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OneNOAA Science Seminars



2005 OneNOAA Science Discussion Seminars

[Seminar Partner's contacts]

[2004 OneNOAA Science Seminars] [2006 OneNOAA Science Seminars]

Last updated:

Friday, February 11, 2011

Please join us for our upcoming OneNOAA science discussion seminars. This is a joint effort to help share science across NOAA.

i-access to our seminar announcements:

1. Join our seminar announcements e-mail list [nominally, one email per week sent on Mondays].
To join our email list contact Hernan Garcia or a seminar partner.

2. Online public access: http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/
Web page originally developed by Hajure Fontaine
; Maintained by Hernan Garcia

3. GoogleCalendar online public access: GoogleCalendar*
Maintained by Felix A. Martinez

General notes about the OneNOAA science seminars:

  • Please check for seminar additions and changes (i.e., cancelations, etc.). [RSS available]
  • Constructive suggestions for improving the content of the seminar series are welcome [Please contact Hernan Garcia or a seminar partner].
  • All NOAA offices/divisions are welcome to participate and/or join as seminar partners (Joining is easy, see seminar format).
  • Please share the seminar announcements with anyone interested. Please notify us of any errors that you find so that we can correct them.
  • Remote access to seminars is available when indicated via web/phone access. When available, seminar presentations will be available for download (see Notes for each seminar).

 


January 2005

 


Thursday, 06 January 2005; 1100-1200h (SSMC3, room 4817; NODC seminar)
Speaker: Mary Hollinger (NODC)
Email: Mary.B.Hollinger@noaa.gov
Title: History, Life History and Status of the Diamondback Terrapin in the Chesapeake Bay
Abstract: Remarks on the iife history and status of the Diamondback Terrapin in the Chesapeake Bay.
Notes: Video and phone conferencing will not be available.


Friday, 07 Jan 2005; 1100-1200h (SSMC3, room 4817; NODC seminar)
Speaker: Igor Smolyar, R. Locarnini, R. Tatusko, T. Boyer, S. Levitus (NODC); G. Matishov, A. Zuyev, V. Golubev (Murmansk Marine Biological Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences)
Email: Igor.Smolyar@noaa.gov
Title: Database for Ecological Studies of the Arctic Seas: Barents, Kara, Laptev, and White Seas (1810-2001)
Abstract: The problem of the development of a database for the Arctic Seas is presented. The proposed data format allows one to formalize various components of the ecosystems of the Arctic Seas: oceanographic variables as well as plankton, benthos, fish, sea birds, and marine mammals. One-degree-square statistics for each month were used to provide quality control of the oceanographic data. The database consists of 433,179 stations for the Barents, Kara, Laptev, and White Seas for the period 1810-2003, after exclusion of errors and duplicates. A quarter of these stations also include meteorological data. Monthly climatic fields of temperature and salinity have been plotted in vertical and horizontal dimensions in order to allow the user to visualize the 3D structure of the Arctic Seas. Time-series of water temperature for the period 1870-2001 have been plotted for the Barents Sea, which allows us to document climatic changes over 130 years.
Notes: Video and phone conferencing will not be available.


Friday, 21 January 2005; 1100-1200h (SSMC3, room 4817; NODC seminar)
Speaker: Renee Tatusko (NODC)
Email: Renee.Tatusko@noaa.gov
Title: A Changing Landscape: Investigations of a Warming Arctic (25-minute video produced by KUAC-TV in Fairbanks, Alaska with funding from NSF and Dept of Agriculture)
Abstract: A Changing Landscape: Investigations of a Warming Arctic Change is coming to the Arctic as a warming climate alters a fragile landscape. These changes are provoking concern about the future, not just for peoples of the North but for all of the earth's inhabitants. Scientists are trying to understand this phenomenon and determine the impacts on a local and global scale. They have been studying the land, the atmosphere, and the oceans in an attempt to understand how these pieces fit together in the arctic and Pan-arctic, and how they interact with the rest of the global system. You will witness scientists out in the field as they study how a warming climate is changing the arctic landscape. Additional information about availability of this video can be obtained by contacting KUAC-TV (http://www.kuac.org/).
Notes: Video and phone conferencing will not be available.


Tuesday, 25 January 2005; 1200-1300h (SSMC4, room 9153; NOS Seminar) **POSPONED**
Speaker: Bruce M. Kahn, Smith Barney
Title: Ecosystem Services and Investment Opportunities: The science behind responsible investing
Abstract: Increasingly, investors want their equity holdings to reflect their social or environmental values. They wish to avoid companies that profit from activities they oppose, and support companies that behave in ways they consider appropriate or responsible. At the same time, however, most of these investors still want or need to earn a reasonable return on their portfolio. In this seminar, we will review whether the damage costs imposed on the environment by industrial resource uses (often referred to as externalities) can be reflected in financial markets. We review the trends in socially responsible investing and assess the social and environmental benefits of these movements of capital. Emerging methods of assessing corporate environmental performance, using these metrics in capital markets and rating publicly traded companies requires collaboration between ecosystem scientists and business analysts.


Wednesday, 26 January 2005; 1200-1300h (SSMC4, room 13153; NOS Seminar)
Speaker: W.G. Nelson, H. Lee II, and J.O. Lamberson (EPA)
Title: From Marshes to the Continental Shelf: Results of the Western Componentof the US EPA National Coastal Assessment
Abstract: The National Coastal Assessment of the US EPA began field work in the Western US in 1999-2000. Probabilistic sampling for biotic and abiotic condition indicators was conducted at 381 stations within estuaries and coastal embayments of Washington, Oregon and California. In 2002, intertidal and low salt marsh habitats were sampled at an additional 190 stations. As part of the intertidal effort, pilot evaluations of landscape indicators of coastal wetland condition were carried out in California. Pilot studies were also conducted in south central Alaska and in the Hawaiian Islands. In 2003, sampling for many of the same condition indicators was conducted on the continental shelf of the west coast from the Strait of Juan de Fuca to the Mexican border. By 2003, NCA-West had completed the field work for assessing the condition of soft sediment, estuarine habitats including low salt marsh, intertidal flats, and subtidal bottom, as well as continental shelf habitats down to a depth of 120 m, for the entire west coast. During summer 2004, NCA-West resampled estuarine systems of WA, OR, CA, AK, HI and conducted pilot sampling in the territory of Guam. NCA-West data will ultimately provide area estimates of western coastal, soft-sediment benthic habitat (exclusive of beaches) with degraded benthic conditions due to the impacts of sediment contaminants and other stressors. Results from the 1999-2000 survey for condition indicators indicate that only a small percentage of area of Western estuaries has levels of sediment contamination of either metals or organic compounds potentially toxic to benthic organisms. Water quality indicators for Western estuaries were generally good, although PO4 was high at many sites, perhaps due to natural factors. Nonindigenous species may be a more spatially widespread form of disturbance to benthic infaunal communities than sediment chemical contaminants, although the ecological consequences of these invasions are not yet known.


Friday, 28 January 2005; 1100-1200h (SSMC3, room 4817; NODC seminar)
Speaker: John Antonov (NODC)
Email: John.Antonov@noaa.gov
Title: Climatological Annual Cycle of Ocean Heat Content
Abstract: The seasonal cycle of heat in the ocean is described [Antonov, J. I., S. Levitus, T. P. Boyer , 2004: Climatological annual cycle of ocean heat content. Geophys. Res. Lett. , 31, doi:1029/2003GL018851; http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/OC5/PDF/PAPERS/grlheat04.pdf ]
Notes: Video and phone conferencing will not be available.


Thursday, 10 February 2005; 1100-1200h (SSMC3, room 4817; NODC seminar)
Speaker: FengYing Ji (NMDIS/China), Charles Sun (NODC), and Shannon Niou (NODC)
Email: fengying.ji@noaa.gov
Title: Nowcast Global T-S Fields: A Feasible Study of Using Argo and GTSPP Data to Produce Monthly, Optimally Interpolated T-S Maps
Abstract: Until now, the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) data archive contains about 1.8 million stations from 1990 to 2004. Based on objective analysis, we have done a feasible study using these data to produce monthly T-S maps, which can clearly discover the temperature distribution and climate anomaly of El Nino and La Nina year from 1997 to 1998 plus the latest month of January 2005.
Notes: Video and phone conferencing will not be available.


February 2005

 

Thursday, 17 February 2005; 1100-1200h (SSMC3, room 4817; NODC seminar)
Speaker: Don Collins (NODC)
Email: Donald.Collins@noaa.gov
Title: NODC Archive Management System: Project Update
Abstract: The primary goals of the Archive Management System (AMS) project are to (1) provide a data management strategy that enables the National Oceanographic Data Center (NODC) to keep track of all of the originator data and standard NODC products archived at the data center using distributed data entry to a centralized database; (2) provide accountability for the integrity of each data file of originator data managed at NODC; and (3) facilitate discovery, retrieval and use of originator data archived at NODC by a diverse group of customers. The AMS at NODC consists of four components: the Accession Tracking Data Base (ATDB), the Ocean Archive System (OAS), the NODC Metadata Manager Repository (NMMR) and file management services. The ATDB, OAS, and file management services components have been in use in an operational mode at NODC since about October 2002. This presentation briefly recounts some of the history of the development of the AMS, describes the key functional components of the AMS, and presents some ideas about the future direction of the AMS within the NODC.
Notes: Video and phone conferencing will not be available.


Monday, 28 February 2005; 1200-1300h (SSMC4, room 13153; NOS Seminar)
Speaker: Richard Appledoorn, Department of Marine Sciences, University of Puerto Rico
Title: Coral Reef Ecosystem Studies: Integrating Science & Management in the Caribbean
Abstract: TBA
Notes: NOS video and phone conferencing will be available.


March 2005

Thursday, 03 March 2005; 1100-1200h (SSMC3, room 4817; NODC seminar)
Speaker: Melanie Hamilton and Michael Simmons (COL)
Email: Melanie.Hamilton@noaa.gov& mikes@nodc.noaa.gov
Title: An Overview of the GTSPP Database and Quality Control Procedures
Abstract: The Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) is a cooperative international program designed to develop and maintain a global ocean temperature and salinity resource with data that are as up-to-date and of the highest quality as possible. The primary goal of the GTSPP is to make these data quickly and easily accessible to users. A demosntration will be given using the GTSPP quality control (QC) editor software. A number of files from the NOAA SEAS (Shipboard Environmental (data) Aquisition System) program (recent data) to run through the editor. Tests will be run against the data file as its being loaded into the Editor. The file will then be available for viewing and or re-setting flags. It will be demonstrated how the editor allows an operator to edit the date/time and or position, while preserving the originators values in a history record. It will be shown cruise track's waterfall plots and to look at multiple profiles bounced against the Levitus monthly, seasonal and annual climatologies (World Ocean Atlas). It will be demonstrated how we can re-set QC flags on profiles where necessary, and that the QC editor preserves all this information in histories.
Notes: Video and phone conferencing will not be available.


Thursday, 17 March 2005; 1100-1200h (SSMC3, room 4817; NODC seminar)
Speaker: Andrew Barton (NODC)
Email: Andrew.Barton@noaa.gov
Title: Peru's Cordillera Huayhuash: Changing People and Climate
Abstract: Peru's Cordillera Huayhuash is one of the most inaccessible, spectacular ranges of mountains in the world, reaching snowy heights of over 6000 meters. Climate change, tourism, and economic development of the region, however, are altering the landscape and local culture at an increasing pace. In this talk--part travelogue and part science--I share, through photographic slides, the incredible beauty of the Huayhuash and discuss the forces of change operating in the region.
Notes: Video and phone conferencing will not be available.


Thursday, 24 March 2005; 1100-1200h (SSMC3, room 4817; NODC seminar)
Speaker: HirofumiOkano [Japan Oceanographic Data Center (JODC)]
Email: okanoh@jodc.go.jp
Title: Resent information and management in JODC
Abstract: Japan Oceanographic Data Center (JODC) was established in 1965. Since then, the JODC has been fulfilling the role of the synthetic marine data and Information bank of Japan in acquisition of marine data obtained by various marine research institutes and organizations. In addition, JODC has been carrying out international data exchange as the National Oceanographic Data Center of Japan within the framework of International Oceanographic Data and Information Exchange (IODE) promoted by Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission (IOC) of UNESCO. I will speak recent information and management in JODC.
Notes: Video and phone conferencing will not be available.


