183; ken.pavelle@noaa.gov)

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Wednesday, October 5, 2011 8:51 AM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science and management information. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] or join our RSS feed by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

October 19, 2011

(Seminar potponed to Nov 16, 2011) Ionospheric Data Assimilation

Date and Time: (Seminar postponed to Nov 16, 2011) October 19, 2011, 11:30-12:30 Eastern Time Zone [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: World Weather Building (5200 Auth Road, Camp Springs, MD 20746); Room 707
Speaker(s): Dr. Robert McCoy (Office of Naval Research)
Speaker's Email:
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NOAA Joint Center for Satellite Data Assimilation (JCSDA)
Abstract:

TBD

About the Speaker: http://nia.ecsu.edu/ureoms2006/mccoy_bio.htm

Remote Access and Notes:

Seminar postponed to Nov 16, 2011)

Video:

  1. Go to JCSDA Seminar and click on the seminar title
  2. Enter your name and email address
  3. Enter the meeting password: JCSDAseminars707
  4. Click "Join Now"
  5. Follow the instructions that appear on your screen
  6. For further information visit http://www.jcsda.noaa.gov/JCSDASeminars.php

Phone Access:

  • USA participants: 1-866-715-2479
  • Passcode: 9457557
  • Enter the meeting password: JCSDAseminar2010
  • International: 1-517-345-5260
  • For further information please contact

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Thursday, July 14, 2011 9:42 AM / Last updated Tuesday, October 18, 2011 7:12 AM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science and management information. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] or join our RSS feed by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].


You Tube 101: Part of a Series Exploring Social Media Tools

Date and Time: October 19, 2011, 12:00-13:00 Eastern Time Zone [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: SSMC-4 (1305 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD, 20910); Room 8150.
Speaker(s): Emily Crum (Chief, Communications and Content Services Branch; NOS Communications and Education Division)
Speaker's Email:
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NOAA NOS Science Seminar Series and the NOS Communications and Education Division
Abstract:

This is the third in a series of presentations exploring the social media tools that the National Ocean Service is currently using.

About the Speaker:

Emily Crum is the Chief of the Communications and Content Services Branch within NOAA's National Ocean Service Communications and Education Division. She serves as the managing editor of the National Ocean Service Web site; manages and implements NOS's social media tools; manages the development of NOS outreach materials; and is involved in messaging and communications strategy/planning for the organization. Emily has been with been at NOAA for five years; she previously did science policy (lobbying) and media relations work for the American Geophysical Union and developed Earth science textbooks and educational Web sites for the American Geological Institute. She holds a master's degree in science communication, a master's degree in geological sciences, and an undergraduate degree in environmental geology and art studio.

Remote Access and Notes:

Presentations are available remotely for free via a combination of phone (US & territories) & webcast. Remote access is limited to 50 connections on a first-come-first served basis.

To participate remotely via phone and internet:

  1. For the audio part of the presentation, Dial toll-free (U.S.) 1-877-708-1667. When prompted enter passcode 7028688 and the # sign. Please use your phone's mute button (*6 toggles on or off) during the presentation until you are ready to ask questions. The phone conference does not start until about five minutes before the seminar.
  2. For the visual part of the presentation, you can access the webex meeting by going to: http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?sigKey=mymeetings&i=744925156&p=&t=c. Enter meeting number 744925156 if needed; no passcode is required. Enter other required fields - First and last name - Check the box that that you have read the Privacy Policy, and click Proceed.

For further information please contact at least 45 minutes before the seminar, or if it is within 5 minutes of the seminar start, call the toll free number above.

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Monday, September 19, 2011 11:04 AM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science and management information. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] or join our RSS feed by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].


(Seminar postponed) Sustainability Science at the National Science Foundation: A GEO Perspective

Date and Time: October 19, 2011, 12:00-13:00 Eastern Time Zone [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: SSMC-3 (1325 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD, 20910); Room 8417.
Speaker(s): Dr. Jun Abrajano [Head of Surface Earth Processes Section (SEPS) of Earth Sciences at NSF]
Speaker's Email:
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NOAA National Oceanographic Data Center (NODC)
Abstract:

In this presentation, Dr. Jun Abrajano will describe on-going and new programs at NSF in support of the Science, Engineering, and Education for Sustainability (SEES) initiative (http://www.nsf.gov/sees), from the perspective of the GEO Directorate in general, and SEPS in particular. Given NSF's intention to support research on SEES in a manner that is cognizant of and complementary to activities in cognate agencies, this presentation to interested scientists at NOAA is meant to set up an open conversation. SEES promotes science and education to inform the societal actions for environmental and economic sustainability and sustainable human well-being. Its goals are to support interdisciplinary research and education that can facilitate the move towards global sustainability (new science), build linkages among existing projects and partners and add new participants in the sustainability research enterprise (enable/strengthen linkages), and develop a workforce trained in the interdisciplinary scholarship needed to understand and address the complex issues of sustainability (SEES workforce). SEES takes the long view in promoting integrative approaches across disciplines, developing systems-level understanding, promoting data-enabled science, linking observational networks, and communicating research findings to decision makers and the public. A summary of existing and emerging specific solicitations will be presented to enable specific conversations on where potential cross-information, linkages or partnerships with NOAA can be explored.