Monday, 28 March 2005 ; 1200-1330h (SSMC3, room 4527; Fisheries Service)
Speaker: Stuart Fiedel (Senior Archeologist, The Louis Berger Group)
Title: Gone with the Waves? The Archaeological Potential of the North American Coasts
Abstract: Rising sea levels have already drowned vast expanses of continental shelves and thereby obscured much of the archeological record of human habitation of North America prior to 3000 years ago. Continued "marine transgression," perhaps exacerbated by global warming, threatens to erode or inundate the remaining traces of Native American occupation along the coasts. Nevertheless, archaeologists have found many interesting sites, on the existing shore and even underwater, that shed light on ancient migrations, climate shifts, and changing human adaptations. Dr. Stuart Fiedel is the author of "Prehistory of the Americas" (Cambridge University Press 1987, revised 1993) as well as numerous articles on diverse topics including Paleoindian origins, radiocarbon dating, Neolithic Europe, migration theory, Pleistocene and Holocene climate change, Algonquian languages, and residue analysis. He received his B.A. in Anthropology from Columbia University in 1973, and his Ph.D. in Anthropology from the University of Pennsylvania in 1979. He currently supervises archaeological research projects and historic preservation studies as Senior Archaeologist for The Louis Berger Group in Washington, D.C.
Notes: This is a brown bag lunch seminar series, designed for the busy professional (or intern, fellow or student). BYO lunch and beverage. *RSVP*: Please RSVP to Kimberly Lellis, NOAA Fisheries Service, Office of Habitat Conservation, at (301) 713-4300 ext.156 or Kimberly.Lellis@noaa.gov


Tuesday, 29 March 2005 ; 1100-1200h (SSMC3, room 4817; NODC seminar)
Speakers: Norman Hall and Melanie Hamilton (NODC)
Email: Norman.Hall@noaa.gov & Melanie.Hamilton@noaa.gov
Title: GTSPP Duplicate Management Tools
Abstract: The Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) is a cooperative international program designed to develop and maintain a global ocean temperature and salinity resource with data that are as up-to-date and of the highest quality as possible. The GTSPP database, like any large collection of data gathered from multiple sources through multiple paths, must be constantly monitored for duplicates. In this seminar, Melanie Hamilton and Norman Hall will describe three tools used regularly to perform this task: 1) STAMATCH (Station Match) to match real-time and delayed-mode data in the database; 2) EDES (Exact Duplicates Elimination System) to prevent exact duplicates from being added to the database; 3) IDES (Inexact Duplicates Examination System) to find and display possible near duplicates in the database, and allow an operator to remove (inactivate) the duplicates. The presentation will feature a live demonstration of this last tool.
Notes: Video and phone conferencing will not be available.


Thursday, 31 March 2005 ; 1300-1400h (SSMC3, room 2501; NOAA library conference room; NODC seminar)
Speakers: Blanca Mendiola and Rosa Delgado (IMARPE)
Title: Instituto del Mar del Peru (IMARPE) and the GODAR project
Abstract: IMARPE, its joint work with NODC/WDC, and the GODAR project
Notes: Video and phone conferencing will not be available.


April 2005

 

Monday, 11 April 2005; 1000-1100h [NOAA Auditorium; NOS Seminar]
Speaker: David Wethey (University of South Carolina)
Title: Climate Change and intertidal biogeography: Forecasting effects of climate change on the biogeography of foundation species in estuarine & rocky intertidal ecosystems
Abstract: We are developing mechanistic links between climate, geography and population biology of the dominant large estuarine sediment-dwellers and rocky intertidal space occupiers, in order to forecast the impact of climate change on the suitability of estuaries and rocky intertidal shores as nursery grounds for commercially and recreationally important marine species. Ground and satellite based climate and ocean water quality data are used as inputs to heat flux models of body temperature of marine ecosystem foundation species as a function of latitude on the Atlantic and Pacific coasts of the US. Models will be tested at five latitudinally separated National Estuarine Research Reserve System sites on each coast, representing all of the marine biogeographic provinces. The models will be used to identify "hot spots" and "cold spots" on the coastlines that should be the most sensitive to environmental change, either from long term global warming, or from decadal scale processes like El Nino. The hot spots are locations where natural resource managers and planners should expect to see local mass die-offs, and shifts in population distributions in response to El Nino or the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO). Today's talk will provide an overview of the biological and physical context of the intertidal system, and a discussion of the modeling approaches for forecasting, hindcasting, and nowcasting. The interplay of terrestrial climate, surface ocean conditions, and tides form the basis of our mechanistic models. Results of model simulations for several sites on the US west coast over the period 2000-2003 will be compared to measurements from biomimetic sensors in the intertidal zone.
Notes: Video and phone conferencing will be available. To join us by phone, dial 866-541-1377, passcode 142625. For video, call the bridge as usual or contact Duane.Mann@noaa.gov.


Tuesday, 12 April 2005 ; 1100-1200 [SSMC3, Room 13836, OHC seminar]
Speaker: Piotr Parasiewicz, University of Massachusetts Amherst
Title: Northeast Instream Habitat Program
Abstract: The Northeast Instream Habitat Program (NEIHP) is a multidisciplinary research and outreach initiative that aims to improve the scientific and methodological foundation for the ecologically sound, sustainable management of running waters. The NEIHP employs a system-scale approach to river restoration planning using the habitat modeling system MesoHABSIM. MesoHABSIM allows for the quantitative evaluation of river management scenarios for dam removals, flow augmentation or channel improvements, and consequently the justification of restoration measures. The NEIHP was founded as a partnership among the University of Massachusetts Amherst, US Geological Survey, US Fish and Wildlife Service, and Environmental Protection Agency. It addresses the needs of resource conservationists and stewards, receiving feedback from advisory committees of state and federal agencies and NGO�s. NEIHP is an integrated research, teaching and extension program with a strong commitment to research and development, sustained outreach, training and technical assistance, and development of expanded graduate and undergraduate education. NEIHP tools have been applied at multiple projects in the Northeast region. The techniques have become part of legislative recommendations for development of state-wide instream flow standards in Connecticut, Massachusetts and New Hampshire.
Notes: Office of Habitat Conservation's Closing the Loop of Applied Science Series. Web conference: http://data.ccsip.com/CCS1.htm, reference # 323620, guest code 489689 - contact polly.hicks@noaa.gov for additional instructions; Audio conference: 1-888-566-5777, pass code 41380


Wednesday, 13 April 2005 ; 1100-1200h (SSMC3, room 4817; NODC seminar)
Speaker: Josh Willis (NASA, Jet Propulsion Laboratory)
Email: joshua.k.willis@jpl.nasa.gov
Title: Upper-Ocean Thermal Variability on Global Scales: A decade of satellite and in situ data
Abstract: As the volume and comprehensive nature of oceanographic data grows, it is increasingly important to develop techniques that utilize the available data optimally. Since the early 1990's, satellite-based estimates of sea surface height have supplemented the sparse oceanographic profile data. In the present study, satellite altimetric height has been combined with in situ profile data to produce improved estimates of interannual variability in upper-ocean heat content, temperature, and thermosteric sea level. The time series of globally averaged heat content contains a small amount of interannual variability and exhibits steady warming from the early 1990's through the present. The warming occurred at a rate of 0.86 ± 0.12 Watts per square meter of ocean (0.29 ± 0.04 pW) from 1993 to 2003 for the upper 750 m of the water column. As a result of this warming, thermosteric sea level rose at a rate of 1.6 ± 0.3 mm/yr over the same time period. This suggests that thermal expansion accounts for just over half of the observed 3.0 mm/yr of total sea level rise over the past decade. More recently, the time series of globally-averaged ocean heat content was extended to include the two years prior to the launch of the satellite altimeter. In the extended time series, a significant but brief period of ocean cooling is observed during 1992, following the eruption of Mt. Pinatubo in the Philippines.
Notes: Video and phone conferencing will not be available.


Wednesday, 27 April 2005 ; 1200-1300h (SSMC4, room 9153; NOS Seminar)
Speakers: Pat Tester and Wayne Litaker (NCCOS)
Title: Tropical Mangrove Embayments: Lessons in Natural Eutrophication and Implications for Dinoflagellate Abundance
Abstract: Belize is home to the largest barrier reef in the western hemisphere where it is bounded by Caribbean Sea and encloses a wide (10-40 km) central lagoon characterized by patch reefs and small mangrove islands. Here mangrove islands with shallow embayments have rich phytoplankton communities supported by rapid regeneration of nutrients. A unique combination of island morphology, wind sheltering and low tidal amplitude favors accumulation of material and limits flushing in these embayments. Typically, these sheltered mangrove embayments are less than 3 meters deep with a shallow sill, which further limits exchange with surrounding waters. These embayments typically have chlorophyll a concentrations 5 to 20 fold higher than in the surrounding oligotrophic central lagoon. These areas serve as ideal habitat for dinoflagellates, some of which produce ciguatoxins. The high dinoflagellate abundance in these high nutrient cays relative to the surrounding lagoon provides insight into the response of ciguatoxin producing dinoflagellates to increased eutrophication. Another integral part of this project has been the taxonomic and molecular characterization of ciguatera producing dinoflagellates. At present, relatively little is still known about the taxonomy of this group and the inter species variations in toxicity. This makes it difficult to determine whether observed temporal and spatial differences in toxicity are due to ariations in species distribution or to factors in the environment which induce toxicity. For the past three years we have been integrating the SEM technologies available at the Smithsonian (via Maria Faust) with the cell culture and molecular biology capabilities at NOAA to analyze to provide definitive molecular identifications of ciguatera causing dinoflagellates collected from mangrove habitats in Belize. Once these isolates are fully characterized taxonomically, their toxin production characteristics will be determined along with development of molecular quantification techniques that will allow accurate estimates of species abundances and distribution in the field. This is a crucial first step in developing monitoring and management strategies for dealing with ciguatera producing dinoflagellates.
Notes: For video, call the NOS bridge or contact Duane.Mann@noaa.gov. To join us by phone, dial 866-541-1377, passcode 142625 (con.9849337). If you are dialing in or participating by video and have trouble with the connection, please call 301-713-4043.


May 2005

 

Wednesday, 04 May 2005 ; 1200-1300h (SSMC4, room 9153; NOS Seminar)
Speaker: Vera Trainer, NMFS, Northwest Fisheries Science Center
Title: The Challenges of Forecasting and Managing Toxic Pseudo-Nitzschia Blooms on the U.S. West Coast
Abstract: A coordinated effort by two NCCOS Sponsored Research programs in the Pacific Northwest has produced a harmful algal bloom (HAB) early warning system that has successfully reduced uncertainty in shellfish bed closures for State and Tribal managers along the Washington State coast impacted by the toxic marine algal species Pseudo-nitzschia. Operational components developed by the MERHAB funded Olympic Region Harmful Algal Bloom (ORHAB) project include regular near shore and beach sampling stations. Close coordination between ORHAB and the Ecology and Oceanography of Harmful Algal Bloom (ECOHAB) Pacific Northwest project is improving this system by integrating knowledge generated from ship-based sampling, satellites, moored sensor arrays, and models. ECOHAB Pacific Northwest is characterizing the physical, biological, and chemical conditions that favor toxic Pseudo-nitzschia blooms, transport the blooms to our coasts, and create negative societal and environmental impacts. Such detailed information is a pre-requisite to developing a HAB forecasting capability. Scientists recently documented the food web transfer of the algal toxin, domoic acid, to shellfish, crustaceans, seabirds, finfish and marine mammals on the West coast. ECOHAB cruises have advanced the understanding that often the highest toxin levels and greatest numbers of toxin-producing Pseudo-nitzschia cells are positioned in water masses associated with offshore eddies or in upwelling zones near coastal promontories. ORHAB and ECOHAB Pacific Northwest measurements of toxin in seawater and shellfish from the Washington outer coast were consistent with the possibility that domoic acid from the Juan de Fuca eddy moves southward in prolonged upwelling events and then onshore during the first major storm of the fall season, resulting in elevated concentrations of toxin in razor clams on coastal beaches. The coordinated analysis of cruise and monitoring data is leading to the characterization of offshore HAB initiation sites and will inform effective placement of automated sensors to enhance the HAB early warning system. This coordinated research is also leading to regional HAB species characterization and specific molecular and biochemical tools eagerly anticipated by coastal managers.
Notes: For video, call the NOS bridge or contact Duane.Mann@noaa.gov. To join us by phone, dial 866-541-1377, passcode 142625 (con.9849337). If you are dialing in or participating by video and have trouble with the connection, please call 301-713-4043.


Thursday, 05 May 2005 ; 1100-1200h (SSMC3, room 4817; NODC seminar)
Speaker: Igor Smolyar (NODC)
Email: Igor.Smolyar@noaa.gov
Title: Discrete model of fish scale incremental pattern: a formalization of the 2D anisotropic structure
Abstract: The structure of growth patterns on fish scales is characteristically anisotropic: the number of circuli and their widths significantly vary with the direction of measurement. We show, however, that because of anisotropy, fish scale growth rate variability can be described in fuzzy terms. The index of structural anisotropy is introduced, which serves as a measure of the fuzziness of growth-rate quantification. A discrete model of fish scale incremental pattern is proposed, which takes into account the incremental structure in 2D. This model is based on a representation of the fish scale pattern as a relay network, taking anisotropy in the form of discontinuities and convergences of incremental structural elements into account, and the widths of growth increments in different directions. The model is used to formalize procedures necessary for the quantification of fish scale growth rate.
Notes: Video and phone conferencing will not be available.