Remote Access and Notes:

Online web access:

  • Click on http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?i=744868915&p=science&t=c
  • type in other required fields (i.e., your name, e-mail, organization; meeting number is 744868915; password is "science" -without quotation marks, password is case sensitive- )
  • indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy
  • click on Proceed and follow the instructions that appear on your screen.

Audio / conference call:

  • Toll free dial 877-725-4068 using a touch-tone phone
  • when prompted enter participant code 8634769 followed by a "#"
  • Please mute your phone during the presentation or toggle *6 otherwise it produces a sound feedback and we will disconnect everyone
  • Phone access limited to the first 50 callers only

You will need both the web/phone access to see the slides and hear the speaker. Phone access limited to 50 users. For further information please contact .

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Monday, October 17, 2011 9:50 . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science and management information. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] or join our RSS feed by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

October 20, 2011

Are Fish Swimbladders Modified Lungs?

Date and Time: October 20, 2011, 11:00-12:00 Pacific Time Zone [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: NOAA Northwest Fisheries Science Center (NWFSC) (2725 Montlake Boulevard East, Seattle, WA 98112; Map to NWFSC), Room: Auditorium.
Speaker(s): Dr. Amy McCune (Professor and Chair, Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Cornell University)
Speaker's Email:
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NOAA NWFSC Monster Seminar JAM
Abstract:

Early anatomical studies indicated that the gasbladders of ray-finned fishes are evolutionary modifications of lungs of bony vertebrates. We are examining the predictions of this hypothesized transition through studies of gene expression and modern imaging techniques. One prediction of the lung-to-gasbladder transition is that the same genes deployed during the early development of mouse lungs would also be involved in the early development of the zebrafish gasbladder. Our studies show this is the case, although the relative timing of gene expression differs during mouse lung development and zebrafish gasbladder development. We are also using modern micro-CT imaging techniques to examine comparatively, the gross morphology of lungs and gasbladders. A previously unresolved anatomical prediction is that the vascular patterning associated with swimbladders would be the same as that for lungs. Increased acuity stemming from micro-CT studies of barium-injected vasculature have revealed vestigial vessels, not previously recognized, and confirm the similarity of the vasculature supplying both gas bladders and lungs.

About the Speaker:

I majored in (marine) biology as an undergraduate at Brown University (1976). As an undergrad at Brown and at the Bodega Marine Lab, I was inspired to study fishes by both coursework and undergraduate research projects. I received a Ph.D. (1982) from Yale University where I first began thinking about paleoichthyology and developed my interests in Macroevolution (large scale patterns of diversification and the origin of evolutionary novelty). Following a postdoctoral year at U.C. Berkeley, I have been a member the faculty and Curator of Ichthyology at Cornell University since 1983. I teach Biology of Fishes, an advanced evolution course on Macroevolution, and part of the introductory course in Evolutionary Biology. I am currently the Chair of the Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology. Ongoing research projects involve studies of bowfin natural history (reproductive biology, population structure, and seasonal patterns of movement as explored through radio telemetry); study of the evo-devo of air-filled organs (gas bladders and lungs) of vertebrates; anatomy of gasbladders of fishes; homology as it relates to developmental genetics. http://www.eeb.cornell.edu/mccune/mccune.html

Salient Publications

  • Cass, A.N., M. D. Servetnick, and A. R. McCune. In revision. Expression of a lung developmental cassette in the adult and developing zebrafish swimbladder. Evolution and Development.
  • Rabosky, D. and A. R. McCune. 2010. Reinventing species selection with molecular phylogenies. Trends in Ecology and Evolutionary Biology. 25(2) 68-74.
  • McCune, A. R. and R. L. Carlson. 2004. Twenty ways to lose your bladder: Common natural mutants in zebrafish and widespread convergence of swim bladder loss among teleost fishes. Evolution and Development 6(4):246 259.
  • McCune, A. R., R. C. Fuller, A. A. Aquilina, R. M. Dawley, J. M. Fadool, D. Houle, J. Travis, and A. S. Kondrashov. 2002. A low genomic number of recessive lethals in natural populations of bluefin killifish and zebrafish. Science 296:2398 2401.
  • McCune, A. R. and N. R. Lovejoy. 1998. The relative rate of sympatric and allopatric speciation in fishes: Tests using DNA sequence divergence between sister species and among clades. In: D. Howard and S. Berloccher (eds.), Endless Forms: Species and Speciation. Oxford University Press, pp. 172-185.
Remote Access and Notes:

Remote access details: TBD. For questions about this seminar please contact Diane L. Tierney-Jamieson (206-860-3380; )

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Wednesday, September 28, 2011 9:18 AM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science and management information. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] or join our RSS feed by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].


The Impacts of El Niño Conditions on California Sea Lion Health and Fisheries Interactions: Stranding Hotspots and Management Implications

Date and Time: October 20, 2011, 12:00-12:30 Eastern Time Zone [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: NOAA SSMC-3 (1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD, 20910); 2nd Floor, NOAA Library
Speaker(s): Amanda Keledjian (Office of Protected Resources in NOAA Fisheries Service)
Speaker's Email:
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NOAA NODC Central Library
Abstract:

California sea lions, Zalophus californianus, are often viewed as a sentinel species whose health can be affected by prevailing oceanographic conditions and environmental quality. For this reason, it has become increasingly important to study the natural stressors and anthropogenic impacts that can lead to diminished health and survival among individuals of this coastal species. In this study, just over 36,000 sea lion stranding records spanning 1983-2010 were used to first identify regional and seasonal fishing interaction "hotspots" in California, and second, to examine how these hotspots might change under additional environmental stress induced by El Niño oceanographic conditions that can affect prey availability. Analyzing mean monthly fisheries interactions cases (n=2,380) revealed that (1) the number of fisheries interactions has risen over time (as much as 20% in some areas) but the frequency of these strandings relative to abundance estimates has not changed significantly throughout the study period; (2) regional hotspots were identified in Monterey, Los Angeles, and Orange counties; (3) seasonal peaks in fisheries interactions occur May-August along the coast; and (4) fisheries interactions are significantly greater during El Niño periods in all regions studied. These results indicate that over a twenty-seven year period, sea lion health is impacted by oceanographic conditions and anthropogenic stressors that may be heightened in early summer following the weaning period. Spatially- and temporally-explicit data such as these can be useful in dynamically mapping marine mammal health within spatial planning tools. This study could inform adaptive management measures designed to minimize incidental take for this and other pinniped species where they overlap with fisheries on the U.S. West coast.

Remote Access and Notes:
  1. Go to http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?sigKey=mymeetings&i=742656968&=brownbag&t=c
  2. Enter the required fields
  3. Indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy
  4. Click on Proceed
  5. Passcode: brownbag
  6. For audio in the US and Canada, dial 866-833-7307. The participant passcode is 8986360
Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Friday, October 14, 2011 4:36 PM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science and management information. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] or join our RSS feed by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].


Melting Glaciers: A Probable Source of DDT to the Antarctic Marine Ecosystem

Date and Time: October 20, 2011, 12:30-13:00 Eastern Time Zone [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: NOAA SSMC-3 (1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD, 20910); 2nd Floor, NOAA Library
Speaker(s): Heidi Geisz (Legislative Fellow with the House Natural Resources Committee subcommittee on Fisheries, Wildlife, Oceans and Insular Affairs)
Speaker's Email:
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NOAA NODC Central Library
Abstract:

Persistent organic pollutants reach polar regions by long-range atmospheric transport and biomagnify through the food web accumulating in higher trophic level predators. We analyzed Adélie penguin (Pygoscelis adeliae) samples collected from 2004-2006 to evaluate current levels of ∑DDT (p,p'-DDT + p,p'-DDE) in these birds, which are confined to Antarctica. Ratios of p,p'-DDT to p,p'-DDE in Adélie penguins have declined significantly since 1964 indicating current exposure to old rather than new sources of SDDT. However, ∑DDT has not declined in Adélie penguins from the Western Antarctic Peninsula for more than 30 years and the presence of p,p'-DDT in these birds indicates that there is a current source of DDT to the Antarctic marine food web. DDT has been banned or severely restricted since peak use in the 1970s, implicating glacier melt-water as a likely source for DDT contamination in coastal Antarctic seas. Our estimates indicate that 1-4 kg y^-1 ∑DDT are currently being released into coastal waters along the Western Antarctic Ice Sheet due to glacier ablation.