Tuesday, 10 May 2005 ; 1100-1200h EST (SSMC3, Room 13836; OHC seminar)
Speaker: Phil Roni, Northwest Fisheries Science Center's Watershed Program
Title: Habitat restoration for salmon: assessments, prioritization and evaluation of effectiveness
Abstract: Hundreds of millions of dollars are spent annually on the restoration of watersheds in an effort to assist recovery of Pacific and Atlantic salmon populations. Guidance is needed to help identify, prioritize, and evaluate recovery actions to assure that these actions are leading to both salmon and ecosystem recovery. The Watershed Program of the Northwest Fisheries Science Center (NWFSC) has been conducting research over the last several years to (1) develop techniques for assessing historic, current, and future watershed conditions, (2) identify and prioritize habitat restoration opportunities based upon watershed processes and salmonid life history strategies, and (3) monitor and evaluate restoration actions at site, stream reach, and watershed scale. We summarize the findings of our research and guidance we have provided to managers, scientists, and local watershed groups on how to develop ecosystem recovery efforts, and how to monitor their effectiveness.
Notes: Office of Habitat Conservation's Closing the Loop of Applied Science Series. Web conference: http://data.ccsip.com/CCS1.htm, reference # 323620, guest code 489689 (contact polly.hicks@noaa.gov for additional instructions). Audio conference: 1-888-455-5419, pass code 18123


Wednesday, 11 May 2005 ; 1200-1300h (SSMC4, room 9153; NOS Seminar)
Title: Polarization Discrimination Technique for Separation of Fluorescence and Reflectance Spectra of Algae in Sea Water AND Algorithm Development and Field Measurements in Coastal Waters of Long Island and Puerto Rico
Speaker: Sam Ahmed, NOAA Cooperative Remote Sensing Science and Technology Center at City College, New York
Abstract: We present the results of recent work, including experiments and computer simulations, on the polarization discrimination technique developed recently by us to separate elastic reflectance and fluorescence components resulting from white light illumination of algae in seawater. The technique uses the polarized properties of elastically scattered light and the unpolarized natureof fluorescence to effect the separation. The approach was successfully applied to measurements on four types of algae of different sizes, shapes and concentrations in the laboratory. The procedure is shown to be effective for extraction of the chlorophyll fluorescence in the 685 nm region from reflectance of algae dominated by chlorophyll pigments with different angles of illumination for both polarized and unpolarized light sources, including sunlight. The results are compared with other methods for the estimation of chlorophyll concentration such as fluorescence line height above the baseline. We also report the results of experiments which examine the impact of surface roughness on the efficacy of the technique for measurements above the surface, as well as the results of field measurements in the Peconic Bay of Eastern Long Island. The experimental observations are supported by the results of a computer simulation model based on Mie theory for the calculation of reflectance spectra and its polarization components including scattering from the main particulate components in the water and which the simulates process of fluorescence retrieval for a wide range of chlorophyll a concentrations. We will also report on work in progress related to algorithm development for retrieval of bio-optical properties in coastal waters and related in-situ measurements in Long Island and measurement campaigns in Mayaguez Bay, Puerto Rico.
Notes: For video, call the NOS bridge or contact Duane.Mann@noaa.gov. To join us by phone, dial 866-541-1377, passcode 142625 (con.9849337). If you are dialing in or participating by video and have trouble with the connection, please call 301-713-4043.


Thursday, 12 May 2005 ; 1100-1200h (SSMC3, room 4817; NODC seminar)
Speaker: Parmesh Dwivedi (Information Systems & Management Division, NODC)
Email: Parmesh.Dwivedi@noaa.gov
Title: An overview of NODC ocean data archive management
Abstract: An informal discussion about the NODC ocean data archive management system
Access to presentation: ftp://ftp.nodc.noaa.gov/pub/outgoing/Training/ then click on NODC_Ocean_Data_Archive_Management_Slides_May_12_2005.ppt
Notes: VideoTeleConferencing (VTC)/phone available upon request by contacting Cheryl Ingram (Cheryl.Ingram@noaa.gov) at the latest by 1700h ET 11 May 2005.


Wednesday, 18 May 2005 ; 12:00-13:00 (SSMC4, room 13153; NOS Seminar)
Speaker: Kacky Andrews, Director of Coastal and Aquatic Managed Areas for the Florida Department of Environmental Protection
Title: Ocean and Coastal Research Needs of Florida Department of Environmental Protection
Abstract: This presentation will provide an overview of the research needs for Florida's system of MPAs, for the Southeast Florida Coral Reef Initiative (SEFCRI) that is implementing the Local Action Strategies as directed by the US Coral Reef Task Force, for Florida�s Oceans Initiative, and for the Gulf of Mexico Alliance. Florida is currently developing a new template for the management plan of its MPA and developing biophysical, socioeconomic, and governance performance indicators. The SEFCRI established a Technical Advisory Committee to identify priorities for research that should be performed to assist the implementation of Local Action Strategies. The presentation will include a short overview of what projects the TAC has identified as the highest priorities. The Florida Oceans Initiative was launched by Governor Bush last year to improve management of Florida�s ocean and coastal resources. Research needs include remote sensing, water quality indicators for estuarine environments, a sea level rise study, and development of a coastal water quality framework. The Gulf of Mexico Alliance is made up of the five Gulf states. The Alliance was created by the states to improve the ecological health of the Gulf and to protect its economic values. The US Ocean Action Plan released in December 2004 identifies this partnership of Gulf states as something the federal government will assist with. The presentation will identify the five priority areas that the Alliance is working on and identify some opportunities for research.
Notes: For video, call the NOS bridge or contact Duane.Mann@noaa.gov. To join us by phone, dial 866-541-1377, passcode 142625 (con.9849337)
If you are dialing in or participating by video and have trouble with the connection, please call 301-713-4043.


Thursday, 19 May 2005 ; 1100-1200h (SSMC3, room 4817; NODC seminar)
Speaker: Freud Park (NODC)
Email: Freud.Park@noaa.gov
Title: The NODC Shipboard Sensor Database (SSD) Data Process and Load Program
Abstract: There are various ways to develop a program that processes raw oceanographic data and load them into database for later search and retrieval. Such methods depend on network environment, operating system, available software and database, and the data processor and programmer�s preferences. Initially, a data process & load program for Shipboard Sensor Database (SSD) was developed and operated without any GUI. Later, a new program was developed using unconventional approach. A windows-based program was introduced and has been used since. It contains not only powerful object-oriented interface tools for data processing and quality control but also RDBMS (M/S Access) features that let users view, search, and query data even in the middle of data processing. Recently, a web-based program has been developed, for which a design review will be presented during the seminar. Also, these programs will be compared and discussed, from a user�s point of view as well.
Notes: VideoTeleConferencing (VTC)/phone available upon request by contacting Cheryl Ingram (Cheryl.Ingram@noaa.gov) at least a day before the seminar.


Tuesday, 24 May 2005 ; 1100-1200h EST (SSMC3, room 15836; OHC seminar)
Speaker: Steve Giordano (Chesapeake Bay Office)
Title: Integrated Ecosystem Monitoring, Assessment, and Modeling for the Chesapeake Bay in Support of Ecosystem-based Living Resource Management
Abstract: TBA
Notes: Office of Habitat Conservation's Closing the Loop of Applied Science Series. Web and audio conferencing will be available please contact Polly Hicks (polly.hicks@noaa.gov) for instructions


Tuesday, 24 May 2005 ; 12:00-1330h (SSMC4, room 10153, NOS Seminar)
Speaker: Nathaniel Scholz, Ecotoxicology and Environmental Fish Health Program, Northwest Fisheries Science Center
Title: The Road to Nowhere: Stormwater and Salmon in the Pacific Northwest
Abstract: The presentation will cover the Coastal Services Center's (CSC) assessments of pollutant transport and harm to aquatic species, especially salmon, in the Pacific Northwest through the Coastal Storms Program. Through an agreement with the Northwest Fisheries Science Center (NWFSC), research is being conducted on the region�s urban land use, impacts from contaminant mobilization in stormwater runoff and recurrent fish kills in Oregon and Washington. Several themes will be covered throughout the discussion such as human population growth and its impacts on the area, coastal development and land use, storms, non-point source pollution, and multidisciplinary approaches to ecosystem research.
Notes: Video not available. To join us by phone, dial 888.581.9841, passcode: 381977#


Tuesday, 31 May 2005 ; 1200-1245h (SSMC4, room 9153, NOS Seminar)
Speaker: Varis Ransibrahmanakul, NCCOS
Title: Distribution of Turbid Waters in South Florida
Abstract: Low light is one of the limiting factors causing seagrass die-offs in Florida Bay. Because the Bay is relatively shallow (average depth is 1m-2m), wind speeds in the order of 5 m s-1 can resuspend unconsolidated bottom sediments, limiting the light available to seagrass. Information on the spatial and temporal variability of turbid events are essential to plans to rejuvenate seagrass growth in the Bay, but obtaining this kind of data through in situ sampling and dives can be expensive. In this presentation, I will present the spatial and temporal distributions of the 90th percentile of satellite-derived turbidity index which may be used to answer the question: where and when do turbid waters in South Florida occur? Also, such a map may be useful for seagrass restoration. The results of the turbidity index show, to our surprise, that offshore sediments west of Florida Bay actually resuspend in December and January, before the sediments in the shallower part of Florida Bay, which resuspend later in March and April. An overlay of wind pattern suggests resuspension in Florida Bay may depend on the wind fetch (i.e., the width and length over which wind of a specific speed blows).
Notes: For video, call the NOS bridge or contact Duane.Mann@noaa.gov. To join us by phone, dial 866-541-1377, passcode 142625 (con.9849337). If you are dialing in or participating by video and have trouble with the connection, please call 301-713-4043.


June 2005

 

Wednesday, 01 June 2005 ; 12:30-1:30 (SSMC4, room 13153, NOS Seminar)
Speaker: Hans Hoegh-Guldberg
Title: The Great Barrier Reef and Climate Change with a tentative discussion of implications for Florida reef study
Abstract: The Great Barrier Reef is perhaps the best managed Marine Park in the world, but it is not immune from climate change. Increasingly frequent El Niño events superimposed on a rising trend in temperatures will impede the recovery of coral cover from previous bleaching events. We are at risk of seeing the most pristine coral reef system degrade over the next few decades, with macroalgae (seaweed) taking over from the coral, and drastic changes to fish populations and biodiversity generally. This is already happening in large areas of the reef as a result of climate change and other impacts. Urgent introduction of better coastal management control, and stricter control of already well-managed fisheries, are central to improving the ecological resilience of the Great Barrier Reef to survive the impacts of climate change as a coral-dominated ecosystem. For the Great Barrier Reef and other coral reef systems to survive, it is essential for global policy-making to become much more ecologically sensitive. This is the inevitable conclusion from the development of four detailed scenario storylines developed in Part 3 of the report.
Notes: For video, call the NOS bridge or contact Duane.Mann@noaa.gov. To join us by phone, dial 866-541-1377, passcode 142625 (con.9849337). If you are dialing in or participating by video and have trouble with the connection, please call 301-713-4043.


Thursday, 02 June 2005 ; 1100-1200h (SSMC3, room 4817; NODC seminar)
Speaker: Hernan Garcia (NODC)
Email: Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov
Title: On the upper ocean long-term variability of dissolved oxygen
Abstract: The decadal-scale variability in O2, Apparent Oxygen Utilization (AOU), and heat content in the top 100 m of the world ocean (70°S-70°N) between 1955 and 1998 is documented using observational data from the World Ocean Database 2001. The lowest O2 (highest AOU) content in the late-1950s are followed by high content in the mid-1980s and by low content in the late-1990s. The O2 and AOU content variability is characterized by relatively small linear trends superimposed on large decadal-scale fluctuations. The largest O2 content changes occur in the Northern Hemisphere. The Northern Hemisphere exhibits a negative linear trend in O2 content of ~ -30 Tmol per decade between 1983 and 1998 and a positive linear trend of ~6 Tmol per decade between 1955 and 1998 (1 Tmol=10^12 mol). The linear trends in O2, AOU, and heat content are sensitive to the time frame of the measurements. The results indicate that a constant upper-ocean O2 content inventory should not be assumed on decadal time-scales. Online reprint: http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/OC5/PDF/PAPERS/O2_04GL0.pdf
Notes: VideoTeleConferencing (VTC)/phone available upon request by contacting Cheryl Ingram (Cheryl.Ingram@noaa.gov) at least a day before the seminar.


Thursday, 02 June 2005 ; 1200-1300h (SSMC3, NOAA Central Library, 2nd Floor)
Speaker: Spencer Weart, College Park
Title: The Discovery of Global Warming
Abstract: Humanity's efforts to come to grips with our influence on global climate has a long history. Scientists began to think about "greenhouse" warming in the 19th century, and by the 1930s climate change was a public issue. At first confident that nothing in nature could possibly go wrong, by the 1960s scientists were locked in confused debates over the effects of pollution. Bitter political arguments followed. Around the end of the century advanced computer models, painstaking observations, and a groundbreaking new system for science-based policy-making brought nearly all experts to a consensus: there is a truly serious risk (although no absolute certainty) of harmful warming in our lifetime. The unprecedented complexity of the history of scientific work that led to this conclusion mirrors the complexity of the climate system itself.