Remote Access and Notes:
  1. Go to http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?sigKey=mymeetings&i=742656968&=brownbag&t=c
  2. Enter the required fields
  3. Indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy
  4. Click on Proceed
  5. Passcode: brownbag
  6. For audio in the US and Canada, dial 866-833-7307. The participant passcode is 8986360
Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Friday, October 14, 2011 4:36 PM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science and management information. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] or join our RSS feed by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

October 25, 2011

Dr. Doolittle meets CSI on a Coral Reef: Ecotoxicology as a Diagnostic Approach

Date and Time: October 25, 2011, 12:00-13:00 Eastern Time Zone [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: NOAA SSMC-4 (1305 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD, 20910); Room 8150.
Speaker(s): Dr. Bob Richmond (Research Professor, Kewalo Marine Laboratory, University of Hawaii at Manoa)
Speaker's Email:
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NOAA NOS Science Seminar Series
Abstract:

Mortality is a crude estimator of stress. Standard techniques for coral reef assessment and monitoring use the death of individuals and the loss of species as the key metrics of change, which are of limited value to resource managers and stakeholders. Add a degree of uncertainty as to the smoking gun(s), and effective mitigation programs become difficult to design and implement. Ecotoxicology, combined with other diagnostic tools, allows us to more effectively identify cause-and-effect relationships between stressors and coral health, and also supports responsive evaluation of the effectiveness of intervention efforts. Key elements of this research are being supported by NOAA/CSCOR/CRES and through a collaboration with NOAA's Holling's Marine Laboratory.

About the Speaker:

Bob Richmond is a Research Professor at the Kewalo Marine Laboratory, University of Hawaii at Manoa. He is a Pew Fellow in Marine Conservation and the President of the International Society for Reef Studies.

Remote Access and Notes:

Presentations are available remotely for free via a combination of phone (US & territories) & webcast. Remote access is limited to 50 connections on a first-come-first served basis. To participate remotely via phone and internet:

  1. For the audio part of the presentation, Dial toll-free (U.S.) 1-877-708-1667. When prompted enter passcode 7028688 and the # sign. Please use your phone's mute button (*6 toggles on or off) during the presentation until you are ready to ask questions. The phone conference does not start until about five minutes before the seminar.
  2. For the visual part of the presentation, you can access the web meeting by going to: http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?sigKey=mymeetings&i=744925156&p=&t=c. Enter meeting number 744925156 if needed; no passcode is required. Enter other required fields - First and last name, other. Check the box that that you have read the Privacy Policy, and click Proceed.

For questions about this seminar please contact Tracy Gill () at least 45 minutes before the seminar, or if it is within 5 minutes of the seminar start, call the toll free number above.

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Friday, October 21, 2011 12:19 PM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science and management information. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] or join our RSS feed by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].


Alaska and the National Climate Assessment: Who, What, Where, When, Why and How You Can Be Involved

Date and Time: October 25, 2011, 10:00-11:00 Alaska Local Time (14:00-15:00 ETZ) [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: The ACCAP office is located on the second floor of the Denali Building, 3352 College Rd., Fairbanks, Alaska
Speaker(s): Sarah Trainor (Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy) and Carl Markon (US Geological Survey)
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NOAA ACCAP monthly climate webinar
Abstract:

ACCAP, the USGS, and other groups state-wide are collaborating to create a technical report of the state of knowledge about climate change impacts and response in Alaska that will be used in writing the Alaska Regional Chapter of the 2013 National Climate Assessment. Join this webinar to learn more about who is involved, the subject and content areas of the report, our process, time-line, and how you can provide input.

Download Presentation: http://ine.uaf.edu/accap/documents/2011_10_Trainor_NCA.pdf

Remote Access and Notes:

Pre-registration is strongly encouraged. To register please fill out the web-form at: http://ine.uaf.edu/accap/teleconference.htm#register, or contact: Brook Gamble, Assistant Coordinator and Outreach Specialist, (907) 474-7812, accap@uaf.edu. Please let us know if you intend to come in person. You are welcome to join us in our Fairbanks conference room. The ACCAP office is located on the second floor of the Denali Building, 3352 College Rd., Fairbanks.

How to Participate / Log-In to the Alaska Climate Webinar:

  • Point your web browser to: http://infiniteconferencing.com/Events/accap/
  • Enter Participant Code 83847342
  • Enter the rest of the requested information (The name and organization you enter will be seen by other participants, but your contact information will remain confidential
  • Click the blue "log-in" button

Audio / conference call:

  • With a regular telephone dial: 1- (877) 594-8353
  • When prompted, enter the Participant passcode: 83847342.Please mute your phone during the presentation. The audio is very sensitive and your external conversations and typing can be heard by other participants.

For support during a call, press *0 on your phone and a conferencing coordinator will assist you. For further information please contact Brook Gamble, Assistant Coordinator and Outreach Specialist, (907) 474-7812,

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Friday, October 14, 2011 11:02 AM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science and management information. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

October 26, 2011

NOAA's Integrated Ecosystem Assessment (IEA) Program - A Multi-Line Office Initiative to Implement Ecosystem-Based Approaches to Science and Management

Date and Time: October 26, 2011, 12:00-13:00 Eastern Time Zone [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: NOAA SSMC-4 (1305 East-West Hwy, Silver Spring, MD 20910), Room 13153 (Note room change)
Speaker(s): Rebecca Shuford (NOAA Fisheries Office of Science and Technology, Marine Ecosystem Division) and Chris Caldow (NOAA's Biogeography Branch, National Centers for Coastal and Ocean Science)
Speaker's Email: and
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: The NOS Science Seminar Series and the NOAA Integrated Ecosystem Assessment Program
Abstract:

NOAA's approach to Integrated Ecosystem Assessments (IEAs) offers a way to better manage resources to achieve ecological, economic, and societal objectives. IEAs are "a synthesis and quantitative analysis of information on relevant physical, chemical, ecological, and human processes in relation to specified management objectives" (Levin, et al. 2008, 2009). The resulting analyses, done at scales relevant to management questions, provide resource managers with information to make more informed and effective management decisions and enable the implementation of an ecosystem-based approach to ocean resource management. IEAs provide a process to work closely with stakeholders and managers to identify priority management issues and provide robust decision-support information. NOAA's approach uses quantitative analyses and ecosystem modeling to integrate social, economic, and natural science information and assess the condition of the ecosystem relative to identified objectives. Further this approach evaluates trade-offs between alternative management actions, forecasts the ecological and socio-economic effects of management decisions, and tests the efficacy of management actions in achieving target outcomes by re-assessing the state of the ecosystem after action has been taken. NOAA's IEA process includes the following components: Scoping; Indicator Development; Risk Analysis; Assessment of Ecosystem Status; Management Strategy Evaluation; and Monitoring and Evaluation.

About the Speakers:

works for the National Marine Fisheries Service Office of Science and Technology, Marine Ecosystem Division. She is a Fisheries Oceanographer by training, having spent many years studying the biology and life history of yellowfin tuna in the Atlantic Ocean. In her current position, one of Rebecca's responsibilities is to manage and implement NOAA's Integrated Ecosystem Assessment program. In this role she has the opportunity and pleasure to work with partners in multiple line offices and programs to jointly develop the IEA program and approach in multiple NOAA Regional Ecosystems.

is the Biogeography Branch Chief for the National Ocean Service National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science. His career began studying estuarine fish biogeography in southern California and subsequently coral reef fish ecology throughout the tropical eastern Pacific and western Atlantic. The Biogeography Branch focuses on providing managers with critical information on the distribution of the living marine resources they manage. The Branch's efforts in support of the IEA program will include bringing this expertise to meet regionally identified needs.

Remote Access and Notes:

Presentations are available remotely for free via a combination of phone (US & territories) & webcast. Remote access is limited to 50 connections on a first-come-first served basis.

To participate remotely via phone and internet:

  1. For the audio part of the presentation, Dial toll-free (U.S.) 1-877-708-1667. When prompted enter passcode 7028688 and the # sign. Please use your phone's mute button (*6 toggles on or off) during the presentation until you are ready to ask questions. The phone conference does not start until about five minutes before the seminar.
  2. For the visual part of the presentation, you can access the webex meeting by going to: http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?sigKey=mymeetings&i=744925156&p=&t=c. Enter meeting number 744925156 if needed; no passcode is required. Enter other required fields - First and last name - Check the box that that you have read the Privacy Policy, and click Proceed.

For further information please contact at least 45 minutes before the seminar, or if it is within 5 minutes of the seminar start, call the toll free number above.

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added WTuesday, October 11, 2011 12:20 PM / Last updated Tuesday, October 25, 2011 3:22 PM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science and management information. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] or join our RSS feed by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].


Nowcasting of Precipitation - Extrapolation v. Statistical-Advection Models

Date and Time: October 26, 2011, 14:30-15:15 (about 45 min talk) Eastern Time Zone [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: NOAA SSMC-2 (1325 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD, 20910); Room 10246
Speaker(s): Zbynek Sokol and Petr Pesice (Institute of Atmospheric Physics AS CR, Prague, Czech Republic)
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NOAA NWS Office of Hydrologic Development
Abstract:

In this presentation two extrapolation methods forecasting precipitation will be compared from the viewpoint of the accuracy of 1-h, 2-h and 3-h precipitation. The comparison will be performed for the territory of the Czech Republic, with a horizontal resolution of 3 km by 3 km, and for the summer season, when majority of precipitation is caused by convection. Although convective storms have a limited areal extent in Central Europe (of the order of km) they can produce heavy torrential rainfalls accompanied by local flash floods. Therefore forecasting of regions endangered by heavy rainfall is an important task of meteorological services in precipitation nowcasting.

The first method is based on the extrapolation of observed radar echo patterns along Lagrangian trajectories. This method does not include any evolution or decaying of convective storms. The second method (SAMR) utilises the same advection technique as the extrapolation method but accumulated precipitation is calculated using a statistical model, which is applied to predictors derived from various extrapolated radar products: radar-derived precipitation, radar reflectivity, vertically integrated liquid water content, and the top of radar echo. This method is similar to an advective-statistical technique used in NWS. The aim of the comparison is to evaluate whether the statistical model is able to simulate development of convective precipitation and thus improve quantitative precipitation forecasts.

The presented results will show that the statistical model slightly improves the accuracy of precipitation forecasts. The improvement increases with the lead time and it has an apparent diurnal variation. The improvement is most apparent during the afternoon period in most verification measures. However, the statistical approach yields virtually no improvement during night-time and very early morning periods. The improvement of SAMR forecasts manifests mainly in RMSE and in the correlation coefficient.

It turns out that the advection plays the key role in the forecast process. Because both methods use the same motion fields, the application of the statistical model does not change the horizontal structure of forecasted precipitation, and only changes values of precipitation. The statistical model is not able to develop storms but is able to forecast storm decay and a resulting decrease in precipitation rates.

Notes:

This is one of two back-to-back OHD seminars. See (Seminar 1) Nowcasting of Precipitation - Extrapolation v. Statistical-Advection Models; (Seminar 2) The New System Of Flash Flood Forecasting In the Czech Republic

Remote Access:

Remote attendance is limited to 25 connections. Teleconference: (866) 804-8142, passcode 2937055. GotoMeeting: https://www1.gotomeeting.com/join/417144657. For questions about this seminar please contact Ken Pavelle (301-713-0640 Ext 183; ken.pavelle@noaa.gov)

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Friday, October 21, 2011 6:52 AM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science and management information. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] or join our RSS feed by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].


The New System Of Flash Flood Forecasting In the Czech Republic

Date and Time: October 26, 2011, 15:15-16:00 (about 45 min talk) Eastern Time Zone [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: NOAA SSMC-2(1325 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD, 20910); Room 10246
Speaker(s): Lucie Brezkova, Petr Novak, Hana Kyznarova, Milan Saek, Martin Jonov, Petr Frolik, Petr Janal (Czech Hydrometeorological Institute, Brno and Prague, Czech Republic)
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NOAA NWS Office of Hydrologic Development
Abstract:

The Czech Hydrometeorological Institute (CHMI) issues daily flow forecasts with a lead time of 48 hours for many catchments ranging from hundreds to thousands of square kilometers in size. But forecasting of local flash floods caused by heavy precipitation, which affects very small catchments, still remains an open problem. A first test using precipitation nowcasts for flash flood forecasting showed that some flash floods can be predicted several tens of minutes in advance.

In the Czech Republic the deterministic approach inspired by the NOAA system called Flash Flood Guidance was set up in a testing operation in 2010. However, the simulation of flash floods provided by hydrological models is associated with great uncertainty in not only the quantitative precipitation forecast (QPF), but also in quantitative precipitation estimates (QPE). Thus the application of a stochastic approach is a logical step. Now, several methods of precipitation nowcasting are run operationally in CHMI. The set of all real-time available QPFs makes so called "poor man's ensemble". The related discharge ensemble can give us a more realistic approximation of flood development. Special attention is paid to the estimation of the probability of exceedance of bankfull discharge in the threatened catchments.

In this presentation a description of the proposed system which is being set up in test mode on several pilot catchments within the territory of the Czech Republic, as well as first results from several case studies, will be shown.

Notes:

This is one of two back-to-back OHD seminars. See (Seminar 1) Nowcasting of Precipitation - Extrapolation v. Statistical-Advection Models; (Seminar 2) The New System Of Flash Flood Forecasting In the Czech Republic

Remote Access:

Remote attendance is limited to 25 connections. Teleconference: (866) 804-8142, passcode 2937055. GotoMeeting: https://www1.gotomeeting.com/join/417144657. For questions about this seminar please contact Ken Pavelle (301-713-0640 Ext 183; ken.pavelle@noaa.gov)

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Friday, October 21, 2011 6:52 AM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science and management information. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] or join our RSS feed by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].


Developing a Great Lakes Information Management and Delivery System to Support Landscape Scale Conservation

Date and Time: October 26, 2011, 10:30-11:30 Eastern Time Zone [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: NOAA Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory, Lake Superior Hall (4840 South State Road, Ann Arbor, MI)
Speaker(s): Dr. Scott Sowa (Senior Aquatic Ecologist, The Nature Conservancy)
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NOAA Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory (GLERL)
Abstract:

Scott provides scientific leadership and advice to the Conservancy and its partners to help implement system level aquatic conservation strategies throughout the Great Lakes. Since joining The Nature Conservancy in 2008, Scott has been involved in projects with the U.S. Department of Agriculture and Michigan State University that are developing decision tools that will help prioritize watersheds and agricultural conservation practices and predict which actions will have the highest ecological return-on-investment. He provides technical and scientific support for inland and coastal conservation and restoration programs, and establishes research programs to develop essential data and knowledge and test new restoration techniques. A major focus of Scott has been improving information delivery in collaboration with the USGS-Great Lakes Science Center in Ann Arbor.