Monday 06 June 2005 ; 12:00-13:00 (SSMC4, room 13153, NOS Seminar)
Speaker: Dennis Apeti
Title: A Model for Heavy Metals Bioaccumulation in the American Oyster (Crassostrea Virginica) from Apalachicola Bay
Abstract: Modeling the uptake of trace metals by aquatic bivalves such as Crassostrea virginica (America oyster) is an important step in assessing human exposure to harmful environmental contaminants via seafood consumption. Potentially toxic trace metal concentrations (Cd, Cr, Cu, Pb and Zn) in oyster soft tissue, sediments and ambient water from 6 locations in Apalachicola Bay were determined. Kinetics of bioaccumulation of the trace metals (Cd and Zn) by C. virginica was also investigated in this study. A computer program, Oyster Bioaccumulation Model (OBM), was developed to simulate the passive accumulation of metals from both the dissolved (water column) and particulate (food) phases by C. virginica. The model is based on two main attributes: (1) the oyster biological characteristics such as gill morphometry, feeding growth rate, respiration rate and lipid composition, and (2) the physicochemical properties of metals, which include aqueous diffusivity and partition coefficients. The simulation results were consistent with the field results. Predicted Bioaccumulation Factor (BAF) (5.5 x 102 for Cd and 3.0 x 104 for Zn) show that elemental concentrations in C. virginica are up to 3 orders of magnitude greater than that of the water column. Furthermore, the model is shown to be flexible enough to be utilized in different estuaries.
Notes: For video, call the NOS bridge or contact Duane.Mann@noaa.gov. To join us by phone, dial 866-541-1377, passcode 142625 (con.9849337). If you are dialing in or participating by video and have trouble with the connection, please call 301-713-4043.


Thursday, 09 June 2005 ; 11:00-12:00, (SSMC2, Room 2358, OHC seminar)
Title: Adaptive restoration of Tijuana Estuary, a National Estuarine Research Reserve
Speaker: Joy Zedler, University of Wisconsin
Abstract: A restoration approach I pioneered in southern California is the phasing of restoration modules, with each module designed as an experiment to test effectiveness of alternative restoration techniques. Findings from early modules are used to improve practice in later modules, and new experiments are undertaken to answer new questions as restoration proceeds (= adaptive restoration). Science is advanced as restoration is accomplished. At Tijuana Estuary, the principal cause of habitat loss and degradation is sedimentation from a large, unmanaged watershed. The first phase of salt marsh restoration was small (~ 0.5 ha), but the site was amenable to testing ways to revegetate the marsh plain. With J. Callaway, G. Sullivan, several students, and funding from NSF, we tested the importance of restoring diversity to achieve key ecosystem functions. We learned that diversity enhances canopy complexity, biomass accumulation and nitrogen trapping--the first demonstration of diversity-function effects in a restoration site; at the same time, the marsh plain was fully revegetated. The second phase was larger (8 ha). We planted species-rich vegetation as recommended from phase 1. In addition, we began testing the importance of incising tidal creek networks into the marsh plain for multiple purposes, including revegetation and food web support (fish support). Again, NSF funded the experimental evaluations (comparison of areas with and without tidal creeks, each replicated three-fold; with collaborators J. Callaway and S. Madon). Every year, we learn something new from this site (now 5 years old). My talk will underscore the benefits of undertaking restoration as experiments so that outcomes can be understood and future efforts improved.
Notes: This is part of the Office of Habitat Conservation�s Closing the Loop of Applied Science Series. Web conference: www.readycast.com, unlisted meeting number 747956789 - contact polly.hicks@noaa.gov for additional instructions. Audio conference: 1-877-805-0964, pass code 489689.


Thursday, 09 June 2005 ; 1200-1300h (SSMC4, room 9153, NOS Seminar)
Speaker: Frank Aikman III (Coast Survey Development Lab) and Mark Vincent (Center for Operational Oceanographic Products and Services)
Title: Operational Estuarine and Coastal Forecast Models in NOAA's Ocean Service
Abstract: NOAA's Ocean Service (NOS) develops estuarine and coastal hydrodynamic models (driven by real-time in situ and remote data and the outputs of operational weather forecast models) and transitions them to a 24x7 quality-controlled operational environment to produce nowcasts and forecasts for a variety of applications. These model systems support safe and efficient navigation (e.g., forecast water level fields for under-keel clearance), emergency response (e.g., circulation and density fields for oil spill trajectory forecasts; search and rescue operations), as well as other marine geospatial and ecosystem applications. Nowcast/forecast systems are presently running operationally for the Chesapeake Bay, the Port of New York and New Jersey, and Galveston Bay, with others in development for the St. Johns River, FL, Cook Inlet, AK, and Delaware Bay. Additional models developed outside NOS are also being transitioned to operations, for areas such as the Great Lakes, the Columbia River and Tampa Bay. Critical to the efficient and skillful operation of these many operational forecast models (which will someday cover all major U.S. bays and ports) is the NOS standardized and modularized operating system, called the Coastal Ocean Modeling Framework (COMF). All models must comply with the COMF infrastructure, which deals with all aspects of inputing real-time data and forecasts from weather, hydrological and/or riverine, and coastal models, with standardized skill assessment, as well as with standardized, user-friendly outputs. The COMF system provides a level of middleware, which abstracts a dozen different data bases, served up locally at NOAA and across the World Wide Web, to a common input format. The operational models are thus able to interchangeably use different data sources with no additional programming necessary. Improvements to the forecast skill of these model systems is an ongoing effort, including the use of data assimilation and ensemble averaging, the latter technique being one approach to the important problem of estimating the uncertainty of individual forecasts.
Notes: For video, call the NOS bridge or contact Duane.Mann@noaa.gov. To join us by phone, dial 866-541-1377, passcode 142625 (con.9849337). If you are dialing in or participating by video and have trouble with the connection, please call 301-713-4043.


Thursday, 09 June 2005 ; 1200-1300h (SSMC3, NOAA Central Library, 2nd Floor)
Speaker: Vincent Mudrak, Director USFWS Warm Springs Regional Fisheries Center, Warm Springs, Georgia
Title: Recovering the Endangered Shortnose Sturgeon through Innovative Techniques and Interagency Partnerships
Abstract: This presentation will focus on how imperiled sturgeon, and their habitats, can benefit from proactive conservation activities by NMFS partners. In this regard, the Warm Springs Center works with NMFS and other NMFS partners to implement recovery strategies for the endangered shortnose sturgeon (Acipenser brevirostrum). Discussions will also address positive interactions between NMFS & USFWS offices, and how technologies may be employed by southeast partners, under the authority and guidance of NMFS, to implement a comprehensive approach to sturgeon recovery.
Notes: NOAA Central Library Brown Bag Seminar series


Tuesday, 14 June 2005 ; 1130-1230h (SSMC1, Room 8331, NESDIS seminar)
Speaker: Stephen J. Talabac, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center
Title: Sensor Webs: A Step Toward Realizing an Integrated Global Earth Observing System.
Abstract: Future environmental observations should be made by sophisticated, interconnected platforms and sensors. These �Sensor Web� systems should be able to autonomously detect current or predicted environmental states, issue notification messages, establish new observation goals, and then appropriately reconfigure itself by applying dynamic measurement techniques and adaptive observing strategies. Mr. Talabac will present an overview of the Sensor Web concept, highlight key benefits, describe recent R&D activities at the Goddard Space Flight Center, and identify potential next steps for future NASA and NOAA collaboration.
Notes: NESDIS assistant administrator's luncheon seminar series.


Thursday, 23 June 2005 ; 1100-1200h (SSMC3, room 4817; NODC seminar)
Speaker: John Antonov (NODC)
Email: John.Antonov@noaa.gov
Title: Thermosteric and halosteric sea level rise for 1955-2003
Abstract: World Ocean Database (WOD) and World Ocean Atlas (WOA) are an important source for empirical estimates of steric sea level changes during the second half of the twentieth century. The number of available ocean temperature measurements is about 7 million which is approximately 3.5 times more than for salinity. Thus, most research has estimated only the contribution due to temperature change (i.e., the thermosteric component). We have conducted a series of computations using only pairs of simultaneously observed temperature and salinity. Preliminary results show that the halosteric changes may have nearly the same magnitude as the thermosteric changes at much vaster geographical extent compared to our previous finding for the subpolar gyre of the North Atlantic (Antonov et al, 2002). Regarding the thermosteric sea level change, the decadal variability is the most prominent feature of the global time series. For instance, the rate of thermal expansion was of the same order (1.0-1.5 mm/yr) during the 1970s and 1990s in contrast to the sharp drop in thermosteric sea level (approximately -3.0 mm/yr) during 1980-1983. The overall increase of sea level due to ocean warming of the upper 3000-m layer is 0.4 mm/yr for the 1955/59-1994/98 period.
Notes: VideoTeleConferencing (VTC)/phone available upon request by contacting Cheryl Ingram (Cheryl.Ingram@noaa.gov) at least a day before the seminar.


Monday, 27 June 2005 ; 1200-1300h (SSMC4, room 9153; NOS Seminar)
Speakers: Craig Cornu (South Slough NERR) & Margaret Sedlecky (Weeks Bay NERR)
Title: Restoration Science at NOAA's National Estuarine Research Reserve System: Case studies from the South Slough (Oregon) and Weeks Bay (Alabama) National Estuarine Research Reserves
Abstract: Many reserves in NOAA's National Estuarine Research Reserve System (NERRS) have been implementing and monitoring experimental habitat restoration projects some for over 20 years that address local, regional, and national information gaps in the science supporting estuarine and coastal habitat restoration. On-site stewardship, research, monitoring, training and education programs at each of the 26 reserves offer an integrated capability to identify local and regional information gaps, and, in response, generate and disseminate empirical restoration science information to a variety of target audiences. These capabilities place the NERRS as a unique �place-based� partner in a proposed new NOAA Restoration Science Initiative (Initiative). Through this proposed Initiative, NOAA restoration-oriented programs will develop collaborative methods to improve the science of habitat restoration in the nation�s estuaries and coastal watersheds. This presentation will present examples of how several NERR sites have implemented restoration projects that have contributed to the scientific literature, advised local and regional restoration practitioners, and provided educational opportunities to high school students. The presenters hope to stimulate discussion on how the NERRS can improve its collaboration with other NOAA programs to support the proposed NOAA Restoration Science Initiative.
Notes: For video, call the NOS bridge or contact nos.video.conference@noaa.gov. To join us by phone, dial 866-541-1377, passcode 142625 (con.9849337). If you are dialing in or participating by video and have trouble with the connection, please call 301-713-4043.


Thursday, 29 June 2005 ; 1100-1200h (SSMC3, room 4817; NODC seminar)
Speaker: Robert Gelfeld (NODC)
Email: Robert.Gelfeld@noaa.gov
Title: 6 months in Paris or How the Intergovernmental OceanographicCommission (IOC) Works!
Abstract: Bob Gelfeld will present a synopsis of his recently completed 6 month assignement at UNESCO's Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission (IOC). This assignment was to help the IOC set up and hold the International Oceanographic Data and Information (IODE) XVIII meeting in Belgium.
Notes: VideoTeleConferencing (VTC)/phone available upon request by contacting Cheryl Ingram (Cheryl.Ingram@noaa.gov) at least a day before the seminar.


July 2005

 

Wednesday, 06 July 2005 ; 1200-1300h (SSMC4, room 9153; NOS Seminar)
Speaker: Ed Baker (PMEL Vents Program)
Title: Chemosynthetic Ecosystems on Submarine Volcanoes: Exploring the Western Pacific Frontier
Abstract: Seafloor hydrothermal circulation is the principal agent of energy and mass exchange between the ocean and the earth's crust. Discharging fluids construct mineral deposits, alter deep-sea mixing and circulation patterns, profoundly influence ocean chemistry, and nurture chemosynthetic ecosystems. Some 250 active vent sites are known along the 66,000 km of midocean ridges, but exploration of the 20,000 km of submarine volcanic arcs, almost entirely in the western Pacific, is only beginning. Since 1999, NOAA's Vents Program, along with NOAA's Office of Ocean Exploration, academic colleagues, and international partnerships, has been a leader in exploring this western Pacific frontier. Hydrothermal discharge along volcanic arcs differs profoundly from that on midocean ridges because the broader rock composition on arcs produces a broader range in fluid chemistry, leading to more varied ecological conditions on the seafloor. In the last six years Vents scientists have visited over 120 submarine volcanoes, discovering more than 40 new hydrothermal sites along the Mariana and Tonga-Kermadec arcs. Following these expeditions, Vents and OE have led comprehensive interdisciplinary explorations of chemosynthetic ecosystems at 15 of these sites, using both Remotely Operated and Human Occupied Vehicles. At these sites we have videoed and sampled ongoing volcanic eruptions, an upward rainstorm of liquid CO2 droplets, overlapping chemosynthetic and photosynthetic ecosystems on a shallow volcano, and some of the most densely populated habitats ever encountered in the deep sea. Compared to midocean ridge hydrothermal sites, on submarine volcanoes magmatic degassing is more prevalent, ongoing volcanic activity is more common, biological productivity may be higher, and individual ecosystems show less within-site but more between-site diversity. This ecological trend may arise from volcano-induced circulation that inhibits larval dispersal, the geological instability of the volcanoes, and the high variability of fluid chemistry between volcanoes. Based on present rate of discovery, we project that some 250 submarine volcanoes may populate volcanic arcs. A wealth of scientific knowledge and excitement
Notes: For video, call the NOS bridge or contact nos.video.conference@noaa.gov. To join us by phone, dial 866-541-1377, passcode 142625 (con.9849337). If you are dialing in or participating by video and have trouble with the connection, please call 301-713-4043.


Thursday, 07 July 2005 ; 1100-1200h (SSMC3, room 4817; NODC seminar)
Speaker: Shannon Niou (NODC)
Email: Shannon.Niou@noaa.gov
Title: Seasonal variation of water masses and surface currents of the seas surrounding Taiwan
Abstract: The topographic features around Taiwan are complicated, and the hydrographic distributions are influenced by oceanic activities and seasonal monsoon. In general, there are three water masses surrounding Taiwan. One is Kuroshio Water, originated from North Equator Current, (NEC), distributes along the east coast of Taiwan. Second is South China Sea Surface water, originated from South China Sea. And the other is China Coastal Water of the East China Sea. Here, National Center for Ocean Research/Ocean Data Bank uses the hydrographic data and current speed & direction data as the examples to present the topic "Seasonal Variation of Water Masses and Surface Currents of Seas Surrounding Taiwan, which was first presented by Ms. Iris Huang from NCOR in IMDIS 2005 (International Marine Data and Information Systems Conference from May/31 to Jun/3rd 2005) at Brest, France hosted by Ifremer.
Notes: VideoTeleConferencing (VTC)/phone available upon request by contacting Cheryl Ingram (Cheryl.Ingram@noaa.gov) at least a day before the seminar.


Wednesday, 27 July 2005 ; 1100-1200h (SSMC3, room 4817; NODC seminar)
Speaker: Charles Sun (NODC)
Email: Charles.Sun@noaa.gov
Title: Integrated Pacific Region Data Delivery for Low and High Bandwidth Internet Connections
Abstract: A state-of-the-art environmental data and information system for delivering an integrated dataset including real-time and historical data to remote users with high and low bandwidth Internet connections, developed at the U.S. National Oceanographic Data Center (NODC), is presented in this paper. The purposes of this paper are: (1) to develop and implement operationally a Pacific regional ocean data and information portal (PRODIP) with capabilities of exploring in-situ data from real-time data streams and integrating the data streams with archives across the Internet through a one-stop shopping (single interface) query for users who have a high bandwidth Internet connection and (2) Alternatively, users without high-speed network access can order CD-ROMs from the NODC that contain the integrated dataset and then use software over potentially low-bandwidth/high-latency network connection to periodically update the CD-ROM-based archive with new data. This project will provide a prototype for the next generation of NOAA products and services that are responsive to needs of the Pacific region ocean communities, governments and business. The developmental and implemental strategy and framework provide adequate coverage and continuity of high quality data in the islands of Hawaii, the Northwestern Hawaii Islands, and the American Flag Territories. The PRODIP provides efficient data sharing and integration, easy access to and long-term archiving of climate data sets and the capability of synthesis of information in the Pacific Islands Region.


Wednesday, 27 July 2005 ; 1100-1200h (SSMC3, room 15836, OHC seminar)
Speaker: Tom Minello (NOAA's Southeast Fisheries Science Center)
Title: Wetland Restoration and Fishery Production
Abstract: Salt marshes in the northern Gulf of Mexico are valuable nursery habitats for fishery species such as penaeid shrimps and blue crabs. Extensive marsh loss has led to numerous restoration projects in the region, but little design information has been available for optimizing fishery productivity from these created wetlands. Building productive salt marshes requires information on 1) the characteristics of natural marshes that make them productive for fishery species, 2) the differences between natural and created marshes, and 3) variability in marshes created with different construction techniques. Efficient habitat restoration also requires an analysis of cost: benefits of different construction techniques. We have sampled the small-scale (1-10 m) spatial distributions of shrimps and blue crabs in marsh systems and developed models to estimate populations of these juvenile fishery species in natural and created marshes of different land-water configurations. These models focus on the vegetation-water interface, and the amount of edge in salt marshes is an important characteristic determining population size. By comparing these standing crop estimates with standardized project costs, we can compare the construction cost versus the projected fishery benefit for different restoration projects. A mechanistic simulation model also has been developed to explain the ecological relationships regulating brown shrimp production in marsh systems. By combining such production models with our spatially-oriented standing crop models, we can estimate expected production for different marsh creation projects and explain why maximizing marsh edge is important for production of these decapod crustaceans. Terracing and the formation of small marsh islands are two restoration techniques that produce a large amount of marsh edge and should provide productive habitats for penaeid shrimps and blue crabs.
Notes: This is part of the Office of Habitat Conservation's Closing the Loop of Applied Science Series. Web conference: contact polly.hicks@noaa.gov for instructions; Audio conference: 1-877-805-0964, pass code 489689


Thursday, 28 July 2005 ; 1100-1200h (SSMC3, room 4817; NODC seminar)
Speaker: Igor Smolyar (NODC)
Email: Igor.Smolyar@noaa.gov
Title: Application of a fish scale model for developing a world ocean ichtyological observation network
Abstract: Fish scale incremental patterns possess a unique combination of features: Fish scales are easily available, their preparation for image processing is very simple, and ichthyologists have used fish scale patterns for decades as a source of information about the life history of fish as well as the state of the environment. Because of these features, many marine institutions around the world have maintained collections of fish scales of various species of fish from the World Ocean for decades. However, only a small portion of these collections has processed due to the luck of formal procedures of the analysis of fish scales patterns. It has been show that the main problem in the development of these procedures is the anisotropic structure of the fish scale patterns: the number of growth increments and their widths significantly vary with the direction of measurement. A discrete model of fish scale incremental pattern is proposed, which takes into account the incremental structure in 2-D. This model is based on a representation of the fish scale pattern as a Boolean function, taking anisotropy in the form of discontinuities and convergences of incremental structural elements into account, and the widths of growth increments in different directions. The model allows one to quantify the growth rate of fish scale in various directions and then combine it into one plot. The notion of entropy of the fish scale pattern is proposed. It has been show that entropy is the measure of the fuzziness of the quantification of the 2-D fish scale growth rate and the structural anisotropy of fish scale pattern is the source of this fuzziness. Experiments with the processing of fish scales of different species of fish show that the model is quite robust: the damage of the structure of fish scales patterns do not amplified into catastrophic errors in the quantification of its growth rate. The model of the fish scale pattern allows us to develop a database of hundreds of thousands of fish scales from the World Ocean. Optical sensors for imaging of fish scale patterns and transmitting devices could be set up on fishing vessels in order to automatically update database and get real time information about the status of fisheries.
Notes: VideoTeleConferencing (VTC)/phone available upon request by contacting Cheryl Ingram (Cheryl.Ingram@noaa.gov) at least a day before the seminar.


Thursday, 28 July 2005 ; 1200-1300h (SSMC3, NOAA Central Library)
Speaker: John Bailey, Director of the Urban Land Institute's Smart Growth Alliance
Title: Lessons from Reality Check and Success Stories from Around the Metropolitan DC Region
Abstract: Growth and development offer communities many potential opportunities by bringing in new residents, businesses, and investments. Growth can improve a community's quality of life by providing the resources to revitalize a downtown, refurbish a main street, build new schools, and develop vibrant places to live, work, shop, and play. However, along with the benefits come challenges. The environmental impacts of development can make it difficult for communities to protect their natural resources while continuing to grow economically. Many communities are adopting policies that can simultaneously support their local economies, improve public health, protect coastal resources, and improve their quality of life. These policies can help NOAA meet its core goals of protecting coastal water resources and promoting long-term economic development in coastal communities. John Bailey will discuss these growth and development issues from his perspective as the director of the Smart Growth Alliance (SGA). He will talk about the development of the SGA partnership (partners include the Chesapeake Bay Foundation, Urban Land Institute Washington, the Greater Washington Board of Trade, Coalition for Smarter Growth, and the Metropolitan Washington Builders Council), the findings from Reality Check the February 2005 alternative growth scenario exercise conducted in Washington, and SGA's successful smart growth recognition program.
Notes: This will be the second presentation of the "Smart Growth" seminar series. Video and teleconferencing are not available.


August 2005

 

Monday, 01 August 2005 ; 1100-1200h (SSMC3, room 4817; NODC seminar)
Speaker: Kiera-Nicole Lee [NOAA Educational Partnership Program (EPP) summer intern]
Email: Kiera-Nicole.E.Lee@noaa.gov
Title: Annual cycles of selected near-surface oceanographic variables around Hawaii
Abstract: Kiera is a chemistry senior conducting a summer internship in the NODC-Ocean Climate Laboratory as part of the NOAA Educational Partnership Program (EPP). She will present results of her project by examining the annual cycles of selected oceanographic chemical (oxygen, nutrients) and physical (temperature) variables based on the in-situ data collected as part of the Hawaii Time Series Station (HOT). She will also compare the HOT and the objectively analized fields of the World Ocean Atlas 2001 on comparable depth levels.
Notes: VideoTeleConferencing (VTC)/phone available upon request by contacting Cheryl Ingram (Cheryl.Ingram@noaa.gov) at least a day before the seminar.


Thursday, 04 August 2005 ; 1100-1200h (SSMC3, room 4817; NODC seminar)
Speakers: Hernan Garcia (NODC), Cynthia Zeigler (NODC) and Lynette Joynes (NOAA, Logistics staff office)
Email: Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov, Cynthia.Zeigler@noaa.gov, lynette.m.joynes@noaa.gov
Title: Preserving NOAA's history by reporting heritage assets and the NODC collection of historical instruments
Abstract: An informal description of personal property retained by NOAA because of its historical, cultural, educational or artistic value that has been an intrinsic part of the past history or culture of NOAA. NOAA has in its care a wealth of resources that recall the agency's proud history and dedicated service to the nation. Such resources include maps, charts, photographs, books, scientific instruments, and other artifacts -- some centuries old. NOAA is also the steward of large-scale historic and cultural resources, such as buildings and shipwrecks. These resources are of immense value not only to NOAA but also the American people -- their true owners. Through his Preserve America executive order (E.O. 13287), President Bush has called on NOAA and other federal agencies to step up efforts to: inventory, preserve, and showcase federally-managed historic and cultural, or "heritage," resources and foster tourism in partnership with local communities See NOAA and the Preserve America Initiative (http://preserveamerica.noaa.gov/future.html). The NODC startup collection of historical oceanographic instruments and other items will be shown. The collection has been inventoried (catalogued) as part of the NOAA heritage assests.
Notes: VideoTeleConferencing (VTC)/phone available upon request by contacting Cheryl Ingram (Cheryl.Ingram@noaa.gov) at least a day before the seminar.


Wednesday, 10 August 2005 ; 1200-1300h (Library Brown Bag Seminar, NOAA Central Library, SSMC #3, 2nd Floor)
Speaker: Rennie Holt (NOAA Fisheries' Southwest Fisheries Science Center) and Ray Arnaudo (U.S. State Department)
Title: Antarctica: The Last Great Place on Earth - The U.S. Antarctic Marine Living Resource Program
Abstract: Antarctica is recognized as the last place on earth where development and economic interests are still at low levels. The US is one of 25 nations which regulate fishing activities in waters surrounding the southern continent. NOAA Fisheries' U.S. Antarctic Marine Living Resources (AMLR) Program is a national program providing information needed for the development and support of U.S. policy regarding the conservation and management of the marine living resources in the ocean areas surrounding Antarctica. The Program supports U.S. participation in both the Commission and Scientific Committee of the Convention for the Conservation of Antarctic Marine Living Resources (CCAMLR), and is directed towards achieving the conservation objectives of the Convention. The Program was established in 1984 by Public Law 98-623 and implements NOAA's strategic goal of managing the use of the Southern Ocean resources through an ecosystem approach. The Program is administered by the Antarctic Ecosystem Research Division (AERD) located at the Southwest Fisheries Science Center (SWFSC) in La Jolla, CA. The principal mission of the U. S. directed AMLR research program is to provide the scientific information needed to detect, monitor, and predict the effects of harvesting and associated activities on target, dependent, and related species and populations of the Antarctic marine living resources and the ecosystem(s) of which they are a part. The Program utilizes an AMLR-chartered research vessel to conduct predator/prey studies in the vicinity of two land bases in the South Shetland Islands. The ship platform is used to collect environmental, oceanographic, primary productivity and prey data (zooplankton abundance and distribution, specifically Antarctic krill Euphausia superba). Concurrently, the AMLR Program collects predator data at land bases located at Cape Shirreff on Livingston Island (seabird and seal data) and at Admiralty Bay (NSF funded) on King George Island (seabird data). Finfish surveys are conducted periodically to assess biomass of species subject to commercial harvesting. In addition to investigating fishing effects on marine living resources, the Program is in an ideal position to contribute to research investigating climate change. During the last fifty years, the Antarctic Peninsula, the Program's study area, has recorded the largest increase in air temperature on earth. The Peninsula is located directly under the ozone hole. Data presently collected, in conjunction with other research efforts, are ideal to contribute to this important scientific question.