About the Speaker:

Scott Sowa provides scientific leadership and advice to the Conservancy and its partners to help implement system level aquatic conservation strategies throughout the Great Lakes. Since joining The Nature Conservancy in 2008, Scott has been involved in projects with the U.S. Department of Agriculture and Michigan State University that are developing decision tools that will help prioritize watersheds and agricultural conservation practices and predict which actions will have the highest ecological return-on-investment. He provides technical and scientific support for inland and coastal conservation and restoration programs, and establishes research programs to develop essential data and knowledge and test new restoration techniques. A major focus of Scott has been improving information delivery in collaboration with the USGS-Great Lakes Science Center in Ann Arbor, Michigan.

Remote Access and Notes:

Remote access via webinar: https://www2.gotomeeting.com/register/429582762. For questions about this seminar please contact Giselle Maira ().

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Friday, October 21, 2011 7:19 AM / Last updated Friday, October 21, 2011 3:52 PM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science and management information. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] or join our RSS feed by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

October 27, 2011

Alternative Foraging Strategies and Social Dominance among Brown Bears at McNeil Falls, Alaska: Why do Some Bears Catch More Fish than Others?

Date and Time: October 27, 2011, 11:00-12:00 Pacific Time Zone [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: NOAA Northwest Fisheries Science Center (NWFSC) (2725 Montlake Boulevard East, Seattle, WA 98112; Map to NWFSC), Room: Auditorium.
Speaker(s): Mr. Jim Helfield (Assistant Professor, Department of Environmental Sciences, Huxley College of the Environment, Western Washington University)
Speaker's Email:
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NOAA NWFSC Monster Seminar JAM
Abstract:

Previous studies of bears (Ursus spp.) fishing for Pacific salmon (Oncorhynchus spp.) suggest that dominant individuals are the most efficient foragers due to their ability to secure access to the most productive locations. We tested this hypothesis by observing brown bears (U. arctos) fishing for chum salmon (O. keta) at McNeil River, Alaska. We did not observe strong relationships between the foraging efficiency of individual bears and the frequency with which they engaged in dominance-related behaviors (e.g., displacing competitors, stealing fish, using more popular or productive locations). While some dominant individuals achieved high catch rates, other non-dominant bears foraged with comparable or greater efficiency by developing alternative strategies adapted to specific locations. Our observations demonstrate that bears may employ a variety of fishing strategies, the success of which may be location-specific and frequency-dependent. These findings suggest that physical and cognitive skills may be as important as social dominance in determining foraging success among bears.

About the Speaker:

James M. Helfield is an Associate Professor in the Department of Environmental Sciences at Huxley College of the Environment, Western Washington University, where he has taught since 2005. He was born and raised in Montreal, Quebec. He received his B.A. (English literature) from Duke University in 1991, his M.Sc. (physical geography) from the University of Toronto in 1995, and his Ph.D. (forest ecology) from the University of Washington in 2001. Dr. Helfield's research focuses on the ecology of rivers and riparian forests, particularly with regard to processes linking aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems. Over the course of his professional career, he has collected excrement from at least six different species in three countries.

Salient Publications

  • Naiman, R.J., J.M. Helfield, K.K. Bartz, D.C. Drake, and J.M. Honea. 2009. Pacific salmon, marine-derived nutrients and the characteristics of aquatic and riparian ecosystems. American Fisheries Society Symposium 69: 395-425.
  • Helfield, J.M., and R.J. Naiman. 2006. Keystone interactions: salmon and bear in riparian forests of Alaska. Ecosystems 9: 167-180.
  • Helfield, J.M., and R.J. Naiman. 2002. Salmon and alder as nitrogen sources to riparian forests in a boreal Alaskan watershed. Oecologia 133: 573-582.
  • Helfield, J.M., and R.J. Naiman. 2001. Effects of salmon-derived nitrogen on riparian forest growth and implications for stream productivity. Ecology 82: 2403-2409.
Remote Access and Notes:

Webinar access:

For questions about this seminar please contact Diane L. Tierney-Jamieson (206-860-3380; )

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Wednesday, September 28, 2011 9:18 AM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science and management information. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] or join our RSS feed by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

October 28, 2011

Adaptive Management of the Great Barrier Reef: A Globally Significant Demonstration of the Benefits of Networks of Marine Reserves

Date and Time: October 28, 2011, 11:30-13:30 Eastern Time Zone [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time]
Location: NOAA SSMC-4 (1305 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD, 20910); Room 1W611 (First Floor)
Speaker(s): Dr. Laurence McCook (Acting Director and Chief Scientist, Science Coordination Group, Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority)
Speaker's Email:
OneNOAA Seminar Sponsor: NOAA NOS Science Seminar Series and the NOS Office of National Marine Sanctuaries
Abstract:

This presentation reports on a recent, collaborative and comprehensive review of evidence on the effects of spatial management on the Great Barrier Reef, from fish and corals, through sharks, dugongs, turtles, seabed habitats, to social and economic information and compliance data.