Thursday, 11 August 2005 ; 1100-1200h (SSMC3, room 4817; NODC seminar)
Speakers: Douglas Hamilton & Karen Taylor
Email: doug.hamilton@noaa.gov&Karen.Taylor@noaa.gov
Title: NOAA's Coral Reef Information System (CoRIS) (http://www.coris.noaa.gov)
Abstract: NOAA's Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) supports projects to preserve, sustain and restore U.S. coral reef ecosystems. The Coral Reef Information System provides a single point of access to coral ecosystem data, data products, publications, and other resources that result from CRCP efforts and other NOAA activities. CoRIS Web site content, data and publication access tools, and data / publication gathering activities will be described.
Notes: VideoTeleConferencing (VTC)/phone available upon request by contacting Cheryl Ingram (Cheryl.Ingram@noaa.gov) at least a day before the seminar.


Tuesday, 16 August 2005 ; 1200-1300h (SSMC4, room 9153; NOS Seminar)
Speakers: William Skirving (NESDIS)
Title: Modeling Climate Impacts on Palau's Coral Reef Ecosystem
Abstract: The Nature Conservancy and the Palau Government have joined forces to design and implement a protected areas network (PAN) for Palau's coral reef ecosystem. They recognized bleaching as being potentially one of the major future threats to the Palau coral reef ecosystem, but with only one poorly documented bleaching event to go by, it is difficult to gain enough experience about the response of the ecosystem to this type of event to be able to build resilience to these events into the PAN. In parallel with the PAN, NOAA and AIMS were collaborating on the development of the use of hydrodynamic models to predict heat stress during a bleaching event. In 2003, it was decided to combine these efforts and for NOAA and AIMS to produce a heat stress model for Palau for use in the PAN in an attempt to build in resilience against potential changes to future climate, regardless of the change.
Notes: For video, call the NOS bridge or contact nos.video.conference@noaa.gov. To join us by phone, dial 866-541-1377, passcode 142625 (con.9849337). If you are dialing in or participating by video and have trouble with the connection, please call 301-713-4043.


Wednesday 24 August 2005 ; 1230-1300 (SSMC4, 10th Floor Large Conference Room; NOS Seminar)
Speaker: Nina Garfield, ALDP Graduate, 2005
Title: Background on the Aspiring Leadership Development Program (ALDP)
Abstract: Recently, a notice soliciting interest in the Aspiring Leaders Development Program among DOC employees in the GS 9-12 grade levels was sent out to all DOC employees. Applications are due September 2, 2005. This will be the second year that such a leadership program for this grade level will be offered. This is a great opportunity for leadership training. This brown bag is dedicated to providing more information about the program. Information will be useful to both managers and employees.


Thursday, 25 August 2005 ; 1100-1200h (SSMC3, room 4817; NODC seminar)
Speakers: Steven Rutz and Donald Collins (NODC)
Email: srutz@nodc.noaa.gov& Donald.Collins@noaa.gov
Title: Ocean data archivists perspective during an ocean exploration cruise
Abstract: Since June 2004, two ocean data archivists from the NOAA National Oceanographic Data Center have participated as on-board data managers for three cruises sponsored by the NOAA Office of Ocean Exploration (OE). These two offices are part of the OE Integrated Product Team (IPT), which is developing an end-to-end OE data management system. Two components of this system are 1) gathering information during OE cruises about the on-board science activities and the collected data; and 2) archiving these data with their accompanying science and cruise information. The NODC archivists participation on the OE cruises gave them a first-hand perspective and insight on these two ends of the data management spectrum. Based on these experiences, recommendations for an end-to-end data management system are presented. (Plus, I'll present pictures from the latest cruise - Hidden Ocean 2005!)
Notes: VideoTeleConferencing (VTC)/phone available upon request by contacting Cheryl Ingram (Cheryl.Ingram@noaa.gov) at least a day before the seminar.


September 2005

 

Wednesday, 7 September 2005 ; 1200-1300h (SSMC4, room 9153; NOS Seminar)
Speaker: Jerald S. Ault (University of Miami, Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science)
Title: Exploring the Last Marine Frontier: Florida's Dry Tortugas
Abstract: Renowned for its broad fishing opportunities and spectacular scenic beauty, the Florida Keys, from Miami to the Dry Tortugas, features North America's largest living barrier coral reef and highly productive fisheries. The world-renowned snapper, grouper, bonefish, tarpon, permit, and billfish resources have built muti-billion dollar fishing and tourism industries in the Keys and have prompted state legislators to call Florida the Fishing Capital of the World. But over the past several decades, the historically productive snapper and grouper stocks have declined dramatically. Although the Keys region remains highly productive, many scientists now consider it an ecosystem at risk. Dr. Ault is leading a groundbreaking project to build sustainable Florida fisheries, unprecedented in geographic scope, which aims to map and quantify fish, coral, and lobster populations in the vast, warm, and turquoise-colored waters of the Dry Tortugas. Dubbed the last frontier for its remote location 70 miles off Key West the Dry Tortugas sits at a crossroads of ocean currents. The Tortugas are a dazzling living museum for marine life, with spectacular deepwater corals and more than 250 species of fish. State-of-the-art sampling techniques will enable one of the most exhaustive surveys of marine life to define current conditions and monitor future changes as the result of controversial management actions, such as marine reserves. These studies give scientists and policy makers a better picture of change that has occurred in the Tortugas since parts of the region have been made off-limits to fishing.
Notes: For video, call the NOS bridge or contact nos.video.conference@noaa.gov. To join us by phone, dial 866-541-1377, passcode 142625 (con.9849337). If you are dialing in or participating by video and have trouble with the connection, please call 301-713-4043.


Thursday, 8 September 2005 ; 1100-1200h (SSMC3, room 4817; NODC seminar)
Speakers: Joseph Shirley, Steven Rutz, & Hernan Garcia (NODC)
Email: Joseph.Shirley@noaa.gov, srutz@nodc.noaa.gov, Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov
Title: Generic Mapping Tools: Overview and examples of use at NODC
Abstract: Generic Mapping Tools (GMT) is an open source collection of approximately 60 tools for manipulating geographic and Cartesian data sets, including filtering, trend fitting, gridding and projecting. It produces PostScript illustrations ranging from simple x-y plots via contour maps to artificially illuminated surfaces and 3-D perspective views. GMT supports about 30 map projections and transformations. It comes with support data such as coastlines, rivers, and political boundaries. It is available from http://gmt.soest.hawaii.edu/. This talk will give a brief overview of the types of operations that can be done using GMT. The main focus will be on examples of GMT use at NODC. Screenshots, demonstrations, and descriptions of procedures will be presented.
Notes: VideoTeleConferencing (VTC)/phone available upon request by contacting Cheryl Ingram (Cheryl.Ingram@noaa.gov) at least a day before the seminar.


Friday, 9 September 2005 ; 1200-1300h (SSMC3, Room 13836 ; NOS Seminar)
Title: Listening for whales offshore Alaska: Developing passive acoustics as a tool for marine mammal detection
Speaker: Sue Moore (Alaska Fisheries Science Center, National Marine Mammal Laboratory)
Abstract: Since 1999, NOAA's Alaska Fisheries Science Center (AFSC) and Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory (PMEL) have deployed autonomous instruments offshore Alaska that are capable of recording whale calls over year-long periods. Whale calls have been detected in the Gulf of Alaska, southeastern Bering Sea and the western Beaufort Sea providing unprecedented information on seasonal occurrence for five large whale species, currently listed as endangered. Sue Moore (NOAA/AFSC) will provide an overview of this program of research, including potential linkages to NOAA's Ecosystem Observations Program (EOP) and integration with on-going oceanographic research in Alaskan seas.
Notes: Phone and video not available.


Tuesday, 13 September 2005 ; 1100-1200h (SSMC2, Room 2358, OHC seminar)
Speaker: Peter Bergstrom (NOAA Chesapeake Bay Office)
Title: Restoration of Aquatic Grass Communities of Chesapeake Bay: How Should We Proceed?
Abstract: Chesapeake Bay has historically supported extensive aquatic grass meadows that provide fishery habitat, about 185,000 acres in all of its tidal waters. However, water quality degradation from increased sediment and nutrient inputs has reduced the area of aquatic grasses, with only 73,000 acres mapped in 2004, or 39% of the historical coverage. This represents some improvement from a low point in the mid-1980's, but after improving almost every year in the early 1990's, recent baywide aquatic grass area has leveled off. Aquatic grass restoration is proceeding on two fronts, by (1) improving water quality to promote natural recovery, and (2) planting aquatic grasses in suitable sites. The results from these two approaches will be compared, and the plans for future restoration described.
Notes: This is part of the Office of Habitat Conservation's Closing the Loop of Applied Science Series. Web conference: contact polly.hicks@noaa.gov before Sept 13th for instructions; audio conference: 1-877-805-0964, pass code 489689


Wednesday, 14 September 2005 ; 1200-1300h (SSMC4, room 13153; NOS Seminar)
Speaker: Dwight Gledhill (NOAA/NESDIS Coral Reef Watch Knauss Fellow)
Title: Coupling Remote Sensing and In Situ Data to Derive a Calcification Index for Coral Reef Ecosystems
Abstract: Recent peer reviewed articles have conclusively demonstrated correlations between rising atmospheric CO2, changes in surface layer ocean pH that could significantly affect calcification rates of carbonate secreting organisms by the middle of the 21st century. Coral Reef Watch is seeking to monitor the long term response of coral reef ecosystems to changing carbon chemistry by coupling a multitude of advanced tools including remote sensing, ships-of-opportunity and moored stations. Based on the reef water to offshore difference in sea surface carbon dioxide partial pressure, an index is proposed that will provide a qualitative assessment of the overall calcification performance at a reef system. Algorithms are currently being derived, correlating shipboard measurements of pCO2 in the Caribbean Sea to collocated satellite products. This talk will show how such algorithms will be used to generate a near real-time regional pCO2 field to which continuous in-situ near-reef CO2 measurements can be compared.
Notes: For video, call the NOS bridge or contact nos.video.conference@noaa.gov. To join us by phone, dial 866-541-1377, passcode 142625 (con.9849337). If you are dialing in or participating by video and have trouble with the connection, please call 301-713-4043.


Thursday, 15 September 2005 ; 1200-1300h (SSMC 3, 2nd Floor, NOAA Central Library)
Speaker: Gary Stith (Director of the Silver Spring Regional Center)
Title: The Revitalization of Silver Spring
Abstract: The first elements of the Silver Spring redevelopment project opened to the public in 2002, and occupancy is now nearing completion. The project has spurred other commercial and residential development activity throughout the Silver Spring Central Business District. Gary Stith, Director of the Silver Spring Regional Center, will talk about the history of this redevelopment effort, including several false starts experienced by Montgomery County and lessons learned. He will also explain the process of building support for a new plan, the public-private partnership involved, and the resources needed for successful implementation. This is the third in a series of brown bags focusing on growth and development issues. The series is co-sponsored by the NOAA Library, the National Sea Grant Office (OAR), and the Office of Ocean and Coastal Resource Management (NOS).
Notes: NOAACentral Library brown bag seminar series


Tuesday, 20 September 2005 ; 1200-1300h (SSMC 3, 2nd Floor, NOAA Central Library)
Speaker: Susan Carlson (Director of Environmentors program)
Title: The EnvironMentors program (http://www.environmentors.org/)
Abstract: She will introduce NOAA staff to EnvironMentors program and the opportunity to serve as a mentor. Mentors work with a D.C. high school student and teacher on
developing environmental science projects over the academic year (http://www.environmentors.org/).
Notes: NOAACentral Library brown bag seminar series


Wednesday, 21 September 2005 ; 1100-1200h (SSMC3, room 4817; NODC seminar)
Speaker: Ken Casey (NODC)
Email: Kenneth.Casey@noaa.gov
Title: Understanding local variations in sea surface temperatures and their impacts on marine ecosystems.
Abstract: Climate-related changes in ocean temperatures appear capable of impacting marine ecosystems, from altering phytoplankton production patterns to increasing coral disease incidence and bleaching. These temperature changes are often considered global in scope, and indeed significant globally averaged ocean warming is observed. However, important local variations exist and have more direct impacts on local ecosystems. Records from in situ platforms can observe larger climate patterns, but satellite systems are often needed to understand global to local temperature variations. While remote sensing systems are often of limited duration, the AVHRR series on the NOAA polar orbiters has been flying for over 20 years. The Pathfinder program has consistently processed these satellite observations, resulting in the Version 5 dataset with global, 4 km resolution. Using the Pathfinder data, spatiotemporal patterns of temperature-related metrics relevant to coral reef ecosystems are determined and used to investigate the relationship between temperature and bleaching events as well as disease outbreaks. Results from these analyses have potential applications for conservation planning, marine reserve design, and understanding the impact of changing climate on marine ecosystems.
Notes: VideoTeleConferencing (VTC)/phone available upon request by contacting Cheryl Ingram (Cheryl.Ingram@noaa.gov) at least a day before the seminar.


Wednesday, 21 September 2005 ; 1200-1300h (SSMC3, 2nd Floor, NOAA Central Library)
Speaker: Stephanie Showalter (National Sea Grant Law Center)
Title: An Overview of the Law Center's Services and Role in the Sea Grant Community as it Serves NOAA and the Nation.
Abstract: She will present the results of recent Law Center research efforts and encourage dialogue between Law Center staff and NOAA attorneys.
Notes: NOAACentral Library brown bag seminar series


Thursday, 22 September 2005 ; 1200-1300h (SSMC4, room 9153; NOS Seminar)
Speaker: George Cathcart and Atziri Ibanez (NERRS)
Title: Estuaries Live
Abstract: Join educators and scientists from the Jacques Cousteau National Estuarine Research Reserve and Barnegat Bay National Estuarine Preserve as they broadcast as part of the EstuaryLive Program. EstuaryLive is a free, interactive educational program for students of all agences that is webcast in celebration of National Estuaries Day (Sept. 24). This year, EstuaryLive will consist of six field trips through five different estuaries; one of the field trips will bea segment comparing three of the five estuaries. For this brown bag lunch event, we will watch the Jacques Cousteau NERR and Barnetgat Bay NEP broadcast and learn about the unique character of the two estuarine systems. The goal of this program is to provide program participants with an understanding of, and appreciation for, estuaries as collections of diverse, connected habitats that serve as critical nurseries for many marine and terrestrial organisms. This is one of NOAA's most important outreach programs. For more information about EstuaryLive, please visit http://www.estuaries.gov.
Notes: TBA


October 2005

 

Monday, 03 October 2005 ; 1200-1300h (SSMC4, room 13153; NOS Seminar)
Speaker: Laurence McCook (Manager, Research and Monitoring Coordination, GBRMPA & Pew Fellow in Marine Conservation)
Title: Research & Management for the Protection & Resilience of the Great Barrier Reef
Abstract: This talk aims to provide an overview of Dr. McCook's research on coral-seaweed interactions and their importance in reef degradation and resilience; The work to be undertaken in my Pew Fellowship in Marine Conservation; Research and Monitoring Coordination for the protection of the Great Barrier Reef, including in particular, the Climate Change Response Program.
Notes: For video, call the NOS bridge or contact nos.video.conference@noaa.gov. To join us by phone, dial 866-541-1377, passcode 142625 (con.9849337). If you are dialing in or participating by video and have trouble with the connection, please call 301-713-4043.


Thursday, 6 October 2005 ; 1100-1200h (SSMC3, room 4817; NODC seminar) **NOTE: THIS SEMINAR HAS BEEN POSTPONED - We'll send out the new date when we have it.**
Speakers: Lynette Joynes (NOAA, Logistics staff office)
Email: lynette.m.joynes@noaa.gov
Title: Preserving NOAA's history by reporting heritage assets.
Abstract: An informal description of personal property retained by NOAA because of its historical, cultural, educational or artistic value that has been an intrinsic part of the past history or culture of NOAA. NOAA has in its care a wealth of resources that recall the agency's proud history and dedicated service to the nation. Such resources include maps, charts, photographs, books, scientific instruments, and other artifacts -- some centuries old. NOAA is also the steward of large-scale historic and cultural resources, such as buildings and shipwrecks. These resources are of immense value not only to NOAA but also the American people -- their true owners. Through his Preserve America executive order (E.O. 13287), President Bush has called on NOAA and other federal agencies to step up efforts to: inventory, preserve, and showcase federally-managed historic and cultural, or "heritage," resources and foster tourism in partnership with local communities See NOAA and the Preserve America Initiative (http://preserveamerica.noaa.gov/future.html).
Notes: VideoTeleConferencing (VTC)/phone available upon request by contacting Cheryl Ingram (Cheryl.Ingram@noaa.gov) at least a day before the seminar.


Tuesday, 11 October 2005 ; 1500-1600h(SSMC3, room 4817; NODC seminar)
Speaker: You-Soon Chang (Meteorological Research Institute, South Korea)
Title: Meridional exchange of water mass during El Niño evolution in the Pacific Ocean derived from ocean general circulation model
Abstract: In this study, ocean general circulation model, modular ocean model version 3.1, is configurated and validated in order to understand the propagation process of El Niño signals contained in subsurface oceanic parameters. Time-longitude diagram of the depth of the 20°C isotherm and the disappearance of equatorial undercurrent during 1982-1983 strong El Niño coincide with the observation evidences. From the EOF and composite analysis of heat content of the upper 300 meters, meridional exchange of water mass during El Niño evolution can be extracted from the second mode of EOF. Meridional redistribution of subsurface water mass occurs after the zonal advection of warm water from the western to eastern tropical Pacific in about one year. Consistent results are obtained for the depth of the 20°C isotherm. Meridional exchange of water mass is also achieved by transport anomalies in the western boundary currents such as Kuroshio and New Guinea coastal current with an 8- to 13-month time delay on the interannual time scale.
Notes: VideoTeleConferencing (VTC)/phone available upon request by contacting Cheryl Ingram (Cheryl.Ingram@noaa.gov) at least a day before the seminar.


Tuesday, 11 October 2005 ; 1100-1200p (SSMC3, room 4527; Office of Habitat Conservation OHC seminar)
Speaker: Denise Breitburg (Smithsonian Environmental Research Center)
Title: Low Dissolved Oxygen; Fish, Fisheries, and Estuarine Foodwebs
Abstract: A discussion regarding the effect of hypoxia on fish and fisheries; how does a low oxygen environment effect fish assemblages. A reduction in dissolved oxygen concentration is one of the most important negative effects of nutrient over-enrichment of coastal waters. Low dissolved oxygen (hypoxia) can cause mortality, reduced growth rates, and altered distributions and behaviors of fishes, as well as changes in the relative importance of organisms and pathways of carbon flow within food webs. As a result, hypoxia and anoxia can lead to large reductions in the abundance, diversity and harvest of fishes within affected waters. In estuaries, both the degree of oxygen depletion and the effects of low oxygen on living resources tend to be most severe in bottom waters. Nutrient enrichment typically increases prey abundance in more highly oxygenated surface waters and beyond the boundaries of the hypoxic zone. Because of this mosaic of high and low oxygen areas within a system, not only the actual oxygen concentration of bottom waters, but the spatial arrangement, predictability and persistence of highly oxygenated, high productivity habitats, and the ability of fishes to locate and utilize those favorable habitats, will determine the ultimate effect of low oxygen on fish populations.
Notes: VideoTeleConferencing (VTC)/phone available upon request by contacting Perry Gayaldo (Perry.Gayaldo@noaa.gov) or or Kimberly Lellis (Kimberly.Lellis@noaa.gov).


Thursday, 13 October 2005 ; 1200-1300h (SSMC3, 2nd Floor, NOAA Central Library)
Speaker: Kristen M. Fletcher (Roger Williams University, School of Law) and Paul C. Ticco (Coastal States Organization)
Title: Kelo v. New London: Implications for Coastal Management
Abstract: In the summer of 2005, the U.S. Supreme Court decided a key decision that affects coastal land use and property rights: Kelo v. New London, an eminent domain case involving waterfront properties in Connecticut, was decided in favor of the city. This presentation will provide description and analysis of the case followed by a discussion of the case's implications for coastal zone management.
Notes: NOAACentral Library brown bag seminar series


Tuesday, 18 October 2005 ; 1100-1200h (SSMC3, room 4817; NODC seminar)
Speaker: Shannon Niou (NODC)
Email: Shannon.Niou@noaa.gov
Title: CD/DVD File Systems for the World Ocean Circulation Experiment-Upper Ocean Thermal Data (WOCE-UOT) and the Pacific Region Integrated Data Enterprise (PRIDE) projects and their Data Format.
Abstract: An open discussion for sharing the experience of making a system-independent & system-friendly file systems for use on CDs/DVDs as our project products and why we use netCDF data format for both of WOCE Global Data & PRIDE datasets.
Notes: VideoTeleConferencing (VTC)/phone available upon request by contacting Cheryl Ingram (Cheryl.Ingram@noaa.gov) at least a day before the seminar.


Tuesday, 18 October 2005 ; 1200-1300h (SSMC3, 2nd Floor, NOAA Central Library)
Speaker: Members of the NOAA Mediator Cadre, NOAA Alternative Dispute Resolution Program
Title: Have your work relationships run aground?
Abstract: Ever wondered how to resolve your differences at work easily? How conflicts can be avoided using Alternative Dispute Resolution? How problems are resolved? How mediation works? Come and see members of the NOAA Mediators Cadre tell how your NOAA Alternative Dispute Resolution Program works and help Jessica and George resolve their differences in a mock mediation. Learn how your NOAA ADR Program can help settle differences with respect.
Notes: NOAACentral Library brown bag seminar series


Wednesday 19 October 2005 ; 1500-1600h (SSMC4, Room 9153, NOS Seminar)
Speaker: Franklin Schwing (NMFS Southwest Fisheries Science Center)
Title: Providing Environmental Data for Ocean Integration and Ecosystem Research
Abstract: Providing science-quality environmental data products for researchers and managers is a critical component of all NOAA programs. This requires thoughtful planning about acquiring, storing, and distributing data prior to its collection. Identifying standards for storing and serving data is also a priority. The Environmental Research Division of the NOAA Fisheries Service Southwest Fisheries Science Center has been developing data sets and products for over 35 years for use by ecosystem-based research and management. While many of the users of these products are outside of NOAA, providing data and information for the NOAA mission is our primary focus. Some examples of the types of data products available and their application to a myriad of activities will be presented.
Notes: For video, call the NOS bridge or contact nos.video.conference@noaa.gov. To join us by phone, dial 866-541-1377, passcode 142625 (con.9849337). If you are dialing in or participating by video and have trouble with the connection, please call 301-713-4043.


Friday, 21 October 2005 ; 1200-1300h (SSMC3 Conference Room 14836, NOS Seminar)
Speakers: Andy Read & Pat Halpin (Center for Marine Conservation, Nicholas School of the Environment & Earth Sciences, Duke University)
Title: OBIS-SEAMAP: Describing the global distribution patterns of marine mammals, sea turtles and seabirds
Abstract: The Spatial Ecological Analysis of Megavertebrate Populations (SEAMAP) initiative is compiling a global database describing the distribution patterns of marine mammals, sea turtles and seabirds. SEAMAP is a component of the Ocean Biogeographical information System (OBIS), the information system for the Census of Marine Life. SEAMAP datasets include dedicated at-sea surveys, observations of individual movements derived from telemetry, strandings and rookery counts. NOAA Fisheries is currently the largest contributor of data sets, with important contributions from all Science Centers. SEAMAP now includes 162 datasets, which comprise 1,064,957 records from 1935 to 2005. In addition, the project includes 358 species profiles. All data sets and species profiles are publicly available at http://seamap.env.duke.edu. To facilitate the research applications of this global database, SEAMAP is developing a web-based system equipped with data analysis and visualization tools that will allow users to display, query, subset, and summarize data on marine vertebrate distributions in conjunction with environmental information. This dynamic global database of marine vertebrate distribution and abundance is designed to enhance our understanding of the biogeography and the ecology of marine mammals, seabirds and sea turtles by: facilitating the study of anthropogenic impacts on species of conservation concern; enhancing our ability to test hypothesis about biogeographic and biodiversity models; and supporting modeling efforts to predict distributional changes in response to environmental change.
Notes: For video, call Laura.Gutierrez@noaa.gov or (301)713-2376 x148 in advance (this is not through the usual NOS bridge). To join us by phone, dial 866-541-1377, passcode 142625 (con.9849337)


Tuesday 25 October 2005; 1430-1530h WST (Northwest Fisheries Science Center Auditorium, NOS Seminar)
Speaker: Rita Horner (University of Washington School of Oceanography )
Title: Oceans and Human Health Joint NOAA/UW Seminar Series: History of Harmful Algal Blooms in the Pacific Northwest
Abstract: Rita Horner's early scientific work was in the Arctic where she was on the faculty of the University of Alaska Fairbanks and studied the taxonomy, ecology, and productivity of phytoplankton, sea ice algae, and benthic microalgae, developed new methods for the in situ study of ice algal productivity, and edited a book on sea ice biota. Since the early 1980s, she has worked mostly with harmful algae including Chaetoceros spp., Heterosigma akashiwo, Alexandrium spp. and Pseudo-nitzschia spp. Her interests are primarily taxonomic, but include the distribution and ecology of harmful and non-harmful species in the Pacific Northwest and elsewhere. She received her B.S. from the University of Wisconsin , her M.S. from the University of Minnesota , and her Ph.D. from the University of Washington.
Notes: The NOS is working to make this available by video to all NOS offices who normally participate in our video conferencing. Stay tuned for connection directions.