Key conclusions include:

  • Overall, zoning of the GBR marine reserve network appears to be making major contributions to the protection of biodiversity, ecosystem resilience and social and economic values of the GBR Marine Park."
  • The breadth and extent of benefits reflect very well on the scientific and engagement processes involved in the development and implementation of the 2004 Zoning Plan, especially the value of larger reserve size and high proportion of overall area in reserves to provide margins of error."
  • A key new result is the demonstration that protected zones suffer less damage to corals from crown-of-thorns starfish. This is especially important since corals provide the very foundation of the reef, and are critical to the tourism industry.
  • The paper shows significant benefits for fish populations within reserves, and probably for GBR-wide fish populations. There are benefits to sharks, dugongs and marine turtles, although these groups remain at serious risk, and require complementary protection measures.
  • It appears that populations of fish and sharks are significantly depleted across the GBR, and that there has been some poaching within protected zones.
  • Although there have been some effects on fishers, these have been less than suggested in some media, and there remains strong support for the need to protect biodiversity.
  • A healthy GBR generates enormous and increasing economic value, approximately $5.5 billion per year, which is far greater than the cost of protecting it.
About the Speaker:

Laurence McCook is Acting Director and Chief Scientist, Science Coordination Group, Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority (GBRMPA) and is an Adjunct Senior Principal Research Fellow at the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies. He previously spent twelve years as a Research Scientist at the Australian Institute of Marine Science, and has a Ph.D. from Dalhousie University in Canada.

Laurence's current role involves the coordination of the scientific information needs for management of the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park, including monitoring programs for the ground-breaking Reef Water Quality Protection Plan and the rezoning of the Marine Park. Laurence was recently awarded an international Pew Fellowship in Marine Conservation, addressing the resilience of coral reefs under climate change, and the development of management and policy initiatives to protect that resilience.

Remote Access and Notes:

Presentations are available remotely for free via a combination of phone (US & territories) & webcast. Remote access is limited to 50 connections on a first-come-first served basis. To participate remotely via phone and internet:

  1. For the audio part of the presentation, Dial toll-free (U.S.) 1-877-708-1667. When prompted enter passcode 7028688 and the # sign. Please use your phone's mute button (*6 toggles on or off) during the presentation until you are ready to ask questions. The phone conference does not start until about five minutes before the seminar.
  2. For the visual part of the presentation, you can access the web meeting by going to: http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?sigKey=mymeetings&i=744925156&p=&t=c. Enter meeting number 744925156 if needed; no passcode is required. Enter other required fields - First and last name, other. Check the box that that you have read the Privacy Policy, and click Proceed.

For questions about this seminar please contact Tracy Gill () at least 45 minutes before the seminar, or if it is within 5 minutes of the seminar start, call the toll free number above.

Listserv Subscription information: OneNOAA Science Seminars added Monday, October 3, 2011 2:15 PM / Last updated Friday, October 21, 2011 3:24 PM . The OneNOAA Science Seminars are a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to share science and management information. To hear about upcoming OneNOAA Science seminars you can join our weekly e-mail of OneNOAA seminars [nominally email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list] or join our RSS feed by

You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time from the serv list. If you already receive an email with our seminar updates, then you do not need to subscribe to this list. For information about the OneNOAA Science Seminars or to suggest a speaker please contact . Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer].

OneNOAA Science Seminars Subscription Information

i-access to our OneNOAA science seminar announcements:

  1. Join our weekly e-mail seminar announcement [nominally, email sent on Mondays; anyone can join the list]. You can subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminars moderated email list by sending an email message to: with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body (don't include the quotes) or visit https://list.woc.noaa.gov/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/onenoaascienceseminars and fill in your email address (see also how to suscribe).
  2. Online OneNOAA web access: http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/ (Web page maintained by Bryan Stephenson)
  3. Archive of previous OneNOAA science discussion seminars (by calendar year): [2010] [2009] [2008] [2007] [2006] [2005] [2004].
  4. Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar RSS feed.
  5. Interested in becoming a OneNOAA science seminar partner?
  6. When available, all seminars can be accessed remotely by anyone on a first-come-first serve basis.
  7. Note: All seminars subject to title, location, date, and time changes without notice. Please check the OneNOAA seminar web page for the latest seminar updates. Unless otherwised indicated, seminars are open to the public. The contents of the OneNOAA Science Seminars web page do not reflect any position of the Federeal Government or NOAA. References to trade names or commercial entities do not imply endorsement of any kind. Links to resources outside the Federal Government are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only [NOAA Disclaimer]. The information provided by the OneNOAA Science Seminars is for broad information purposes only. See privacy policy [NOAA Privacy policy]

 

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