Thursday, 27 October 2005 ; 1100-1200h (SSMC3, room 4817; NODC seminar)
Speakers: Darrel Knoll, Francis Mitchell, Anthony Picciolo (NODC)
Email: Darrel.Knoll@noaa.gov, Francis.Mitchell@noaa.gov, Anthony.Picciolo@noaa.gov
Title: The U.S. National Oceanographic Data Center (NODC)...in the beginning...Part II
Abstract: An informal discussion of the early conceptual ideas of how NODC processed incoming oceanographic data: accessions numbers, cruise numbers, country codes, code tables, punch cards and bathythermograph data, and other interesting pieces of NODC history.
Notes: VideoTeleConferencing (VTC)/phone available upon request by contacting Cheryl Ingram (Cheryl.Ingram@noaa.gov) at least a day before the seminar.


November 2005

 

Thursday, 10 November 2005 ; 1100-1200h (SSMC3, room 4817; NODC seminar)
Speaker: Alexey Mishonov (NODC)
Email: Alexey.Mishonov@noaa.gov
Title: World Ocean Database: newly added beam attenuation data - history and usage
Abstract: Data on beam attenuation coefficient collected during the last few decades of field work all over the world ocean were checked, adjusted and compiled into global data set. These data now merged into the next release of the World Ocean Database for further dissemination among the scientific community. Overview of the data, their history, condition, and possible usage for global carbon cycle studies will be discussed.
Notes: VideoTeleConferencing (VTC)/phone available upon request by contacting Cheryl Ingram (Cheryl.Ingram@noaa.gov) at least a day before the seminar.


Tuesday 22 November 2005 ; 5:30-6:30 EST (Northwest Fisheries Science Center Auditorium, NOS Seminar)
Speaker: Frank Cox (Washington Department of Health & Dan Ayres, Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife)
Title: Public Health and Fisheries Management Implications of Domoic Acid in Razor Clams
Abstract: Dan Ayres is a Fish and Wildlife Biologist who leads the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife's (WDFW) coastal shellfish unit based in Montesano and Willapa Bay. He manages Washington's razor clam fishery and oversees the unit's work managing the coastal Dungeness crab, pink shrimp and spot prawn fisheries, the Willapa Bay oyster reserves and research projects in Willapa Bay. Dan is a University of Washington graduate and he began his career with WDFW in 1980. He has worked closely with other state and federal agencies on harmful algal bloom (HAB) issues since domoic acid was first found along the Washington coast in 1991. Dan has represented WDFW in testimony on this topic before and Washington State Legislature and the U.S. Congress. He recently served as part of the team of researchers and fishery managers from around the nation who have authored the soon to be released national plan titled, Harmful Algal Research and Response: A National Environmental Science Strategy: 2005-2015.Frank Cox graduated in 1969 from California State Polytechnic University with a Bachelor or Science degree in Biology. After graduation, Mr. Cox spent six years in the United States Army as a Petroleum Officer. In 1978, Mr. Cox joined the Department of Social and Health Services, Office of Shellfish Programs. Mr. Cox continued working in the Office of Food Safety & Shellfish Program, Washington Department of Health, when it separated from DSHS. Mr. Cox has worked in all areas of the Shellfish Program and is currently the Marine Biotoxin Program Lead.
Notes: If you are interested in participating in this talk by video conference, please email me (Ruth.Kelty@noaa.gov) by Friday, Nov. 18. I will only set it up if people email me expressing interest. This seminar is part of the Oceans and Human Health Joint NOAA/UW Seminar Series. Please see flyer for complete fall schedule and location details at the following link: http://habsweb.nwfsc.noaa.gov/ohh/OHH_101105_121305.pdf


December 2005

 

Thursday, 1 December 2005 ; 12:00-13:00h (SSMC3, 2nd Floor, NOAA Central Library)
Speaker: Tundi Agardy (Executive Director, Sound Seas, and Marine Protected Areas Federal Advisory Committee member)
Title: MPA Networks: Are They Important? More Importantly, Are They Feasible?
Abstract: Dr. Agardy will talk about her views on what constitutes a regional network of MPAs, and why such large scale networks are a crucial step in moving towards more effective, ecosystem-based management. She'll discuss the growing interest in ocean zoning, and how MPA networks form a logical basis for zoning plans. She will also address feasibility and whether the world is ready for such ambitious marine protection.
Notes: This Brown Bag is jointly presented by the National Marine Protected Areas Center (http://mpa.gov) and NOAA Central Library, as part of the Library's Brown Bag seminar series (http://www.lib.noaa.gov/docs/news/news.html).


Thursday, 8 December 2005 ; 1100-1200h (SSMC3, room 4817; NODC seminar)
Speaker: Sang-Woo Kim (National Fisheries Research & Development Institute, Korea)
Email: swkim26@nfrdi.re.kr
Title: Introduction of the research activities in the ocean research team at the National Fisheries Research & Development Institute (NFRDI)
Abstract: Sang-Woo Kim is a visiting researcher at NODC. He will provide an overview of research activities at the NFRDI.
Notes: VideoTeleConferencing (VTC)/phone available upon request by contacting Cheryl Ingram (Cheryl.Ingram@noaa.gov) at least a day before the seminar.


Thursday, 8 December 2005 ; 12:00-13:00h (SSMC3, 2nd Floor, NOAA Central Library)
Speaker: Peter Leigh (NOAA Fisheries Office of Habitat Conservation)
Title: The ecological crisis, the human condition, and community-based restoration as an instrument for its cure
Abstract: By the vigor of our consumption and procreation, the human species has modified our global environment at wide regional and global scales. In spite of admirable efforts to arrest some of these processes and restore environmental vitality, the pace at which humans modify their environment continues with considerable intensity. These destructive propensities have deep cultural and psychological roots that divide us from the rest of the environment. Significant social change is needed for improving our collective relationship with the earth. Humans are beginning to understand that the underpinnings to our current ecological problems lie within our attitudes, values, ethics, perceptions, and behaviors. New ways to reconceptualize our unity with the biosphere, understand downstream impacts, and link social behavior with environmental transformations are increasing with corresponding intensity. Community-based restoration is a powerful means for facilitating this trend, by reconnecting communities with their landscape, empowering citizenry, and fostering an environmental ethos based on ecopsychological health.
Notes: For those interested, a full text article on this subject, written by Dr. Leigh, is available through the Journal of Ethics in Science and Environmental Politics free of charge at: http://www.intres.com/articles/esep/2005/E60.pdf


Monday 12 December 2006 ; 1200-1300 (SSMC3, 2nd Floor, NOAA Central Library)
Speaker: Tony Ribbink (Director African Coelacanth Ecosystem Programme of the South African Institute for Aquatic Biodiversity)
Title: African Coelacanth Ecosystem Programme; biodiversity and biomass
Abstract: TBA
Notes: This date was selected in order to accommodate Dr. Ribbink's travel schedule. Please note this on your calendar, as Monday is not a usual NOAA Central Library Brown Bag presentation day.



Concept: The "OneNOAA" science seminar series are an opportunity to share and promote constructive discussion of the work conducted at NOAA, and elsewhere with colleagues and guests speakers in an informal setting.


OneNOAA Science Seminar Partner's contacts


NESDIS / National Oceanographic Data Center
(NODC) seminars:
Location: Unless otherwise indicated, NODC seminars are held in conference Room 4817 (SSMC-3, 4th Floor; 1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD 20910). NESDIS Seminars: Check locations. Information/questions? Please contact Hernan Garcia (301-713-3290 Ext 184). Notes: For VideoTeleConferencing (VTC) access: contact Cheryl.Ingram@noaa.gov (301-713-3284 x155) at least a day before the seminar. For Webcast access: 1) go to http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?i=442112424&p=NODC4817&t=c); 2) type in other required fields (i.e., your name, e-mail, organization); 3) indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy; 4) click on Proceed. For phone access: toll free dial 866-743-9902 using a touch-tone phone; when prompted enter participant code 4689608 followed by a "#".

National Ocean Service (NOS) seminars:
Location:  Unless otherwise indicated, seminars are typically held in the NOS conference Room# 8150 (SSMC-4, 8th Floor)
Information/questions? Please contact Felix A. Martinez (301-713-3338 x153) NOS/NCCOS/Center for Sponsored Coastal Ocean Research. Notes: Presentations are available remotely via a combination of phone & webcast. Please be aware that remote access is limited to 50 connections on a first-come-first served basis, so we cannot guarantee participation. To participate remotely you must: 1) Dial 866-541-1377, and then wait for instructions. When prompted enter passcode 142625 followed by the # sign. Please use your phone’s mute button (or toggle *6) during the presentation until you are ready to ask questions. 2) Go to the webcast site at https://www.mymeetings.com/emeet/join/index.jsp?customHeader=mymeetings 3) Enter meeting number 449707376 and passcode NOS8150. 4) Enter other required fields. 5) Indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy and click Proceed.

National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) seminars:
Location:
  Check announcements
Information/questions? Please contact Gloria Thompson (301 713-2239)

Fisheries Service, Office of Habitat Conservation seminars:
Location: Check announcements
Information/questions? For more information or to suggest a speaker, contact Julie Nygard (Julie.Nygard@noaa.gov ) or Perry Gayaldo (Perry.Gayaldo@noaa.gov)

Air Resources Laboratory seminars:
Location: Check announcements
Information/questions? Please contact  Betty Wells (Betty.Wells@noaa.gov)

National Weather Service - Office of Hydrologic Development
Location:  Check announcements
Information/questions? For more information or to suggest a speaker, contact Pedro.Restrepo@noaa.gov

National Weather Service - Science and Technology Seminars
Location:  Check announcements
Information/questions? For more information or to suggest a speaker, contact Bob Glahn at (301-713-1768 ; Harry.Glahn@noaa.gov)

National Marine Fisheries Service Office of Policy Seminars
Location:  Check announcements
Information/questions? For more information or to suggest a speaker, please contact Anne.Isham@noaa.gov (301) 713-9070 ext 116).

NOAA Chesapeake Bay Office (NCBO): NCBO focuses multiple NOAA capabilities on Chesapeake Bay restoration through science, service, and stewardship of the Bay ecosystem.
Location:  Check announcements
Information/questions? For more information or to suggest a speaker, please contact Kim.Couranz@noaa.gov (410) 267-5673.

NOAA Central Library:
Location: All NOAA central library brown bag seminars (unless otherwise noted) are held from 1200-1300h ET in SSMC-3, 2nd Floor (main floor), 1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring. Information/Questions? Contact Mary Lou Cumberpatch (301-713-2600 Ext.129; Mary.Lou.Cumberpatch@noaa.gov) or Albert (Skip) Theberge (301-713-2600 Ext. 115; Albert.E.Theberge.Jr@noaa.gov). Subscribe to the RSS NOAA Central Library brown bag seminars.

NOAA NMFS Office of Protected Resources (OPR) seminars
Location:  Check announcements
Information/questions? For Webex access and further information please contact Jaclyn Taylor [(301) 713-2322 ext 118]

Office of Ocean Exploration
Location: Check announcements
Information/questions? For questions please contact: Reginald.Beach@noaa.gov, Margot.Bohan@noaa.gov, and/or Nicolas.Alvarado@noaa.gov.

NOAA’s National Climatic Data Center
Location: Check announcements
Information/questions? For questions please contact Sharon LeDuc (828-271-4848)

Joint Center for Satellite Data Assimilation (JCSDA) Seminars:
Location: Unless noted otherwise, all seminars take place at World Weather Building Science Center, 5200 Auth Road, Camp Springs, MD 20746.
Seminar web?: http://www.jcsda.noaa.gov/JCSDASeminars.php
Information/questions? For questions please contact Ada Armstrong (301-763-8172 x188) and George Ohring (301-763-8154 x352)

Center for Satellite Applications and Research (STAR) Seminars:
Location: Unless noted otherwise, all seminars take place at Center for Satellite Applications and Research, World Weather Building, Science Center, Room 707, 5200 Auth Road,
Camp Springs, MD 20746.
Seminar web?: http://www.orbit.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/seminars.php
Information/questions? For questions please contact Lori K. Brown (301-361-0637).

National/Naval Ice Center (NATICE) Seminars
Location: Unless noted otherwise, all seminars take place at NOAA Satellite Operations Facility (NSOF), 4251 Suitland Road, Washington, D.C. 20395.
Information/questions? Please contact Pablo Clemente-Colón

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Seminar Locations (unless otherwise indicated)

NOAA Silver Spring Campus

  • SSMC-1 (Silver Spring Metro Center, Building 1): 1335 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD, 20910, USA.
  • SSMC-2 (Silver Spring Metro Center, Building 2): 1325 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD, 20910, USA.
  • SSMC-3 (Silver Spring Metro Center, Building 3): 1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD, 20910, USA.
  • SSMC-4 (Silver Spring Metro Center, Building 4): 1305 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD, 20910, USA.
  • SSMC-5 (NOAA Science Center/Auditorium): 1301 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD, 20910, USA.

NOAA Camp Springs Campus

  • World Weather Building, Science Center, Room 707, 5200 Auth Road, Camp Springs, MD 20746, USA.

NOAA Satellite Operations Facility (NSOF)

  • NOAA Satellite Operations Facility (NSOF), 4251 Suitland Road, Washington, D.C. 20395.

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